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Clermont County, Ohio
Genealogy and History


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HISTORY OF
CLERMONT COUNTY, OHIO

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BY J. L. ROCKEY AND R. J. BANCROFT, published 1880

Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Nina Kramer


CHAPTER XI.
COMMISSIONERS' EARLY PROCEEDINGS---ESTABLISHING THE FIRST ROADS---BUILDING BRIDGES---HOW MATTERS WERE MANAGED THREE-QUARTERS OF A CENTURY AGO

Under the State government, which went into operation in March, 1803, the board of county commissioners took the place of the justices' Court of Quarter Sessions in the management of the county's internal affairs, such as levying taxes, paying and allowing bills, establishment of roads, building of bridges, and, in short, all business pertaining properly to the county's domestic affairs not specially confided to the township authorities.

The first meeting was held on the first Monday of June, 1804,at the house of Nicholas Sinks, in Williamsburgh, then the usual place of holding the Courts of Common Pleas in and for the county, and consisted of Robert Townsley, George Conrad, and Amos Smith, elected at a special election held in April previous. They appointed Roger W. Waring their clerk, and then determined by lot the time for which respectively they should continue in office, which resulted in fixing the term of Robert Townsley until the ensuing October annual election, that of George Conrad until the second succeeding annual election, to wit, in October, 1806.

The commissioners at this session allowed William Perry, ex-sheriff, one hundred dollars payment in part of his contract made with the associate judges for hauling stone to build a court-house in Williamsburgh, to be paid out of the money appropriated at August term of 1803 by the associate judges of that purpose. Daniel Kain was allowed thirty-six and one-half dollars as deputy sheriff and jailer for diet, etc., furnished John Rowe one hundred and fourteen days while in jail charged with murder, and for one tub and one padlock for the use of the jail; Daniel Kidd, one dollar and fifty cents for killing an old panther on the 21st of October, 1803. Roger W. Waring, as clerk of Common Pleas Court, in cases where the State failed in prosecutions, where the criminals were insolvent, and for fees in establishment of three public highways, received twenty-four dollars and a half. John Dunham got three dollars and seventy-five cents for services as supervisor of part of Ohio township. Five dollars were appropriated to buy a book for their proceedings, and twelve and a half to Deputy Sheriff Daniel Kain for advertising William McKinnis, who was committed to jail on suspicion of horse-stealing, and also for taking and guarding said McKinnis (on a writ of habeas corpus) from Williamsburgh to Lebanon and attending the judge there. William Hughes had killed an old wolf, Dec. 31, 1802, and was paid three dollars. The following supervisors were given allowances for services in charge of highways: John McMeans, of Miami township, for year 1802, eleven dollars and eighty-seven and one-half cents; Edward Hall, of Pleasant, five dollars (Fielding Feagans, of same township, failed to get his bill for like services allowed); Ezekiel Dimmiii, of Ohio, three dollars and seventy-five cents. Thomas McFarland killed an old wolf on January 22, 1804, and was granted one dollar and fifty cents. The sheriff was appropriated twenty dollars, his annual allowance named by law in cases where the State failed in prosecution and when the criminals were insolvent. Peter Light, for keeping an estray horse given up to him by Joseph Jackson to sell while said Light was sheriff, and for selling said horse,---it appearing that the said Light had paid into the county treasury the whole amount for which said horse was sold, without retaining his fee (a thing never since heard of on the part of an official),---got three dollars. This was the entire doings of the first session. Board again met July 23, 1804, and William Holmes was granted fourteen dollars and twenty-nine cents, the amount (deducting the treasurer's fees) which was paid into the county treasury by the sheriff for an estray horse sold to Jasper Shotwell, which turned out to be the property of said Holmes. Thomas Frost, supervisor of Miami, and Adam Snider, of Williamsburgh, were respectively paid four dollars and thirty-seven cents and ten dollars. There were granted to Henry Chapman for returning poll-book of Pleasant township, and Jeriah Wood that of Washington, one dollar each. They bought for five dollars a book to keep the accounts against the treasurer and collector, and made their settlement with Peter Light, collector of county taxes for the year of 1802.

They were allowed (at August session of 1804) to Edward Sopp, for killing an old wolf, Oct. 4, 1803, one dollar and fifty-cents; to Laben Ricords, for killing two wolves, Oct. 3 1803, and to Alexander Buchanan, for killing two, Oct. 6, 1803, two dollars to each party. The associate judges were allowed for their services two dollars per day, and paid; and, from the bills allowed, it seems the following were the listers of lands and taxable property in the various townships: Williamsburgh, Daniel Kain; Pleasant, William White; Ohio, Shadrach Lane; Miami, Joseph Brown; Williamsburgh, Robert Dickey; Ohio, David Kelly. Nicholas Sinks got twenty dollars for a year's rent of house in which to hold the courts. There were granted for killing wolves,---to Jacob Burget (on Feb. 12, 1804), one dollar and fifty cents; Christian Shingle, for an old wolf, Nov. 8, 1803, one dollar and fifty cents; William Stewart, one dollar and fifty cents; John Mefford, one killed Feb. 22, 1802, one dollar and fifty cents; Archibald McLean, one killed Dec. 16, 1802; George Washburn, an old and vicious one, three dollars; same for another on Feb. 16, 1804; John Lattimore, one killed Oct. 16, 1804, one dollar and fifty cents; Peter Frybarger, one killed, Feb. 2, 1804, one dollar and fifty cents; and to Thomas Davis, for an old panther killed Aug. 1, 1804, and wolf, July 30, three dollars.

