Schenectady County, New York

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Reuben S. Allen
RAILWAYS.
REUBEN S. ALLEN, the hale and hearty old gentleman whose features are shown in the accompanying engraving, was born in Burlington, Vt, in 1823. When a young boy he was apprenticed to Gay & Edwards, of Winouski Falls, to learn the machinist's trade, and readily grasped the details of the business. When he was about seventeen, he was sent by Mr. Gay to Canada, to ride for a month on a locomotive engine plying on a railroad from St John to La Prarie, to study its workings. This attracted his attention to locomotive engineering, which he was destined to make his life work. At the time Mr. Allen began learning his trade, the science of steam motive power had progressed so little, that there was scarcely a steam engine in the State of Vermont, and during succeeding years, Mr. Allen set up many stationary engines in Vermont, New York State and elsewhere, in the meantime spending one year on the steamer "Dodger," then plying on Lake Champlain. On March 11, 1846, he became a locomotive engineer, running an engine on the Whitehall and Saratoga railway. In 1850 he relinquished his place for a similar one on the N. Y. Central road, which he has kept ever since. During this time he has run engines named after every president of the road, beginning with Erastus Corning. In this long period Mr. Allen has never been injured, nor has a brakeman or passenger on his train received a scratch. Many notable persons have been carried by him, both on his regular trips and specials. About twenty-five years ago he took the Russian fleet from Albany to Niagara in six and a half hours, the first time an engine ever ran so long a distance without long stops. In 1881, he ran William H. Vanderbilt's special train from Syracuse to Albany in the remarkable time of two hours and fifty minutes. Mr. Allen now runs the "flyer," which leaves Albany daily for the West at 12:15 P. M. In 1844, Mr. Allen married Miss Irene Taylor, and their union has been blessed with six children-five of them daughters. All these have married, and twenty-three little ones say "grandfather" to the subject of our sketch. Mr. Allen has always had good health, and still possesses an iron constitution. His present home is in Schenectady. When he retires, as he expects to do March 11, 1886, the fortieth anniversary of the beginning of his life on the locomotive, he intends to publish a book relating his varied experiences among railroad men and others. After that is finished, Mr. Allen says he "will go fishing ten years," after which he will be ready to go "over the river.'' The veteran often receives letters from young engineers asking for advice, which he is always ready to impart in his genial, whole-hearted way.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Adriaen Appel

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Adriaen Appel was innkeeper in Beverwyck in 1654. His two sons, Jan and Willem, lived here in 1670. In 1704 Willem owned the lot extending from the store of Robert Ellis to that of Samuel Myers, including the canal, and the building called the "Wedge." In 1710 Appel owned lots 103 to 111, inclusive.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Douwe Aukes

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Douwe Aukes (De Freeze) came here in 1663, and became an innkeeper. His inn was on southeast corner of State street and Mill Lane, February 10, 1718. He conveyed his property to Cornelius Viele.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Gerrit Bancker

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Gerrit Bancker was one of the first proprietors, but never became a resident. His house in 1662 was bounded by Union, Washington, State and Church streets. It was sold by his son in 1702 to Cornelius Swits. The corner lot was sold to James Murdoch in 1802.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Theodore Wells Barhydt

BARHYDT, THEODORE WELLS (deceased), Banker and Merchant, Burlington, Iowa, was born at Newark, New Jersey, April 10, 1835, the son of Nicholas and Phoebe Headley (Gardner) Barhydt. Mr. Barhydt's paternal ancestors were among the early Knickerbocker settlers of New York. Jerominus Hanse Barheit (as it was then spelled) and his brother, Andreas, the first of the family to emigrate to the new world, came from Holland and settled on the west bank of the Hudson some time prior to 1665. Theodore Wells Barhydt was descended in a direct line from Jerominus, the genealogy being as follows: Jerominus; Johannes; Hieronimus; Johannes; Jerominus; Nicholas and Theodore Wells. Mr. Barhydt's grandfather, Jerominus, was born in 1763, in the Mohawk Valley of New York, near the city of Schenectady. He was a farmer, but left the plow to serve the colonies in the War of the Revolution. His brother, Jacobus, was a commissioned officer in that struggle, being given his chevrons for gallant service at the battle of Saratoga. Jerominus also served again in the War of 1812, being attached to the Quartermaster's Department. Mr. Barhydt's father was the youngest of a family of thirteen children. He was born near Schenectady and after completing his schooling entered the shoe business. He was married at Newark, N. J. On the maternal side Mr. Barhydt is also descended from Knickerbocker ancestry. His mother's father was Aaron A. Gardner, a shoe manufacturer. Mr. Barhydt's father had gone to Newark to learn the shoe business and fell in love with his employer's daughter. Soon after the birth of Theodore Wells Barhydt his family removed to Schenectady. Mr. Barhydt married Miss Eleanor C. Christiancy at Schenectady, N. Y. Mrs. Barhydt, who survives her husband, is a native of Schenectady and a daughter of Isaac C. Christiancy, who was born near that place. The first of her family to settle in America was Christian Christiaanse, who became a property owner at Schenectady in 1671.

Theodore Wells Barhydt received his early education in the public schools at Schenectady.

In 1855, accompanied by his wife, Mr. Barhydt started for the great western country to which thousands were then directing their steps lured by the promise of wealth held out by the vast undeveloped regions beyond the Mississippi and along the Pacific. They traveled by train, reaching Burlington, Iowa, March 24, 1855. Mr. Barhydt began clerking in the shoe store of H. C. Sweetser, in the old Barrett House Block, the present site of the Tama Building. Not yet out of his teens he began at once to take up the hard work of life in a frontier town. With his young wife they faced the dangers and shared the hardships of that day unflinchingly and devoted himself with unflagging zeal to the task of making his way in the new country. In 1856 he cast his first vote for James Buchanan for President of the United States.

In 1857, Mr. James Tizzard was appointed Postmaster at Burlington and he selected young Barhydt as his assistant. Mr. Barhydt remained with Mr. Tizzard until June, 1859, assisting him in the arduous task of establishing a postal service on the edge of the wilderness. In 1859, in association with Mr. Tizzard, Mr. Barhydt quit the post office and established a shoe house under the firm name of Tizzard and Barhydt. He remained with Mr. Tizzard until the spring of 1860, when he bought the latter out and established himself in the Parsons Block, Burlington. In 1870, his business having grown to much larger dimensions he removed to much more commodious quarters on the site of the present Delano Hotel. A little later, his business demanding enlarged quarters, he removed to the corner of Main and Jefferson streets. Mr. Barhydt finally retired from the jobbing trade but still retained an interest with his associate, A. H. Brown, in the retail trade.

Early in his career, Mr. Barhydt exhibited pronounced ability in banking, and in 1860 began operations in buying and selling gold, silver and gold dust, also uncurrent money, then popularly known as "stump tail." By keeping himself informed on money rates and the general trend of the money market, he was able to take chances that few men would risk. His acumen and daring were rewarded by substantial profits.

In 1870, Mr. Barhydt helped organize the Merchants' National Bank of Burlington, and was its President from 1870 until 1904. He was Alderman in Burlington in 1869-'70, and President of the Board of Trade in 1871. He had been identified with numerous industrial enterprises, among which were the building of the Burlington, Cedar Rapids and Minnesota Railroad, and the Burlington and Western Railroad, of which he was a Director for many years. He was one of the Promoters and Director and Treasurer of the first street railway in Burlington and of the city's first water company. He was a member of the Holland Society of New York, of the Sons of the American Revolution, the Transportation Club of New York, a Mason and a Knight Templar.

He passed away at Delmar, California, July 16, 1913, and was interred at Burlington, Iowa.

[Being the Portraits and Biographies of the Progressive Men of the West, By Press Reference Library (Western Edition)]


Caleb Beek

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
CALEB BEEK settled here in 1700. He was an innkeeper, and his house lot was on the south corner of Union and Church streets. This lot remained in the family for about one hundred years.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Charles W. Bennett

Judge Bennett was for years a distinctive and unmistakable leader at the bar and while in active practice was esteemed as one of the foremost lawyers of the West. He was the founder of the firm of Bennett & Whitney, which now bears tine name of Van Cott, Allison & Riter. In politics, Judge Bennett was very active. He was candidate for the United States Senate in 1896. He was born October 14. 1833, in Duanesburg, New York, and spent his early life on his father's farm in that State. He was educated at Princeton Academy, and graduated from Albany Law School in 1857, and admitted to the bar of New York that year.

Considering the West to offer the best field, he moved to Wisconsin, and practiced in that state until 1860, when he moved to Chicago and became a member of the firm of Bentler, Bennett, Ullman & Ives, where he continued until 1871, when he moved to Salt Lake City. Since then his activities were in Utah, where he was associated with the greater legal problems that have come up for settlement. The firm he established steadily built up a reputation for the integrity of its membership and for their great learning in the law.

