Genealogy Trails


Champaign County, Ohio
Genealogy and History


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LEVI GEIGER, attorney at law, Urbana; is a son of Henry and Julia A. (Rhenbush) Geiger. He was born A. D. 1797 in Montgomery Co., Penn., and was the grandson of one of three brothers who emigrated from Germany about 1700. He was a volunteer in the war of 1812, participating in the battle of Lundy's Lane. At the close of the struggle, he returned home and married, at Greencastle, Franklin Co., Penn. His wife was born in 1805, at Mercersburg, Penn. She was a woman of feeble and delicate body and possessed extraordinary energy and mind. In 1832, they and family emigrated to Columbiana Co., Ohio; thence to Champaign Co., where Julia A. died, and Henry afterward, at Dayton. Their remains lie in the cemetery at Springfield, Clark Co., Ohio. Levi was born March 14, 1824, in Greencastle, Franklin Co., Penn., and is the fifth son of a family of eleven boys, of whom nine reached maturity. He spent his early life in his native State and Eastern Ohio, and studied law at Millersburg under W. S. Taneyhill. He was admitted to the bar in May, 1850, at Canton, Ohio. In April of the following year, he came to Urbana, where he was elected Prosecuting Attorney, and, in 1859, declined a re-election. In 1854, he was a delegate to the State Convention that organized the Republican party, in which he took an active part. Two years later, he was elected as a delegate to the first National Convention of the Republican party that convened at Philadelphia, and nominated John C. Fremont for President of the United States. In the summer of 1860, he represented the Eighth Congressional District in the National Convention that met at Chicago, Ill., and nominated Abraham Lincoln for Chief Magistrate of our country. Mr. Geiger was one of six delegates from Ohio who voted on first and all other ballots for Lincoln, and was active throughout the entire convention. He was admitted to the practice of law by the Supreme Court of the United States, at Washington, D. C., March 7,1861, on motion of Hon. Thomas Ewing, Sr. During the late war, he was active in its support for the suppression of the rebellion, and one of a committee of three who distributed the bounty funds to the families of the soldiers of Urbana City and Champaign Co. He afterward was nominated by the Republican party for Judge of the Common Pleas Court of the counties of Champaign, Miami and Darke. The addition to the city of Urbana, known as the"Geiger & Russell Addition,"is due to their purchase (the Ryan place) and laying out. Since May, 1841, Mr. Geiger has been a member of the M. E. Church, and for over thirty years has filled official positions in the same. He married Rosalinda Gleason, March 28, 1844, at Millersburg, Ohio. The issue of this union is two sons and four daughters, all of whom are now living. Mr. G. is the grandfather often children, and has seven brothers, all save one professional men. Three are ministers of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, and one of them is also a Professor of Mathematics in the Wittenberg College at Springfield, Ohio; the oldest is a practicing physician in Dayton, another is District Judge at Springfield, Mo., and the last an attorney at law in the Southern part of the last-named State. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

GEORGE GIVEN, farmer; P. O. Urbana. The parents of Mr. Given came to Ohio in 1837. Their names were Tatty and Mary N. Given. They were born in Pennsylvania. Mary, Sarah and Elizabeth were born in Ohio; William, Margaret, James. Ann and George were born in Pennsylvania. Samuel died in Pennsylvania previous to their removal. They commenced farming after coining to Ohio, on the McBeth farm, and continued in the agricultural business until his death, which occurred in 1855. Mrs. Given died in 1846. Six of the children are living; all are married and live in the county, eXcept Isabel, who lives in Sandusky. The marriage of our subject to Miss Sarah Pence was celebrated April 1, 1862. She represents one of our oldest families. They are the parents of Margaret, William, Olive and Jerome. Mr. Given is entitled to great credit for his success in life, as he started in business for himself without capital, and has, by industry and economy, become the owner of a fine farm, and is ranked among the prominent men of the locality in which he lives. Men who have thus prospered, and have the reputation for fair dealing possessed by Mr. Given, should certainly be classed among our self-made men. His children should ever feel proud of their ancestry, as on both sides they were classed among the best families in the land, enjoying the confidence of all who knew them. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