Daniel Kain was appointed collector of county taxes and gave bonds, with James Kain and Samuel W. Davis as securities. Roger W. Waring made out three duplicates of the taxes on the lands of residents within the county,---one for the collector, one for the auditor of state, and one for commissioners,---and for all this work received forty-eight dollars. Joshua Collet, for services as prosecuting attorney for September term of 1803 in Supreme Court, got twelve dollars, and Martin Marshal, for like services at June term of Common Pleas, twenty dollars. There was given to Thomas E. Allen seven dollars and fifty-seven cents for conveying, guarding, etc. (all expenses included), John Rowe to jail, charged with the murder of Mary Malone. William Perry, late sheriff, presented a claim of sixty-four dollars and thirty-four cents, it being the amount of a judgment obtained against him by Stephen Frazer in an action for letting a certain Andrew Cotterell escape on mesue process, but said claim laid over.

Nov. 5, 1804,---present, George Conrad, Amos Smith, and Amos Ellis,---the latter elected at October election vice Townsley, whose time had expired,---John Shroof got three dollars for an old panther killed; Henry Sumalt, same for two wolves; John Anderson, for an old panther killed Nov. 19, 1804, one dollar and fifty cents; and John White, for killing an old wolf, Nov. 14, 1803, one dollar and fifty cents; John Erwin, for guarding William Maginnis four nights in jail, one dollar (twenty-five cents per night; the guard probably slept with the prisoner); Robert Townsley took four dollars and a half for killing three old wolves.

February session 1805, Henry Zumalt, for killing an old wolf in 1805, Nicholas Prickett one in 1804, one dollar and a half each; and the latter was allowed two dollars for killing two young ones in 1802.

June term, 1805, Jacob Miller, for killing an old wolf, Nov. 1, 1804, got one dollar and a half. The rates of tavern licenses for ensuing year were established, to wit: "In Williamsburgh, eight dollars; in Bethel, six dollars; in White Haven, four dollars; in Staunton (now Ripley), four dollars; and all other taverns four dollars. The ferries were priced as follows: at Staunton (now Ripley), across the Ohio per annum, two dollars; at Waters' ferry (now in Brown), four; at Samuel Ellis' (now in Brown), above the mouth of White Oak, one dollar and a half; at White Haven, four dollars; at Boud's and Bolander's, four dollars each; at the mouth of Bullskin, five dollars; at Machir's ferry, two dollars; at or within one mile of Twelve-Mile Creek, three dollars; and at all other ferries that may be established across the Ohio River, two dollars. The rates were fixed,---to wit, the highest rates allowed by law on all the other waters within or bounden on this county,---for a foot person six and a quarter cents, and the full amount to the extent of the law for all other ferriages. Joseph Wood, for killing one old wolf, Sept. 17, 1804, was allowed one dollar and a half.

August term, 1805, Thomas Morris, for services as clerk of the election for sheriff, and as judge of the annual election, was allowed one dollar. Edward Doughty, Stephen Parker, John Latimore, and Andrew Irwin were each allowed one dollar for killing wolves, all killed, May, June, and July. The report of the viewers on the road from Denhamstown to the mouth of Bullskin (viewers, Obed Denham, James South, John Boggess, and John Conrey, with Houton Clark as surveyor) was approved, and the road ordered to open.

November term, 1805, William S. Jump now appeared as commissioner, elected in place of George Conrad. Upon a petition of a number of inhabitants of the townships of Pleasant and Tate for viewers to view the way for a road leading from Waters' road and beginning at or near the still-house of Daniel Feagans, running from thence by or near Roney's mill, and from thence along the dividing ridge between White Oak and Bullskin Creeks, and to be continued on until it intersects Waters' road at or near the plantation of Aaron Leonard, it was ordered that Daniel Feagans, Fielding Feagans, and James Rounds (or any two of them) view the way as aforesaid, and Houton Clarke survey the same, and that they make report thereof agreeably to law. On the proposed road beginning at the Indian Riffle on the Little Miami, and running from thence by Silas Hutchinson's to Wilson's mills, on the Obannon, it was ordered that Joseph Hutchinson, Theophilus Simonton, and John Davies be the viewers, and that Owen Todd make the survey. On the projected road from Williamsburgh by the plantations of William Hunter and Christopher Hartman, to intersect the State road near the latter's residence, William Lytle, William Hunter, and Robert Dickey were selected viewers, and R.W. Waring surveyor. On the road to be built from Denhamstown through the "Yankee Settlement" to Henry Zumalt's, on White Oak Creek, James Rounds, Robert Allen, and Houton Clarke were the viewers, the latter doing the surveying. One lock and two large padlocks, at a cost of thirty-two dollars, were purchased for the jail. David C. Bryan was allowed four dollars and fifty cents for surveying the new road from Williamsburgh to the county-line on a direction to West Union, the viewers of which were William Wardlow, Ramoth Bunting, and John Lytle; chainmen, Roland Boyd, Samuel Wardlow; and marker, Josiah Osborn; which road was ordered established. The bond of Levi Rogers, sheriff-elect, was received and approved, and contained the following securities,---William Smith, James Sargent, John Boultinghouse, Abraham Wood, James South, John Sargent, George Brown, William Buchanan, John Wood, and David Wood, all solid men of those days,---and was in the sum of four thousand dollars. Upon a list returned by Alexander Robb, a lister of Ohio township, of a stud-horse belonging to Jacob Light (which said Light refused to list agreeably to law), stating that said horse stood the season at the rate of three dollars, it was ordered that said Light be taxed with the said stud-horse fourfold, amounting to twelve dollars, and that he be proceeded against for its immediate payment. The necessity of laying before the public an account of the receipts and expenditures of the county since June, 1803, was agreed upon. The commissioners stipulated to pay their clerk fifteen dollars per annum, and ordered that all delinquent collectors appear before them by the first Tuesday of the coming January to square up their receipts and make exhibits of outstanding delinquencies.