In September 1858 Judge Bennett married Isabella E. Fisher. In social and fraternal circles Judge Bennett was most active at one time. He was a member of the Masonic Order. But of all his activities, he stands pre-eminently as a leader of the bar. Known for his fairness, as well as his judicial acumen, he made friends among those who were working for the uplifting of the legal standing of the West, and finished his active career with a reputation among the foremost achieved by men, who have given their talents to legal matters in the Rocky Mountain region. Judge Bennett was killed by a street car in Salt Lake City on October 11, 1906.
[Source: "History of the Bench and Bar of Utah"; By Interstate Press Association; Publ. 1913; Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack.]


Hendrick L. Bont

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
HENDRICK LAMBERTSE BONT (Bint, Bent) in 1692 owned land lying mainly above the first lock, west of the city. He also owned Sassian's Island. The land long remained after passing from Bont's possession in the Viele family.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Andries A. Bratt

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
ANDRIES ARENTSE and Capt. ARENT ANDRIESE BRATT in about 1700 owned various parcels of land, part of which Reyer Schermerhorn disposed of as trustee.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Arent A. Bratt

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
ARENT ANDRIESE BRATT was one of the first proprietors in 1662. He owned a farm of about sixty acres, which afterward was in possession of Judge Tomlinson, deceased. The "hindmost" farm fell to Mrs. Bratt's second son, Samuel.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Dirk Arentse Bratt

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
DIRK ARENTSE BRATT was born in 1661. He owned a farm in Niskayuna, which passed to his eldest son, Johannes, by will. Dirk was buried June 9, 1735.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Samuel A. Bratt

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
SAMUEL ARENTSE BRATT was born in 1659, and died in 1713 or 1714. His farm passed to his son Arent, who built the brick house, a short distance west of the first lock on the canal, and continued in the family until 1839.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Hendrick W. Brouwer

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
HENDRICK WILLEMSE BROUWER owned a lot on east side of Church street in about 1700. This was owned by his widow in 1724.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Philip H. Brouwer

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
PHILIP HENDRICKSE BROUWER was one of the original proprietors in 1662, and owned lot No. 2, which in 1667 was owned by Jan Van Eps.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Geraldus Cambefort

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
GERALDUS CAMBEFORT (or Comfort) was here in 1690, and owned 20 acres on north side of Mohawk. This was afterward owned by Johannes Van Eps.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Christiaan Christiaanse

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
CHRISTIAAN CHRISTIAANSE, in 1671, had a village lot on the northeast side of Union street, adjoining the Dutch Church lot. It was owned in 1701 by Jellis VanVorst.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Peter and Joseph Clement

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
PIETER and JOSEPH CLEMENT owned land here from about 1725 to 1755. The property afterward passed into the hands of Cornelius Viele and Hausen Toll.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Jan, Johannes and Frederick Clute

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Capt. JAN, JOHANNES and FREDERICK CLUTE were early residents. Capt. Jan owned the Great Island in 1671, and lands in Canastagione. He died in 1683, leaving his property to his nephew, Johannes Clute, who, in 1704, sold part of it to Frederick Clute. Johannes died in 1725. All the Clutes in this region are believed to be descended from either Johannes or Frederick.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Ludovicus Cobes

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
LUDOVICUS COBES lived here in 1677, being schout and secretary of Schenectady. He owned the fourth flat on the north side of the river, which was afterward owned by his daughter, Maria Klein.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


J. H. Crane

This gentleman, who is one of the oldest and most highly respected merchants in Schenectady City or County, was born in Amsterdam, Montgomery County, April 22, 1813. His father was Caleb C. Crane, who was born in Newark, N. J., April 17, 1768. He was but a lad at the time of the destruction of Newark by the British in revolutionary times, and with many others fled to the high ground from which he viewed the burning of the town. That was one of the most memorable days in the history of Newark, and it was with streaming eyes that many then saw their homes swept away under the torches of the ruthless invaders. But it was such scenes that fired the American heart with hatred for the oppressors of Americans, and nerved desperate men to press forward to victory. During all the years that followed, Caleb C. Crane never quite forgot the feeling of resentment which took root in his being on that occasion. When he reached maturity, being of an ambitious turn of mind, he resolved to strike out for himself in some other part of the then new country. He made his way to a point two miles north of where the village of Cranesville, Montgomery County, now is, and there, in the midst of an almost undisturbed wilderness, made a settlement.

Buying lands he improved them and made a home for himself and his family, and there he lived out the remainder of his allotted years, and died, passing into the local history as one of the pioneers of that section.

Of the fourteen children of Caleb C. Crane, J. H. Crane was the eighth born. His early years were passed on his father's farm. The common schools of the time and place supplied him the only means of education. As he neared manhood it became evident to him that he was not physically strong enough to make a successful farmer of himself, and he concluded to enter upon a mercantile career as soon as an opportunity should present itself. He came to Schenectady January 1, 1835. He first found employment for several years in a hotel, and later he kept the Givens House four years. In 1849 he formed a co partnership with Mr. Marcus N. Millard, which has continued uninterruptedly through a period of more than thirty-six years to the present time, Mr. Crane facetiously remarking that he and Mr. Miller "had yet to have their first quarrel." This business has kept pace with the public progress, and they have ever held a place among the leading merchants of Schenectady. Mr. Crane is an old school Democrat, but is not inclined to take any active part in politics. He was married in 1844 to Cordelia A. Seely, of New York, and resides at No. 24 Church street.

[History of the County of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell] mkk


Claas Andries De Graaf

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
CLAAS ANDRIES DE GRAAF was one of the first settlers, taking up land at the Hoek, at Scotia, where, for several generations, the family resided.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Jan De La Warde

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
JAN DE LA WARDE bought land in about 1675 at Niskayuna, and an island in the Mohawk, which was called La Warde's Island, and afterward Jaris Aertse's Island. It lies just north of Van Slyck's Island. It was conveyed in 1699 to Gysbert Marcelis, of Albany. Since then it has been called ''Gyse's Island." The Niskayuna property was also sold to Jaris Aertse in 1699.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Ernestus De Spitzer

DE SPITZER, Ernestus, surgeon-general, was born in Heilbronn, in the kingdom of Wurtemburg, Germany, April 6, 1709. He descended from the ancient Von Spitzers, a family of noble knights who flourished in a town of the same name in lower Steiermarke, a German province, where they were enrolled among the nobility in the early part of the fourteenth century, having been allied to royalty itself. The family controlled the city government of Heilbronn from 1602 until 1682. His grandfather, Dr. John Von Spitzer, who was also an LL.D., was burgomaster of the city of Heilbronn for over forty years. Ernestus De Spitzer, the first of the family to come to America, sailed from Rotterdam, Holland, on the ship Two Brothers, Thomas Arnott, captain; and on the ship's list wrote his name with a "De," the Latin for "Von." He landed in Philadelphia, Oct. 13, 1747, and later settled in Schenectady, N. Y., where he practiced medicine and surgery for many years with success. Dr. Spitzer was a very important personage in that town, being one of the first practicing physicians, and is mentioned in both Pearson's and Saunder's early history of that part of New York state. He served with distinction in the French and Indian war as surgeon, at the garrison at Oswego, N. Y., from Oct. 28, 1753, to May 22, 1755, and later received an appointment as surgeon-general of the provincial forces. Dr. De Spitzer was married to Barbara Wilfelin, of Dutch ancestry, by whom he had three sons and one daughter, Garrett, Aaron, Ernestus, J r., and Elizabeth. Garrett and Aaron served in the revolutionary war. Their descendants married into the Schermerhorn and Astor families. After the French and Indian war he returned to Schenectady, and practiced his profession until his death, which occurred Oct. 8, 1789. His remains were buried in the old Dutch cemetery in Schenectady. In 1901 his monument was restored by his descendants, and the names of his sons, Garrett and Aaron, who served in the war of the revolution, were placed upon it.

[Source: The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Copyright, 1909, James T. White & Company]


Garrett De Spitzer

DE SPITZER, Garrett, physician and soldier, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., June 20, 1758, oldest son of Dr. Ernestus and Barbara (Wilfelin) De Spitzer. He served in the war of the revolution, after which he returned to Schenectady. A few years later with his family he removed to Wastina, now Amsterdam, N. Y., where he was one of the first practicing physicians. He was married to Annatje, daughter of Nicholas and Susannah Sixbury, and had eight children, six sons and two daughters, Aaron, Nicholas, Jeremiah, Peter, John, Joseph, Susannah and Barbara. Dr. Spitzer died in Amsterdam, N. Y., June 2, 1801, and was buried in the Old Dutch cemetery, Schenectady, N. Y.

