Finding Ancestors wherever their trails led

Seneca County
New York
Genealogy and History



Ovid

Transcribed from "History of Seneca County New York", 1876
Transcribed and contributed by Jan Stypula





     The town of Ovid was formed March 5, 1794, at which time it was organized as a town of Onondaga County, when that county was set off from Herkimer. Ovid retained its original dimensions until 1817, when Covert was set off, and was again diminished in size when Lodi was taken from Covert and a part of Ovid, in 1826. These three towns, Ovid, Lodi, and Covert, comprise the original military town of Ovid, which contained one hundred six-hundred-acre lots. The present territory of Ovid embraces Military lots from 1 to 33 inclusive, except Lot 26, Lodi, and is the north part of the original town, bounded as follows: on the north by the town of Romulus, east by the centre of Cayuga Lake, south by the towns of Covert and Lodi, and west by the west shore of Seneca Lake, which is due north from Washington, longitude 77° west from Greenwich ; and the village of Ovid is in latitude 42° 41' north. The north line of the town is about seven and seven-eighths miles in length from lake to lake, and is a short distance south of the narrowest part of the County. The south line is about nine and one-third miles in length from east to west, and the width of the town north and south is about three and three-fourths miles.
     The central ridge of Ovid is about four miles from Seneca Lake, and attains a height of from five to seven hundred feet above its level, and a still greater height above the waters of the Cayuga, which is sixty feet lower than Seneca. The central and southern portions of this town are underlaid by the Genesee slate, succeeded by the Tully limestone in the eastern and western portions, more particularly noticeable in the ravines leading to the lake, beneath which occurs the Moscow shales of the Hamilton group of rocks found along the lake shores, and is the underlying rock in the northeast and a small portion of the northwest part of the town. Over all, the drift is deposited to a depth of from one to forty feet, which forms the basis of a naturally fertile and productive soil, containing more or less lime, and was in its natural state covered with a heavy growth of deciduous trees, except along the lakes and ravines, where pine, hemlock, and cedar are found. Among the forest-trees, the white-oak and basswood attained an elevation of one hundred feet, the latter flourishing to such an extent in the eastern central portions of the town that the region in an early day was denominated the “Basswoods." The principal varieties of the timber-trees of the town were, viz.: white oak, red oak, swamp white oak, - some of which were from four to six feet in diameter, - black or yellow oak, white and black ash, pig-and shell-bark-hickory, sugar- and soft- (or white) maple, basswood or linden, poplar or whitewood, swamp, rock, and red slippery-elm, beech, ironwood, cucumber, cottonwood or balm of Gilead, aspen, black walnut, butternut, and, occasionally, wild cherry and mulberry, sassafras and dogwood.
     The name of the town was bestowed by Simeon De Witt, the Surveyor-General of the State at the time the Military Tract was surveyed and divided into towns. Mr. De Witt applied names to the whole tract taken apparently at random from some classical dictionary. Among those names were Aurelius, Sempronius, Ulysses, Ovid, Hector, Homer, Solon, Virgil, etc., entirely ignoring the significant and often more euphonious names applied to portions of this tract by the aborigines, such as Canoga (sweet water), Sacawas (swift water), and Kendaia.
     Sullivan, in his campaign of 1779, passed down on the east side of Seneca Lake to "Kanadesaga." In the journal of Lieutenant Adam Hubley, who was under the command of Sullivan in this expedition, we find the following under date of September 4, 1779: "We destroyed several fields of corn, and after a march of thirteen miles we encamped in the woods in front of a very large ravine, and half a mile from Seneca Lake. On account of some difficulty with the pack-horses, the main army did not reach so far as the infantry, and encamped about two miles in the rear." The encampment of Sullivan's infantry was at what is now known as Ovid Landing, and the encampment of the main army was near the present site of the Coombs school-house.
     Scarce one decade had passed after the rattle of Sullivan's musketry ceased to reverberate in the forest along his line of march from "Newtown" now Elmira, to "Kanadesaga," now Geneva, ere the white settlers might have been seen threading their way through the forest in the wake of Sullivan's army, anxious to rear their homes in the fertile country of the Senecas.
     The first that entered the County following on in the track of the invading forces was Andrew Dunlap, who came from Pennsylvania, located near the old Indian trail on Lot No. 8, in the southwest part of the town, in May, 1789, and died March 26, 1851, aged ninety-one years, six months, and nineteen days. It is claimed by some that Dr. Dunlap was the first permanent settler within the present boundaries of Seneca County. When Mr. D. planted the standard of, civilization upon the soil of Ovid, there was no permanent white settler. Where now is located the beautiful and thriving village of Geneva, only was found the ruins of the Indian village of "Kanadesaga." Oliver Phelps had just located at Canandaigua; Colonel John Handy, the pioneer of Chemung, had just settled at "Newtown;" and there were but four small houses where now is situated the city of Buffalo with a population of 117,000. And it was not until several years after the settlement of Mr. D. that Joseph Ellicott, the agent of the Holland Land Company, laid out the village upon the present site of Buffalo, called "New Amsterdam." To conceive of a home in the forest, surrounded by the remnants of a hostile Indian tribe, together with wild beasts, is to form some idea of the courage and invincible determination that characterized Andrew Dunlap when he planted his home in the wilds of No. 8. He settled in May, 1789, following the first inauguration of Washington, and soon thereafter plowed the first furrow in what is now Seneca County. His brother-in-law, Joseph Wilson, and Peter Smith settled in the same year,—Wilson afterwards locating on Lot 17 and Smith on Lot 7, a large portion of which is now owned by his son, Colonel Ralph Smith.
     In 1790, Abraham Covert and his son Abraham A., from New Jersey, settled , on Lot 27, where the first town-meeting was held in April, 1794, when Silas Halsey, who lived on Lot 37 (now Lodi), was elected Supervisor, and sworn in before himself, there being no other Justice between the lakes.
     In 1792, John Seeley, grandfather of the late Hon. John E. Seeley, located on Lot No. 3, on the present site of Ovid Village, and erected a dwelling on the site now occupied by the residence of William Jones, where his son Hezekiah, now of Niagara County, the oldest native of the village, was born in 1797. Moses Cole and Josiah B. Chapman, former Sheriff, father of Hugh Chapman, who has also been Sheriff, afterwards settled on Lot No. 3.
     The same year Captain Elijah Kinne, from Dutchess County, settled a short distance west, on Lot No. 2, near the site where Benajah Boardman erected the first grist-mill in the County, in 1793, which was a primitive affair, the bolt being turned by hand. In 1793, Nicholas Huff, who had been wounded at Germantown, and his brother Richard came from New Jersey and located on Lot 20, in the heaviest timbered portion of the town. Peter Hughes came the same year, also Abraham De Mott with his sons James and John, also from New Jersey, and located on Lot 9, a short distance south of the village. James, familiarly known as Judge De Mott, afterwards served as lieutenant in the war of 1812, represented the County in the Legislature in 1825, was appointed Associate County Judge, and was married the third time when in his eighty-seventh year; he died February 18, 1875, aged eighty-eight years and eight months, and, at the time of his death, was more familiar with the early history of the town and County than any person now living. His sister Cristina, when a young child, in 1794, was brought from New Jersey on horseback, grew up at Ovid, married Colonel Cornelius Post, and was the mother of the Hon. Lewis Post, now of Lodi, the present member of the Assembly from Seneca County.
     William and Robert Dunlap came in 1794 and settled on Lot 5, where the former, father of the Hon. A. B. Dunlap, of Michigan, died in 1854, aged ninety-three.
     The same year (1794) Teunis Covert and family, from New Jersey, settled on Lot 32.  His sons, Teunis and Rynear, also settle on the same lot.  A daughter of his married David Brokaw (father of A. C. Brokaw, Esq., of Lodi), and resided for a time on the west part of the same lot. One night a bear visited their premises, seized their only pig, and started off through the woods with his booty. Whereupon Mrs. Brokaw, not feeling disposed to give up all prospect of the next winter's pork, seized her lantern, and, guided by the music of the pig, followed after, and kept track of the robber until her husband loaded his gun and came up, when bruin was dispatched and the settlers got their pig
again.
     About the same year Garret Harris, from New Jersey, settled on Lot 27, between the villages of Ovid and Lodi, where his grandson, George Harris, now resides. Peter Le Conte, Esq., also settled on Lot 27. Ralph Swarthout, from the same State, settled on the adjoining Lot 28, near where Charles S. Johnston now resides. Mr. Johnston has in possession a sword captured by his great-grandfather from a Hessian officer in the battle of Bennington. Mr. Swarthout, it is said, built the first cider-mill in the town, in 1811.
     In 1795, Dr. Jonas C. Baldwin settled on Lot 11, and afterwards built a saw-mill near Ovid Centre, where Hughes afterwards built a grist-mill, familiarly known to this generation as "Van Lieu's Mill." Dr. Baldwin, in 1801, removed to Onondaga County and founded Baldwinsville.
     Samuel Sweeney built the next mill below, on the same stream now owned or operated by Edwin Barry.
     From 1705 to 1806 the population increased rapidly. John I. Covert first settled on Lot 19, and afterwards on Lot 10, in 1796; Leddie Dunlap,from Connecticut, also located on Lot 10; Abraham Bloomer settled on Lot 21; Folkerd Sebring, Peter Harpending, and George Harris on Lot 19; Gideon Scott and Ephraim Weed on Lot 12; his son Daniel, father of Hon. D. D. Scott, at Scott's Corners, on Lot 11; also, Abijah and Noah Barnum on the same lot; and Chas. Thompson and Anthony Schuyler on Lot 25. Hon. Wm. Thompson, brother of Charles, who first resided on Lot 18 and subsequently on Lot 9, near the village, was a lawyer, Surrogate of the County, and several years a member of the Legislature. He died in Michigan, in November, 1871, aged eighty-seven, and was buried in the cemetery near his old home in Ovid.
     Charles Starrett and Peter Wyckoff settled on Lot 31 ; John Van Tuyl, Cornelius Sebring, Cornelius BoDine, Paul Anten, and Joshua Coshun on Lot 29; Matthew and David Gray, Abraham VanDorn and son, and Abram Low on Lot 28, where Colonel Wilson Gray was born; John McMath, who kept the first store and the first inn in the town, on Lot 18; he erected the house in which Dr. C. C. Coan now resides, which for some years was a noted tavern; John Boice and Joseph Stull located on Lot 18; Peter Sherman on Lot 14; Simon and James Wheeler, with their father, and Benj. Waldron also on the same lot near Sheldrake; Geo. Sauter on Lot No. 6; James Brooks and John Townsend on Lot No. 10; John Leonard on Lot 9; John and Ralph Wilson and James Van Horn on Lot 17. Mr. Van Horn was Supervisor of the town several years, and was the grandfather of Hon. Burt Van Horn, of Niagara County, and the brother of Mrs. Abraham De Mott. The Simpsons located on Lot No. 1. John Simpson, the father, it is said, drew the lot for his services in the war of the Revolution, and lie is the only one of the soldiers to whom the land in the town was allotted who located upon it. His sons were Anthony, Alexander, and John, all now deceased; John, the present, being the son of Anthony.
     Peter Combs and Abram P. Covert settled on Lot 15, where was buried George Dunlap, brother of Andrew, who died September 24, 1791, his being the first death among the settlers in the town and County. David McCormick settled on Lot 16. Lot No. 30 was the gospel and school lot, which, for some years, was owned by the town and rented to various persons. Geo. Runyan, the Powelsons, James and John Dennis, John Brokaw, and Charick Rosecrants were among its early occupants.
     Near the centre of this lot in 1809 or 1810 was erected the Reformed Dutch church, the first church edifice built in the town or County. There also is located the Gospel Lot Cemetery, in which lie buried Nathaniel Ballard, Rev. Abraham Brokaw, Cornelius BoDine, Nicholas Huff, Abraham VanDorn, Sr., Captain Joseph Stull, who was with Washington at Valley Forge, and probably several other soldiers of the Revolution. Captain Stull also served in the war of the Whisky Rebellion in Pennsylvania in 1796 and 1797. Near there are the graves of Captain John I. Sebring, Captain Charles Starrett, General James Brooks, Robert and Jeremy Slaght, and other soldiers of the war of 1812; also the graves of Winfield S. Coahun and his brother Stephen, who lost their lives in the war of the Great Rebellion,—soldiers of three wars resting together in honored graves. Andrew Dunlap, Peter Smith, Peter Sherman, Thomas Covert, John Simpson, Ephraim Weed, Elijah Kinne, Sr., Benjamin Scott, and William Taylor, also soldiers of the Revolution, lived and died in the town, and the last-named three are buried in the old cemetery in Ovid Village.
     Nancy Thomas, the widow of Jonathan Thomas, who built a tannery near Sheldrake in an early day, and who was a sister of the late Daniel Scott, and is the mother of S. D. and J. B. Thomas, is still living at Sheldrake, aged ninety years, and is the oldest inhabitant of the town, unless Mrs. Feehan, a native of Ireland, who claims to be about one hundred, is older.
     In the spring of 1793, Abraham Sebring, from New Jersey, settled on Lot 35 (now Lodi). With him came his family, including his daughter Catherine, who in 1804 married Joshua Coshun, Esq., and removed to Lot 29, Ovid, where she still resides, aged about ninety, and has resided continuously in this County longer than any of its inhabitants now living. The first child born in this town was David Dunlap, son of Andrew, February 2, 1793.
     In the spring of 1793 three promising young men of the town, viz., Joseph Wilson, Abraham A. Covert, and Enoch Stewart, severally made matrimonial alliances with Anna Wyckoff, Catherine Covert, and Jane Covert, respectively and, as there was neither priest or justice between the lakes, all crossed the Seneca Lake together in a skiff, and proceeded to Esquire Parker, a follower of Jemima Wilkinson, who united them in the bonds of matrimony, whereupon they returned rejoicing. John N. Wilson, a grandson of Joseph, has still in his possession the original marriage-certificate of his grandfather, of which the following is a copy:
     "This certify that Mr. Joseph Wilson and Miss Anna Wyckoff was joined together in marriage in Jerusalem, in the County of Ontario, on the 3d day of April, A.D. 1793, by James Parker, Just. Peace."
     David Wilson, who now resides in the town of Romulus, was the first child born of these marriages, in January, 1794, and is now probably the oldest native resident of the County. He was General Porter's right-hand man in the sortie at Fort Erie, September 17, 1814, and assisted in rescuing him from the British, who at one time in the fight had dragged him from his horse and were carrying him off.
     All of these first married couples lived to old age (Stewart and wife in Lodi) honored and respected; the last, Abraham A. Covert, dying in May, 1868, at the age of ninety-eight. He was carried to his grave by six of his neighbors, the youngest of whom was over seventy years of age. They were Judge James De Mott, Dr. C. C. Coan, Abraham VanDorn, Chester Eastman, James Foster, and Elijah Denton, all of whom except the first and last are still living in this town.
     In 1867 and 1868 several of the old residents of the town died, viz., Captain John I. Sebring, aged ninety-six; Daniel Scott, aged eighty-seven; Jonathan Thomas, aged eighty-three; and, on the same day, October 29, 1867, Rev. Thomas Lounsbury, D.D., for many years pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Ovid, aged seventy-eight; George BoDine, May 15, 1868, at seventy; and Mrs. Elizabeth Pack in 1875, aged ninety-one.
     On Lot 33, and about one mile north of Farmer Village, is the grave of Samuel Weyburn, who in an early day had shot at and wounded a bear, which just before night escaped into one of the ravines leading to Cayuga Lake. On going out the following morning to feed his cattle he heard his dog barking in the ravine, and, with his pitchfork, went to the place, where he found the dog in a contest with the bear on a narrow rock or shelf about half-way down the side of the ravine. He immediately took part in the fight to assist the dog, and presently the bear seized him with his mouth by the arm, effected a hug on Mr. W., when both parties rolled over and over to the bottom, a distance of forty feet, in an embrace altogether too close for comfort, to one of the parties at least. Fortunately, when they landed in the water at the bottom the man was uppermost, and by ramming his arm, still in the bear's mouth, down his throat, he succeeded in holding the bruin's head under the water and drowning him. The man was severely wounded, but survived many years, though carrying the scars of this contest to his grave, and was ever after known as "the man who fought the bear."
     One evening, in the fall of the year, about 1807, '8, or ‘9, as several young people, the Misses VanDorn, accompanied by Cornelius BoDine, Jr., were on their way home through the woods from a visit to a neighbor, Mr. Folkerd Sebring, who lived where L. B. Drake now resides, they were chased by a panther, which would run towards the young people, apparently intending to seize one of them, when the young man would spring out and strike at the beast with a club, at the same time making a noise in the fallen leaves, and the panther would spring aside, run off a few rods, and then turn and come for them again, when the same operation would be repeated, until they arrived, greatly frightened but not hurt, at a clearing where I. N. Brokaw now resides.
     Mr. BoDine, when relating this incident to the writer many years afterwards, said, "Every time that painter came I expected he would get one of us."
     Among the old settlers still surviving are Isaac I. Covert, son of John I., born in this town April 7, 1797, and the oldest native now residing in it; his brother, John J. Covert, and wife; John K. Bryant, Horatio Palmer, Horace C. Tracy, former Sheriff, James Burlew, Stephen Dennis, Captain Silas C. Covert and Abraham Covert, James Smalley, John Brooks and Ellis Brooks, sons of General James Brooks, Jacob Compton; Abraham Van Dorn, who, with his father Abraham, from New Jersey, arrived on the 4th of July, 1806, when the first celebration of that anniversary was being held in the village of Ovid; Colonel John Y. Manning, who came in 1815; these last are the two surviving pensioners of the war of 1812 in the town. Arad Joy and Peter De Forrest, father of Mrs. J. E. Seeley, also pensioners, died in 1872, and James De Mott in 1875.

