Isaiah Baker

Son of the foregoing, born in Barn-stable, Massachusetts, in the year 1780, came to this county with his family in 1814, and settled three miles west of Athens, where he followed farming the rest of his life. He died in 1825, leaving seven sons and three daughters, all of whom are living, except one son, Matthias, who was killed by the kick of a horse in 1837. Mr. Baker was a worthy member of the Methodist church.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Jacob L. Baker

Another of the sons of Isaiah Baker, is an extensive farmer in Athens township. He has a family of seven sons and one daughter, most of whom are well settled on good farms in the neighborhood of their father, who manages to buy an additional farm as often as needed, for some of his family. The five other sons of Isaiah Baker removed to the west and are-there settled—most of them in Illinois.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

James Baker

James Baker was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, in the year 1805, and came to Carthage in 1826, where he has followed the joint vocation of farmer and miller. Six of his sons and one son-in-law were in the Union army during the late war.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Nicholas Baker,Senior

born in England in 1760, was brought to this country at seven years of age, for forty-four years followed the sea, as cabin boy and sailor, and in 1814, with his only son Isaiah Baker, came to Athens county where he lived in his son’s family, in the vicinity of Athens, till his death in 1829.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Nicholas Baker

son of Isaiah, born in Massachusetts in 1799, has lived in Athens (town and township) fifty-four years. Social and genial in his daily intercourse with friends, few men lead a more placid life than “Uncle Nick.” With a heart corresponding in capacity to his ponderous frame, with a healthy and happy temperament, he is one of those kind-hearted men whom dumb animals like and children make friends with. He fondly cherishes the remembrance of his once having lived in Judge Silvanus Ames’ family, in Ames township, in the summer of 1817. Edward R. Ames (Rev. Bishop Ames) at that time was eleven years old, and Mr. Baker, partial to him in boyhood, refers to their early acquaintance with lively pleasure. He relates with much gusto and laughter how “the bishop,” being naturally rather lazy, would lie on the grass in the shade and amuse young Baker with his talk, while the latter cheerfully performed an extra amount of work for his dreaming companion. Mr. Baker, formerly a farmer, has resided for many years past in the town of Athens. His son, George W. Baker, is now treasurer of Athens county.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

John Ballard

was born in Charlemont, Massachusetts, October 1st, 1790, and came to Athens in February, 1839. During the greater part of his residence here he engaged successfully in the mercantile business; was also for several years president of the Athens branch of the State Bank, and a leading man in the local enterprises of the place. He has now retired from business. Four of his sons are living, viz: Otis, a banker in Circleville, Ohio; Charles, manufacturer of farm implements in Springfield, O.; James, merchant in Athens, and the Rev. Addison Ballard at Detroit, Michigan.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Capt. Isaac Barker

came from New Bedford, Massachusetts, to the northwestern territory in the autumn of 1788. For several years he lived in the Belpre settlement on the Ohio river, about fifteen miles from Marietta, and his name is preserved as one of the heads of families who, in the year 1792, took refuge in the block house called “Farmers’ Castle,” where he and his family remained till the violence of the Indian war was spent. In 1798 he removed with his family of five sons and three daughters to Athens township, and settled near the village of Athens, where he passed the remainder of his life. Capt. Barker was a sea-faring man in early life, being supercargo and captain of an East India vessel) and, during the revolutionary war, took an active, part in the privateering service. His sons were Michael, Isaac, Joseph, William, and Timothy.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]


Isaac Barker, Jr.