[Source: The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Copyright, 1909, James T. White & Company]


Pieter J. DeSteenbakker

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
PIETER JACOBSE BARSBOOM DE STEENBAKKER was one of the first fifteen settlers. His village lot was on the south corner of Washington and Front streets, and passed to his four daughters, and remained in the family for many years.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Hans Janse Eenkluys

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
HANS JANSE EENKLUYS came to Schenectady soon after it was settled; died in 1683, leaving his property to the church. His farm consisted of 18 morgens of river flats, lying in Third Ward. After holding this land for 180 years, it was sold by the church, in 1863, for $11,000.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Dominie Barnhardus Freerman

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
DOMINIE BARNHARDUS FREERMAN, the second minister of the church, came here in 1700. He staid here five years, and died in 1741. He married Margarita Van Schaaick, of New York, in 1705.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


James Frost
JAMES FROST, formerly a prominent citizen of Mariahville, in the town of Duanesburg, N.Y., was born in Washington County, this State, August 4, 1783, son of Lot and Temperance (Semen) Frost. He was a descendant in the fifth generation of William Frost, first, a native of Hampshire, England, and a Quaker, who came to America and settled in Boston, but on account of the religious intolerance of that time was obliged to seek a home eLsewhere, and accordingly removed to Long Island. He married Rebecca, daughter of Nicholas Wright. William Frost, second, the next in line of descent, who was born on Long Island about the year 1647, and resided there until his death, married Hannah Trior.

Benjamin Frost, son of William, second, and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born June 9, 1719, and spent the greater part of his active life in Dutchess County, New York. He married Rose Springer. Their son Lot, father of James, was born in Dutchess County, March 1, 1744. He was a resident for some years of Washington County, whence he moved to Duanesburg, taking up his residence on Quaker Street, a locality settled by the Friends Society at an early date, and which is still known by that name. His wife, Temperance, was born on August 30, 1744.

James Frost accompanied his parents from Washington County to Duanesburg. He received a good education, and taught school in his younger days, but relinquished that occupation to become a surveyor, in which capacity he performed much work of an important character. He projected and completed a plank road from Albany to Fort Hunter, and drafted one of the earlier maps of Schenectady County. In 1833-34 he surveyed the new line between Canada and New York State, as well as the greater part of Clinton, Essex, and Franklin Counties, then a wilderness. With his associates he camped out for weeks and months at a time. At night the wolves howled around them, and were kept at bay only by fires. That section of the State, the Adirondack region, is now a famous place of resort in summer. In 1819 he began a survey of the east shore of the Hudson River, under the direction of the Surveyor General, traversing the river by sloop and making numerous soundings. He also surveyed the ground for the second railroad built in the United States, that between Albany and Schenectady, and surveyed and made maps of all old Schoharie, besides other territory. In 1835 he surveyed lands in Elizabethtown, (now Elizabeth City), N.J., belonging to Messrs. Conner, Bryant & Crane of that place, and Clark and others of New York, and made maps of the city. Subsequently, removing from Quaker Street, to the northerly part of the town of Duanesburg, about two miles west of Mariahville, he engaged in farming, and also conducted a general store. Possessing an unusual amount of energy and ability, which made him especially eligible to the public service, he took a leading part in town affairs, was particularly interested in educational matters, acted as a Justice of the Peace for many years, and was a member of the Assembly three terms. Politically, he was a stanch supporter of the Whig party. Though reared a Quaker, he was liberal in his religious opinions, and in his later years favored the Universalist belief. He died at his home in Mariahville, December 23, 1851, and his death was the cause of general regret.

James Frost married Mary Marsh, who was born in Canaan, Conn., October 24, 1787, daughter of Silas Marsh. She was a good business woman, and rendered valuable assistance to her husband by carrying on the store while he was absent on surveying trips. She became the mother of ten children - five sons and five daughters - all of whom grew to maturity, and two are living, namely: General D. M. Frost, a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, and now a prominent resident of St. Louis, Mo.; and Miss M. Louise Frost. General Frost had a large family of girls, three of whom married English noblemen. One of them is now living in Paris. The others are in England. Miss M. Louise Frost, who is a lady of superior attainments, resides at the homestead during summer, and passes her winters in the South. The other children of James and Mary (Marsh) Frost were: Caroline, Adelia D., Silas W., Rosanna, James, William M., John S., and Phoebe A. The mother died August 18, 1864. The sons nearly all studied and followed engineering. John S., who was a lawyer, died in 1857.
[Source: Schoharie, Schenectady and Green Counties, New York, 1899] mkk


Henry Austin Gillette

Henry Austin Gillette physician in Eureka, Clay township came to this county in 1870. He was born in Rome township, Lawrence county, Ohio, April 8, 1839. His father, Alanson Gillette, was born in Schenectady county, New York, August, 1802, and lives in Rome township, Lawrence county, Ohio. His mother, Sarah F. (Radford) Gillette, was born in Somersetshire, England, June 12, 1812, and died February 26, 1866. He was united in marriage with Anna D., daughter of Alexander B. and Amanda F. (Moss) Sollers, in Clay township, Gallia county, Ohio, November 27, 1862. She was born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, August 2, 1845, and has had only one child: Effie A., born November 9, 1863, who lives at home. Dr. Gillette held the office of corporation clerk from 1877 to 1879. He has also been a member of the school board for six years, from 1876 to 1882. Postoffice address is, Eureka, Gallia county, Ohio.
[SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Sander Leendertse Glen

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
SANDER LEENDERTSE (LINDSAY) GLEN came from Scotland about 1633. His wife was Catalyn Doncassen. They both died within about a year of each other-she, August 12, 1684; he, November 13, 1685-leaving three sons, Jacob, who settled in Albany, Sander and Johannes. He was one of the first proprietors of Schenectady.

Sander Glen, second son of Sander Leendertse, was born in 1647. His village lot was on the north side of Washington street, adjoining the estate of the late Judge Paige. Captain Sander Glen died about 1695, without issue, leaving his estate to the children of his two brothers, Jacob and Johannes. The farm of Sander Leendertse, lying on the north side of the river, was called Scotia.

The Glen property comprised several hundred acres. By marriage this estate passed to the Sanders family, by whom a large portion of it is still held.

Johannes, youngest son of Sander Leendertse, was born in 1648.

The residence of Charles P. Sanders was built by him in 1713, and occupied until his death in 1731.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Joseph B. Graham
JOSEPH B. GRAHAM, ex-Mayor of Schenectady, N. Y. , was born in Rossie, St. Lawrence County, this State, September 27, 1830, son of William and Janet (Fairbairn) Graham. His father was born in Wigton, near Carlisle, England, June 6, 1806, and his mother was a native of Scotland.

Joseph Graham, the grandfather of Joseph B. , was born in Wigton about the year 1767. He was a saddler by trade, and carried on business there until meeting with reverses. In April, 1819, he sailed from Liverpool with his wife and eleven children, landing at Quebec in the following June. With his small means he purchased a tract of wild land in Wilna, Jefferson County, N.Y., and with the assistance of his five sturdy sons he cleared a good farm, upon which he resided for the rest of his life. He died in 1841, and his wife, who survived him, died in Lowville, N. Y., on her eightieth birthday, while visiting her daughter. They had five sons and six daughters. One of the latter, who was taken ill while on the passage from England, died soon after landing. The first and third sons settled near St. Catherine's, Canada. The others located in this State, married, and reared large families. All lived to an advanced age, and Margaret, the youngest, died in Carthage, N.Y. , at the age of eighty years. The grandparents were members of the Church of England, but, through the influence of the itinerant Methodist preachers who visited the outlying districts in those early days, their children were converted to that faith.

William Graham, the father, was educated in England, and was an apt scholar, especially in mathematics. When nineteen years old he began teaching school in the Scotch settlement near Wilna, but his principal business was the furnishing; of plans and specifications to contractors for heavy mason work, bridge building, and so forth. He was a highly intelligent, well-read man, particularly fond of biography and history, and is said to have predicted that slavery in the South would ultimately cause a civil war. He died November 3, 1858. Jeanette, his first wife, whom he married in 1829, was a daughter of James and Mary (Hell) Fairbairn, who came from the neighborhood of Glasgow, Scotland, in 1818, and settled in Rossie, N.Y. They were industrious farming people and sturdy pioneers. They reared one son and five daughters. William Graham by his first marriage was the father of eight children, of whom Joseph H., the subject of this sketch, was the eldest. All are living except James, the second-born, who died suddenly in May, 1894, aged sixty-two years, leaving two children. The mother died in 1852, aged forty-two years. By a second marriage William Graham had three daughters.

Joseph B. Graham resided with his maternal grandparents from his fifth to his tenth year, and, as they spoke the Scotch dialect, he learned it to perfection. He began his education in the district schools, and was fitted for college at the Wesleyan Seminary, Gouverneur, N.Y. In order to procure funds for the completion of his studies, he taught in the common schools until 1854, when he entered Union College, where he was graduated with honors in 1858. After teaching classics and mathematics at the Stillwater Academy for a time, he came to Schenectady, and in company with Mr. F. A. Young was engaged for the succeeding eight years in mercantile business, dealing in books, stationery, wall papers, pianofortes, and other musical instruments. Selling his interest to his partner, he was out of business for about six years, and then engaged in the dry-goods trade as a member of the firm of T. H. Reeves & Co., from which he withdrew some seven years later. He was for a number of years extensively engaged in the real estate business, and, although his activity in that line has somewhat diminished of late, he still owns a large amount of valuable city property, which is occupied by thirty or more tenants. He resides in a substantial house at 6 Nott Terrace, which he built twenty-seven years ago.