January term, 1806, R.W. Waring, the old clerk to the board, having resigned, Amos Ellis, one of the board, was elected in his place. Settled with the county treasurer, Nicholas Sinks; found that he had properly accounted for all moneys received by him, and found a balance due him of eight dollars and thirty-nine cents. Settled with Alexander Robbs and Benjamin Sharp, collectors of Ohio and Pleasant townships. Tavern licenses fixed as follows: In Williamsburgh, eight dollars; in Bethel, four and one-half; and in all other parts of the county, four. Ferry licenses put at this schedule: At Waters', White Haven, Boude's, Bolander's, four dollars each; at Staunton, two; at Sam Ellis', one and a half; at mouth of Bullskin, five; within one mile of Twelve-Mile Creek, three; and at all other places that ferries may be established, two each. The following bounties were offered for the killing of wolves for the ensuing year; for any wolf exceeding six months old, two dollars; and any under that age, one dollar. In pursuance of an act of the General Assembly, it was ordered that the township listers collect State and county tax of 1806.

June term, 1806,
settled with Andrew Jackson, late collector of Washington township, and resolved that the listers appear on the 30th and give security for their collections. Joshua Manning, for listing Washington township, received twenty dollars, Josiah Boothby eighteen for that of Tate, and Benjamin Sharp fifteen for that of Pleasant. William Fee was allowed twelve dollars and seventy-two cents for necessary irons purchased by him as county inspector. Oliver Lindsey listed Williamsburgh township, and got twenty dollars therefor; and Joseph Bowman, Miami, for eighteen dollars.

September term, 1806, allowed Henry Fitzgerald and William Beasley each two dollars for killing a wolf, and to William Lytle, postmaster of Williamsburgh, two dollars and ten cents for postage on a duplicate of resident lands in the country for the year 1806 and a letter accompanying the same. Nicholas Sinks, John Erwins, Sr., and Samuel Howell were appointed viewers, and David C. Bryan surveyor, on the proposed road from the court-house in Williamsburgh, crossing the east fork by or near the house where John Erwin, Sr., now lives; thence on a northwesterly direction on the best ground until it intersects the road leading from the house of James Kain towards Chillicothe. On the proposed road beginning at Johns' mill, at or near the Ohio River, to the Little Miami, at John Smith's mill, John Vaneaton, William Robb, and William Whitaker were viewers, and John Hunter surveyor. An order was issued to the supervisors of Ohio township to open a road from the branch of Shalor's Run to the county-line. Christian Long and William McKinney took an order each for two dollars for killing a wolf, with which they paid their taxes. On the proposed road from the plantation of John P. Shinkle, at the four-mile tree, in the Boude's Ferry and Williamsburgh road, and to run intersecting the same road near the "Yankee Settlement", Samuel Rounds, John P. Shinkle, and Josiah Boothby were viewers, and John Boude surveyor; and on the projected road from Boude's Ferry to intersect the Cincinnati road at the mouth of Bullskin Creek, Samuel Ellis, Robert Higgins, and Gabriel Aikins were viewers, and Joseph Wells surveyor.

December term, 1806, there were allowed for killing wolves: Jesse Gold, an old one, two dollars; Shadrach Tribble, an old one, two dollars; Hugh Ferguson, an old one, two dollars; Charles Ramsay, two young ones, two dollars. There being objections to the report on the road from Johns' mill, on the Ohio, to John Smith's mill, on the Little Miami, John Donham, Robert Townsley, Jacob Whetstone, William Christy, and Peter Emery were appointed to review it and settle the matter. Samuel B. Kyle killed an old wolf, and took his two-dollar order. On the road wanted from Jacob Light's residence, on the Ohio River, thence to Daniel Light's saw-mill, thence the nearest and best way towards the "Round Bottom", John Donham, William Bennett, and Rodom Morin were viewers, and Peter Light surveyor. John Boggess, Henry Cuppee, and Jacob Whinton were appointed viewers, and Houton Clarke surveyor, to view the road from the Ohio River opposite Stepstone to Bethel, also to view the way for a road the nearest and best way from Bethel, to intersect the Stepstone road near to Alexander Buchanan's, and to see if a nearer and better way from Buchanan's to Bethel can be had. On the road wanted from Bethel to John Harmon's, John Boggess, Walen Williams, and William Winters were viewers and Houton Clarke surveyor. For killing wolves, Samuel B. Kyle, William Glancy, James Fitzpatrick, and Stephen Calvin were each allowed two dollars. The bond of Jeremiah Beck, Jr., coroner-elect, was presented, being for two thousand dollars, with the following securities,---Kelly Burke and Sears Crane,---and the same approved.

January term, 1807, as the reviewers on the road wanted from Johns' mill, on the Ohio, to John Smith's mill, on the Little Miami, reported the damages of Samuel B. Kyle to be two hundred and thirty dollars to his place, the board considered it too much to pay, and refused to build the road. Part of the Denhamstown road, from a branch of Shaylor's Run to Hamilton county-line, was vacated. The road from Williamsburgh to John Legate's farm by way of Thompson's mills was ordered to be surveyed by Josephus Waters, with John Mefford, Henry Chapman, and Josephus Waters as viewers. Absalom Brooks received two dollars for killing a wolf. A road was asked from Tatman's old road, at Henry Wise's improvement, till it intersected the road at the cross-roads, and William Fee, Conrad Metzgar, and Benjamin Sells were viewers, and Joseph Wells surveyor.