ABRAHAM M. and CHAUNCY F. GLESSNER, retired. The paternal grandparents of these twin brothers were both born in Germany, where they grew to maturity and married. They emigrated to America about the middle of the eighteenth century, locating in what is now the Keystone State of our nation; there they lived through the war of Independence, and died at advanced ages. The maternal grandparents, George and Margaret Young, emigrated to the American Continent about the time the freedom of our country was obtained. They located in Maryland, where George devoted his time to ministerial labor in behalf of the German Reformed Church. He was a man of fine education, honorable and generous in his actions, hence, highly esteemed. His death occurred in Hagerstown, Md., leaving his second wife to mourn the loss of a devoted husband. His first wife departed this life in 1786. Jacob Glessner, the father of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania, in 1775, where he was raised and educated. At a suitable age he engaged in the cabinet trade, which he followed until within twenty-five years of his death. At the age of 27 years he married Margaret, daughter of Rev. George Young (above mentioned), and settled in the town of Somerset, Somerset Co., Penn. Margaret was born in Hagerstown, Md., in 1783. They had born to them thirteen children, among whom were two pairs of twins. In 1839, they and family emigrated to Ohio, locating in Norwich, Muskingum County, where Jacob continued his trade a short time, then retired from active business, spending his time in treasuring up knowledge until his death, which occurred in April, 1865, severing a union that had trod the path of life for three-score years. He was a man of fine intellect, well informed and of good repute. Possessing a remarkable constitution, strong and vigorous mind, although not engaged in literary pursuits, he was a great reader, and always had his table filled with the choicest books, and each day brought about its regular hours which were devoted to searching out the interesting facts contained on the pages of those volumes. His associates were of the professional and cultivated class, who resorted daily to his place for reading and social converse. He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church for more than half a century, and a Ruling Elder the greater part of that time. Margaret, his wife, died in 1800; she, also, was a devoted member of the same church. Our subjects, Abraham M. and Chauncey F., were born in the town of Somerset, Somerset Co., Penn., June 1, 1827, and, from 12 years of age, grew to maturity in Muskingum (Jo., Ohio. There they were educated, learned the trade of their father and conducted the business one year; then jointly engaged in mercantile pursuits, in Cambridge, Guernsey Co., Ohio, where they successfully continued for several years. Being out of business from 1864 to 1868, when they opened in Champaign City, Champaign Co.. Ill., but one year later brought their stock to Norwich, Muskingum Co., Ohio, and continued until 1871, since which they have been engaged in real estate transactions. In 1867, they purchased property in Urbana, Champaign Co., Ohio, where they located in the summer of 1875. They have neat and comfortable residences of like architecture, well situated in the Second Ward of Urbana. A. M. was married, in 1851, to Mary A. McCloud, who was born in Muskingum Co., Ohio. After a united path of life for nine years, she was called hence. His second and present wife was Miss Clara, daughter of the late J. W. Simons, of Cambridge, Guernsey Co., Ohio, who was for a quarter of a century proprietor of the Cambridge foundry, and a descendant of Com. Perry; was born in Zanesville, Muskingum Co., Ohio, Oct. 21, 1843, and married to A. M. Glessner Sept. 29, 1864. By this union three children were born—Harry S., who died at the age of 18 months; Augustus M., now 9 years of age, and Clara Louisa, who died in 1878, aged 4 years. C. F. (one of the subjects) married, Nov. 11, 1856, Elizabeth Maxfield, born March 23, 1836, in Norwich, Muskingum Co., Ohio, and died April 1, 1865, leaving her husband and three children. The latter are respectively—Lee M., now a medical student at Cleveland, Ohio; Charles C., a graduate of the Urbana High School, and Edward E., who died in infancy. The second wife of C. F. was Miss Elizabeth J. Hadden, born in Norwich, Muskingum Co., Ohio, and married March 30, 1869. The children by this union are Carry G. and Louis Y. These twin brothers have been for years devoted members of the Presbyterian Church, accompanied by their families. They have ever jointly pursued the same business. They now live retired and are men of good moral, social and financial standing. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

I. W. GODDARD, M. D., physician, Urbana. Dr. Goddard was born in Urbana in 1823, and is the son of John Goddard, who came from Kentucky and settled in Urbana about 1812, and was a grocer here for many years, but he removed to Iowa in 1840, where he died. Dr. Goddard received a rudimentary education in the subscription schools of the early days; he read medicine with Drs. Carter and Fyffe, and afterward graduated from Starling Medical College; he began practice at Westville in 1854, and, in 1861, removed to Urbana, where he has continued ever since, having been a practitioner in this county for more than a quarter of a century; he has confined himself strictly to his profession, leaving others to look after politics and public affairs. He married, in 1854, Miss Sarah Virginia Russell, a native of the State of Virginia; they have one child—William Malan. The Doctor is a member of the M. E. Church, and highly respected, both as a citizen and as a physician. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

JAMES C. GOOLD, farmer; P. O. Urbana. Mr. Goold is a native of New York State, and is, withal, one of our prominent young men, who merits a place in the history of Champaign Co. by reason of his position, and also by marriage into one of the old families. This will form an important factor in the compilation of consequent histories of the county during the next century, when those who are here represented will be classed among the pioneers of the county; as their grandchildren nestle around their knees and listen to the tales told by their silvery-haired grandsires of the country, then a part of the great West, will their, minds be refreshed by the perusal of the biographies of their kindred. Mr. Goold came to Ohio in 1875, having married Miss Fanny Osborne, in Clay Co., Ill., in 1874; she was born and reared on the farm now their residence, and represents the family of James and Jane Osborne; James was born on the farm where James Rawlings now lives, in 1824; his father, John Osborne, came to this county in 1810; James and his wife had no son to perpetuate their name, but their grandchildren will have enough of the Osborne blood in their veins to remember, with pride, their ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. Goold have five children—Frank, Jessie, Arthur, Helena and Ruby; the social advantages under which they are reared will give them ample opportunities for development, both mentally and socially. We take pleasure in giving this family a place in this history, as the biographical sketches of their relatives form an important part of this work. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