Mr. Graham is a director of the Union National Bank. In 1879 he became a member of the Mutual Relief Society, under certificate No. 212; he was a member of its Board of Directors for six years; was chairman of the Reserve Fund Committee and of the committee appointed to revise the by-laws; and at the annual convention in 1883 he was unanimously elected vice-president. His connection with the society has been marked by an unusually clear conception of and a conscientious regard for its business interests, and he is considered one of its most valued officials. He was twice elected to the Common Council, has been a member of the boards of Health and Education, and as Mayor of the city in 1879-80 he managed the municipal affairs in a business-like manner.

On August 8, 1858, Mr. Graham was united in marriage with Cornelia L. White, of this county, daughter of Andrew and Cornelia (De Forest) White. Her father was a native of the north of Ireland, and her mother belonged to an old Dutch family of this city. She died in 1878, and in 1880 he married for his second wife Sarah E. Hagaman, also of a well-known Dutch family, daughter of Joseph J. and Elizabeth M. Hagaman. He was the father of three children by his first union, namely: Jennie, who died at the age of five; William, who died at the age of one year and six months; and Edward White Graham, who married Abbie Craver, and is now residing in Denver, Col. One child, Mary Hagaman, by his second marriage, is living with her parents.

Mr. Graham is an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, which he has served in an official capacity. He was prominently identified with the building of the present edifice, which was completed in 1874, at a cost of eighty thousand dollars, and is a liberal contributor toward its support. He is a member of Union College Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society; has been a trustee of the Troy Conference Academy, Poultney, Vt., continuously since 1874; and has been president of the board since 1878. He possesses and highly prizes a small writing-desk which was purchased in England for five guineas by his grandfather, who in April, 1819, gave it to his son William. In it are some rare specimens of drawings executed by his father when a lad of thirteen years, and also some letters received from the father by the son while in college. Mr. Graham received this heirloom from his father in November, 1858, just before his father's death.
[Source: Schoharie, Schenectady and Green Counties, New York, 1899] mkk


Symon Symonse Groot

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
SYMON SYMONSE GROOT came here in 1663. He married Rebecca, daughter of Philip Du Trieux, of New Amsterdam, and had six sons and four daughters, of whom Symon, Abraham, Philip, Dirk and Claas were captured by the French and Indians in 1690 and carried to Canada. They were redeemed the following year. His home lot was on the northern side of Union street, 100 feet west from Church street. It remained in the family several generations. Symon Symonse Groot, Jr., was his eldest son, and he married, in 1692, Geertruy, daughter of Jan Rinckhout, of Albany. His village lot was on the north side of State street. Philip Groot settled on the north side of the river, near Crane's village. He married Sarah, daughter of Jacobus Peek. Abraham Groot married Antje Wemp, widow of Sander Glen, in 1696, and secondly, Hesterje, daughter of Harmen Visscher, of Albany, in 1699, by whom he had several children. His home lot was on the north side of Union street, about half way up College Hill.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Barhydt Andries Hause

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
BARHYDT ANDRIES HAUSE and JERONIMUS HAUSE were among the early settlers. . They owned in 1760 a lot with forty-eight feet frontage, on Front street, at Jefferson.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Ahasuerus Marselis

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
AHASUERUS MARSELIS came here about 1698. He was a shoemaker, and had his shop on the south comer of Mill lane and State street. This property was afterward owned by Pieter Fonda, and the lot in the rear by Marselis, Fonda and Robert Yates.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Gerrit Marselis

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
GERRIT MARSELIS was the son of Marselis Janse, of Albany, and early settled here. He was slain in 1690. His lots, Nos. 139 to 143, afterward belonged to Wm. McCamus.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


William D. Maxon

MAXON, William Densmore, clergyman; born, Schenectady, N.Y., Oct. 23, 1857; son of George G. and Ann Maria (Wood) Maxon; attended public schools and Union Classical Institute, Schenectady; B.A., Union College, Schenectady, 1878, A.M., 1886 (D.D., 1894); student at General Theological Seminary, New York City, and Berkely Divinity School, Middletown, Conn.; married at Schenectady, Oct. 26, 1881, Annie Cuyler Lush. Ordered deacon, P.E. Church, 1881, ordained priest, 1882; missionary at Fonda, N.Y., 1881; assistant minister, St. George's Church, Schenectady, 1882; acting professor logic and rhetoric Union College, 1882; rector Grace Church, Waterford, N.Y., 1883-87, Trinity Church, Utica, N.Y., 1887-94, Calvary Church, Pittsburg, Pa., 1894-98, Christ Church, Detroit, since Jan. 1, 1899. Member Sigma Phi, Phi Beta Kappa. Club: Country. Recreation: Golf. Residence: 408 Jefferson Avenue.
[Source: "The Book of Detroiters". Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis, 1908 - Submitted by Christine Walters]


Jan Pieterse Mebie

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
JAN PIETERSEK MEBIE married Anna, daughter of Pieter J. Borsboom. His home lot was on the east side of Church street, to the north of the Dutch Church. He was in the possession of this lot before 1690. His farm was on the third flat, on the south side of the river, about eight miles above the village. His descendants still occupy the farm. It is the writer's belief that the house on this farm, at least its stone walls, date from 1670-80, when Daniel Janse Van Antwerp occupied the land in the center of which it stands. The Mebie House, as it is now known, is doubtless the oldest house in the Mohawa Valley, if not in the State of New York.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


John Morrison

John Morrison, farmer on section 20, Chippewa Township, is a son of David and Cynthia (Dodge) Morrison, he a native of New York, and she of New England. They settled in Schenectady Co., N. Y., where he died May 6, 1838, and she Feb. 20, 1855. Their family numbered eight, John being the youngest.

He was born in Schenectady Co., N. Y., May 6, 1833, and remained with his parents until of age, alternately working on the farm and attending school. He attended both the common schools and a select school at Schenectady. Attaining the age of legal freedom, he worked out by the month from March to February, and returned home five days before his father's death. The latter had a life lease of his farm and had become badly involved by going security on notes, etc. John was appointed administrator of the estate, the duties pertaining to which office occupied him for a year and a half, during which time he carried on the farm. He then worked out for a year, and in March, 1858, came to Michigan, where he worked one season at carpentering, in Lenawee County. In the fall of 1858 he rented a farm, but after putting in a crop of wheat he returned to Schenectady Co., N. Y., for the winter. The following spring he came with his family to Lenawee County; and after seven years' renting he bought a farm in Seneca, that county. There he lived until May, 1882, when he left his farm in charge of his son, and came to this county, arriving on the 15th of that month. He bought 280 acres in Chippewa Township, where he has since resided, having at present 120 acres under the plow.

He was married in Schenectady Co., N. Y., March 20, 1856, to Miss Alexina, daughter of John and Mary M. (Crossfield) Young, natives of Schenectady and Schoharie Counties. The parents settled in the former county, where the father died, in July, 1883. The mother survives. Mrs. Morrison was born in Duanesburg, Schenectady County, April 28, 1833, and is the mother of three children: Wallwin J., born Feb. 5, 1858; Erwin D., Nov. 30, 1859; and Henry W., Dec. 22, 1861. Mr. and Mrs. M. are prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been class-leader four years, Steward 11 years and Superintendent of the Sunday-school five years. Mr. M. supports the Republican party, but is a strong temperance man and prohibitionist. He is now Deputy Township Clerk, Health Officer and School Inspector.

[Source: Portrait and Biographical Album of Isabella County, Michigan, Chapman Brothers, Chicago: 1884]


Johannes Myndertse

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
JOHANNES MYNDERTSE came here in 1700; by trade a smith, he was armorer of the Fort. He owned two lots on State street, one where Barney's store now stands; the other on the west corner of Mill lane and State street, where his dwelling was. Myndertse left by will, proved September 7, 1757, his property to his three sons, Myndert, Reinier and Jacobus.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Philip Philipse

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
PHILIP PHILIPSE married Elizabeth, daughter of Harmen Ganzevoort, of Albany, about 1685. The descendants of Philipse still reside on or near Willow flat. Jan Philipse, a brother, is first mentioned as a member of the church in 1701.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Robert B. Potter

Potter, Robert B., major-general, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., July 16, 1829. He entered Union college in the class of 1849 but did not graduate, studied law, and at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war enjoyed a lucrative practice in New York City. He was appointed major of the 51st N. Y. infantry, Oct 14, 1861, and was promoted lieutenant-colonel on Nov. 1 and colonel Sept. 10, 1862. He took part in Burnside's expedition to North Carolina, led the assault at Roanoke island, was wounded at New Berne, and he subsequently participated in the battles of Cedar mountain, Manassas or second Bull Run, Chantilly, Antietam, where he took part in the assault on the stone bridge and was wounded, and Fredericksburg. He was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers, March 13, 1863; commanded a division at Vicksburg and in the siege of Knoxville; was brevetted major-general of volunteers, Aug. 1, 1864, commanded his division in the Wilderness campaign, and was severely wounded during the final assault on Petersburg, April 2, 1865. On his recovery he was given command of the Rhode Island and Connecticut district of the Department of the East. He was married, Sept. 20, 1865, to Abby, daughter of John Austin Stevens, and on his wedding day was given his commission as full major-general of volunteers. He was honorably mustered out of the volunteer service, Jan. 15, 1866, and was then for three years receiver of the Atlantic & Great Western railroad. He died in Newport, R. I., Feb. 19, 1887.
(Source: The Union Army, Volume VIII, Biographical, Federal Publishing Co., 1908. Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Linda Rodriguez)


John H. Putnam
JOHN H. PUTNAM, who carries on farming and market gardening in Niskayuna, was born in this town, June 15, 1816. His parents, Harmon and Margaret (Wheaton) Putnam, were natives of this county. His paternal grandfather, John Putnam, was an early settler here and a noted hunter in his day. He afterward resided in various places, and died in Greene, Chenango County, at an advanced age.