     Mr. De Forrest was one of the artillerymen who fired minute-guns when the body of Captain Lawrence, of the "Chesapeake," was brought to New York City.
     John Simpson and John G. Wilson both reside where they were born seventy-four years ago. Mr. Wilson has cast his vote at every election in the town and at every town-meeting, except one, since he became a voter, more than fifty years ago. Dr. Candius C. Coan, who settled in 1816 or '17, in that part of the town now Lodi, and has resided in this town during the last forty years, has been a practicing physician sixty years. Dr. Coan and his wife, a sister of the late General T. J. Folwell, of Romulus, are still living, and celebrated their "golden wedding" in 1867.
     Among other early settlers arc General Halsey Sanford and wife, who celebrated their "golden wedding" May 1, 1872; Peter N. Huff, son of Nicholas Huff; David D. Scott, his aunt Mrs. N. Rowley, Isaac BoDine, N. N. Hayt, George Dunlap, and Joshua W. and Aaron Wilson, both sons of Joseph Wilson. Mr. Aaron Wilson has in his possession a block of the beech-tree upon the bark of which his father had inscribed his initials and the date of his advent in this town,—"J. W., May 12, 1789." Captain Andrew S. Purdy, General George Smith, David Dunnet, F. C. Williams, and Esquire James Foster were among the early settlers. Esquire Foster has held the office of Justice of the Peace more than forty years, and several times was Associate Judge of the County Court. The five last named reside in the village. Mrs. Laura Ann Hartsough is the oldest resident in the village since 1808. Charlotte Jackson, an aged colored woman, resides in the village, and at one time was the slave of William Godley under the laws of this State. Ralph Cady and John Mickle also reside in the village, aged about eighty-six. Amos Yarnall, a native of Pennsylvania, in his ninetieth year, is the oldest man now living in the town. Mrs. Rachel Young, living with her son-in-law Peter A. Brokaw, Rachel Starrett, widow of Captain Charles Starrett, and Rachel, widow of Judge De Mott, are each nearly ninety years of age.
     Among other old residents are Nathaniel and Alanson Seeley and Abigail Voorhees. John Lindsley was the first minister in the town, and Benjamin Munger taught the first school in 1795.
     Thomas Purdy settled on Lot No. 5, Charles Dickerson on Lot No. 4, and on Lot No. 9 Abram Pease, who was a soldier of the French War, and afterwards of the Revolution; Thomas Osborne, Esq., settled on Lot 13; and Samuel Weyburn on Lot 33.