JOHN F. GOWEY, attorney at law, Urbana; of the firm of Young, Chance & Gowey. In mentioning the members of the bar of this city, the name of J. F. Gowey deserves a proper space; he was born Dec. 7, 1846, in North Lewisburg, where he received his primary education, after which he took a two-years course in the Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio; he then engaged in the study of law with Gen. Young, with whom he is now a partner in that profession; on May 10, 1869, he was admitted to the bar; after a practice of three years, he became a member of the Sixtieth General Assembly of the State Legislature; in 1873, he was elected a member of the Sixty-first General Assembly of the same body—thus having filled positions of honor that inspired confidence in the citizens of his native county, where he was elected as Prosecuting Attorney in 1875, and, two years later, a re-election followed; in June, 1880, he was a delegate to the National Convention that convened at Chicago and nominated Gen. James A. Garfield for President of the United States, in which meeting he was active throughout. He is one of the promising young attorneys of this city. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

M. M. HANCE, merchant, Urbana. Mr. Hance was born in Miami Co., Ohio, in 1851, and grew to manhood on a farm, receiving a rudimentary education in the district school, and a commercial course. He became connected with the dry goods trade as a clerk, in Urbana, in 1871, being in the employ of Russell Bros., where he continued until 1879, when he purchased the stock and became the successor of Hoyt & Frederich. His store is located at No. 15 Monument Square, where he keeps a full line of staple and fancy dry goods, and also a millinery department, which latter is presided over by an experienced milliner. Mr. Hance is a young but promising business man; a member of the Baptist Church, and an active, useful member of society. He married, in 1875, Miss Sallie, daughter of Thomas Bell. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

ISAAC B. HAPPERSETT, grocer, Urbana. Mr. Happersett was born in Pennsylvania in 1830; he is the sou of William and Elizabeth (Brunner) Happersett, who came from Pennsylvania about 1838, and resided in Urbana until his decease, in 1852; she still resides there with her son. Isaac B. learned the trade of carriage maker and worked at it several years. He clerked in a grocery one year, and in 1859 formed a partnership with Mr. H. C. Hovey, whose biography appears in this work. Their firm has been in operation without change longer than any other in Urbana. Mr. Happersett has been identified largely with the general, as well as the business, interests of Urbana, having been a member of the Council, and its President in 1879. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. He married, in 1855, Martha F., daughter of William Sampson; they are both members of the Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, formerly Second Methodist Episcopal Church, he having been chorister for twenty-five years, and Superintendent of the Sabbath school from 1858 to 1878. She has also been a member of the choir from the beginning of choir singing in the Second Church, as it was then called. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

J. C. HAPPERSETT, of the firm of Happersett & Bro., boot and shoe dealers, Urbana. Urbana, like all cities of its size, is represented with nearly all classes of business, and the above, which is an old and reliable shoe firm, should have proper mention. In March, 1871, the business was opened by "Robert R. Young & Co.," the Co. being Happersett brothers, who became sole proprietors in March, 1874, since which they have built up a healthy patronage, and are now among the leading boot and shoe dealers in the city, located at No. 3 North Main street. J. C. was born in Columbia, Lancaster Co., Penn., Sept. 9, 1835, and at the age of 13 months, his parents brought him to Urbana, where he was raised, and educated in the Union Schools to a good business degree. In May, 1871, he married Miss Maggie C. Dye, a native of Mechanicsburg, Champaign Co., Ohio, but at the date of her marriage was a resident of Madison County, Ohio. They have had four children—Alice L., Clara, Josephine, and the fourth, James Dye, a bright boy of 6 years 2 months and 18 days, died April 18, 1880. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

EMORY HEDGES, farmer; P. O. Urbana. The father of Emory Hedges, Jonas Hedges, was born in Berkeley Co., Va., in 1789. His marriage to Miss Elizabeth Robinson, of that county, was celebrated in 1811. They had three children, born in that State—Joseph, Mary and Ann. In 1818, they emigrated to this township, and their entire business life has been connected with its interests. Jonas was a remarkably successful business man, and his first purchase of 160 acres was added to until he was owner of 900 acres prior to his death. He served in the war of 1812, and was a pensioner at the time of his death. He built the first house on Sec. 11, Urbana Township, and this tract is still in possession of our subject. They were the parents of twelve children, five of whom are living—Elizabeth Hamilton, Hamilton J., Samuel R., James R. and Emory. All but James live in the county, and will be represented in this history. The wife and mother died in 1834, and Jonas, her husband, in 1864, at the ripe old age of 74. He lived long enough to see the county interlaced with railroads, and the forests disappear, and in their stead appear beautiful fields of waving grain. The best years of their lives had been given to the development of this county, and too much honor cannot be given to the pioneers who reared families of noble sons and daughters to perpetuate their names, who are possessed of the same spirit of enterprise that characterized their ancestry. Emory was married, in 1858, to Nancy J. Gainer, of this township. They have six children living—Jonas H., Rebecca E., Wilber R., Marlay, Mary B. and Annie. The children are being well educated, and Jonas has been engaged in teaching, bat as yet has chosen no profession. Their parents are both able and willing to give them all an academic education. The family history of the Hedges will form a very important part of the biographical series of Urbana Township. Mr. Hedges was a volunteer during the war of the rebellion, and served in Co. G, 134th Ohio V. I. He served in front of Petersburg, and was principally engaged in doing guard duty on the Appomattox and James Rivers. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