Harmon Putnam, the father, followed the carpenter's trade during his active period. He was married in Niskayuna, which was thenceforward his place of residence. He was a reliable workman, and as an honest, industrious citizen he stood high in the estimation of the entire community. He died at the age of sixty years. Margaret Wheaton Putnam, his wife, died at the age of twenty-seven. She was the mother of four children, of whom John H., the subject of this sketch, was the first-born, and is the only one living. Reuben and Jacob died young, and the other died in infancy.

John H. Putnam was educated in the town schools of Niskayuna. At an early age he began work as an assistant on the farm he now occupies, which was then owned by one John Clark, and he afterward worked for other farmers in the neighborhood. When seventeen years old he began an apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade, which was his occupation for thirty years, or until 1864. In 1876 he bought his present farm of seventy acres, which he has greatly improved, and has since been engaged in general farming.

On February 28, 1839, Mr. Putnam was joined in marriage with Mary Ann Van Vranken, of Niskayuna, daughter of Jacob Van Vranken and a representative of an old family of this town. Mr. and Mrs. Putnam have one son living, Jacob, who was born January 1, 1846, and is engaged in farming with his father. He married Gertrude McChessen, and has four children - John, Margaret A., Julia, and Lena.

Since the breaking out of the Southern rebellion in April, 1861, Mr. Putnam has voted with the Republican party. He has served with ability as Supervisor and Town Clerk, each two terms. He was Highway Commissioner five years, and has been a Justice of the Peace. He is a Master Mason and one of the oldest members of St. George Lodge, No. 6, F. & A. M., of Schenectady, having joined the order in 1855. Mr. and Mrs. Putnam are members of the Dutch Reformed church.
[Source: Schoharie, Schenectady and Green Counties, New York, 1899] mkk


Jan Roeloffoe

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
JAN ROELOFFOE was the eldest son of the famous Anneke Janse, by her first husband, Roeloffe Jansen. In 1680 he owned a home lot on the north side of Union street; the lot subsequently owned by Joseph Y. and Giles Van De Bogart.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Jacob Janse Schermerhorn

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
JACOB JANSE SCHERMERHORN died at Schenectady in 1689, where he had lived for some years. He left part of his property to his son Reyer, who married Ariaantje Bratt. Symon Schermerhorn, another son of Jacob Janse, was in 1693 a skipper on the Hudson river.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Oscar H. Shannon
OSCAR H. SHANNON, a Civil War veteran, was born in Schenectady, where he now resides, August 29, 1848, son of Thomas T. and Lucy C. (Geer) Shannon. The father was a native of Glenville, N. Y. His great-grandfather Shannon, and his great-grandfather Tull served in the Continental army during the Revolutionary War.

Having completed his education, Oscar H. Shannon at the age of fifteen enlisted in the Seventy-seventh Regiment, New York Volunteers, with which he served until the close of the Rebellion, and participated in the siege of Petersburg. After his discharge he went to sea as engineer's storekeeper on the steamship "Henry Chauncy, " and was absent about one year, during which time he visited South America. Upon his return to Schenectady he served an apprenticeship at the tinsmith's trade, which he followed as a journeyman previous to opening an establishment on his own account, and he subsequently carried on a successful business for about fifteen years. Joining the National Guard, he served for some time as Lieutenant in a company of the Eighty-third Regiment, and assisted in organizing two other companies, one of which, the Washburn Continentals, formerly the Stanford Hose Company, withdrew in a body from the Schenectady Fire Department to become the Stanford Cadets. He was promoted from the rank of First Lieutenant to that of Captain of the company, and its present name was suggested by him. The Washburn Continentals were mustered into the National Guard during the war with Spain as Company F, Second Regiment. He was also one of the principal organizers of a company composed entirely of Civil War veterans, which flourished for a time as originally made up; but the veterans were compelled by old age to withdraw one by one, and their places were filled by young recruits. This company, of which he was First Lieutenant for five years, was mustered into service during the late war as Company E, Second Regiment.

Mr. Shannon married Mary A. Langdon, of Schenectady, daughter of John Langdon. He has one daughter, Bernice L., who is now the wife of Andrew T. Branion, of New York City.

Mr. Shannon belongs to St. Paul's Lodge, No. 17, I. O. O. F., and is a Past Commander of Harsfall Post, No. 90, G. A. R. In 1871 he joined Julian Lodge, Knights of Pythias, which was afterward disbanded, but prior to the surrender of its charter he withdrew for the purpose of organizing the Mohawk Valley Lodge at Fort Plain, and was its first Chancellor. He was representative to the Grand Lodge in 1897, and was Deputy Grand Chancellor. He organized Loyal Lodge, No. 384, in 1896; was formerly Chief of Staff of the New York Brigade, Uniform Rank, with the rank of Colonel; received his Grand Lodge degrees during the present year; and was appointed assistant organizer of the Endowment Rank by Past Grand Chancellor and Supreme Representative William Ledew, his jurisdiction covering the entire .State of New York outside of the metropolis. Mr. Shannon is now a member of Schenectady Lodge, to which he was admitted by card.
[Source: Schoharie, Schenectady and Green Counties, New York, 1899] mkk


Cornelius Slingerland

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
CORNELIUS SLINGERLAND married Eva Mebee in 1699. His house lot (1706-22) was on the south side of State street, forty feet east of Water street alley.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Aaron Bovee Spitzer

SPITZER, Aaron Bovee, banker and business man, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., Oct., 8, 1823, second son of Nicholas and Nancy (Bovee) Spitzer. He was a general business man, and considered a good judge of credit and values, and was engaged in the banking business for several years with his oldest son, Ceilan Milo Spitzer, and Ludwig Wideman. He was a lover of horses, owned a stock farm near Medina, and bred some very fine specimens. Mr. Spitzer retired from active business in 1886. He was married to Laura Maria, daughter of Joseph and Harriet (Draper) Perkins, and had one son, Ceilan M. Spitzer. He was married the second time to Anna Maria Collins, and by this marriage had three sons, Frank P., Garrett E., and Sidney Spitzer. He was a life-long Republican, and at the time of his death a member and deacon of the Congregational church. He died in Medina, O., May 13, 1892.

[ The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Copyright, 1909, James T. White & Company]


William James Smeallie
WILLIAM JAMES SMEALLIE, a thrifty farmer of Princetown, Schoharie County, N. Y., [sic.] was born in this town, May 10, 1852, son of John and Jane (Milmine) Smeallie. His father was born here March 3, 1816, and his mother was born in Florida, N. Y., March 26, 1816. His paternal grandfather, James Smeallie, was born in Linlithgowshire, Scotland, April 18, 1786, and came to America in 1811. James Smeallie settled upon a farm in the northern part of Princetown, where he resided the rest of his life. He was quite prominent in public affairs, serving as Supervisor and School Commissioner, and he was one of the founders of the United Presbyterian Church of Florida, N. Y. He married his cousin, Mary Smeallie. She was the daughter of his uncle, John Smeallie, first, a native of Scotland, who came to this country and served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war.

John Smeallie, second, son of James and Mary, was a prosperous farmer and lifelong resident of Princetown. Being a man of progressive tendencies, he made good use of his resources, and realized excellent results as a general farmer. In politics he was originally a Whig and later a Republican. He was a member of the Scotch church. Jane Milmine Smeallie, his wife, became the mother of three children, namely: Mary L., wife of John M. Conover; William J., the subject of this sketch; and Agnes Smeallie, of Princetown. John Smeallie, second, lived to be seventy-five years old, but Mrs. Smeallie died at thirty-eight.

William James Smeallie was educated in the district schools. He resided in Duanesburg for ten years, but with that exception has been engaged in general farming in Princetown ever since reaching manhood. He is now the owner of one hundred acres of fertile land, comprising one of the best farms in town. He makes a specialty of breeding Jersey cattle and fancy poultry, owning at the present time some fine specimens of each, and his buildings are well adapted for these purposes.