March term, 1807, Peter Light, Isaac Higby, and Joseph Dole, as viewers, and the first named as surveyor, were ordered to view the way for a road from or near the mouth of Clover Lick Creek to the mouth of Indian Creek. Upon a petition of a number of inhabitants of the townships of Williamsburgh and Tate, praying that viewers might be appointed to view a way for a road beginning near the house of Dr. Allison, from thence up the cast fork, passing near the house of George Ely, thence the nearest and best way to the house of John Collins, thence passing near McCollum's and Higby's saw-mill on the nearest and best ground until it intersects the road leading from Williamsburgh to the mouth of Twelve-Mile Creek, Ezekiel Dimmitt, Jacob Sly, and Daniel Husong were chosen viewers, and David C, Bryan surveyor. (This is the old, and partly the present, road from Stonelick via Batavia to Bantam.) On the road wished from Isaac Higby's mill to "Goshen meeting-house", Peter Light, Shadrach Tribble, and Absalom Brooks were viewers, with the first named as surveyor.

June term, 1807, a road was desired from Williamsburgh to intersect Cincinnati road at "Two-Mile Tree", with D.C. Bryan, Daniel Kidd, and Adam Snider as viewers, the first to make the survey. Henry Dunn was allowed two dollars for killing a wolf, and James Dunn four dollars for killing two wolves. Ferry licenses were regulated, to wit: At White Haven, Boud's, Bolander's, each three dollars; at mouth of Bullskin, four; at all other places on the Ohio, two; and at any ferries that are or may be established on the Little Miami, or any others of the waters in the county, one dollar and fifty cents. Tavern licenses were scheduled, to wit: In Williamsburgh seven, and at all other places four dollars. The bounties on wolves were fixed same as previous year. For killing five young wolves, John Mitchell got five dollars; Enoch Gest for killing one, one dollar; Thomas Allen for killing an old one that had seriously disturbed the settlements, two dollars. Lewis township (now in Brown) was organized, extending from the east end of Washington township, of which it was a part, to Bullskin Creek. John Rowe, who was in jail for alleged murdering of Mary Malone, had escaped, and two dollars were allowed to Nicholas Sinks for taking an express to Cincinnati to the printer's to get posters struck of poor John's escape.

August term, 1807, Shadrach Tribble, for killing one old and two young wolves, was allowed four dollars; Jacob Ulrey, for three young ones, three dollars; James Whitaker, an old one, two dollars; and Edward Doughty and John Miller, the same each.

September term, 1807, for killing wolves, William Boydston and Thomas John received two dollars each; also James Waits. On the proposed road from the mouth of the middle fork of Bullskin towards Bethel, Nathan Tatman, William Judd, and Joseph Wells were chosen viewers,---the latter to make the survey. Settled with Nicholas Sinks, county treasurer, and found five hundred and five dollars and twenty-seven cents in the treasurer's hands all right. An order was issued to the supervisors of Tate and Washington townships to open a road from Bethel to or near Alexander Buchanan's, opposite the mouth of Stepstone. Nicholas Sinks, county treasurer, gave bond in sum of three thousand dollars, with William Hunter and Robert Townsley as securities. John Arnold and others, for standing guard at the prison, were allowed three dollars.

December term, 1807, a road was wanted beginning on the State road near Bullskin, through the settlements on Bear Creek and Indian Creek, crossing the latter at Brown's mill, till it intersected the State road at Witham's Settlement, and William Barkley, David Colglazer, and John Reeves were appointed viewers, and Joseoh Jackson surveyor. On the road wished from Bethel to Jacob Light's, on the Ohio River, Rhodam Morin, Stephen Frazee, and Houton Clarke were selected as viewers, the latter to do the surveying. For killing wolves were allowed: Hatley Sapp, two dollars; Shadrach Tribble, four; Samuel Doughty, two; Libbeus Day, one; Jacob Ulrey, two; Joseph Moore, two; John Crist, John Wray, two.

January term, 1808, Samuel English (who was the fifer in Col. Lewis Cass' regiment in the war of 1812, and died in Chilo, of this county, in 1865), for guarding the jail over Caldwell and Handley from December 24th to January 29th, was allowed thirty-nine dollars and thirty-seven cents.

March term, 1808, Ezekiel Howard, John Weeks, and Moses Wood were each allowed two dollars for killing an old wolf. Levi Rogers, being re-elected sheriff, gave bond in the sum of four thousand dollars, with the following securities: John White, Henry Willis, Jeremiah Beck, Jr., and William South. Shadrach Tribble, Thomas Patterson, and Michael Cowley each got two dollars for killing an old wolf; Jeremiah Beck, coroner, was allowed four dollars and ten cents for services in holding an inquest (the first of record in the county) on the body of a dead child, alleged to have been killed by Jane Hamilton. John Wardlow, for killing an old wolf, got two dollars.

May term, 1808, for killing wolves, there were allowed to William Hartman two dollars; Joseph Glancy, same; Jacob Burget, four dollars; William Glone, same.

