William Jackson

settled in what is now Canaan township in 1799. A native of Ireland, he came to this country with his father’s family when nine years old, and lived for twelve or fifteen years in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, whence, after his marriage, he removed to the northwestern territory, and settled near the site of the present village of New England in Canaan township. He was a man of fine natural ability, good education, and considerable culture. In 1800 he surveyed the first road through the woods from Marietta to Chillicothe. In January, 1803, he was elected representative from this (then Washington) county to the state legislature, in opposition to Ephraim Cutler, and was an influential member of that body. In the fall of 1803 he was re-elected, and in the session of 1803—4, by a well-timed speech, defeated a bill offered by Philemon Beecher, requiring a property qualification for office holders. In 1804 he declined a renomination in consequence of having received an appointment from the government to survey a large district of country on the Wabash river. In the discharge of this duty he went to Vincennes, Indiana, and died there soon after his arrival. Mr. John Jackson, of New England village, who died in the winter of 1867, was a son of his.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

David and Daniel James

well known citizens, settled here in 1820. The James family still live in Bern.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

A.P. Jeffers

[William Jeffers] oldest son, A.P. Jeffers, was born in 1810 in Carthage, where he still lives. He was for several years one of the township trustees. Two of the sons of A.P. Jeffers served in the 53rd regiment O.V.I.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

R.W. Jeffers

another son of William, was born in Carthage township in 1814, and is still living there a respectable farmer.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

William Jeffers

William Jeffers, born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1786, settled in Carthage township as a farmer in 1807. He has lived in the township continuously for over sixty years, and is a highly respected citizen.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Dr. Leonard Jewett

one of the pioneer physicians of the county, was born September 6, 1770, in Littleton county, Massachusetts. He studied medicine and surgery at the Boston Medical college, and received a diploma from that institution in 1792. In 1796 he married Miss Mary Porter, of Rutledge, Massachusetts. After this he served four years as assistant surgeon in the New York hospital. In 1802 he removed from New York to Washington county, Ohio, and in 1804 or ‘5 to the town of Athens, and occupied a house built by Captain Silas Bingham, on the lot now owned and occupied by Mr. George W. Norris. In 1806 he was elected to the state senate, which position he held till 1811. When hostilities began in 1812, he was commissioned as surgeon in the army of the northwest, under Harrison, and was assigned to duty on the staff of General Tupper. At the close of the war he returned to Athens and resumed the practice of medicine with success. In 1816, while performing a surgical operation, he received poisonous matter into a small wound on his hand, the absorption of which produced violent inflammation and sudden death; he died May 13, 1816. Dr. Jewett was a gentleman of fine intelligence and professional ability, and there are those living who still cherish his memory as one of the leaders among the early citizens of the county.
Four of his sons survive; three of them, Joseph, Leonard, and Leonidas Jewett, live in the vicinity of Athens, and one resides in Oregon. Leonidas was county auditor from 1839 to 1843, and was for many years a successful lawyer of Athens.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Leonidas Jewett, Jr

son of the last named, a lawyer of promise, is settled at Athens, where he was born. During the late war of the rebellion, he served three years with credit as adjutant of the Sixty-first Ohio regiment.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Azel Johnson

In 1802 Azel Johnson, with his family, settled in Dover, on the creek and joining the Weethee farm. Many of his descendants are still living in the township. Azel and Benjamin Johnson are sons of his.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

John Johnson

settled in Athens with his family as early as 1805. One of his daughters was married in 1807 to Robert Linzee, and another, about the same time, to Jacob Dombaugh, who was an active man, and at an early day kept public house where the Brown House is now situated. A son of John Johnson’s, Samuel, married a daughter of Abel Glazier, of Ames. In 1815 Mr. Johnson and Mr. Glazier carried the mail, as sub-contractors, between Marietta and Chillicothe, when there were but two post offices on the route, viz., at Athens and Adelphi, Ross county.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

John Johnson

Purchased from Leonard Fewett a fine tract of land at the mouth of Federal creek which lay chiefly on the south side of the Hockhocking in Rome township. Mr. Johnson married Miss Sarah Wyatt, a daughter of Deacon Joshua Wyatt, of Ames, and a woman of rare excellence. By their industry and good management they in a few years opened up one of the best farms in the county. Mr Johnson was a "close dealer," and so tenacious of his rights as to be thought by some a hard man; but he was benevolent at heart, and would rather give away a dollar than be cheated of a cent. Many a destitute emigrant or needy family has had timely relief at his hands. He was the father of Dr Wm P Johnson, the present representative of the county in the state legislature, and whose character as a man, as a physician and a public officer is too well known in his native county to require comment. Mrs John Johnson, who was born in Beverly, Massachusetts, in 1786, and came to Athens when she was fourteen years old, died December 26, 1859.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]

John B. Johnson

John B Johnson, son of Azel Johnson, one of the early settlers of Dover township, settled in Trimble as a farmer in 1820. He was the father of Mr. J.M. Johnson, recently sheriff of the county.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...."Charles M. Walker - 1869]

Jesse Jones

Prominent among the citizen of Waterloo, are Mr. Jesse Jones, a native of Virginia, who settled on Little Raccoon at an early day; ... of whom have reared respectable families, and are highly esteemed.

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...." Charles M. Walker - 1869]


Robert Wilmeth Jones


Timothy Jones

a native of Rhode Island, was born of wealthy parents, graduated at Brown university, became a lawyer and also a graduate in medicine, and held a high social position in Providence, Rhode Island, where he lived. In 1805, when near fifty years old, his wife having died, he reliquished the comforts of settled life and removed to Ohio. He arrived in Rome township in that year and buried himself in the forests fo Federal creek. He was a man of considerable scientific research. During the revolutionary war he obtained the first premium, offered by the legislature of Massachusetts, for the manufacture of saltpeter. His descendants possess the certificate of his admission to the bar in Providence, in 1786. Dressed in the garb of a pioneer working on his farm on Federal creek, he presented to those who knew his history and character an interesting study. Some time after coming here he married a second wife—the widow Polly Hewitt, a daughter of Ebenezer Barrows. The Rev. T.F. Jones is a son of theirs. An aged citizen of Rome, who knew Dr. Jones, says "in the forest he was a hunter—in the log cabin parlor a perfect Chesterfield."

[From: "History of Athens County, Ohio...."Charles M. Walker - 1869]


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