Mr. Smeallie has served with ability as Excise Commissioner twelve years, and is now holding the office of Overseer of the Poor. In politics he acts with the Republican party. The family has long enjoyed local distinction for thrift and prosperity, and the subject of this sketch has fully demonstrated his ability to maintain this reputation. Mr. Smeallie is unmarried. He attends the United Presbyterian church, of which he was elected Elder in 1883.
[Source: Schoharie, Schenectady and Green Counties, New York, 1899] mkk


Ceilan Milo Spitzer

SPITZER, Ceilan Milo, banker, was born at Batavia, N.Y. Nov. 2,1849, eldest son of Aaron Bovee and Laura Maria (Perkins) Spitzer, and a great-greatgrandson of Dr. Ernestus De Spitzer. Through his mother he is descended from James Draper, of Roxbury, Mass, and Quartermaster John Perkins of Ipswich, Mass., the first of their families in America. His great-grand father, Nathaniel Perkins, before he was of age was aid-decamp to Gen. George Washington. Mr. Spitzer's great-great-great-great-grandfather, Hendricks Cornelius Van Buren, was a soldier in the Indian war of 1663, being stationed at Fort Cralo in Papshire, and was an ancestor of Pres. Martin Van Buren. He is also a descendant on the maternal side (being the great-great-great grandson of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, founder of the family bearing his name in America, who came from Waterland, Holland, in 1636, and settled in Beverswyck, in the New Netherlands, where he became a man of wealth and prominence until his death in Schenectady in 1688. Ceilan Milo Spitzer was educated in the schools of Medina, O.; whither his family had removed in 1851, and at Oberlin College. He entered upon his active business career in 1869 by purchasing a half interest in a drug store at Seville, O., which he sold out two years later, and with his father opened the Seville Exchange Bank under the style of C. M. Spitzer & Co., a banking house which obtained immediate standing and reputation in the financial world. In 1877 a branch bank was opened at Medina, O., and in 1878 the German-American Bank of Cleveland, O., was organized, the last enterprise growing in such immediate favor that Mr. Spitzer purchased the interest of Ludwig Wideman, who had become a partner in 1873, an during the next two years conducted a general banking and investment business. In January, 1880, owing to financial depression the bank failed and soon after settled with its creditors on a forty per cent basis. Ten years later, however, quite without legal or moral necessity, Mr. Spitzer paid all the bank's debts in full, an act which has deservedly given him a high reputation in the business world. With Ludwig and Jerome P. Wideman he opened the Bank of Fremont, at Fremont, O., in 1880, but he sold it the following year, and formed the firm of Spitzer, Wideman & Co., bankers, at Toledo, O. In the following year Mr. Spitzer purchased the interest of the Widemans, and formed a co-partnership with his cousin, Adelbert L. Spitzer, under the firm name of Spitzer & Co., bankers. In 1887 a branch office was opened in Boston, Mass. In May, 1899, the Boston office was removed to 20 Nassau street, New York city. The firm has enjoyed a continuous and permanent increase in prosperity, and is now the oldest and one of the most successful investment banking houses in the central West, buying and selling municipal bonds and other high grade investment securities. Mr. Spitzer is also a stockholder and director in six other banks, including the Ohio Savings Bank and Trust Co. and the Security Trust Co., Toledo; a director of the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railroad Co., and president of the Spitzer Building Co., which erected in 1893 the modern ten-story fireproof building in Toledo. In January, 1900, Gov. George K. Nash appointed him quartermaster-general of Ohio, with rank of brigadier-general. Mr. Spitzer is one of the leading citizens of Ohio, and is ever ready to foster or contribute to any worth artistic, business or benevolent enterprise in his adopted city. He has always refused to permit his name to be used for any elective office, preferring to exert his influence and benefit his fellow men in the capacity of a private citizen and a general of financial affairs. He is a member of the Toledo and Country clubs, of Toledo, and the Middle Bass Club, of Put-in-Bay, also a member of the Ohio Society of New York. He has traveled widely, both in this country and abroad, and his colonial home. "lnnisfail," on Collingwood avenue, is filled with choice specimens of the artistic and curious from all parts of the world, and includes a fine art gallery. He was married, in 1884, to Lilian Cortez, daughter of Alexander McDowell, a lineal descendant of Elizabeth, sister of William Penn, and a cousin of Gen. lrvine McDowell. They have no children.

[The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Copyright, 1909, James T. White & Company]


Garrett Spitzer

SPITZER, Garrett, financier, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., Nov. 7, 1817, oldest son of Nicholas and Nancy (Bovee) Spitzer, of Medina, O. He was an excellent business man, and his opinion was often sought on financial and business propositions. He was for over twenty years one of the advising directors of the Ohio Farmers' Insurance Co., and for several years was associated with his two sons, Adelbert L. and Amherst T. Spitzer, in the banking and investment business. During the civil war he was an extensive shipper of grain, flour and Wool, and owned a large stock farm south of Medina. He always voted the Republican ticket, and was a member of the Congregational church. He was married to Mary Jane, daughter of Elisha and Sarah (Thompson) Branch, by whom he had three sons and five daughters: Amherst T., Aaron R., Adelbert L., Alice, Evelyn, Francilia, Luette and Bessie Spitzer. Mr. Spitzer died in Medina, O., Jan. 3, 1891.


Nicholas Spitzer

SPITZER, Nicholas, physician and stock farmer, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., Nov. 26, 1783, second son of Dr. Garrett and Annatje (Sixbury) De Spitzer. He practiced medicine in Schenectady, until he was fifty-two years of age, when on account of poor health he gave up his profession, and with his family removed to Medina, O., where he engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock farming. His health was not improved by the change, and in a few years he retired from business, his oldest son, Garrett, taking charge of his affairs until the close of his life. When he went to Ohio he left off the prefix "De" to his name, which was frequently done in the early years of the republic. His health was greatly improved without business cares, and he lived to be an old man. He was married to Nancy, daughter of Jacob and Maria (Schermerhorn) Bovee, and had four sons and five daughters, Garrett, Aaron, Matthew, Jacob, Maria, Susan, Sallie, Sarah and Mary. Dr. Spitzer died at Medina, O., Dec. 6, 1868.

[The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Copyright, 1909, James T. White & Company]


Teunis Cornelise Swart

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
TEUNIS CORNELISE SWART was one of the early settlers. He occupied the lot on the east corner of Church and State streets. He had other property. ESAIAS SWART was son of Teunis. He married Eva, daughter of Teunis Van Woert, and owned a village lot on the east side of Church street.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Isaac Cornelise Swits

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
ISAAC CORNELISE SWITS settled here in 1663. He married Susanna Groot, by whom he had nine children, eight of whom were living in 1701, when he made his will. CORNELIUS SWITS was his eldest son. He married Hester Visscher, of Albany, and took up his residence there about 1702.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Willem Teller

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
WILLEM TELLER was one of the first proprietors, though never a resident here. He died in 1701, in his 81st year. His house lot was on Washington street.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Carel Hansen Toll

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
CAREL HANSEN TOLL first settled at Hoffman's Ferry. In 1712 he owned a village lot here, on Union street, which is the present Courthouse lot. He married Lysbet, daughter of Daniel Rinckhout, of Albany, and had eight children. He owned Cuyler's flat, Cambefort's flat, the seventh flat and Maalwyck.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Andrew Truax, M. D.

Dr. Andrew Truax was born in Schenectady April 10, 1811, and died there September 26, 1883. About 1830 he became a clerk in the drug store of Richard Fuller (the old Dunlap & Fuller drug store), and while thus employed studied medicine. After his graduation, he located and practiced for a few years on the Hudson River. Returning to Schenectady about 1835, he opened a drug store, which has grown to be the most extensive concern of the kind in the city, and is now under the management of his nephew, Andrew T. Veeder, who became his partner in 1866.

Dr. Truax was successful in business. Ever attentive to all duties, he was economical, but never penurious. His reputation for all those qualities which characterize the honorable, upright man of affairs was well known, and as a citizen his virtues were as conspicuous as his honor. He was a quiet, unassuming gentleman, courteous to all, whether high or low. His words were few, but to the point. No appeal for charity, when the object was deserving, was made to him in vain. Many an aching heart was made glad by his kindly hand, and many a poor soul, whose necessities he relieved, felt, at his death, that a faithful friend was gone. Like his life, his charities were unostentatious, and in this he but obeyed the promptings of his noble heart, which turned from vain display. He never married. Although not a professor of religion, he was a faithful attendant at the First Reformed Church. His friendship was steadfast, and the many who knew him will respect his memory while they live.

[History of the County of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell] mkk



Biographies transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman unless otherwise indicated.