June term, 1808, Moses Wood killed an old wolf, and got two dollars. Tavern licenses were fixed for the year: In Williamsburgh, eight dollars; in Bethel, six; and at all other points, four. A road was wanted from Ferguson's ferry towards Deerfield, by way of Dr. Allison's; Shadrach Lane, Abel Denham, and James Townsley were the viewers, the latter to make the survey. On the proposed road from Zachariah Chapman's, on the State road from Holley's mill through the "Apple Settlement" till it intersected the county road near Mr. Fairchild's, on the east fork, Nicholas Pricket, Henry Davis, and Joseph Shaylor were the viewers, and Daniel F. Barney the surveyor. William Wardlow and Fielding Feagans, each for killing two old wolves, received four dollars, and Jacob and Aaron Burget, for killing an old one, got two dollars a piece. On the proposed alteration of the Williamsburgh and Newtown road, beginning where Denhamstown road forked near Nathan Sutton's, and from thence to the Hamilton county-line, John Day, Peter Emery, and Samuel Lane were the viewers, and James Townsley surveyor. Ferry licenses for ensuing year were fixed as follows: At Waters' or Keuek's, White Haven, three dollars; Boude's, Bolander's, at mouth of Bullskin, four dollars; at all other places on the Ohio where ferries may be established, two dollars; and at any ferry on the Little Miami, or other waters in the county, one dollar and a half. The rates of bounties on wolves were scheduled as year before. James Perine was allowed twelve dollars, and Thomas Foster a like sum, for guarding the jail over Caleb Wright for twelve days, and Joseph Haines four dollars for iron-work done for the confinement of prisoners.

August term, 1808, David Brunk and Thomas Patterson received two dollars each for killing an old wolf. The associate judges, Philip Gatch, John Morris, and Ambrose Ransom, were each allowed six dollars for a three days' called court in cases of John Clark and Mordecai S. Ford. (The latter was convicted of horse-stealing, and publicly whipped therefor by the sheriff; he died shortly after, and was the first man buried in Calvary Graveyard, in Washington township.) John Graham and Samuel Glenn, for guarding jail, got a dollar each; also Josiah Osborn and James Wilson, for like services, five dollars each. Horse-thieves gave the authorities great trouble, as we find Amos Smith got one dollar and seventy-five cents for iron-work to secure the prisoners in jail. Sheriff Oliver Lindsey received twelve dollars and sixty-two cents for diet for Handley, Clark, and Ford at one time, four dollars and seventy-two cents at another, and a dollar for cleaning the jail. Most of these horse-thieves were transient persons, but Mordecai S. Ford owned a farm in the Buchanan Settlement.

September,1808, Timothy Rariden, for killing five young wolves near New Richmond, received five dollars. Ezekiel Ball, for apprehending and delivering to the jailer of this county agreeably to the advertisement of the sheriff the bodies of Mordecai S. Ford and John Clark, seventy-three dollars; so it appeared, after all the guarding, night and day, of the jail, its inmates escaped and put the authorities to great annoyance and costs. On the proposed road beginning where Cincinnati road crosses Shaylor's Run, so as to intersect the State road two and a half miles eastward of Moses Broadwell's place, Ezekiel Dimmitt, Peter Emery, and James Townsley were viewers,---the latter to make the survey,---who were likewise to view the way for a road from the "Nine-Mile Tree", on the Cincinnati road, to intersect the same three-fourths of a mile distant. It was petitioned to build a road beginning in the State road leading from the Little Miami to West Union, near where the Denhamstown road takes off near the "Witham's Settlement", and from thence as near as the trace as was then traveled would admit, until it intersected the State road leading from Cincinnati to Chillicothe, and Jacob Teal, Daniel Kirgan, and Daniel F. Barney were the viewers, the latter to do the surveying. For killing wolves there were paid to John Warren, two dollars; Nicholas Prickett, four; and John Bridges, two. John Earhart, for repairing jail, got one dollar; and Samuel English, for guarding the jail nine days and nights, nine dollars, and for securing the prisoners Clark and Ford in the jail, two dollars and twenty-five cents. On the proposed road, beginning at or near Samuel Ellis', on the road from Williamsburgh to Twelve-Mile Creek, and on the road leading from Williamsburgh to Bullskin, the viewers were Joseph Dole, Samuel Nelson, and Thomas Page, and Alexander Blair the surveyor. There was paid James Wilson, for guarding the jail over Ford and Clark, twelve dollars, and Amos Smith, for irons made to secure Mordecai S. Ford in the jail, ten dollars. Settled with the county treasurer, and found him indebted to the county in sum of one hundred and fifty-three dollars and fifty-nine cents.

October term, 1808, Enoch Gest, for killing an old wolf, received two dollars. Clark township (now in Brown County) was organized, and extended from Washington, Tate, and Lewis townships to the Highland and Adams county-lines. John Charles furnished nine benches for jury-rooms and fixed two jail windows, and was paid nine dollars. An order was issued to Richard Hall, Ezekiel Leming, and David Roudebush to view a way for a road from Milford to intersect the road leading from William Smalley's mill, on Todd's Fork, Conduce Gatch to make the survey. Stephen Smith and others, for guarding the jail the night of October 13th, three dollars and fifty cents. John Dennis got two dollars and twenty cents for underpinning the jail and repairing irons to secure the prisoners. Stephen Smith and others guarded the jail the night of the 20th, and were paid therefor the sum of three dollars and fifty cents. For extra guarding of jail, Jacob Ulrey received twenty-five cents, and Josiah Osborn two dollars.

December term, 1808, Henry Chapman (of Pleasant township) appeared as commissioner in place of William S. Jump, whose term had expired. For killing wolves there were paid William Fletcher, two dollars; Joseph Calvin, same sum; Charles Johnston, same sum; John Gest, same sum; James Waits, same sum; George Sheke, same sum; Shadrach Tribble, same sum; Joseph Moore, six dollars (for three old ones); William Fletcher, four dollars (two old ones); Vincent Wood, two dollars; Thomas South, same sum; and Josiah Prickett, same sum.

