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Schenectady County, New York

 


Divorces


Mme. D'Alama and Rudolph Aronson

Mme. D'Alma was a member of the chorus at the Casino Theatre, when she met Rudolph Aronson, to whom she was married in Schenectady on September 9, 1888. The couple lived together only a short itme, and were separated by divorce proceedings in November, 1896. Previous to her marriage to Mr. Aronson she is said to have secured a divorce from a French actor.
[Source: The Times (Washington DC) April 24, 1899; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]


FLORENCE & HARRY CAMPBELL

Former Schenectady Man Obtains Divorce
Harry R. Campbell, formerly of Schenectady and Elnora, has obtained a final decree of absolute divorce in an uncontested action against Mrs. Harry R. Campbell, nee Florence G. Sisson, known also as Stacey Campbell. The divorce hearing was held January 22, 1930, in the Supreme Court of Brooklyn, and the final decree was signed by Justice Mitchell May on May 7. Mr. Campbell was at one time an employee of the Schenectady Trust Company and also of the Union National Bank. He left Schenectady to follow the banking business with the Corn Exchange Bank Trust Company of New York city. The former Mrs. Campbell after studying art obtained a position as designer and style consultant with the Eastern Isles Importing Company of New York. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George M. Sisson of Elnora.
[Schenectady Gazette, Schenectady, New York, May 10, 1930, submitted by Mary Kay Krogman]


Emma and Levi Goodro

Court came in half an hour earlier in the afternoon to hear the case of Emma Goodro vs. Levi Goodro. The grounds laid down were intolerable severity and refusal to support. These parties were married in Schenectady, N. Y., September 6, 1909, it being the second marriage for each. They came later to Ripton, where Mrs. Goodro purchased a farm. The wife testified that her husband abused her. She had supported the house for most of the time since the marriage. The decision was not announced. Mr. Sturtevant represented the petitioner-no defense.

[Source: Middlebury Register (Middlebury, VT) June 11, 1915, submitted by Mary Kay Krogman]


Peter P. Hogeboom

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY.
Saturday, Feb. 3.
Petition of Peter P. Hogeboom of Glenville, Schenectady co. for a divorce.

[Source: Saratoga Sentinel (Saratoga Springs, NY) Tuesday, February 13, 1827, submitted by Mary Kay Krogman]


Mary and Henry Klammer

Mary C. Klammer, formerly of South Woodstock, was granted a divorce from Henry Klammer. The ground was intolerable cruelty. The couple were married at Schenectady, N. Y., on July 23, 1915. Attorney C. L. Torrey was counsel for Mrs. Klammer.
[Source: Norwich Bulletin (Norwich, CT) February 4, 1919; transcribed by Mary Kay Krogman]


Lillian Estelle and Norman Selby

KID M'COY IS BEING SUED FOR DIVORCE.
NEW YORK, Dec. 21.-Norman Selby (Kid McCoy), the pugilist, was sued for absolute divorce today. His wife who was the widow of the young millionaire "Bud" Ellis of Schenectady, when she married McCoy appeared in court. McCoy was not present. A statutory offense was alleged. Justice Platzek reserved decision. [Source: The Salt Lake Tribune (Salt Lake City, UT) December 22, 1910; transcribed by mkk]

KID M'COY'S WIFE GETS HER DIVORCE.
NEW YORK, Dec. 24.-Justice Platzel of the supreme court today signed an interlocutory decree of divorce in favor of Mrs. Lillian Estelle Ellis Selby, against Norman Selby, known to pugilistic circles at "Kid McCoy." Mrs. Selby charged her husband with a statutory offense.

[Source: Daily Telegram (Adrian, MI) Saturday, December 24, 1910, submitted by Mary Kay Krogman]


BARNEY and CARRIE SNOW

Enoch Arden Law Invoked for First Time in Schenectady
Mrs. Carrie Snow has been granted a decree by Justice Edward C. Whitmyer under the Enoch Order law dissolving her marriage to Barney L. Snow in March, 1911. The Snows were married in Koesville and have one child now 26 years old. In 1904 her husband left his wife and child and has never since been heard from. The new law makes it possible for a person to obtain a divorce if the husband or wife has been absent for five years. Mrs. Snow is the first local woman to invoke the aid of the new legislation.
[Schenectady Gazette, Schenectady, New York, June 22, 1922, submitted by Mary Kay Krogman]


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