Daniel Janse Van Antwerpen

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
DANIEL JANSE VAN ANTWERPEN was born in 1635, coming here about 1665. He built, substantially, what is now known as the Mebie House, above referred to. [see bio for Jan Pieterse Mebie] JAN DANIELSE VAN ANTWERPEN, Daniel's oldest son, was born about 1670; married Angnieta Vedder in 1700, and died January 20, 1756. Arent, another son, married Sara, daughter of Johannes Van Epps, and had nine children. His village lot is now occupied by Given's Hotel.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Marten Van Benthuysen

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
MARTEN VAN BENTHUYSEN, through his wife, Feitje, daughter of Pieter Jacobse Borsboom, had a fourth interest in Borsboom's land.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Gysbert Gerritse Van Brakelen

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
GYSBERT GERRITSE VAN BRAKELEN came here in about 1700. He owned several lots of land. He left two sons, Gerrit and Gysbert.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Arent Van Curler

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
ARENT VAN CURLER was the leader of the colony at Schenectady in 1662. He came over in 1630, and in 1643 married Antonia Slaaghboom, widow of Jonas Bronck. No man of his time had so fully won the confidence and esteem of the Indians, and to honor his memory they ever addressed the Governor of the Province by his name. He was drowned on Lake Champlain in July, 1669. Van Curler's home lot in the village was a portion of the block bounded by Union, Church, Front and Washington streets. The Rev. WM. ELLIOT GRIFFIN, D. D., says that "Arent Van Curler was a scholar and a gentleman, fluent with his pen, possessing a gift by no means to be despised-the mastery of language. He was a man of systematic mind, so faithful to his trust and vow as to recall a Roman of classic days; and so kind of heart, so full of deep conviction of conscience, along with the power of rising above the narrowness of sect or nationality, as to suggest a Christian. Brave as a lion, fearless neither of conspirators, scheming lawyers, who made use of their profession mainly to molest honest men, or of crafty savages, or perfidious French; further, he had the eye of an engineer and strategist, with the foresight of a statesman."
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Frans Van De Bogart

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
FRANS VAN DE BOGART came here among the early settlers, and was killed in the massacre of 1690. His farm lay on the south side of the river at and below the Saratoga Railroad bridge, and a portion of it still belongs to his descendants.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Laurens Claese Van Der Volgen

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
LAURENS CLAESE VAN DER VOLGEN, at the destruction of the village in 1690, was made captive by the Indians, with whom he remained several years. He became interpreter for the Province, which position he held until his death, in 1742. His village lot was the eastern half of the lot now occupied by the Myers block, and he also owned part of the fifth flat
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Jacobus Van Dyck

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
JACOBUS VAN DYCK was a doctor; he settled here and practiced his profession until his death. He married Jacomyntje, daughter of Johannes Sanders Glen, October 25, 1694, and had two children, Elizabeth, and a son, Cornelius, who followed his father's profession and inherited his possessions.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Dirk Van Eps

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
DIRK VAN EPS married Maritie Damens, and had two children, Johannes and Lysbert, who became the wife of Gerrit Bancker, of Albany. His home lot was on the north corner of State and Church streets. JAN BAPTIST VAN EPS, eldest son of Jan Dirkse Van Eps, was born in 1673, and married Helena, daughter of Johannes Sanderse Glen, in 1699, and had eleven children, all of whom, save one, reached mature age and had families. He was captured by the Indians in 1690, with whom he remained three years. He owned, with other parcels, the "foremost" farm, No. 8, on the bouwland. This farm has remained in the family until this day. EVERT VAN EPS was a son of Jan Dirkse Van Eps. His first wife was Eva, daughter of Carle Hansen Toll; his second, Elizabeth, daughter of Isaac Truax. He had thirteen children. His village lot was on the west side of Washington street.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Claas F. Van Petten

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
CLAAS FREDERICKSE VAN PETTEN was born in 1641. His wife was Aeffie, daughter of Arent Bratt. They had eight children. They both died in 1728, she aged seventy-eight years, he eighty-seven years. He owned a farm between the river and the lake in Scotia, and a village lot, being part of the Glen lot.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Harmen A. Vedder

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Harmen Albertse. Vedder owned much land here at an early day, removing here in about 1672. He died, June 18, 1714, leaving five sons and one daughter. ALBERT VEDDER, eldest son of Harmen, was born in 1671. He was captured by the Indians in 1690, and was kept in captivity for several years. His village lot was on the north side of Union street. It was afterward owned by Regnier Schaets. HAARMANUS VEDDER, son of Harmen, was an Indian trader, and owned a village lot on the north corner of State and Church streets. In 1757 Harmen Vedder, Jr., conveyed this lot to Alexander Vedder. Ferry street (extended south) passes through this lot. ARENT VEDDER, son of Harmen, married Sara, daughter of Symon Groot, and had eleven children, all of whom, save one, were living, and had families, August 10, 1846, when he made his will. His village lot, on the west side of Washington street, is now owned by D. Cady Smith. JOHANNES VEDDER, fourth son of Harmen, was carried to Canada in 1690 with his brother Albert, he inherited a portion of the ''hindmost" farm, No. 8, from his father. CORSET VEDDER, fifth son of Harmen, lived in "Schaghkook" until 1720, when he removed to Niskayuna. He owned four morgens of his father's farm.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Symon Volckertse Veeder

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Symon Volckertse Veeder was born in 1624. His home lot in the village was on the north corner of State and Ferry streets. GERRIT SYMONSE VEEDER, son of Symon, married Tryntje, daughter of Helmer Otten, in 1690. He was the owner of much landed property. PIETER SYMONSE VEEDER, son of Symon, married Neeltje, daughter of Claase Van der Volgen, in 1704. He settled on the Normans Kil. He died about 1709. JOHANNES SYMONSE VEEDER, son of Symon, resided on the Normans Kil, where he had a portion of his father's land. VOLKERT SYMONSE VEEDER, son of Symon, lived on the north corner of Ferry and State streets, on a lot received from his father.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Pieter Cornelise Viele

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
PIETER CORNELISE VIELE was among the early settlers. He owned part of De Winter's bouwery in 1670, and died some time before 1690. CorNelis Viele, brother of Pieter, owned the two bouweries No. 8. He was one of the two licensed tapsters of the village, his inn being on the south corner of Mill lane and State, near Church street. ARNOUT CORNELISE VIELE, son of Cornelis, was for many years provincial interpreter. On account of the Indians' high esteem for him, the Mohawks, in 1683, gave him a parcel of land, above Schenectady, on the north side of the river, called Wachkeerhoha.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Henrick M. Vrooman

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Hendrick Meese Vrooman came here in 1677 and bought the Van Curler bouwery. His village lot was on the north side of State street. He was slain in 1690. Adam Vrooman, son of Hendrick, in 1690, saved his life "by his bravery in defending his house, which stood near the north gate, on the west corner of Church and Front streets." Besides this lot he owned other parcels of land.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


Jan Vrooman

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Jan Vrooman, son of Hendrick, married Geesie, daughter of Symon Veeder, July 4, 1680, and had fifteen children, the most of whom attained maturity and had families. His village lot, inherited from his father, was on the north side of State street, near Given's Hotel. Capt. Hendrick Vrooman was the fourth son of Adam Vrooman. Among other parcels of land, he owned in 1706 a lot on the south side of State street, "on the side of the Coehorn creek." Barent Vrooman, son of Adam, married Tryntje, daughter of Takel Heemstraat, of Albany, June 18, 1699. He died in 1746; his village lot was on the north corner of State and Center streets. Wouter Vrooman, son of Adam, married Marytje, daughter of Isaac Hallenbeck, of Albany; they had sixteen children; he died October 26, 1856; he owned five different parcels of land. Jan Vrooman, son of Adam, was by trade a brewer. He received some land from his father, among which was a parcel lying west of the city, now mainly covered by the canal and railroad. Pieter Vrooman, son of Adam, married Grietje, daughter of Isaac Van Alstyne, of Albany, February 2, 1706; they had twelve children. He settled early upon "Vrooman's land," in Schoharie. Simon Vrooman, son of Jan Vrooman, married Eytje, daughter of Jacob Delamont. He bought, in 1710, a "lot lying on the west side of the canal, extending from State to Liberty street." By his will, made in 1752, his son Jacob inherited this, and his son Johannes the "tan-pits," near the Church mill on Mill lane.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk


David J. Watkins

David J. Watkins, of Cambria township, in this county (Hillsdale County, Michigan), one of the sturdy and substantial farmers of that portion of the state, is the scion of an old Welsh family, who long lived and labored in their native land, and gave to its interests their best services in war and peace. They fought valiantly under its early chieftains and princes to maintain its independence and dignity, and, in its fields, mines and other industrial lines of productive effort, they worked faithfully to promote its mercantile, financial and educational welfare.

Its American progenitors brought to the land of their adoption the same spirit of martial and industrial fidelity, espousing with enthusiasm and a lofty patriotism the cause of the common weal in every way on the soil of the new world, which their forefathers had so faithfully supported on that of the old.

The one who planted the family tree in this country was David's grandfather, Hezekiah Watkins, who emigrated from Wales to the United States while he was yet a young man, and who became soon after a soldier in the Colonial army, for seven years thereafter following the varying fortunes of the young confederacy in the Revolutionary struggle, against the fearful odds with which it had to contend, aiding materially in securing and rejoicing greatly in celebrating its final triumph. When peace came he settled in New York state and there worked at his trade as a weaver until his death.
    His son, Johnson Watkins, was born and reared in that state, there married with Miss Eunice Randall, a native of Vermont, and they became the parents of eight children, of whom their sons, David J. and another, and two daughters are living, all being residents of Michigan. The father was a farmer in his native place until 1849, when he brought his young family to this state and settled in Cambria township, this county, on twenty acres of the farm on which David now lives. This was then all heavily timbered, and he cleared it and reduced it to fertility, living on it until his death, in 1873, at the age of seventy seven. His wife survived him four years, dying in 1877, also aged seventy-seven.