February term, 1809, there were allowed for wolf-killing, Ichabod Willis and Peter Waits, each two dollars.

March term, 1809, for wolf-killing there were paid John Bridges, four dollars; John Godfrey, same sum; Daniel South and Robert Wright, each two dollars. To view the amendment to the road leading from mouth of Bullskin to Cincinnati, near Stout's, or between there and Twelve-Mile, Alexander Buchanan, Hugh Ferguson, and Rhodam Morin were appointed viewers, and Philip Nichols the surveyor.

June term, 1809, Allen Wood, coroner-elect, presented his bond in the sum of two thousand dollars, with Nathan Woods, John Arnold, and John Davis as securities; same was approved and ordered to be recorded. Stephen Smith, for repairing jail, received one dollar and a half. Tavern licenses for ensuing year were priced, to wit: At Williamsburgh, eight dollars; Bethel and Milford, six; and at all other points, four. Ferry licenses were put as follows: At mouth of Red Oak (now in Brown County), Waters', Samuel Ellis', White Haven, and Bolander's, three dollars; at Boude's, six; at Bullskin, four; at all other ferries that may be established on the Ohio, two dollars; and at all points on Little Miami or other waters in the county, one dollar and fifty cents. Same bounties as before continued on wolves,---that is, two dollars for wolves over six months old, and one for those under that age. For killing wolves there were paid John Hall, Christian Long, Benjamin Fisher, two dollars each; Hugh Ferguson, eight dollars; and James Fee, and Greenberry Lakin, one dollar each. On the proposed road from Danby's mill to intersect the Williamsburgh and Twelve-Mile road where it crosses the east fork, nearly opposite Clover Lick Creek, the viewers were William Johnston, George Higby, and Isaac Higby, with David C. Bryan as surveyor.

September term, 1809, for killing wolves there were paid: John Morris, one dollar; Andrew Frybarger, one dollar; Joseph Moore, two dollars. On the proposed road from Harner's Run, in Miami township, across the mill ford to Stonelick, the viewers were Richard Hall, Josiah Prickett, and William Glone, and Zachariah Tolliver the surveyor. John Kain and John Boyd, for guarding jail over John Mureat, June court, received two dollars. Settled with Nicholas Sinks, county treasurer, and found the county indebted to him one hundred and twenty dollars and fifty-seven cents.

October term, 1809, James Garland, for killing an old wolf, got two dollars. On the road wanted in Miami township from Christian Waldsmith's mill up Harner's Run to the school-house (the first school-house mentioned in Clermont records), past Jacob Long's, crossing the Williamsburgh road to "the Widow Roudebush's", the viewers were Richard Frazee, Andrew Shederly, and Robert Hewitt, and Conduce Gatch the surveyor. John Charles fixed the fireplaces in the court-house and whitewashed its walls for seven dollars.

November term, 1809, paid Dunhem McCoy eight and one-half dollars for guarding the jail over James Black, and eight dollars to Adam Snider for like services. Oliver Lindsey, sheriff, elected at the October election, presented his official bond in the penal sum of four thousand dollars, with the following securities,---Thomas Paxton, Samuel Bayed, and T.S. Foote,---which was duly approved, and Thomas Morris, of Bethel, then one of the Supreme judges of the State of Ohio, administered to the new sheriff the solemn oath of office, being the only official act on record of Judge Morris, who was the next winter (two months after) legislated out of office.

December term, 1809, the board appointed Daniel Kain its clerk. For killing wolves there were paid: John Bridges, four dollars; John Hamilton, two; Theophilus Simonton, two; John Gest, six; Peter Fronk, one; Charles Baum, one; Joab Woodruff, two; James Henderson, two; Jacob Frazee, two; Charles Waits, two; Jacob Waits, two.

February term, 1810, Levi Rogers having in the summer of 1809 resigned his office as sheriff, the coroner, Allen Wood, filled out the remaining six months of his term, and for extra services was paid twenty dollars.

March term, 1810, for killing wolves there were paid: James Ellis, two dollars; John Osborn, same; John Bridges, same. On the proposed road from Williamsburgh to the "salt-works", on the east fork, occupied by Peter Wilson, there were appointed as viewers Daniel Kain, Ramoth Bunting, and Charles Waits (the great wolf-killer and hunter), with David C. Bryan as surveyor.

June term, 1810, for wolf-killing there were paid: Peter Harden, two dollars; William Davis, five; William Glone, six; William Smith, two; John Waits (panther), two. On the road wanted beginning near Thomas Robinson's, on the State road, near the east fork, leading down said stream past Samuel Fountain's and "Major Shaylor's", and continued on to the county-line near the "Round Bottom mills", the viewers appointed were Jacob Teal, Jacob Voorhies, and Jacob Whetstone (three Jacobs), with Daniel F. Barney as surveyor.

August term, 1810, for killing wolves Timothy Raridin got six dollars for six young ones, and two dollars for an old one. John Earhart made the clerk of the court a bookcase for twelve dollars, and John Boyd, for iron-work to confine the prisoners in jail, received thirteen dollars and sixty cents.