ANCIENT FORTIFICATION.

     This fortification or embankment was situated on Lot No. 29, in the southern part of this town, on the dividing ridge between Seneca and Cayuga Lakes, about four miles distant from the former in a direct line, and five from the latter. In 1801, Cornelius BoDine, from Pennsylvania, came to this town and erected a dwelling inside of this fortification on a gentle eminence, sloping gradually in all directions. The inclosure consisted of an embankment of an irregular elliptical or oval shape, its maximum breadth about twenty rods, and length from thirty to forty rods. At that time the embankment was about three feet in height, with a base measuring from five to eight feet in width. There were several open spaces in the bank of different sizes, which undoubtedly at some far distant era of the past had served as gateways. The plowshare has obliterated all traces of the mound, except a few rods covered with buildings and fences, where a slight bridge still remains. It was evidently a work of no recent date, as the timber found on the inside, consisting of oak, maple, basswood, etc., was of the same size as the surrounding forest. Huge logs in a state of decay were lying in the ditch, and on the mound trees the growth of centuries were standing. The subsoil consisted of clay, gravel, and sand,—the clay predominating, and covered with a fine dark soil, here and there spotted with heaps of ashes. In making an excavation for a cellar more than fifty years ago, a human skeleton was found directly under one of these heaps two and one-half feet beneath the surface. The large bones were in a good state of preservation, and were of the size of those of a full-grown man. It appeared to have been buried in a sitting posture,—facing the southeast,—as the skull was found nearer the lower extremities than an extended posture would admit. In enlarging this excavation in 1857, some five other skeletons were discovered near the place wherein the first was exhumed. No arms or ornaments were found buried with any of these skeletons. Many fragments of earthenware have been found, of a dark-red color, smooth on the inside, and frequently ornamented on the outside. The fragments were about one-fourth of an inch in thickness. A pipe of the same material has also been found, which exhibits much taste and skill in its manufacture. Seventy rods southwest of the embankment were three holes a few feet distant from each other, the largest measuring from twelve to fifteen feet across, and twenty feet in depth; the others were smaller. It is hardly probable that these holes were made for the purpose of obtaining water, as there is a never-failing running spring near by. De Witt Clinton visited this fortification in 1811, and considered it one of the same class of mounds found in the valley of the Ohio. (See his Journal.)

CHURCH HISTORY.


PRESBYTERIAN.


     In the year 1800 the General Assembly appointed the Rev. John Lindsley a missionary for a period of four months, with directions to visit the town of Ovid. He undoubtedly organized a church while on this mission, which became connected with the Presbytery of Oneida, and was subsequently transferred to the Presbytery of Geneva. Mr. Lindsley became pastor of this church, but at what date it is impossible to ascertain. He was dismissed November 5, 1805. " Hotchkiss's History of Western New York," in speaking of this church, says: “The church, on its request, was dismissed from its connection with the Presbytery of Geneva to join the classis of the Reformed Dutch Church. This was the original Presbyterian Church of Ovid. The author believes that its general place of meeting and centre of operation was at or near the place of worship, in the town of Ovid, of the church which styles itself the 'True Reformed Dutch Church,' and that the original church has succession in this church."
     The Presbytery of Oneida issued a commission June 28, 1803, for the organization of a church in the town of Ovid, and on the 10th of July of the same year Jedediah Chapman organized the "First Presbyterian Church of Ovid," consisting of twenty members. In 1810 the membership had increased from twenty to seventy-three. In 1825 it numbered one hundred and seventy-one in 1832, two hundred and twenty; in 1843, two hundred and eighty-three; in 1846, two hundred and seventy-nine. This church, upon its organization, was styled the "Seneca Church," and in 1817 was denominated the "First Presbyterian Church of Ovid." It is impossible to ascertain who served this church as pastor prior to 1811. April 17 of that year William Clark was installed pastor, and officiated until August 9, 1815. The church has subsequently been under the pastoral charge of the following persons, viz.: Rev. Stephen Porter, Rev. Thomas Lounsbury, D.D., Rev. M. M. Smith, Rev. L. Hamilton, Rev. O. P. Conklin, Rev. Willis J. Beecher, Rev. Charles E. Stebbins, and Rev. Hugh W. Torrence, the present pastor, who was installed in May, 1871. The present church edifice was erected in 1856, at a cost of twelve thousand dollars. The present membership numbers two hundred and five. The session, as at present constituted, consists of Rev. Hugh W. Torrence, Pastor, Clement Jones, Sen., Isaac I. Covert, John N. Wilson, H. D. Eastman, and Joseph Wilson, Elders.

Baptist.


     In 1820, Elder Caton, of Romulus, preached occasionally in the old court-house in the village; also in 1836-39, when Elder Wisner was pastor at Scott's Corners, he preached occasionally in the village.
     May 30, 1858, Elder C. A. Votey, of Scott's Corners, preached his first sermon in the court-house, and continued to preach there until the present church edifice was erected.
     The church was organized April 28, 1859, at a meeting of which D. D. Scott was chosen Moderator, and Gordon Dunlap Clerk; when it was resolved that a church be organized and called "The Baptist Church of Ovid Village."
     The following is a list of the first members: Aaron Wilson, Horace H. Bennett, Gordon Dunlap, Cornelius V. D. Cornell, Monmouth E. Wright, Mrs. Julia Wilson, Cornelia Wilson, Mrs. Elizabeth Bennett, Mrs. Minerva Cornell, Mrs. Mary C. Miller, Mrs. Harriet Clarkson, Mary H. Johnson, Sophia Sly, Mrs. Gertrude Warne, Nauey B. Miller, Jane Welton, and Mrs. Jane Wright Horace H. Bennett was chosen Deacon, and Gordon Dunlap Clerk.
     On the 5th of May, 1859, a Council of delegates from nine churches of the Seneca Baptist Association convened in the court-house, and organized by the choice of Rev. Elijah Weaver as Moderator, and Oliver W. Gibbs as Clerk. The Council unanimously voted to recognize the "Regular Baptist Church of Ovid Village." Recognition sermon by Rev. J. M. Harris, prayer by Rev. E. Marshall, hand of fellowship by Rev. E. Weaver, and charge by Rev. H. West. Horace H. Bennett was ordained Deacon. Consecrating prayer by Rev. F. Dusenberry, who laid on hands with Rev. C. A. Votey and Rev. P. Irving.
     The Rev. C. A. Votey continued as pastor till December 20, 1862, when he was succeeded by the Rev. L. Ranstead.
     In 1862 the present church edifice was erected, and the first church meeting held in the lecture-room on Saturday, December 13, 1862. The church edifice is a frame building, on the west side of Main Street, in the village of Ovid, between the Methodist and Presbyterian churches, and cost about two thousand five hundred dollars, besides labor, etc., contributed by the members and others. At this time the church membership numbered sixty-four.
     The Rev. L. Ranstead continued as pastor until April 23, 1865. He was succeeded by the Rev. D. Cory, who removed to Trumansburg in the spring of 1866 (letter of dismissal granted April 1, 1866).
     He was succeeded, July 1, 1860, by the Rev. Granville Gates, who continued pastor until April 1, 1807, when he removed to Forest City, Wisconsin.
     The church was without a settled pastor until April 1, 1869, when the Rev. Peter Goo was settled and continued pastor until April 30, 1871.
     During portions of the year 1873, the pulpit was supplied by Talmage Van Doren, a student at Madison University; and on the 5th of April, 1874, John E. McLallen, of Trumansburg, became pastor, and continued till August 29, 1875, since which time the church has had no settled pastor.
     Baptist Church, Scott’s Corners.-This church was organized on Wednesday, March 19, 1828, and Rev. Edward Hodge was first pastor. The first deacons were Abram Bloomer and Hoolin Word.  The church edifice was erected in 1830, at a cost of two thousand dollars, and with subsequent repairs is now estimated to be worth three thousand dollars.  Joseph Dunlap was the first clerk.  The present membership is one hundred and twenty-nine, and is under the pastoral charge of Rev. F. D. Fenner.