ALEXANDER R. HEDGES, deceased. This worthy representative of the name died Dec. 29, 1873, and his wife, Ellen (Morris) Hedges, in February of the same year. They left a family of children, nine in number; their names are, respectively, Elizabeth A., Pearl I., Edward O., Rebecca C., Franklin J., Mary A., Deborah E., Martha E. and Frederick M.; they all reside in the county eXcept one—Pearl I. Hedges—who is in the drug business at Piqua. There are seven living on the old homestead. Three are married at this time. The father, Alexander, was quite a prominent man in his day, being Justice of the Peace, and for many years was a member of the school board. He was one of the originators of the agricultural society at Urbana, and from its organization until his death was one of its Directors. He was a member of the National Guards, and a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years, being one of the most prominent officials. He reared his children in the faith of his fathers, and the example set by him has done much to give them that straightforward business character for which the Hedges family are noted. At the time of his death, he owned 185 acres of land. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

HAMILTON HEDGES, farmer; P. O. Urbana. The subject of this sketch is the eldest son of Jonas Hedges, who is spoken of in the biography of his son Emory. Jonas was a prominent local politician in his day, and was one of the first to espouse the principles of the Republican party in this county. He was one of the originators of the"Know-Nothing"party, and was the third enrolling his name on their roster. He was largely engaged in the settling of estates, in which he gave universal satisfaction. He was a remarkable mathematician, although not having a collegiate education, and was largely endowed with a spirit of enterprise, being foremost in anything looking toward moral and social advancement. Having a cool head and being a close observer of matters pertaining to the business interests of the neighborhood, his judgment could always be relied on, and he seldom made a mistake. His death was greatly felt in the locality in which he lived so long. James and his two sisters, Mary and Elizabeth, were given a collegiate education, the others attending only the common schools. All, however, received a good English education, which has done much to make them the practical business men and women that so ably represent the name. The marriage of Hamilton and Miss Ruth E. Gearard was celebrated Dec. 15, 1847. She was born in Winchester, Va., June 1, 1826. Their children are five in number, three sons and two daughters. Emily J. wedded Thomas Fuller; Jonas A. was married to Miss Carrie Laughlin, of Columbus; James, Nannie E. and George R. live with their parents. There were three other children who died in infancy. Mr. Hedges has been Assessor of this township for sixteen years, and during all this time no complaints have been made. He has always been a leading man in his neighborhood in political matters, and during the war of the rebellion was an active worker in the organization of troops, being himself a member of Co. G, 134th Ohio V. I. Previous to entering upon his term of service, Mr. Hedges was unfortunate enough to lose an arm by accident, which necessitated his discharge. He has always been an exemplary man, and his record as such will ever live in the history of the county, and his descendants for all time may take a pride in their ancestry, who have, from their earliest connection with the county's interests, been foremost among those who have been honest, upright, and faithful to their trusts. Elizabeth Hamilton is the eldest daughter of Jonas Hedges, and her marriage to Nelson Miller was celebrated in 1836. One son (Robert M.) was born to them, who is now Deputy Sheriff of Champaign Co. The death of Nelson, his father, occurred in 1837. The marriage of Mrs. Miller to Joseph C. Hamilton occurred in 1840, to whom were born four children, all dying in infancy, eXcept Virginia, who became the wife of D. W. Todd, of Urbana. The death of Mr. Hamilton occurred May 27, 1872. His widow resides on the farm which has been her home for many years. Her brother James married Miss Mary L. Hamilton, daughter of Joseph Hamilton, and their residence is in New York. They have only one son living—Merklin McLain, who resides in Springfield, Clark Co. Mrs. Hedges died in July, 1862, and in 1866 he married Miss Lydia Huffman, of Dayton, Ohio. They have no children. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

JOHN M. HELMICK, Urbana; dealer in stoves and house furnishings, is another native and old resident of Champaign Co., born in Urbana May 21, 1818. He is a son of David and Mary (Miller) Helmick, who came from Hamilton Co., where his father settled in 1802. David was a cabinet-maker, and in those early days was a prominent manufacturer, widely and favorably known. The subject of this sketch was born in an old-style log cabin on Water street. A two-story brick, built by his father, now stands on the site of his birthplace. He learned the tinner's trade in his youth with the late Stephen L. Miller, an uncle. In 1843, he married Miss Roxaline Miller, of Clark Co., and, in 1847, removed to Clark Co., where his wife died in 1848. In 1850, he returned to Champaign Co., and was a prominent dealer in stoves and housekeeper's furnishings until 1859. when he returned to Urbana, and has since conducted the same business here. He is now located at No. 13 N. Main street. Mr. Helmick has been identified with the business and other interests of Champaign Co. from his early manhood, and probably, with the exception of Mr. Hitt, is the oldest native resident merchant now actively engaged in merchandising in the city. He married, October. 1849, Miss Sarah W. Baker, who was also a resident of Clark Co., and sister of his first wife. Their parents came from New Jersey, and settled in Clark Co. in 1802. From this marriage have resulted four children—Samuel, William, Osman and Annie. Samuel is married, and all are grown and residents of this county. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