September term, 1810, on the proposed road beginning at John Troy's, on "Stone Run", passing Townsley's and McClelland's mill to the "Deerfield road", the viewers were Conrad Harsh, Robert Lane, and Samuel Kilbreath, with James Townsley as surveyor. To view the way for a road beginning at "old Mr. Apple's lane", thence by "Stony Run", past Richard Doughty's and Charles Robinson's, to intersect the Denhamstown road, the viewers were Richard Doughty, Joseph Dole, Ezekiel Dimmitt, with James Townsley as surveyor. James Leming, for killing an old wolf, received two dollars, and R.W. Waring, clerk, for extra services in a called court on cases of Jane Hamilton, William Thomas, Yanger Prickett, etc., received fifteen dollars and eighty cents. David C. Bryan, road commissioner on the road leading from the county-line between the counties of Highland and Clermont, and from thence to Milford, was paid fifty-three dollars and seventy-four cents.

November term, 1810, Oliver Lindsey, sheriff, for taking and victualingWm. Thomas in jail, got twenty-six dollars, and for sundry service in furnishing firewood, candles, etc., at Supreme Court session, three dollars.

December term, 1810, on the proposed road from where Apple's intersects the State road until it intersects the road from Clover Lick Creek to the mouth of Indian Creek, between the six and seven-mile tree, crossing Twelve-Mile Creek near Jacob Fisher's, the viewers were Nathan Morgan, George Brown, and Joseph Dole, and Joseph Jackson the surveyor. For the road reached from "three forks of Nine-Mile Creek" to William Reece's, the viewers were John Dunham, Isaiah Ferguson, and Rhodam Morin, with Philip Nichols as surveyor. Benjamin Hess (afterwards the notorious counterfeiter of Bear Creek) was paid two dollars for killing an old wolf. On the road prayed for from near Henry Fitzpatrick's, near the mouth of Ten-Mile Creek, and up same till it intersects the Williamsburgh road, the viewers were Shadrach Dial, Joseph Dole, and Joseph Jackson, the latter acting as surveyor also.

March term, 1811, James Kain was allowed two dollars for use of a room, with fires, for the board. Joseph Calvin, for killing three old wolves, was paid six dollars.

April term, 1811, John Earhart, for making two boxes for the jury-ballots (?), was paid a dollar and a half.

June term, 1811, on the proposed road beginning at or near Samuel Beck's, passing Kelly Burk's mill, to intersect the road leading from Williamsburgh to the mouth of "Big Indian Creek", the viewers were John Boggess, Thomas West, and Joseph Jackson, the latter to make the survey. On the road wanted from mouth of Stonelick through "Glancy's Lane" and by Joseph Moore's, and up Stonelick as far as "McKinney's old improvement", the viewers were William Glancy, Josiah Prickett, and Joseph Moore, with Zachariah Talliafero as surveyor. Settled with county treasurer Nicholas Sinks, and found him indebted to the county three hundred and seventy-two dollars and fifteen cents. The board appropriated thirty-five dollars for the purpose of building a bridge across a branch of "Clover Lick Creek", on the State road, between George and Peter Light's, under the superintendence of George Light, which was the first bridge built in Clermont by the county authorities, as the records indicate. Tavern licenses for following year were thus rated: at Williamsburgh, eight dollars; at Bethel and Milford, five; at all other points, four. Ferry licenses were priced, to wit: at Red Oak, Sell's, three dollars; at Samuel Ellis', two; at Boude's, five; at Bullskin, four; at all other places, if established on the Ohio, two dollars; and at all other places on the Little Miami, one dollar and a half. Daniel Kain was appointed to procure a half-bushel agreeable to the act "Entitled an Act for Regulating Measures".

September term, 1811, on the projected road from Bethel passing through the plantation of Okey Vanosdol and by Levi and Benjamin Tingley's "tan-yard" (the first noted on the county records), thence near a school-house (the second noted on the county records), by John Ross' to the east side of Thomas Davis', the viewers were Jeremiah Beck, Jr., John Morris, and Thomas West, with John Bogges as surveyor. On the road wanted from Williamsburgh past John Charles' mill, on Stonelick, to intersect the road leading from Todd's Fork to Milford, the viewers were Josiah Prickett, John Kain, and Hugh Dickey, with James Townsley as surveyor. On the road wished from "Nevillesville" up the river-bottom to "Willow Creek", past James Sargent's mill, and still up the creek between Mathew Boner's and George Botts', by "Hopewell Meeting-House", until on a dividing-line of survey northeast it intersects the State road leading from the mouth of Bullskin to the county-seat at Williamsburgh, the viewers were Jonathan Taylor, Joseph McKibben, and Alexander Buchanan, with James Sargent as surveyor. The foregoing were also ordered to view the way for a road from "Nevillesville" so as to intersect the Stepstone road near Andrew Buchanan's. For the alteration of the road from Milford to "Smalley's mill" the viewers appointed were Joseph Bowman, Alexander Hughey, and Andrew Erwin.

December term, 1811, appeared Gideon Minor, commissioner elected at the October election in place of Henry Chapman, whose term had expired. James O. Flint's bill of sixty-four dollars and thirty-seven and a half cents for repairing the court-house was allowed. The report of the viewers---Frederick Eppert, Edward Chapman, and Joseph Behymer---on the alteration of the Williamsburgh road through the lands of Joseph Fagin was confirmed. James Ralston, as court bailiff for April term, was allowed two dollars and a half, and William Shearer, for like services at the succeeding term, six dollars. John Kain, for apprehending Theophilus Case, was paid three dollars.