METHODIST.


     Ovid first appears upon the minutes of the Conference as a distinct appointment in 1820, with Jonathan Hustis as pastor. In 1827 it next appears with the name of William Fowler as pastor. Mr. Fowler formed the first class in Ovid village, consisting of eight persons, viz.: Elijah Horton, Ann Horton, Noah Barnum, Lucy Barnum, Alice De Mott, Delos Hutchins, Sarah McQuig, and Lydia De Mond. Jesse Vose was the first class-leader. The following-named persons have served this society as pastors; J. Chamberlain, G. Osburn, William Snow, James Hale, D. Hutchins, Jonathan Hustis, Noble Parmeter, William H. Goodwin, B. Shipman, J. W. Nevins, J. Dennis, J. Dushaw, S. Parker, J. K. Tinkham, S. Mattison, G. D. Perry, R. Harrington, William T. Davis, Moses Crow, E. G. Townsend, B. F. Stacey, Robert Hogeboom, F. G. Hibbard, H. T. Giles, J. T. Arnold, David Crow, Delos Hutchins, N. N. Beers, Calvin Coats, J. C. Hitchcock, J. Alabaster, M. S. Leet, G. W. Chandler, Martin Wheeler, William H. Goodwin, D.D., LL.D., and Robert Townsend, the present pastor. This society's present fine church edifice was dedicated June 2, 1870, by Bishop Jesse T. Peck and B. I. Ives. The edifice is valued at twenty-five thousand dollars. The present church membership is one hundred. The present officers are: James Bennett, John Banker, and Richard Hoagland, Trustees; Halsey Smith, H. R. Westervelt, W. B. Swarthout, John Talladay, and John W. Runner, Stewards.
     The Methodist Church at Sheldrake was under the same administration as the Ovid M. E. Church, until about ten years ago. The first class was organized at the house of Mr. Peter Sherman, at Sheldrake Point, in about the year 1812. The first church edifice was erected in 1831, and located one mile west of Shel- drake Point. The following are the names of prominent members at that time, viz.: Peter Sherman, Isaiah Stevenson, Thomas Osborn, Noah Barnum, James Kidder,—from whom Kidder's Ferry derived its name,—Samuel Lynch, Jasper Shutts, James Wheeler, Isaac Blew, Betsey Dinmock, Mrs. Chambers, and Mrs. Peter Sherman. The church building was moved to Sheldrake Point in the year 1869, while under the pastorate of Rev. N. M. Wheeler. The present church edifice cost eight thousand dollars. In 1869 or 1870 the present parsonage was purchased at a cost of twelve hundred dollars, one thousand dollars of which was a legacy from Peter Sherman. The present church membership numbers forty-five persons. The present officers are, viz.: Pastor, Rev. N. M. Wheeler.

CATHOLIC.


     The first mass of this church was celebrated in the court-house on the 15th of August, 184§, by Father Gilbride, who also built the first church edifice. The following named persons have officiated in this church: Fathers Gilbride, Kenney, Gleason, Stephens, Maguire, Kavanaugh, English, Kenan, O'Conner, and Thomas J. O'Connell, the present pastor. The church edifice is finely located on Main Street. This society has a large number of communicants, and is in a prosperous condition.

CIVIL HISTORY.


     The first town-meeting in Ovid was held April 1, 1794, at the house of Abraham Covert, one-half mile west of the present residence of Dr. C. C. Coan. The following officers were chosen: Silas Halsey, Supervisor; Joshua Wyckoff. Town Clerk; Elijah Kinnie, Abraham Covert, and George Fassett, Assessors; Abraham Sebring, Collector; Elijah Kinnie and Andrew Dunlap, Overseers of the Poor; James Jackson, John Livingston, and John Selah, Commissioners of Highways; Abraham Sebring, Constable; Elijah Kinnie, Abraham Covert, and George Fassett, Overseers of Highways; Henry Scivington, Daniel Everts, Elijah Kinnie, John Selah, James Jackson, and Samuel Chiswell, Fence Viewers; Thomas Covert, Pound Master.
     Silas Halsey, the first Supervisor of the town of Ovid, swore in before himself,—being at the time a Justice of the Peace,—upon the same day of his election, April 1, 1794.
     The following quaint receipt was found in the Town Clerk's office:
     "Received, this fifteenth day of February, 1794, of Oliver Halsey, the full and just sum of four dollars, in full of all demands, from the beginning of the world to this day, I say, received by me,
Thomas Sebring.”

OVID VILLAGE.


     Ovid Village was incorporated April 17, 1816; the Act was repealed on the eleventh day of April, 1849, and it was re-incorporated July, 1852.
     John Seeley was the pioneer of Ovid Village. He purchased nine hundred acres of land, a portion of which comprises the site of the present village, and erected a house, which he opened for the entertainment of man and beast, on what is now known as Main Street, a short distance north of the flouring- and saw-mills of George W. Jones & Brother. This tavern was a frame building, unlike most of the rude structures of that early day, which ordinarily were of logs, sometimes covered with siding. Colonel Manning relates that in 1816 he boarded at this inn, then kept by Simon Vrooman.
     In 1806 the first court-house in Seneca County was erected in this village, being raised on the day of the great eclipse, upon the site now occupied by the
present court-house and for a period of forty years justice was administered within its walls by the venerable Ambrose Spencer, James Kent, Governor Yates, and other pioneer judges whose names have become a part of the early history of western New York.
     In 1815, Ovid had attained the reputation of being one of the most flourishing towns in this section. In that year Ira Clark kept a tavern upon the site now occupied by the hotel of Daniel Clough, and opposite, on the site of the Powell Block, Andrew Farling kept a public house. Elihu Grant also was an early inn-keeper on what is now Water Street, in the building occupied by Barney McGregan as a dwelling — now, the only log building in town.
     The following are names of those engaged in other branches of business in 1815 Ira and Amos Clark, dry-goods merchants, occupied a building upon the site of William Swarthout, hardware. James Seymour occupied a store where now is located the cabinet establishment of Foster Brothers. Williams & Davidson were located on the present site of McElroy's hotel, and Moses Green upon the site lately occupied by the drug store of Clement L. Jones, Jr., and where Henry Wood kept a store before 1815. Jonathan Stout was a hatter, doing business in a large building subsequently owned by Colonel John Y. Manning, who carried on the business of a hatter for many years, and is still living at the advanced age of eighty-one. Chester Hall and Andrew Dunlap were silversmiths, and Edward Thurston a harness-maker. Daniel Scott and John Sinclare operated a distillery here as early as 1811, near the present residence of Mrs. Gray. This distillery, mentioned above, was subsequently converted into a fulling-mill, and later, occupied as a grist-mill. John Maynard and James Watson were the proprietors; Mr. Maynard was a prominent lawyer, and afterwards elevated to the position of Circuit Judge, which he occupied at the time of his death, in 1851.
     Peter Doig settled in the village in 1822, and opened a mercantile establishment in the building formerly occupied by Williams & Davidson. Other early merchants were William C. Van Horn, Seba Murphy, William A. Boyd, Philip Toll, and Richard Hardiker.
     Early physicians were : Jesse Tewksbury, Peter Covert, Achilles Gates, Tompkins C. Delevan, C. C. Coan, and Dr. Basvine.
     Early attorneys were Alvah Gregory, William Thompson, John Maynard, Asgill Gibbs, Moses Green, Samuel Wilcox, William Seeley, and Samuel Birdsall.
     The first school-house in the village was erected in an early day, just north of the Presbyterian church. Among early teachers are mentioned the names of William Moulton, Robert Harriet, and Henry Hewett.
     Hezekiah Seeley, son of John Seeley, was the first child born in the village, in a house which occupied the site of the present residence of William Jones, on Main Street.
     Ovid, located, as it was, in the midst of a wealthy agricultural region, together with its climate and location, has kept abreast with the rapid tide beginning with the settlement of the County.


The following persons represent the business interests of to-day:

       ATTORNEYS.—Thaddeus Bodine, George Franklin, William C. Hazelton, Henry V. L. Jones.
       PHYSICIANS and SURGEONS.—Alfred Bolter, H. W. Struble, E. W. Bryan.
       CLERGYMEN.-H. W. Torrence, Robert Townsend, James O’Connor.
       DRY-GOODS MERCHANTS.-John F. Seeley, George H. McClellan.
       BANKING.-James B. Thomas.
       BOOTS AND SHOES.-Chester Brown & Son, Joshua Thomas.
       HARDWARE.-William Swarthout, E. C. Howell.
       DRUGS.-Clement Jones, Jr., O. C. Powell.
       GROCERIES.-Ezra Terry, Peter H. Covert & Son, Jared H. Smith, O. C. Powell.
       MILLINERS.-Mrs. M. Harris, Mrs. J. Lockwood.
       ARCHITECT AND BUILDER.-F. M. Rappleye.
       CARPENTERS AND JOINERS.-John E. Craus, Alfred Havens, Fred Cady, James Bennett, Amos Hall, Henry Covert, Jacob Dickens, Jonathan Lockwood, Peter C. Hunter.
       CABINET-MAKERS AND UNDERTAKERS.—William and James Foster.
       PUMP-MANUFACTURERS.—Urial C. Dart & Son.
       CARRIAGE-MAKERS.—Frank Frantz, Alanson Seeley.
       BLACKSMITHS.—Alanson Seeley, Richard Hoagland, Abram Hart, John Mohan, Eli Beary.
       PAINTERS.—Charles Warn, A. H. Covert, Clement Gordon. William Brewer. Saw-Filer.—William Pomeroy.
       CLOTHIERS.-James D. Purdy, S. S. Salyer.
       HARNESS-MAKERS.-J. B. Bliss, W. Fagley.
       BARBER.-Lorin Conklin.
       HOTELS.-“Park House," Daniel Clough; “Franklin House,” N. N. Hayt.
       LIVERY.-Peter Wright, Frantz & Frotter.
       SALOONS.-Chalres McElroy, M. Johnson.
       DENTIST AND WATCHMAKERS.-R. L. Reynolds, Joseph M. Foster.
       STONE-MASONS.-James Fechan, Hugh McLaughlin, Andrew McLaughlin.
       BUTCHERS.-J. N. and W. H. Seeley, John Turk.
       AXE-MAKER.Nathan Seeley.