D. C. HITT, Postmaster, Urbana; a son of Rev. John W. Hitt, was born in Bourbon Co., Ky., May 25, 1801. He came to Warren Co., Ohio, a year or two later, and in 1,813 came to Champaign Co., residing in and near Urbana until his death, which occurred Oct. 3, 1877, at the advanced age of 76 years. He spent a long life among the people of Urbana, and at its close, it was said of him, He was a good man."He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church at an early age; was always an ardent supporter of the church through faith, having teen a local minister for fifty years, ever active and zealous in good works. Though born in the South, he espoused the cause of freedom, and was for many years an operator in the "underground railroad," and never hesitated to assist a black man seeking his freedom. At one time he owned considerable property, and was classed as one of the wealthy men of this county, but, through misfortune and too great confidence in others, was stripped of his possessions and almost reduced to poverty in his last days. He labored for his support, yet was never know to complain or give expression to bitterness of spirit, but, even to the end, rested his hope on the things of the world to come. Thus ended the earthly career of one of the noble citizens of Urbana. Our subject was born on a farm, now in the corporation of Urbana, Feb. 25, 1844. He was raised to farm life and educated in the schools of the city. In Aug., 1861, he enlisted in Company A, 2d O.V.I., being in service until Nov. 8, of the same fall, when he lost his left eye by a rifle-ball in the battle of Ivy Mountain, in East Kentucky. He was discharged April, 1863, and returned home. In March, 1868, he married Laura McDermott—born in Baltimore, Md., Dec. 29, 1842; died Aug. 16, 1873, leaving two daughters, Mary and Laura. On Sept. 22, 1875, he married Miss Fannie J. Rhoades, a native of Virginia, where the nuptials were celebrated. Two children, Florence and John W., have been born to them. Mr. Hitt continued farm pursuits until July 1, 1869, when he was appointed Postmaster. Capt. W. A. Brand was the former Postmaster, and Mr. Hitt was the assistant until the death of Capt. Brand, when he was appointed to fill the vacancy, and still holds it with honor and respect. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

SAMUEL W. HITT, merchant. Among the present prominent business men of Urbana, Mr. Hitt deserves more than a passing notice. About the year 1814, two brothers, Martin and Samuel 1 III i, both Methodist ministers, came from Virginia and purchased a section of land which they divided between them, and most of which now lies within the present bounds of Urbana. Our subject is the son of Samuel Hitt, and the only male representative of these families now residing in this county. He was born in 1817, and has always resided here. At the age of 15, he entered the store of Judge John Reynolds, and, by dint of industry, integrity and remarkable business talent, passed successively through the stages of apprentice and clerk, and in 1852 became a partner in the firm of Ross, Hitt & Co. After the decease of Mr. Reynolds, in 1857, the firm was Ross & Hitt. In 1866, Mr. Ross retired, and the business was conducted solely by Mr. Hitt. Thus had he risen from store-boy to partner and proprietor of the leading and oldest dry goods house of Urbana (it having been established by Mr. Reynolds about 1806). Mr. Hitt's success is the best compliment that can be given to his energy and business management. He has always been a generous, public-spirited citizen, and has done more, perhaps, than any other one person in Urbana for the support of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is an honored and worthy member. He was married, in 1843, to Miss Sallie B., daughter of Joseph White. They have had five children—Joseph, killed in action, as a soldier in the 66th O.V.I.; Anna, now Mrs. John T. Mitchell; George, now in charge of the branch store at Bellefontaine; Lizzie and Mary. The present style of the firm is Hitt, White & Mitchell, and their place of business is located on the corner of Main street and Monument Square. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

WILLIAM M. HOUSTON, physician, Urbana; is a native of Ohio; his father was a native of Kentucky, but removed to Lebanon, Warren Co., Ohio, where he married Lydia Truitt. The subject of this sketch was born in Lebanon in 1821; studied medicine in Piqua, and graduated at the Ohio Medical College, in 1850, and commenced the practice of his profession in Piqua the same year. In December, 1852, he removed to Urbana, where he soon secured a remunerative practice, in which he is now assisted by his son Henry C. Mr. H. was a Surgeon in the war of.the rebellion; was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the 122d O.V.I. in September, 1862; was promoted to Surgeon in 1863, and became Surgeon-in-Chief of the 2d Brigade, 3d Division, 6th Army Corps, in January, 1864, and at the close of the war was Surgeon-in-Chief of the same; wag taken prisoner with a large part of Gen. Millway's force, near Winchester, Va., in 1863, and confined in"Libby"five months. He married, in 1846, Miss Henrietta, daughter of Dr. Henry Chapeze, who was from Kentucky; he was a medical officer in the war of 1812, and settled in Piqua soon after the close of that struggle. Henry C. was born in Piqua in 1847. He commenced reading medicine there quite young, and graduated at the Cleveland Homoeopathic Hospital College in 1876, and has since assisted his father in practice. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and active in the different departments of church-work, especially the Sunday school, in which he organized a young men's class, denominated No. 8, which now numbers thirty-two members, and forms an important factor in the school. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