Col. Joseph Barker


Michael Barker

son of Capt. Isaac Barker, born in 1776 at New Bedford, Massachusetts, came with his father’s family to Marietta in the autumn of 1788. During the Indian war, from 1792 to 1795, while they lived in Farmers’ Castle at Belpre, Michael served as a scout or spy against the Indians in a company raised under the authority of the Ohio Company. He came to Athens county and settled near the town of Athens in April, 1798, where he spent the rest of his life. He married a daughter of Win. Harper, who was county treasurer from 1809 to 1811. Mr. Barker was for many years a constable in Athens township, and held other local offices. He was a man of scrupulous exactness in his dealings, and of much firmness and decision of character. He died June 10th, 1857.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Enos Barnes

from New England, a son-in-law of Mr. Bagley, settled here [Trimble township] in 1818. He was a blacksmith.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...."Charles M. Walker - 1869]

The Barrows brothers, William, George, and Henry

came to what is now Canaan township in 1797, and settled near where N. O. Warren now resides. During the next year they brought out their father, Ebenezer Barrows, and the rest of the family from the east. The old man had been a soldier in the French and revolutionary wars. His ‘descendants are widely scattered through Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Iowa. One of his daughters, Mrs. Ebenezer Culver, is living in Upper Sandusky, Ohio, aged ninety years. Two of his grandsons, Voltaire and Massena, own the old Bar-rows’ mill on Federal creek. Perry Barrows has a farm near the mill tract. These are sons of Henry Barrows. Several, of the children of George Barrows survive. Parker, now seventy years old, is a respectable farmer of Canaan township. Orange and George, also farmers, live in Rome township, the latter on the old farm. Between seventy-five and eighty of the descendants of Ebenezer Barrows, are known to have served in the Union army during the late rebellion.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Henry Bartlett

the son of Captain William Bartlett, was born at Beverly, Massachusetts, February 3, 1771. His father was a seafaring man, and received, it is believed, the first commission that was issued to engage in privateering, during the revolutionary struggle, in which he rendered conspicuous service. In 1785, Captain Bartlett removed with his family to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and settled near the Forks of Yoh, where he lived till his death in While living in Westmoreland county, Henry Bartlett married Miss Betsey Corey, and in 1796, brought his young family to the northwestern territory and settled the next year at Athens. During his youth, Mr. Bartlett enjoyed pretty good educational advantages, and after his arrival at Athens was soon recognized as one of the readiest and most accurate clerks and businessmen in the community. Previous to the organization of the county, he taught school several quarters in the surrounding neighborhoods. Soon after the organization of the county in 1805 he was appointed by the county commissioners as clerk of the board and of the county courts, which position he held, discharging the duties with great fidelity for thirty years. He ceased to be clerk in 1836, and from that time till his death, acted as a justice of the peace in Athens. He was also for many years secretary and auditor of the Ohio university. He died September 9th, 1850. Esquire Bartlett was a man of great purity of character, thoroughly judicial mind and excellent capacity for business. During his early residence here, he adapted himself with admirable facility to pioneer life, and to the changing circumstances of the times, and was for many years almost indispensable in the management of county affairs. He possessed a fine quality of wit and humor, which he was fond of exercising, though always without offense to others, and which made him one of the most popular as he was one of the most highly respected men in the county. His family consisted of two sons and ten daughters, of whom nine daughters are living.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Francis Beardsley

born at Stratford, Hartford county, Connecticut, December 28, 1792, came to Athens in 1814, where he has lived ever since. Soon after coming here he married Miss Culver, sister of John Gillmore’s wife, who died in _____ . For his second wife he married Rebecca, daughter of Esquire Henry Bartlett. Of a retiring disposition and unobtrusive manners, Mr. Beardsley has led a quiet and useful life. A model of Christian rectitude under all circumstances, he is respected and esteemed by all who know him.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Charles Beebe

Rome Twp - One of Captain Hopson Beebe sons, the venerable Mr Charles Beebe, now in his eighty-third year, resided on the "old farm" until quite recently. He now lives with Mrs J.W. Johnson in this township.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Captain Hopson Beebe

Captain Hopson Beebe was born in Connecticut, February 17, 1749, was a soldier of the revolutionary war, and settled in Rome township in 1804, where he resided till his death in 1836. Sons Charles, Peter, William.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Peter Beebe

The youngest son of Captain Hopson Beebe, Peter Beebe was an active and successful business man, and for several years one of Rome township trustees. He died in the prime of life in 1849.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