    The extensive grist-, flouring-, saw-, shingle-, and planing-mills owned by G. W. Jones & Brother were erected by George W. Jones in 1867, at a cost of twenty thousand dollars. The business was continued by him until 1871, when his brother William Jones purchased an interest. Six hundred thousand feet of lumber has been sawed in a year, and the average annual amount is five hundred thousand. Various kinds of grain to the amount of forty thousand bushels are ground annually.

SOCIETIES.


OVID chapter, R. A. M.


    The original warrant of Constitution of this Chapter was granted on the 2d day of February, 1825, to Josiah B. Chapman, High Priest; John De Mott, King; and Samuel M. Porter, Scribe. The said warrant was surrendered in 1830, and was accepted by the Grand Chapter, February 3, 1830. The Chapter was revived by the Grand Chapter, February 8, 1850, and Peter Himrod was appointed High Priest; John De Mott, King; and Arad Joy, Scribe. And, in addition, the following persons were declared members,—viz., John Van Horn, William Booth, John Kinney, F. C. Williams, H. C. Tracy, P. H. Flood, and William Fish. February 3, 1875, a warrant was granted by the Grand Chapter, as a duplicate of the warrant of the Chapter partially destroyed by fire, October 12, 1871, and the following empowered as officers,—viz., Edward W. Bryan, High Priest; William H. Kinnie, King; and Benjamin Stevens, Scribe.

UNION LODGE, NO. 114, F. AND A. M.


    No member of the Lodge was able to furnish the date of the original charter, nor the date of its surrender. The charter was renewed June 13, 1846, and destroyed by fire October 14, 1875. W. Halsey Kinnie is present Master, William L. Foster, S. W.; C. H. Swarthout, J. W.

WILLARD LODGE, NO. 311, I. O. O. F.


    This Lodge was instituted March 20, 1872. The following were the charter members,-viz., John Turk, Sr., William Coe, Lorin Conklin, George W. Wilkins, Willoughby Fighley.
    The first officers were,—J. Turk, Sr., N. G.; William Coe, V. G.; L. Conklin, Sec.; G. W. Wilkins, T.
    The present officers are,-G. W. Wilkins, N. G.: John Turk, Jr. V. G.; E. C. Terry, Sec.; J. M. Foster, Per. Sec.; W. Fighley, T.; Ely Beary, L. R. S.; Guy Conklin, L. S.; L. Conklin, W.; Charles Griffen, L. S. S.; E. Backman, R. S. S.; J. M. Harrington, I. G.; F. Youngs, R. S. of V. G.; J. McDonald, L. S. V. G.; M. C. Griffen, Chap.  The lodge since its organization,-that of Rev. William H. Goodwin, D. D., LL. D.

I.O.G.T.


The Lodge of the Independent Order of Good Templars, of Ovid, was chartered April 15, 1874, and charter burned in 1874.  A new charter was a granted in 1875. The following were the charter members: William E. Franklin, H. W. Torrence, Kinnie Dart, John F. Seeley, Oliver C. Cooper, chester Brown, A. Hunt, H. R. Westervelt, N. J. Dart, Robert Crawford, A. T. Slaight, Della Dart, Sarah Earle,Emma Jessup, Cordelia B. Hart, Frank Hart, Frank Youngs, James Jeffrey, D. Martin, P. C. Hunter, A. Hunter.  The officers for 1876 are,-Benj. Franklin, W. C. T.; Emma B. Gorton, W. V. T.; Jonathan Lockwood, W. Chap.; F. Thomas, W. Sec.; Charles Foster, W. A. S.; Walter T. Foster, W. T. S.; Joseph Foster, W. Treas.; Wallace Reynold, W. M.; Cordelia R. Heart, W. I. G.; Abram Hart, W. O. G.; N. J. Hart, P. W. C. T.; Chester Brown, L. D.

G. A. R.


    A Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, consisting of honorably discharged soldiers of the United States army and navy who served in the late war of the Rebellion, was organized in Ovid Village on the evening of October 3, 1874, by J. Marshall Guion, of Seneca Falls, of the Council of Administration, and C. M. Woodward, of Waterloo, Medical Director of the Department of New York, G. A. R. The following is the charter:

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC.


To all unto whom these presents come, Greeting:
    Know Ye, That reposing full trust and confidence in the fidelity and patriotism of Comrades Francis M. Rappleye, Henry C. Covert, John M. Chambers, James M. Conniver, Lewis D. Woodruff, John C. Williams, Joseph M. Foster, Patrick Carroll, Abram B. Hart, Archibald M. Covert, Jacob Dickens, John M. Harrington, Abram Wilson, H. V. L. Jones, Eugene C. Baker, H. Peterson, John A. L. Bodine, Alton Van Horn, John Magee, and C. H. Williams.
    I DO HEREBY, in conformity of the Rules and Regulations of the Grand Army of the Republic, and by virtue of the power and authority in me vested, constitute them and their associates and successors a Post of the Grand Army of the Republic, to be known as Charles P. Little Post, No. 40, Department of New York.  And I authorize, in accordance with the rules and Regulations of the Grand Army of the Republic.

    [L.S.]  Dated at the Headquarters of the Department of New York, of the Grand Army of the Republic at New York City, on the eighth day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-three, and of our Independence the ninety-seventh.

John K. Perley,                                                                                                                                                        Stephen P. Corliss,
        Assistant Adjutant-General                                                                                                                                    Department Commander.


    The following were the original charter officers:
    Henry V. L. Jones, Commander; Henry Peterson, Senior Vice-Commander; Archibald M. Covert, Junior Vice-Commander; Lewis D. Woodruff, Adjutant; Francis M. Rappleye, Officer of the Day; James M. Conover, Officer of the Guard; Abram Wilson, Chaplain; Patrick Carroll, Quartermaster; John A. L. Bodine, Quartermaster-Sergeant; Alton Van Horn, Sergeant-Major.

    During the two and one-half years of this Post's existence, several hundred dollars have already been expended by it in fitting up a soldiers' lot in the village cemetery, for the burial of poor soldiers who served in the late war; in depositing therein the bodies of those already dead and buried in Potter's Field, and placing suitable headstones over their graves; for the relief of their sick and disabled comrades, and other charitable acts, meriting the just praise of a grateful and appreciating community.

    The maximum of membership has reached fifty-six; but, from death, removals, transfers, and other causes, the Post now numbers twenty-one members in good standing, of which the following are their respective names:

    H. V. L. Jones, Commander; Joseph Burden, Senior Vice-Commander; Frank
Frantz, Junior Vice-Commander; N. T. Brown, Adjutant; Abram Wilson,
Quartermaster; Rev. William L. Hyde, Chaplain; Hon. Lewis Post, M.D., Surgeon; F. M. Rappleye, Officer of the Day; Terrance Keenon, Officer of the Guard; Isaac D. Conley, Sergeant-Major; J. M. Foster, Quartermaster-Sergeant; A. Van Horn, Bugler; E. C. Baker, Assistant Bugler; Peter C. Hunter, Orderly Sergeant; Patrick Carroll, Henry Peterson, O. C. Cooper, Darwin Spencer, Stephen B. Pearce, David Miller, and Erastus Benjamine.

    H. V. L. Jones, Henry Peterson, and Alton Van Horn represented the Post as delegates in the last Department Encampment, held at Albany, January 25 and 26, 1876.

VILLAGE OFFICERS.—The Board of Trustees is composed of the following persons : Clement Jones, Jr., Pres. ; James D. Purdy, Lorrin Conklin, Ezra C. Terry, and Frank Frantz.

    The Ovid Academy was opened in this village in 1825. In 1855 its name was changed to the Seneca Collegiate Institute. The East Genesee Conference subsequently assumed control of the institution, and conducted it under the name of the East Genesee Conference Seminary. It is now conducted as a Union school, and is in a flourishing condition. The following are the names of the Faculty: William L. Hyde, Principal; Elizabeth Weaver, Preceptress; Mary McQuigg, Mattie Seeley, and Delia Crane, Teachers. The following compose the Board of Education: Thaddeus BoDine, Hugh W. Torrence, Elijah C. Howell, Dr. E. W. Bryan, and Joseph Dunlap. Senator Christiancy of Michigan and Hon. D . C. Littlejohn were once students at this academy.
    The Ovid Bee was started in this village in 1838, by David Fairchild & Son. At the close of one year it passed into the hands of the son, Corydon Fairchild, who published it until 1874, when it was discontinued, and changed to the Ovid Independent; Hyatt & Cooper, editors and proprietors. The office of the Independent was destroyed by fire October 11, 1874, and the paper was re-established by Oliver C. Cooper, the present editor and proprietor. It is a prosperous and influential sheet, independent in politics and religion.
Ovid is a flourishing village of eight hundred inhabitants, finely located upon the dividing ridge between Seneca and Cayuga Lakes. From the seminary observatory the eye sweeps over portions of nine counties, viz.; Tompkins, Chemung, Steuben, Yates, Ontario, Wayne, Cayuga, Onondaga, and Seneca, while the waters of Seneca and Cayuga Lakes are plainly discernible, the former at a distance of three, and the latter at six miles.