FRANK HOUSTON, grocer, Urbana; was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, April 22, 1833, and is descended from a long line of Scotch Presbyterians. His father, William Houston, was a farmer who had five sons, three of whom came to Ohio. Frank, with his brother Christopher, left the home of their boyhood in May, 1850, to seek a home in a far-away land, among strangers On the 5th of July of that year, he landed in Columbus, Ohio, a rosy-cheeked, merry-hearted lad of 17 years. The faithful teachings of his humble home were with him, and the habits of industry and economy were linked with principles of truth and honesty. He soon found employment in the grocery of J. & W. B. Brooks, where he remained four years. In the summer of 1854, he came to Urbana with a small sum he had saved from his wages and opened a very unpretending grocery in an old house on South Main street, on the site of which he has since erected a fine building, opposite the Odd Fellows' Hall. In April, 1864, he married Nancy Tappan, of Steubenville, Ohio, grand-daughter of Hon. Benjamin Tappan, and niece of Hon. E. M. Stanton. They have had three sons and four daughters, all of whom are yet living, eXcept one daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Houston are members of the First Presbyterian Church, and useful, respected members of society. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

OBED HORR, City Clerk and Deputy County Clerk, Urbana; is a native of Champaign County, and a grandson of the pioneer Dr. Obed Horr, of Mechanicsburg. The subject of this sketch was born in Mechanicsburg Oct. 5,1856; he attended the local school in his early youth, and later, attended the Urbana University, but his father being unable to attend to the duties of County Clerk, he left school when in the senior class, and has since been employed in fiduciary duties, having occupied the position of Deputy County Clerk the past five years, and was recently elected Clerk of Urbana City. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

HENRY CLAY HOVEY, grocer, Urbana; is another native and life resident of Urbana, and was born Dec. 29, 1827, within thirty-five yards of where he now resides, and has never removed. He is a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Hartsom) Hovey; they came from Willimantic, Conn., and settled near Milford Center, this county, about 1818, and soon after removed to Urbana. His father became connected with the woolen factory, the history of which appears in the history of Urbana. Henry, when 14 years of age, began work at brickmaking with his father and older brother, and^followed this together with building for several years. He burned the brick and laid the walls of the building in which he now does business, as well as many other of the older brick structures of the city. In 1859, the firm of Happersett & Hovey was formed, and opened a meat-market and grocery establishment on the south side of the public square, where they have continued the business ever since with success. Mr. Hovey married, in 1855, Miss Susan Happersett, a sister of his partner, Isaac B. Happersett, he having been previously married in 1850, to Susan Gregory, who died about four months after their marriage. They have two children—Edmund, now assistant in the store, and Bertha, aged 11 years. His residence is on Kenton street, and occupies nearly a square between Factory and Water streets. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

G. H. HUMPHREYS, undertaker, Urbana. G. H. Humphreys has been located on North Main street since 1873, and his establishment is supplied with everything needed in the successful business which he superintends. He was born in Clark Co., Ohio, in 1842, where he was raised and partly educated at the Wittenberg College, Springfield. On Aug. 1, 1861, he enlisted in the 16th Ohio Battery for two years; at the expiration of this period he still saw the need of the suppression of the war, and re-enlisted, serving until the close of the great struggle, when he was honorably discharged at Columbus, Ohio; he participated in the battles of Port Gibson, siege of Vicksburg, Champion Hills, Jackson, Miss., and others, but returned home uninjured, only having suffered for want of food and endured lone; and tiresome marches. Upon Dec. 27, 1869, he married Miss Ida Miller, born in Clark Co., Ohio, in 1847. The issue of this union is two sons—R. Earl and Harry F. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

Rev. A. J. IMHOFF, Urbana, Pastor of the English Evangelical Lutheran Church; was born July 8, 1823, in Westmoreland Co., Penn. Ten years later his parents located near Ashland, Ohio, where he worked on a farm and received his primary education in the common school and Ashland Academy, which at that time was an important school. He graduated from the Wittenberg College, at Springfield, Ohio, in 1851. The following year he was Superintendent of and taught in the preparatory department. By close application while a student and teacher in college, he acquired a partial knowledge of theology under Dr. Sprecher, the theological professor and, at the time, President of the college. In the fall of 1852, was licensed by the Lutheran Synod to preach, and located at Tarlton, in Pickaway Co., Ohio. The same year, Sept. 9, married Miss Margaret A. Ruhl, to whom five children have been born, of whom two, Mary K. and C. Edward survive at a mature age. In 1855, he removed to Findlay, Ohio, and for ten years preached there and at other points, which are now divided into four pastoral charges. In 1865, was induced to organize a female college at Ottawa, Ohio, which enterprise did not prove a successful one; though he continued teaching eighteen months, at which time he was re-called to the Findlay charge, but declined the call. He was then appointed, by the Board of Home Mission, to the churches of Urbana and St. Paris. After a servitude of six years, he received and accepted a call to Leipsic and Arcadia Churches, which congregations he had served while residing in Findlay. In 1876, through request at Urbana, returned, though very reluctantly, and not with the consent of the Leipsic Church. In a literary way, he never sought much eXcept his preparation for the pulpit, though the Board of Directors of the Wittenberg College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity, for which he does not claim responsibility and never sought the honor, but accepted it as the only way of manifesting a decent respect for the judgment of others. In 1876, he published the "Life of Officer," a book of 464 pages, which was well received : presenting, in an interesting way, the leading facts of an extraordinary man. In 1879, he accepted the position as assistant editor of the Lutheran Evangelist. This position he still holds, in connection with the pastoral work of the Urbana Church. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