William Beebe

Dr. William Beebe, son of Captain Hopson Beebe, was an assistant surgeon in General Tupper's brigade in the war of 1812. After the war he settled in Belpre, and practiced medicine there for the rest of his life.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

William Beebe

Dr William Beebe (son of Dr. William Beebe and grandson of Captain Hopson Beebe), is now a practicing phyician in Barlow, Washington county.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

William Bell

William Bell, section 30, Dover Township, was born in Leicestershire, England, April 11, 1841, and came to America in 1864 and settled in this county, where he has since lived. Mr Bell cleared thirty-three acres of land on middle branch of Bailey's Run. He moved to his present farm April 3, 1883. He was married May 2, 1869, to Jane R. Price, daughter of Abel O. Price, of Trimble Township. Mr and Mrs Bell have five children, of whom two are living- William A. and Rebecca A. The deceased were-Sarah A., Frances E. and Lucy A. Mr Bell owns 125 acres of land and is engaged in raising stock. Mrs. Bell was born in Dover Township near Kidwell's mill, Oct. 1, 1839, the same year Kidwell's mill was built.

[Source: History of Hocking Valley, Ohio Chicago:Inter- State Publishing Co. 1883; Submitted by Kathy Stanley]

Dr. William Blackstone

was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, in 1796, and came with his father’s family to Ohio in 1802, settling first in Pickaway and afterward in Ross county. He studied medicine at Circleville, Ohio, and Lexington, Kentucky, and graduated at the Cincinnati Medical college in 1833, having engaged actively in the practice during several years before this. Dr. B. came to Athens in 1838, and has practiced here continuously since. He and Dr.. Carpenter have both partially retired from active practice.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Anselm T Blake

Was born in Washington county, Ohio, October 23, 1801, and came to this county (Gallia Co) with his parents, David and Martha (Dagett) Blake, in the year 1817. He located in Ohio township, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Blake was married in Athens county, Ohio, December 10, 1826, to Hannah P. Trobridge, who was born in Fairhaven, Rutland county, Vermont, July 6, 1802. She is a daughter of Levi and Hannah (Smith) Trobridge. The following are the children of Mr. and Mrs. Blake: William D., born November 2, 1827, resides in Louisiana; Cincinnatus B., January 8, 1830, resides in Gallipolis; Harriet N., August 7, 1833, died May 14, 1858; Julia A., August 17, 1836, resides in Lawrence county, Ohio; Hannah D., June 29, 1839; resides in Gallipolis; Martha, June 2, 1846; resides in Gallipolis. Mr. Blake has held the office of township trustee for a number of years. He had two sons in the late war. Cincinnatus served two years and was discharged for disability. William enlisted for three years and was discharged on account of disability. The postoffice address is of Mr. Blake is Swan Creek, Gallia county, Ohio.

[SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]

Samuel L. Blake

born in Middletown, Middlesex county, Connecticut, in 1779, removed in 1816 to Alexander township, where he lived the rest of his life. He was a thorough farmer, a man of excellent character and sound judgment, and assisted largely in molding the society of the township. He died March 16, 1859, leaving a large number of descendants, some of whom are well known in the county.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Adam Blazer

A prominent farmer and extensive stock-raiser of this county was born on the 10th day of July 1815. His parents were Phillip and Elizabeth (Kinsley) Blazer. They settled in Gallia county in 1805. The subject of this brief personal history was married to Mary Z. P. Warner on the 2d day of April, 1846, the Reverend Hiram R. Howe performing the ceremony which made them one for life. Mrs. Blazer was born at Point Harmer, Washington county, Ohio, July 6, 1826. From this union of hearts and hands, came five children, in the order given below: Warner, born January 31, 1847, still living in this county; Mary M., October 23, 1850; Arthur A., June 25, 1856; infant son, July 25, 1859, died July 25, 1859, and Hannah A., July 15, 1864. The parents of Mrs. Blazer were Anaximander and Lucretia (Porter) Warner. Her father was born in 1794, and died in Lee township, Athens county, Ohio, May 31, 1843. Her mother was born at Ashfield, Massachusetts, September 13, 1795, and died in this township, July 19, 1858. Mr. Blazer has been constable for two years, and held the office of supervisor for several terms. His postoffice address is Gallipolis, Ohio.

[SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Joseph Bobo


Hugh Boden

Prominent among the citizens of Waterloo, are ... Mr. Hugh Boden, a native of Ireland, who settled here in 1839, and now lives in Marshfield; ... of whom have reared respectable families, and are highly esteemed.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

James Bosworth

James Bosworth, from Fall River, Massachusetts came here [to Trimble township] in 1821, but, after living in the township a few years, went back to New England.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...."Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Daniel Boyd

Daniel Boyd was born in Ireland in 1794, emigrated to the United States in 1819, and settled in Carthage township as a farmer in 1838. He was an active member of the Methodist church and an excellent citizen. He died August 20, 1867. His oldest son, Dr. John E. Boyd, died in West Virginia in 1855. His other two sons, Hugh and William F., graduated at the Ohio university in 1860 and 1866, respectively, and have engaged successfully in teaching.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

John Boyles

son of Peter, was born in Pennsylvania in 1791, came to Canaan township with his father's family in 1795, and lived there till his death in 1849. Some of his descendants still reside in the county.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Peter & George Boyles

a native of Bedford county,Pennsylvania, settled in what is now Canaan township in 1795. He was probably the first white settler within the present county of Athens. This was the year of the treaty of Greenville, and the close of the Indian war. Athens county was the very frontier at that time, and Mr. Boyles, in settling here, took his life in his hand, for this section was by no means safe in that year from Indian outrages. He lived in Canaan township till 1827, when he removed west, and died in Missouri in 1843. The date of his settlement here is accurately fixed by his son, George Boyles, who is still living in Andrew county, Missouri, and who was born in Canaan township June 5, 1795. He was, beyond doubt, the first white child born in Athens county. He says he was born “on the school section between the graveyard and the river.” Mr. Hocking H. Hunter, of Lancaster, Ohio, has frequently been accorded the distinction of having been the first white child born in the Hockhocking valley. He was not born till August 23, 1801. It hardly admits of a question that George Boyles, a native of Canaan, was the first white child born on the waters of the Hockhocking.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Peter W. Boyles

son of John Boyles, was born in Canaan township, December 20, 1820, and has since passed his life in this county. He now owns and lives on the “Daniel Stewart farm” in Rome township – probably the best farm in the county. Samuel S. Boyles, another son of John, lives in Lodi township. Both he and Peter W. are prosperous and highly respected citizens.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Barnet Brice

his son, and a native of Pennsylvania, preceded his father to Athens, having settled here in 1807. He kept public house many years (he built the Union hotel now occupied by O. B. Potter), and was extensively acquainted through the country. He died about 1853.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

James Brice

was born in Maryland in the year 1750, and, removing to western Pennsylvania, settled near Fort Pitt (Pittsburgh) in 1787. While living here he held various public stations, such as member of the state legislature, county commissioner, collector of internal revenue, trustee of Washington college, etc. In 1821 he removed further west, and settled in the town of Athens, where he passed the latter years of his life, living in the family of his son. He was a man of high character, and during his long life was an active and exemplary Christian. He died in Athens) December 22, 1832.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Thomas Brice

another son of James, came to Athens in 1818. He was a successful merchant here for many years, and a large dealer in cattle from 1820 to 1830. He built the brick dwelling house on Court street, now owned and occupied by Dr. W. P. Johnson.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]