POPULATION.


The population of Ovid in 1835 was 2997; in 1840, 2721; in 1845, 2129; in 1850, 2248; in 1885, 2274; in 1860, 2538; in 1865, 2382; in 1870, 2403; in 1875, 2397.

MILITARY RECORD.


    When war’s loud alarum sounded over this republic and our imperiled country called for brave men to strike at the hideous head of rebellion, the patriotic citizens of Ovid responded promptly, and on the 29th day of April, 1861, the first war-meeting was held in the village of Ovid.  Colonel John Y. Manning was President of the meeting, and James B. Thomas and James Ferguson, Secretaries.  This war-meeting was addressed by Thaddeus BoDine, Esq., who, at the close of his remarks, placed his own name upon the rolls, heading the list of volunteers from this town.

The following list comprises the names of those who enlisted in the war of the Rebellion from the town of Ovid, together with the number of the regiments to which they belonged, with date of discharge or death.

    Armstrong, Jehial, enlisted in the 148th Regiment, at Ovid, August 30, 1862. Died on hospital boat en route to Fortress Monroe.

    Ackley, J. Corey, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 30, 1862. Discharged December 31, 1863.

    Anderson, Isaac, enlisted in Company F, 148th Regiment, August 26, 1864. At Lee’s surrender.

    Bolter, William Alfred, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 29, 1864. Discharged June 29, 1865.

    BoDine, William Alfred, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, September 5, 1864. Discharged June 22, 1865, at Richmond.

    Bogardus, George W., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July 29, 1862. Was at Lee's surrender, and discharged June 3, 1805.

    Brown, Marvin Aurelius, enlisted in Company A, 148th Regiment, December 22, 1863. Discharged August 28, 1865.

    Bishop, James, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December 18, 1863. Discharged August' 28, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia.

    Burlew, Noyes Stephen, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862.  Discharged for physical disability October 4, 1863.

    Bodine, John Augustus L., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 21, 1862. Discharged March 31. 1865.

    Banker, Austin, enlisted in Company E, 14Sth Regiment, August 27, 1862. Discharged June 29, 1865.

    Brokaw, Abram, enlisted in Company F, 148th Regiment, August 1, 1864. Discharged July 1,1865.

    Bennett, Martin Luther, enlisted in Company G, 148th Regiment, December 22, 1863. Discharged June 14, 1865.

    Bumpus, Henry, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 31, 1862. Killed in battle before Petersburg, Virginia, June 18, 1864. Buried at Petersburg.

    Bogardus, De Witt C, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 27, 1862. Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Brokaw, Isaac, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 29, 1862. Discharged June 30, 1865.

    Bride, Patrick, enlisted in Company I, 164th Regiment, January 11, 1864. Discharged July 15, 1865.

    Boyce, Darwin Covert, enlisted in Company F, 148th Regiment, November 2, 1864. Discharged June 30, 1865.

    Blue, Samuel, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 6, 1862. Killed at Gettysburg July 2, 1863.

    Blue, Oscar Ditmars, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 6, 1862. Died at Camp Douglas, Chicago, November 26, 1862.

    Barnum, Abram Covert, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July 29, 1862. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Bingham, Denton Elijah, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July 28, 1862. Discharged December 25, 1864.

    Bishop, Jerome Madison, enlisted in Company G, 148th Regiment, December 19, 1863. Died in regimental hospital at Yorktown, March, 1864.

    Bird, James, enlisted in Company C, 148th Regiment,December,1863. Died from wounds received at battle of Cold Harbor in June, 1864.

    Bloomer, Bennett Beardsley, enlisted in 111th Regiment, August 29, 1864. Discharged November 30, 1864.

    Boyer, James Brooks, enlisted in 50th Regiment, September 4, 1864. Discharged April 27, 1865.

    Brokaw, Leroy, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July 29, 1862.

    Bunn, Jacob, enlisted in Company H, 15th Regiment, September 2, 1864. Discharged June 30, 1865.

    Brown, Sidney E., enlisted in Company C, 120th Regiment, July, 1862.

    Caywood, David Genoa, enlisted in Company 1, 33d Regiment, September 30, 1861. Wounded at Fredericksburg May 4, 1862. Discharged June 6, 1862.

    Covert, Archibald McNeal, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December 21,1863. Discharged October 28, 1864.

    Covert, Abijah Barnum D., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 4, 1862. Discharged June 5, 1865.

    Clarkson, Andrew B., enlisted in Company I, 50th Regiment, September 1, 1864. Discharged July 1, 1865.

    Countryman, George W., enlisted in Company H, 15th Regiment, September 3, 1864. Discharged June 13, 1865.

    Covert, Henry Handford, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. DischargedJune5,1865.

    Covert, Darwin C, enlisted in Company G, llUh Regiment, February 5, 1804. Discharged April 24, 1865.

    Cary, Edward, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 30, 1862. Died in hospital at Point of Rocks, Virginia, February 8, 1862.

    Craven, Hamilton B., enlisted in Company E, 14Sth Regiment, August 30, 1862. Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Carragher, Alexander, enlisted in Company I, 164th Regiment, December 26, 1863. Discharged July 27, 1865.

    Covert, Daniel F., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 11, 1862. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Carl, Patrick, enlisted in Company H, 148th Regiment, December 23, 1863. Discharged August 28, 1865.

    Carl, Owen, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December 18, 1863.

    Chambers, John M., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 6, 1862. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Craver, William Harris, enlisted in 50th Regiment, September 3, 1864. Discharged May 19, 1865.

    Cory, Samuel D., enlisted in Company D, 50th Regiment, August 22, 1862. In hospital at Elmira until discharged on surgeon's certificate of disability, January 2,1863.

    Chambers, Samuel, enlisted in Company B, 3d Artillery, August 5, 1864. Died at Morris Island.


    Coshun, Stephen, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 6, 1862. Died at Union Mills, Virginia, February 6, 1863, of smallpox.

    Covert, Abram C, enlisted in Company F, 50th Regiment, August 28, 1862. Discharged June 28, 1865.

    Covert, Rynear Beech, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. Discharged June 3, 1865.

    Covert, William Henry, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. Discharged June 3, 1865.

    Close, Sidney C, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 22, 1862. Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Covert, Abram V., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July, 1862.

    Corey, Andrew J., date of enlistment and number of regiment unknown.

    Corvet, Lyman, enlisted August 10, 1862, and was taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry.

    Close, Edwin, enlisted in April, 1861.

    Croix, St. Dc Louis Philippe, enlisted in April, 1861.
   
    Dickens, Jacob, drafted July, 1863, and joined Company I, 97th Regiment.
Discharged November, 1864.

    Dondle, Patrick, Jr., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 27,
1862. Discharged June 22, 1865, at Richmond, Va.

    Darling, Alfred, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 8, 1862.
Discharged June 4, 1865.

    Dart, Jonathan, enlisted in Company H, 33d Regiment, August 30, 1862.
Discharged May 25, 1865.

    Daley, Owen, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 31, 1862.
Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Demond, Isaac, enlisted in Company E, 26th Regiment, February 18, 1864. Discharged August 28, 1865.

    Donelly, James, enlisted in Company G, 148th Regiment, August
1864. Discharged June 29, 1865.

    Denning, Charles A., enlisted in December, 1863.

    Derham, George, enlisted in 1st New York Battery December, 1863.

    Decker, Muses, enlisted in 111th Regiment, January, 1864.

    Davis, Alfred, enlisted in 1861.

    Dean, Elisha H., enlisted October 25, 1861.

    Davis, Eugene W., enlisted in April, 1861.

    Everts, Calvin Damon, enlisted in Company H, 33d Regiment, August 30,
1862. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Finnegan, Stephen, enlisted in Company I, 164th Regiment, December 26,
1863. Discharged July 15, 1865.

    Flimn, Peter, enlisted in Company I, 164th Regiment, January 12, 1864.
Discharged June 17, 1865.

    Feeghan, John, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 25, 1864.
Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Finnegan, Michael, enlisted August 24, 1862, and was killed at the battle of Cold Harbor, August 24, 1862.

    Foster, Joseph M., enlisted in April, 1861.

    Gilchrist, Alexander, Jr., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, September 4, 1862. Discharged June 30, 1865.

    Gorman, George, enlisted in Company E, 14Sth Regiment, August 27, 1862.
Discharged June 30, 1865.

    Garnett, George Adam, drafted July 24, 1863, and joined Company D, 94th
Regiment. Discharged from hospital June 20, 1865.

    Griffon, James, enlisted in. 50th Regiment.

    Galloup, William A., enlisted in Company D, 3d New York Artillery, September 1, 1864, and was discharged May 29, 1865.

    Harris, Frederick James, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. Discharged June 16, 1865.

    Hoagland, Benjamin M., enlisted in Company M, 3d Light Artillery, August
27, 1864. Discharged July 8, 1865.

    Huff, Omar, enlisted in Company K, 21st Cavalry, September 3, 1864.
Discharged July 29, 1865.