CHARLES T. JAMIESON. This gentleman was born at Batavia, Clermont Co., Ohio. May 2, 1855, and is the son of M. and Maria T. Jamieson, the former a native of Ohio, of Scotch descent, and the latter of New York, and descended from Quaker stock. His father is one of the most prominent business men of Clermont Co., and reared his son in the Presbyterian faith, of which denomination he and wife have been life-long members. Surrounded by the influences of a Christian home, and under the watchful care of his practical Christian parents, Charley T. passed his boyhood days and began molding the character which is to be his guiding star through life. He attended the city schools of Batavia in childhood, and in 1870 entered Hanover College, which is located in Jefferson Co., Ind., where he remained two years, afterward entering Wooster University, of Ohio, from where he graduated in June, 1875. He returned home and began studying law, and in October, 1877, was admitted to the bar. During his law studies, and until coming to Urbana, he was Superintendent of the Cincinnati & Eastern Telegraph Co., and paymaster on the Cincinnati & Eastern R. R. In January, 1879, he purchased the interest of W. A. Brand in the Citizen and Gazette, and in December of the same year bought the remaining half of Joshua Saxton, becoming sole proprietor of the most valuable newspaper property of Champaign Co. In October, 1877, Mr. Jamieson was made a Mason, and is now U. G. of Raper Commandery of Knights Templar. Since coming to Urbana, Mr. Jamieson has identified himself thoroughly with the interests of Champaign Co., and has never ceased to advocate and uphold every measure which he believed would add to the wealth, enterprise or prosperity of its citizens. He is as outspoken in condemning wrong through the column? of his paper as in upholding right, and this demonstrates that he possesses the proper qualities of a successful editor, and insures the continued prosperity of the Citizen and Gazette which it has enjoyed in the past. Mr. Jamieson has been actively identified with the welfare of the Presbyterian Church since locating here, and, although an ardent Republican, has won many friends, irrespective of party, and enjoys the confidence of all who know him. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

CHARLES T. JAMIESON. This gentleman was born at Batavia, Clermont Co., Ohio. May 2, 1855, and is the son of M. and Maria T. Jamieson, the former a native of Ohio, of Scotch descent, and the latter of New York, and descended from Quaker stock. His father is one of the most prominent business men of Clermont Co., and reared his son in the Presbyterian faith, of which denomination he and wife have been life-long members. Surrounded by the influences of a Christian home, and under the watchful care of his practical Christian parents, Charley T. passed his boyhood days and began molding the character which is to be his guiding star through life. He attended the city schools of Batavia in childhood, and in 1870 entered Hanover College, which is located in Jefferson Co., Ind., where he remained two years, afterward entering Wooster University, of Ohio, from where he graduated in June, 1875. He returned home and began studying law, and in October, 1877, was admitted to the bar. During his law studies, and until coming to Urbana, he was Superintendent of the Cincinnati & Eastern Telegraph Co., and paymaster on the Cincinnati & Eastern R. R. In January, 1879, he purchased the interest of W. A. Brand in the Citizen and Gazette, and in December of the same year bought the remaining half of Joshua Saxton, becoming sole proprietor of the most valuable newspaper property of Champaign Co. In October, 1877, Mr. Jamieson was made a Mason, and is now U. G. of Raper Commandery of Knights Templar. Since coming to Urbana, Mr. Jamieson has identified himself thoroughly with the interests of Champaign Co., and has never ceased to advocate and uphold every measure which he believed would add to the wealth, enterprise or prosperity of its citizens. He is as outspoken in condemning wrong through the column? of his paper as in upholding right, and this demonstrates that he possesses the proper qualities of a successful editor, and insures the continued prosperity of the Citizen and Gazette which it has enjoyed in the past. Mr. Jamieson has been actively identified with the welfare of the Presbyterian Church since locating here, and, although an ardent Republican, has won many friends, irrespective of party, and enjoys the confidence of all who know him. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

A. C. JENNINGS, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Urbana. Among the prominent and distinguished farmers of Champaign Co., we mention the name of A. C. Jennings, who was born in Clark Co., Ohio, in February, 1815. There he enjoyed the usual common-school advantages until the age of 15 years, at which time he engaged in the harness trade, which he followed until 1844. In the meantime he carried on business for himself in Marysville, Ohio. At this time he went to New York City, where he was in the employ of J. L. Cochran for a period of two years, then associated with T. B. Read, forming the firm of Jennings, Read & Co., carrying a wholesale stock of hats, caps, straw and fancy millinery goods. This they conducted successfully several years, but A. C. becoming tired of business, retired in 1859, and returned to Champaign Co., locating on his farm, which he had three years. previously purchased. He brought with him a number of fine horses to put on the farm, which he superintends, and it still receives his daily attention, though not residing on it. It is located in Salem Township, adjoining the incorporated city of Urbana, and known as the "Nutwood Farm," which is one of the finest farm in the county. This farm, through the taste and enterprise of the proprietor, is unusually well improved, the architecture of his barn being unequaled in the history of the State. Its dimensions are 100 feet in diameter, and the immense circular brick walls stand twenty-four feet high, and fifty-one feet higher is a large circular observatory, which is reached by a circular or winding stairway from the base to the top, where a grand view is afforded. This was erected in 1861 and 1862, at a cost of nearly $23,000, and, as he dealt in fine and fast horses, he had an excellent place to keep them, though now he has but few fine horses, but handles fine cattle. For ten years he had a full mile track on his farm, which was in first-class condition. His farm consists of 450 acres, which, in quality and improvements, is far superior to any in the vicinity or State. From the year 1874 to 1877, ho conducted a dry goods trade in Springfield, Ohio, though residing on his farm, since which he has not resided on the farm, and freed from all business cares eXcept those of his stock and farm. His nuptials were celebrated in 1839, with Miss Julia A. McNay, of West Liberty, Logan Co., Ohio, born in 1819. She is a daughter of John and Aroda McNay. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

