The Athens Messenger, April 8, 1875

  • --A meeting of the disaflected miners was called to assemble at Nelsonville on last Thursday, but for some reason it failed to be largely attended. Whether the object of the meeting was to foment strife between the white and colored element there, as we have been assured, we are not justified in announcing. It is to be trusted, however, that if any such purpose actuates any considerable number of the miners, that judicious reflection, and "the better councils of their nature" may induce the abandonmnet of such purpose, as the issue of like attempts elsewhere, has not been of a character to encourage imitation.

The Athens Messenger, Thursday, April 15, 1875

  • John Tonar, a boy miner, was recently severely injured by falling from the Lick Run Mine hoppers.

The Athens Messenger, Jan. 11, 1883

  • A German miner, whose name we have been unable to learn, was fatally injured last Saturday by a fall of slate in Brook's ban, section 19, near Nelsonville. A number of miners who promptly went to his rescue were more or less seriously hurt by an additional fall of slate, among them Robert Sayers, sustaining a broken arm, and Richard Smith painful bruises.
  • A German miner, whose name we have been unable to learn, was fatally injured last Saturday by a fall of slate in Brook's ban, section 19, near Nelsonville. A number of miners who promptly went to his rescue were more or less seriously hurt by an additional fall of slate, among them Robert Sayers, sustaining a broken arm, and Richard Smith painful bruises.
  • A Nelsonville correspondent who evidently writes in no hopeful mood says: Times here are very dull. Transient miners are passing through here every day, seeking employment, and the men here are barely making a living, with a few exceptions. Since the Orbison Furnace has shut down a large number of men have been thrown out of employment. The times seem to be pinching harder and harder.

The Athens Messenger, Thursday Morning, February 15, 1883, pg 5

  • --a well known and industrious miner, named Loren Bridges, was instantly killed at Hamley's Run shaft, Monday morning, by a fall of coal. He had been cautioned just before that the portion of the floor that fell was unsafe, which warning unwisely prompted him to fest the spot with his pick, which caused the coal to fall. The deceased was a widower and leaves two children.
  • Carbondale: -The miners during the present month have only made about half time.

The Athens Messenger, Feb. 17, 1888

  • Our townsman, Decker Barnes, had last week, the misfortune to sustain two severe injuries, one on the foot by the stroke of a pick, while at work in a mine, and another, much severer one, by a heavy barrel which he was assisting to unload from a car at Floodwood, falling on his leg. It is apprehended, as a result of the injury last named, that he will be confined to his bed a number of months, which as he has a large family depending upon his daily labor for support, will prove a specially grievous calamity.

The Athens Messenger, July 28 1927

  • Takes Over Mine
    William Miller And George Carter Operate Carr Mine At Bishopville.
    Glouster, July 28 -- William Miller and George Carter of this city, have taken charge of the coal mine on the D.E. Carr farm about a mile east of Bishopville and after several weeks' work have the mine in position to produce coal. A 56 horse power generator is being operated at this mine with an automobile engine and the plan is proving highly satisfactory. A coal cutting machine has been installed in the mine, doing away with the custom of shooting the coal off the solid. The No 3 vein of coal is being mined.
    - Submitted by kastf

The Athens Messenger, November 1947

  • Bone Coal Fall Fatally Hurts Chauncey Man
    CHAUNCEY -- A Chauncey resident was injured fatally and a fellow worker hurt in a bone coal fall at Hocking Mine 25, Wednesday afternoon, mine officials reported today.
    The death victim was Emmett Dickerson, 48, who died in Sheltering Arms Hospital at 6:50 p.m. Wednesday, three hours and five minutes after the accident. He suffered a crushed chest and a broken right leg.
    Suffering apparently minor injuries was his buddy, Lester Locke. Locke was taken to his home in Morristown.
    Mr. Dickerson was the last of a family of nine children. He leaves two daughters, Mrs. Dorothy Simmers, Chauncey, with whom he made his home, and Mrs. Betty Palmer, Cleveland; also, one son, Jack Dickerson, Norfolk, Va.
    Funeral services will be conducted Saturday at 2 p.m. at the Chauncey Methodist Church, by the Rev. Gilbert Courtney. Burial will be at Greenlawn Cemetery, Nelsonville.
    - Submitted by karstro at sbcglobal.net

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional Valid CSS!