    Harris, Charles F., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. Killed at the battle of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, during the last charge.

    Herdsell, George, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December 21, 1863. Discharged January 26, 1865.

    Huff, James Burt, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 6, 1862.
Killed in battle of the Wilderness May 6, 1864.

    Hubbs, Daniel, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, in July, 1862.

    Hunt, Byron, enlisted in 111th Regiment, March, 1864.

    Hartigan, Harrison, enlisted in April, 1861.

    Hadley, Alfred, enlisted in 108th Regiment, July 28, 1862. Wounded July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg.

    Ike, Charles, enlisted in Company H, 3d Light Artillery, September 3, 1864. Detailed. Discharged July, 1865.

    Jeffrey, James, enlisted in 50th Regiment, September 3, 1864. Detailed at Elmira. Discharged May 18, 1865.

    Judd, Walter, enlisted in 1st New York Independent Battery December 18, 1863. Discharged June 23, 1865.

    Jamerson, David Hulsey, enlisted in Company D, 50th Regiment, August 29, 1862. Discharged June 28, 1865.

    Jump, George V., enlisted September 3, 1864. Johnson, Mather, enlisted September 19, 1864.

    Jones, Jacob E., enlisted in April, 1861.

    Jones, Elijah, enlisted in April, 1861.

    Krug, George, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 31, 1862. Died in hospital, at Philadelphia, July 18, 1864, from wounds received in battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864.

    Kinch, Washington Irving, enlisted in Company M, 3d Artillery, September 3, 1864. Discharged June 26, 1865.

    King, John, enlisted January 9, 1865.

    Lewis, John G., enlisted in Company H, 1st Light Artillery, October 26, 1861. Discharged June 11, 1865.

    Lounsbury, Thomas E., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July 28, 1862. Discharged June 16, 1865.

    Lyon, Alonzo, enlisted in Company A, 50th Regiment, December 31, 1864. Discharged June 30, 1865.

    Lyons, Eugene, enlisted in Company K, 50th Regiment, December 25, 1863. Discharged June 30, 1S65.

    Lindsley, Joseph, enlisted in Company K, 3d New York Artillery, September 3, 1864. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Mack, Daniel, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 25, 1862. Discharged June 22, 1865.

    McLaughlin, Andrew, enlisted in Company C, Thirty-third Regiment, August 31, 1862. Discharged June 16, 1865.

    McDonald, Francis, enlisted in Company D, 3d Light Artillery, September 1, 1804. Discharged July 15, 1865.

    McDonald, Owen, enlisted in Company I, 164th Regiment, December 23, 1863. Discharged November 20, 1864.

    Manderville, Samuel, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. Discharged June 16, 1865.

    Middleton, Augustus, enlisted in 39th Regiment February 18, 1864.

    McCann, John, enlisted m Company I, 164th Regiment, December 25, 1863. Killed at Cold Harbor June 3, 1864.

    McArdle, Peter, enlisted in Company I, 164th Regiment, June 20, 1864. Discharged July 15, 1865.

    Mathews, Horace Smith, enlisted in Company K, 50th Regiment, December 25, 1863. Discharged June 25, 1865.

    McKinnie, Andrew, enlisted in Company B, 3d Artillery, August 28, 1864. Discharged July, 1865.

    Mathews, George Whiteman, enlisted in Company B, 3d Artillery, August 5, 1864. Discharged July, 1865.

    Martin, Alfred, enlisted in Company 6, 148th Regiment, December 18, 1863. Discharged August 28, 1865.

    Murray, Henry, drafted, and joined Company G, 8th Pennsylvania Regiment, in July, 1863. Discharged November 10, 1865.

    Mason, Robert, enlisted in Company F, 50th Regiment, August 28, 1862. Discharged June 28, 1865.

    McArdle, James, enlisted in Company G, 94th Regiment, January 4, 1864. DischargedJune3,1865.

    Miller, John, enlisted in 111th Regiment in March, 1864.

    Morton, James, enlisted February 14, 1865.

    Martin, James D., enlisted in Company M, 11th Artillery, April 18, 1863.

    Martel, Paul, enlisted April, 1861. Dead.

    Mathews, John, enlisted in April, 1861.

    Murrell, Thomas, enlisted in April, 1S61.

    Parish, Augustin S., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 1, 1862. Discharged February 5, 1863.

    Parish, Lyman W., enlisted in Company E, 14Sth Regiment, August 31, 1S62. Discharged July 24, 1865.

    Purcell, Joshua B., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. Killed in battle of Gettysburg July 3, 1863.

    Pentz, Thomas, enlisted in Company D, 50th Regiment, September 1, 1862. On detached service. Discharged December, 1862.

    Payne,William,enlistedSeptember12,1864.

    Polhamus, John.

    Roll, Jonathan S., enlisted in 50th Regiment September 3, 1864. Detailed at Elmira. Discharged May 18, 1865.

    Rumsey, Harrison, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July, 1862.

    Ross, Noah F., enlisted September 19, 1864.

    Raynolds, Theodore, enlisted February 14, 1865.

    Smith, George, Jr., enlisted in Company E, 14Sth Regiment, December 18, 1863. In battle of Cold Harbor. Wounded and sent to hospital.

    Seeley, James Henry, enlisted in Company H, 148th Regiment, December 21, 1863. DischargedJuly21,1865.

    Swick, William H., enlisted in Company M, 3d Artillery, August 29, 1864, Was at evacuation of Richmond. Discharged July 12, 1865.

    Simpson, John H., enlisted in Company K, 3d Artillery, September 1, 1864. Was at evacuation of Richmond. Discharged July 18, 1865.

    Scott, John Covert, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July 29, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg July 2, 1363. Discharged June 3, 1865.

    Scott, George B., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, March 17, 1864. Was at Lee's surrender. Discharged October 5, 1865.

    Stewart, Wilmar, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 22, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg July, 2, 1863, and died August 27, 1863.

    Stull, James Henry, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, July 29, 1862. Wounded at Gettysburg July 3, 1863. Discharged June 14, 1865.

    Scott, Winfield (Captain), enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 19, 1862. Wounded severely at Spottsylvania. Discharged September 26, 1864.

    Swick, Peter, enlisted in Company F, 148th Regiment, August 29, 1864.  Discharged June 22, 1865. Substitute.

    Stevens, Isaac Heminway, enlisted in the 9th New York Artillery, September 3, 1864. Was at Lee's surrender. Discharged July 6, 1865.

    Simpson, Andrew H., enlisted in 148th Regiment.

    Simpson, Darwin C, enlisted in 1863.

    Stewart, Jacob D., enlisted in the 33d Regiment in September, 1862.

    Smith, John D., enlisted in September, 1864.

    Tharp, James R., enlisted in Company K, 3d Artillery, September 3, 1864. Was at the evacuation of Richmond. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Treadwell, Bennett, enlisted in Company E, 126th Regiment. Discharged June 3, 1865.

    Toner, John, enlisted in 9th Artillery, August 31, 1864. Was at Lee's surrender. Discharged July 8, 1865.

    Thomas, James, enlisted September 10, 1864.

    Thomas, William J., enlisted in 75th Regiment, October 26, 1861. Discharged November 25, 1864.

    Taylor, Theodore R., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 31, 1862. Discharged June 30, 1865.

    Voorheis. William C, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 3, 1862. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Voorheis, Augustus C, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December 30, 1863. Discharged April 30, 1864.

    Voorheis, John B., enlisted in Company K. 50th Regiment, December 28, 1863. Discharged June 13, 1865.

    Wilson, Irving B., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 7, 1862. Discharged February 5, 1863.

    Wilson, Abram, enlisted in Company G, 148th Regiment, December 22, 1863. Discharged November 5, 1864.

    Woods, Peter, enlisted in Company E,. 148th Regiment, August 29, 1862. Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Woods, Arthur, enlisted in Company H, 148th Regiment, December 26, 1863. Discharged August 28, 1865.

    McElroy, William, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 31, 1862. Discharged May 9, 1865.

    Graves, John J., enlisted in Company E, 148th Recent, August 22, 1862. Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Wilson, Almon H., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regimient, August 11, 1862.  Discharged June 3, 1865.

    Eaton, Milo, enlisted August 25, 1864.

    Little, Charles P., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December 21, 1863. Mortally wounded at Petersburg.

    VanHorn, John A., enlisted in 15th Regiment, September 3, 1864. Discharged June 3, 1865.

    McGee, James, enlisted in Company E, 160th Regiment, August 31, 1862. Died October 20, 1864.

    Whiteman, Peter H., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December, 1863. Died at Fortress Monroe, July 29, 1864.

    Voorhies, Wisner, enlisted in Company I, 33d Regiment, August 31, 1862. Killed at battle of the Wilderness.

    West, Irving A., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, December 19, 1863. Killed at battle of Drury's Bluff, May 12, 1864.

    Reeder, Stephen S., enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 29, 1S62. Discharged June 23, 1865.

    Quinn, Michael, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 31, 1862. Discharged April 3, 1865.

    Van Sickle, William, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 31, 1862. Discharged April 3, 1865.

    McNany, Philip, enlisted in Company E, 148th Regiment, August 29, 1862. Discharged June 22, 1865.

    Van Horn, Cornelius, enlisted in Company H, 126th Regiment, December 18, 1863. Discharged August 28, 1865.

    Williams, Charles H., enlisted in 50th Regiment, September 4, 1864. Dis- charged May 18, 1865.