David J. Watkins was fourteen years old at the time of his parents' removal to Michigan, having been born in Glenville township, Schenectady county, New York, on March 6, 1835. He began his education in the schools of New York and finished it in those of Michigan. But his opportunities were limited at the best, for he was obliged early in life to make a field hand in the work of the farm, and in making a living for the family. He began life for himself as a farmer, purchasing twenty acres of land adjoining that of his father, and working it until the opening of the Civil War and for some time during its progress. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Union army in Co. B, Eighteenth Michigan Infantry, under Capt. C. B. Van Valer, and he remained in service until the close of the contest, being attached to the Army of the Cumberland, participating with it in many of its important battles, among them those at Spring Hill and at Athens and Decatur in Alabama. He was mustered out at Nashville in 1865, with the rank of corporal, to which he had been promoted through merit, being finally discharged at Jackson, in this state. He returned at once to his Hillsdale county farm,on which he has lived ever since, increasing its size to eighty acres and bringing it to a high state of cultivation and improvement. On March 8, 1857, he married Miss Minerva Vincent, a daughter of John and Mary A. (Reynolds) Vincent, early settlers in Branch county. Her father was a railroad contractor and assisted in the construction of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad. He died in this state on January 27, 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Watkins have four children: Edmund J., a leading manufacturer at Hillsdale; Chauncey E.; George E., a farmer and blacksmith; Edith E., wife of F. W. Dailey, of Hillsdale county. Mr. Watkins is an earnest Republican in politics and has served as township treasurer and also as highway commissioner, rendering acceptable and appreciated service in both positions. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, with devotion to the organization and efficiency and zeal in its service. His life in this county has been both useful and productive, ever showing him upright in character, diligent in industry and full of consideration and help for his fellows. He is regarded as one of the sterling and representative men of the township and has the respect of the community.
[Source: Compendium Of History And Biography Of Hillsdale County, Michigan, Illustrated, Elon G. Reynolds, Editor, (Chicago, A. W. Bowen and Company, Publishers, Engravers and Book Manufacturers), 1903, pp. 195-196. - Submitted by Judith]


George H. Wells
A leading member, not only of the Calcasieu bar, but of that of southwest Louisiana, is HON. GEORGE H. WELLS, of Lake Charles. He was born September 11, 1833, at Schenectady, N.Y., and is a son of Joel and Susan (Bellows) Wells, natives of Massachusetts. George H. received his education in the common schools of his native state. At the age of nineteen years he left school and came to Louisiana. This was in 1852, and December 18, 1854, he was admitted to the bar at New Orleans, and located in Harrisonburg, Catahoula parish, where he practiced law until 1861. He was district attorney in 1859 by appointment, and then by election, and held the position until he resigned it for the "tented field" in the stormy period of 1861. When the war commenced he enlisted as a private in Company G, Eleventh Louisiana infantry. He was soon made sergeant-major and then promoted to lieutenant. When the Eleventh was mustered out Lieutenant Wells joined Shelly's battalion. Afterward he united with the Houston City (Texas) battalion as its major. During Major Wells' army experience he volunteered four times, and was discharged three times on account of ill health. After the war was over he laid aside his sword, and reopened his law office. He located at Lake Charles, Calcasieu parish, in 1866, where he has since practiced law. His practice is large and lucrative, and as a criminal lawyer he has few equals in this part of the state. He is a finished orator upon almost any topic. Although his educational training was wholly in the common schools, yet so thorough it was, coupled with his voluminous reading, that he speaks with the chosen language and fluency of a classic scholar. Mr. Wells is democratic in his political views, but does not claim to be a politician. He was elected to the state senate in 1878, from the first district composed of the parishes of Calcasieu, Cameron, Vermillion and St. Mary, and in the session which followed his course was marked by the same high ability which has given him such eminence. This closed his political career, and he has since devoted himself sedulously to the practice of his profession. Major Wells was married in May, 1861, to Miss Ellen C. Lewis, of Rapides parish. She died in April, 1886, leaving seven children - five daughters and two sons. In 1889 he married Miss Jennie Barden, of Lake Charles. Mr. Wells is a member of the M.E. church, South, and is president of its board of stewards. He is a Free Mason, and is district deputy grand master of the Eighteenth Masonic district of Louisiana.
[Source: Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Louisiana; Chicago; The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1892; transcribed by Kim Mohler.]


Jan Bartense Wemp

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Jan Barentse Wemp settled here in 1662, buying "Van Slyck's" or "Wemp's Island." His village lot was on the west side of Washington street. This lot was inherited by his son Myndert, who was killed in the massacre of 1690. Myndert Wemp, son of Jan, was born in 1649. He married Diewer, daughter of Evert Wendel, of Albany. Capt. Barent Wemp, son of Jan, was born in 1656, and married Folkje, daughter of Symon V. Veeder. His village lot was on the east corner of State and Center streets. The front of this lot is now occupied by the Carley House.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886, submitted by Mary Kay Krogman]


Eddie P. Wilbur

When the active, enterprising and public-spirited citizen who is the subject of this sketch settled in Rio Blanco county in September 1882, only two stock men lived in the White river valley. There were few roads and almost no bridges in the region. The land was in its state of primitive nature, productive of its wild growth of little use for civilized life and yielding grudgingly to the hand of the husbandman. There were no ditches for irrigation and large acreages were too arid for cultivation. Indians and wild animals still roamed about at will insulting the lone majesty of night with their hideous deeds, and white men, not yet present in sufficient numbers to provide the community of effort necessary for self defense, were practically at the mercy of nature's untamed children who jealously resisted the intrusion and encroachments of the strangers. Mr. Wilbur has therefore the distinction of being one of the patriarchs of the section and can look around him and see in almost every evidence of progress and improvement a tribute to his daring, endurance, constructive enterprise and breadth of view. He helped to build the fist ditch in the county and also the Old Agency, Miller and Oakridge ditches, and the Meeker townsite as well. He took an active part in the inevitable Indian troubles, especially those occurring at the time when warrants were issued for the arrest of troublesome Utes in 1887. Then he, Mr. Gilley, James Van Cleve, and Frank Clark buried Jack Benner, Mart Holden and Edward Archie, victims of savage fury. He was the guide of the troop that made the arrests and quelled the consequent uprising, and one of its leaders in action. He was the first juror summoned to service in the county, Breckenridge then being the county seat. He served as marshal of Meeker from 1890 to 1894, sheriff of the county from 1893 to 1897, member of the county high school board for many years, and since 1897 has been secretary of the Coal Creek school board. His life began in Schenectady county, New York, on September 22, 1862, and he is the son of David V. and Norine Wilbur, natives of New York state. In his early manhood the father was a farmer, but his late years were devoted to his work at his trade as a carpenter. He was a Republican in politics and both parents were Methodists. Of their nine children six are living, Charles E. H., Julius R., Bradford B., Eddie P., Aggie, wife of William Showers, and Ella, wife of Frank E. Watson. The father died in August, 1900, and the mother is living at Meeker. Mr. Wilbur attended the public schools and worked on the home farm until he was seventeen. He then moved to Chicago and for a number of years worked at different employments, among them driving piles at the docks, and boating between that city and Buffalo. In 1881 he came to Colorado and located at Denver where he worked at hard labor for several months. In March, 1882, he moved to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and there continued working as a laborer, finally shipping out on the Oregon Short Line for labor in the employment of that road; but being dissatisfied with the boss in charge, he left the train and went forward on foot, his blankets packed on his back, the snow deep and troublesome, and his provision along the hard and difficult way being one meal a day, and that often a scant one. After some considerable effort and through hardships he will never forget, he reached Idaho and secured employment with the Union Pacific Railroad. A short time afterward he went to freighting for the government and in the spring of 1882 for Hughes Adams, at the same time furnishing hay and wood for the government under contract. In September following he located the ranch on which he now lives, one hundred and sixty acres of it, adding eighty acres afterward by purchase. Of this tract two hundred are under cultivation and yield good crops, while cattle and horses furnish his chief resource. Fraternally he belongs to the Woodmen of the World and politically he is independent. On Christmas day, 1888, he was married to Miss Mollie E. Watson, a daughter of John A. Watson (see sketch elsewhere in this work). Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur have had five children, of whom Ella P., Arthur E., George D., and Mary B. are living, and Frankie died in August 1890.
(Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Richard Ramos)


Robert Yates

ADULT FREEHOLDERS.
Robert Yates, son of Joseph Yates, settled in Schenectady at the age of twenty-three, and married Grietje Claase De Graff, of the Hoek in Scotia. His village lot was on the Albany road, near the present Ferry street. By his will, made in 1747, he left his interest in his tan-yards to his sons, Joseph and Abraham. Robert, son of Joseph, settled in Schenectady before 1712, and his nephew, Joseph Christoffelse, settled here in 1734. Abraham, a son of the latter, owned a house and lot on Union street, opposite the Court House.
[Source: History of the county of Schenectady, N. Y., from 1662 to 1886, George Rogers Howell, John H. Munsell, 1886] mkk

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