MICHAEL A. JORDAN, County Recorder, Urbana. Mr. Jordan is a native of Virginia, born in Botetourt Co. in 1832. His father, William Jordan, who was a man of great physical strength, removed with his family from Virginia to Gallia Co., Ohio, in 1837. He died soon after settling in this State, and his widow, who was a Miss Mary Gish a native of Pennsylvania, afterward married John Stevens, a local Methodist preacher, and a descendant of the famous Boone family. They removed to Champaign Co. in 1845. Here the subject of our sketch grew to manhood. He began teaching at 19 years of age, and continued, with some interruptions, until 1866, having taught 132 months in all—two terms being a union school, and one term a select school—and also doing service as local preacher, and serving in the army from 1863 to the close of the war. He was a member of the 66th O.V.I. He entered the service with a crippled hand which would have excused him from military duties. He took part in six severe engagements, was once taken prisoner and confined in the notorious Libby Prison two or three months, and was severely wounded at the battle of Ringgold, Ga. After his return from the army, he engaged in farming, and now has a nice farm of eighty odd acres in Johnston Township. He married, in 1866, Miss Rebecca J., daughter of John Looker, who was the nephew of Prov. Gov. Looker. They have a family of seven children. Mr. Jordan is emphatically a self-made man. His father was well off, and his mother from a wealthy family, but, unfortunately, before his decease his father indorsed heavily for a slave-speculator of Virginia, whose debts swept away all his and his wife's means, and left her penniless, with a family of seven children, when Michael A. was but 5 years of age. Mr. Stevens was a poor but kindhearted man, and in spite of the adverse circumstances, Michael M. received such education as enabled him to teach, and notwithstanding he has given largely of his time and talents for public service, he has gradually risen as a man and citizen, filled several local offices of trust, and, in 1878, was elected Recorder, carrying his own precinct, although reliably Democratic, by forty-five majority, and is now administering the duties of the Recorder's office with credit to himself and satisfaction to the people of the county. [Source: "History of Champaign Co., Ohio"; (Urbana Township) by John W. Ogden, W. H. Beers & Co., 1881) Transcribed by Linda Blue Dietz]

WILLIAM A. SUTTON, a native of Champaign County, Ohio, was born on the 14th day of February, 1843, the second son of John D. and Mary (Long) Sutton, of Westmoreland County, Virginia, who went to Pennsylvania in 1847, and came to Miami County, Indiana, in 1848, and established themselves on a farm where the subject grew to manhood. In 1861 he answered to the country's first call for volunteers and entered the 13th Indiana Regiment. He was mustered out in four years and six months— in the fall of 1865. Was wounded in the leg at the battle of Bull Run. In 1867 he and Miss Rebecca Kesler, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Kesler, were married, which marriage has been blessed by the birth of six children, viz: Minnie M., Charles H., David, Ursula, Edith and John. Was elected to the office of County Coroner in 1876 on the Republican ticket, but did not make out a bond. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and Masonic fraternity, and in politics votes the Republican ticket. [Source: "History of Miami County, Indiana: From the earliest time to the present..." By Brant & Fuller, Chicago. Contributed by Barb Ziegenmeyer]

SULLIVAN T. WAITE, one of the prominent farmers of Allen Township, is a native of the township in which he now resides and was born August 14, 1850. He was the youngest son born to Sullivan and Margaret A. (Woods) Waite, who emigrated to this county from Champaign County, Ohio, in the fall of 1838. He located upon a farm in Allen Township upon which our subject was born. He attended the district school in which he received a good common school education. At the age of nineteen he took up the vocation of a teacher and was thus successfully engaged for eleven years. His vacations were generally spent working upon the farm. His success in the school room is evidenced by the fact that, during his whole career as a teacher, he taught in about four school houses. He located where he now resides November 14, 1876. September 28, 1876, he was married to Maria Baker, a native of Perry Township, this county, born February 28, 1855. She was the daughter of Timothy and Susan A. (Messinger) Baker, who were among the most highly respected citizens of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Waite have four children. Their names are Lillie M., Timothy B., Deborah E. and Charles F., all of whom are living. Our subject and his wife are both members of the M. E. Church. Politically, Mr. Waite is a Republican. They own a handsome farm of 240 acres, over half of which is in cultivation. Mr. Waite is an industrious and successful farmer and a first-class citizen. [Source: "History of Miami County, Indiana: From the earliest time to the present..." By Brant & Fuller, Chicago. Contributed by Barb Ziegenmeyer]



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