    Randolph, Harrison, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 1, 1862. Discharged June 15, 1865.

    Quigley, David 0., enlisted in Company M, 3d Artillery, September 3, 1864. Discharged June 26, 1865.

    Townsend, John H., enlisted in Company I, 94th Regiment, January 27, 1804. Discharged July 28, 1865.

    Gibbs, Albert, enlisted in Company B, 94th Regiment, August 10, 1864. Discharged June 28, 1865.

    Thomas, Elijah K., enlisted in Company H, 3d Artillery, September 3, 1864. Discharged in July, 1865.

    Van Sickle, John, enlisted in Company B, 3d Artillery, August 5, 1864. Discharged July 13, 1865.

    Lockhart, Richard C, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 6, 1862. Discharged May 17, 1865.

    Garrett, Thomas, enlisted in Company D, 50th Regiment, August 28, 1862. Discharged August 28, 1865.

    Covert, Madison, enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, in July, 1862. Discharged July 1, 1865.

    Van Horn, Tunis S., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, in July, 1862.    

    Babcock, James P., enlisted September 11, 1864.

    Webb, William L., enlisted September 13, 1864.

    Petkio, John R. G., enlistedJanuary 9, 1865.

    Kruce, Henry, enlisted February 14, 1865.

    Brown, Nelson, enlisted in Company D, 3d Artillery, August 26, 1864. Dis- charged July 5, 1865.

    Brokaw, Isaac N., enlisted in Company H, 50th Regiment, December 10. 1801. Died at Bottom Bridge, Virginia, June 17, 1862.

    Wyckoff, John E. S., enlisted in Company F, 75th Regiment, October 26, 1861. Discharged November 25, 1864.

    Osgood, William, enlisted in Company K, 94th Regiment, October 10, 1861. Discharged March 31, 1865.

    Covert, Lyman, enlisted August 10, 1862. Taken prisoner at Harper's Ferry.

    Bartlett, Martin, enlisted in April, 1861.

    Bradley, Austin S., enlisted in April, 1861.

    Vescelius, Alanson S., enlisted in April, 1861.

    Vaughn, Darwin E., enlisted in Company C, 126th Regiment, August 5, 1862. Killed at Gettysburg.

    Mulcohey, Lawrence, enlisted in the navy September 1, 1864, and served on the vessel "Old Vermont."'

    Thirty-seven additional persons were accredited to Ovid, but it is impossible to obtain their names, as their certificates were not left at the Provost Marshal's Office in this district, nor their names at the Paymaster-General's Office in Albany.



PERSONAL SKETCHES.



THE WILSON FAMILY.


    In the late winter, or early spring, of 1732, Ralph Wilson and his wife left their home in Ireland and emigrated to America. Just as their voyage was ended and the vessel reached the American shores, they had a son born to them, whom they named David. The family soon made for themselves a home in Tinicum, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. In 1739, after establishing a residence in this new land, Ralph and his wife obtained a certificate of church-membership from the Presbyterian Church of Stow, dated April 30, 1739. The family continued to live in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. About the year 1760, David, son of Ralph, married Ann Morrison. Four children were born to them; one daughter (Mary) married Andrew Dunlap. From this time for a number of years the interests of the families of Wilson and Dunlap were, to a great extent, identical. During the Revolutionary war, Andrew Dunlap was in the service as teamster. Joseph Wilson, son of David, at the time of the war, then a young lad, was at times engaged as a helper in the blacksmith-shop of his uncle Francis, and, when General Sullivan's army was sent out to subdue the Indians, assisted in shoeing the horses used in that campaign. Upon the return of the soldiers of Sullivan's army to their homes, they gave such a glowing description of the country through which they had passed that the families of Wilson and Dunlap became much interested, and determined to see some of the country for themselves. Accordingly, in the spring of the year 1789, Joseph Wilson, Andrew Dunlap, Robin Dunlap, William Dunlap, George Dunlap, Hugh Jimison, and William Roberts left their homes in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and followed up the Delaware and Susquehanna Rivers until they came to what is now Elmira. Here they made their course to the head of Seneca Lake. They prospected quite extensively between Seneca and Cayuga Lakes. They went around Seneca Lake by the way of what is now Geneva. At that time Geneva was inhabited by only one white person, who was trading with the Indians. They found no trace of any white settlement between Geneva and Watkins on the west side of Seneca Lake. They then followed mainly the trail of General Sullivan's army on the east side of the lake, until they arrived in the vicinity of Lodi Landing, as it is now called. Here, it is said, the seven men lodged comfortably in the hollow of a buttonwood tree and here, it is also said, the first sucker-fishing was done by the party, and that, too, in a very primitive way, merely stepping into the creek and throwing out the fish with their hands. In this vicinity the party determined to locate, and soon after erected a log cabin near the southwest corner of Military Lot No. 8, in the town of Ovid. This cabin was joint property, and was the home and for the protection of the whole party. They all settled near this place, or within a few miles. Andrew Dunlap chose Lot No. 8, and Joseph Wilson the south half of Lot 17, and inscribed his initials and the date on a beech-tree, May 12, 1789. The other members of the party located within a few miles of their cabin home. The party remained during the summer, making all the improvements possible, clearing the land and sowing winter wheat, the seed for which some of them were obliged to go some distance down the Susquehanna River to obtain. The next winter all of the party, except Wm. Dunlap, returned to Bucks County, Pennsylvania, for a new lot of supplies. In the following spring, the six returned to their chosen houses. Now, improvement is the order of the day.
    Soon other settlers located near them, and in a few years a goodly number of sturdy men and women had settled in this beautiful and healthy country. In April, 1793, a triple marriage took place, the first in the town of Ovid. The parties were Joseph Wilson and Anna Wyckoff, Abram A. Covert and Catharine Covert, Enoch Stewart and Jane Covert. They were obliged to cross Seneca Lake to find a justice of the peace to perform the ceremony. The marriage certificate of Joseph Wilson and Anna Wyckoff is preserved, and is dated on the 30th day of April, a.d. 1793, and signed by James Parker. There is also a certificate of Joseph Wilson's character preserved. The following is a copy:
"This certifieth that the bearer, Joseph Wilson, was born in the bounds of this congregation, of sober, creditable parents, with whom he lived until the spring of
the year 1789, and supported a fair and unspotted character; and was then, and, as far as our knowledge serves, is yet, free from publick scandal or church censure.
                                                   “Thomas Stewart,
“Certified by                                      “James Wilson,   Elders,
                              “David Wilson,
“Tinicum Presbyterian Church, Jan’y 12th 1792.”



    The privations and hardships endured by all pioneers were encountered by Joseph Wilson and his neighbors. The produce raised in excess of home consumption found no market nearer than what is now Elmira. In a few years, the family of Joseph Wilson growing up about him, and having the help within himself to carry it on, he erected a distillery, the products of which were mostly sold in Philadelphia. This, it must be remembered, was at a time when it was universally thought necessary to have their glass of some kind of liquor before each meal, and no one was considered social who did not bring out the bottle when called upon by a friend. This state of things existed until the year 1830, when the two great causes of temperance and religion stirred the minds and hearts of the people all over the land. Among those who at this early day saw and felt the evils of intemperance was Joseph Wilson, who at once gave up the business of distilling and became a stanch teetotaler. He united with the Presbyterian Church April 3, 1830. His wife had joined the same church nearly five years previous, viz., on the 16th of July, 1825. Joseph Wilson made farming the main business of his life.
     He had little to do with politics, but for many years had largely to do with making the highways of the town, and in all such matters his judgment was conclusive. He and his wife died amidst the comforts their own energy had so largely created. His wife died December 12, 1846, aged seventy-four years. Joseph Wilson died April 14, 1849, aged eighty-five years. They had twelve children. The oldest, David Wilson, who was a soldier in the war of 1812, is still living. The ninth child, Aaron Wilson, was born May 13, 1808. His early educational advantages were quite limited. In his younger years he worked on his father's farm, and when he arrived at his majority still lived with his father. At the age of twenty-five years he married Julia M. Ben- nett, of Scipio, Cayuga County, New York. The marriage took place December 25, 1833. Ten children, seven sons and three daughters, have grown up to manhood and womanhood as the fruit of this marriage. Two of their sons, Almon H. and Irvin B., were soldiers in the late war of the rebellion. They were both members of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Regiment of New York State Volunteers, and served their country with great credit. Almon is now a resident of the State of Nebraska, as is also one of his married sisters. In the year 1840, Aaron Wilson united with the Baptist Church of Scott's Corners, and has been intimately connected with the interests of said church ever since: and when the Baptist church in Ovid Village was erected, very largely contributed to the enterprise. His wife, Julia M. Bennett, joined the Baptist Church at Scipio, Cayuga County, New York, in the year 1831, and united with the Baptist Church at Scott's Comers in 1834. In questions of morals and in the general good of the neighborhood, he has ever been on the side of what was right and for the best interests of his neighbors. In early life he pledged himself to the cause of temperance, and has lived a life in accordance with his early pledge. And now, at the age of nearly seventy years, he, with his wife and three of his children, are living on part of the farm reclaimed from the wilderness by his father and family
since 1789.
     Aaron Wilson and his wife do not boast of having done any great thing, but
have made it the best efforts of their lives, by precept and example, to bring up their family to ornament and benefit society. And now they say, " Let another man praise thee, and not thine own mouth." They feel that their life-work is nearly ended, and hope what is left to them of this life may not be spent in vain.
Ovid, May 18, 1876.



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