A. G. Brown

son of Captain Benjamin Brown, was born April 16th, 1798, near Waterford, in Washington County, Ohio, and has lived in Athens County since he was one year old. His youth was passed in working on his father’s farm (in Ames township), and in assiduous study and preparation for college. In due time he became a student at the Ohio university, and graduated there in 1822. From 1824 to 1825, he was preceptor in the academical department of the university. In 1825 he began the publication of the Athens Mirror, the first paper printed in the county, and continued as its editor and publisher for five years. From 1827 to 1833, he was county recorder, which office he again filled from 1836 to 1841, when he began the practice of law in Athens. In 1841 he became a member of the board of trustees of the university, which position he still holds. He was a delegate to the convention, which formed the present constitution of Ohio, and was for two years president judge of the Athens district. For many years past he has practiced law in Athens. Judge Brown came to Athens County when nearly the whole of its area was an unbroken forest and to the town of Athens when it was a mere cluster of log cabins. The personal friend and associate of the leading men of the community who assisted in building up society here, most of whom have passed away, he has witnessed the steady development of the county during considerably more than half a century. Looking back over its whole history to a period before it was organized, he may very truthfully say:

“Quae ipse vidi,
Et quorum pars magna fui.”

Judge Brown's sons, Henry T. Brown, an active lawyer and businessman, and Louis W. Brown, for many years clerk of the county, are natives of Athens, and well known in the community.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]


Benjamin Brown


John Brown

well known in southern Ohio as “General Brown,” son of Captain Benjamin Brown, one of the pioneers of Ames, was born in- Rowe, Massachusetts, December 1, 1785. In 1787, his father’s family moved to Hartford, Washington county, New York, and in 1796, with several other families seeking homes in the west, came to the Forks of Yoh, on the Monongahela, three miles above Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Here they remained till February, 1797, building a boat during the winter, in which they completed their journey and arrived at Marietta, February 11, 1797. Of the twenty-three persons of various ages who descended the river in this boat, there are but four now living, viz: Samuel and John Brown, Mrs. Aphia Hamilton, and Mrs. Phebe Sprague. As elsewhere stated, Captain Brown’s family came out to Ames township in the spring of 1799, moving their household effects by canoes down the Ohio, and up the Hockhocking and Federal creek—the members of the family not required to work the canoes, coming across the country.
In 1811, Mr. Brown married Sophia Walker, daughter of Dr. Ezra Walker, and continued to live in Ames township till 1817, when he removed to the town of Athens, where he still resides. On coming to Athens, he kept a public house one year at the Zadoc Foster house (on the south end of the lot now owned and occupied by Judge Barker), when he bought the corner property in front of the university, and built and kept the "Brown House,” so long known to the public, and so kindly remembered by his hosts of friends. He kept this house till December, 1865, a period of forty-seven years.
In 1808 Mr. Brown was elected captain in the militia, and was subsequently made major and colonel, and in 1817 was elected brigadier general. He was county auditor from 1822 to 1827, and has been treasurer of the Ohio university from 1 824 to the present time. He was also mayor of Athens for several years, and coroner for two terms He is, in every good sense, one of the village fathers who has “come down to us from a former generation.” Possessed of sound judgment, a kind heart, sterling integrity, and unfailing humor, General Brown has for fifty years had the respect and affectionate regard of this community. His genial wit still oft enlivens the social circle, and his venerable form is recognized with pleasure by all, on the streets of the town where he has lived so long and where, without an enemy in the world, he is cheerfully approaching the end of his journey. He reared here a family of six sons and two daughters; four of the sons graduated at the Ohio university, and three survive, viz: Oscar W., Win. Loring, and Archibald Douglas; the latter is cashier of a bank in Pomeroy, Ohio. One of the daughters, Mrs. Hannah Pratt, lives in Illinois, and the other, Mrs. Lucy Hey, in Cincinnati, Ohio.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]


John R. Buchtel


Ebenezer Sr, Ebenezer jr, & Stephen Buckingham

Ebenezer Buckingham, Sen., settled in what is now Carthage township in 1801, near to Esquire Cooley. He was the father of the late Ebenezer Buckingham of Muskingum county, who was at one time esteemed one of the wealthiest men of southern Ohio. Stephen Buckingham, his brother, settled hear him and about the same time.

["History of Athens County, Ohio...."by Charles M. Walker - 1869]



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