March term, 1812, William Fee, for procuring the necessary "branding-irons", agreeably to the direction of the court, to be used by him as inspector, was allowed nineteen dollars, and James Herbert, jailer, for boarding David Ferguson ninety-four days in jail, received twenty-three dollars and fifty cents. On the proposed road beginning near the mouth of Indian Creek, thence up the same, passing "Abram's mill", thence near John Lowe's plantation, by that of John Klingler, and between Stephen Frazee and Peter McClain, and passing Thomas Carter, to intersect the county road near Kelly Burk's mill, Thomas Marsh, John Boggess, and John Lowe were the viewers, with Boggess as surveyor. On the proposed road from Nevillesville up Willow Creek, William Fee, Peter Hastings, George Botts, Erasmus Prather, and Zadock Watson filed their statement that they would thereby be greatly injured; the following were appointed to assess the damages: Joseph Wells, David Miller, and Stephen Bolander. Samuel Howell, for furnishing a blanket for Graham in jail, was paid one dollar and seventy-five cents. The duplicate this year showed as follows:

First rate lands…………………………… 3,501 ¼ acres.
Second-rate lands………………………..125,501 "
Third-rate lands…………………………. 46,053 ½ "
Amount of taxes in county……………… $1659.16 ½

Isaac Foster, constable, for attending on the traverse jury at the December term, was allowed two dollars and twenty-five cents. The board believing that James Lewis, confined in the jail, is an unworthy burden to the county, therefore it is ordered that the sheriff discharge him.

April term, 1812, the bond of Sheriff Oliver Lindsey, re-elected, and in the sum of four thousand dollars, was presented with the following securities,---Thomas Paxton, George Ely, John F. Strother, William Christy, and T.S. Foote,---and was approved.

June term, 1812, fourteen dollars and seventy-five cents was allowed jailer Herbert for boarding in jail Benjamin Legate and James Allen. On the application of Andrew Megrue to alter the road leading from Milford, passing Ranson's, and the road leading from Harner's Run to Stonelick, near "Captain Slone's", the following viewers were selected: Ambrose Ranson, Nathaniel Barber, and John Gest. On the Nevillesville and Willow Creek road the viewers gave Erasmus Prather five dollars damages, William Fee eleven dollars and sixty-two and one-half cents, Peter Hastings thirteen dollars and twenty-five cents, but awarded none to Zadock Watson or George Botts. Established tavern and ferry licenses at rates of previous year.

August term, 1812, one dollar was allowed for board of Richard S. Sanburn in jail.

December term, 1812, on the proposed road in Washington township beginning near Jacob Fisher's, where a road from the State road ends, passing by John Flack's plantation, through Henry Cuppy's land and Thompson Gates, thence to "Gilbert's horse-mill", thence to intersect Manning's and Minor's road, thence with said road to intersect the State road between William Watson's and the "Widow Harmon", William Thompson, David Smith, and Peter McClain were chosen viewers, and Joseph Jackson surveyor. On the petition to turn the road leading from the "Middle Fork of Bullskin", the viewers were William S. Jump, David Miller, and Isaac Barkley.

March term, 1813, on the alteration of the Neville road past "Hopewell Meeting-House", the viewers were John Prather, Hugh Larkin, and James Sargent. On the proposed road in Washington township leading from or near William Winter's, thence to "Wiley's saw-mill", thence to "George Brown's mill", thence to intersect the road leading from the mouth of Big Indian Creek, near James Abrams, the viewers were John Manning, Thomas Fee, and Robert Brown, with Benjamin Penn as surveyor. On the road wanted from "Clark's mill", on Bullskin, till it intersected the Bolander road between Mark Day's and Michael Conley's, the viewers were Stephen Bolander, William Judd, and Allen B. Hughes, with the latter as surveyor. The rates of lands for 1813 were as follows:
Acres.
First-rate lands................... ... 3,652
Second " " …………………... 131, 973
Third " " …………………… .. 48,927 ¾
Amount of taxes in county…. $1638.41

For boarding Samuel Henry one hundred days in jail there was allowed twenty-five dollars. The official bond of Jeremiah Beck as coroner was presented, being in amount two thousand dollars, with the following securities: Samuel Beck and James South.

June term, 1813, the rates of tavern licenses and ferries were put as in two previous years. The following were the listers of taxable property in the county this year: Miami, Robert Hewitt; Union, Laban Brazier; Washington, Henry H. Evans; Williamsburgh, John Earhart; Ohio, Joseph Evans; Tate, Samuel Beck; Lewis, Reuben Baring; Pleasant, Benjamin Griffin; Stonelick, John Whortman; Clark, Thomas Myers; who were also appointed by the commissioners to collect the taxes.

July term, 1813, John McBeth, for surveying a road from "Widow Shinkle's" to "Chapman's mill", on White Oak, was allowed thirteen dollars and eighty cents.

September term, 1813, on the proposed roads from Neville to mouth of Indian Creek, and one to the Ohio River at low water from the "Neville public square", the viewers were Hugh McKibben, Nathaniel Bouser, and Alexander Buchanan. On the projected Stonelick road, Levi Moore, John Fee, and Richard Marsh were chosen viewers, and Samuel Hill surveyor, to begin at John Moore's, at a road running from Townsley's mill to Richard Hall's, down "Brushy Fork", passing down Stonelick by Jonathan Smith's farm, thence to the foot of a hill by David Brunk's farm, thence to intersect the Milford road. Samuel Shaw, jailer, for boarding Reuben Darrel, a prisoner, was allowed one dollar and seventy-five cents. Daniel Kain was ordered to raise the chimney on the court-house to prevent the fires from being dangerous, and to secure the floor in the clerk's office with sheet iron and a circular bar to prevent any conflagrations by fire. On the prayed-for roads,---one from Bethel, to a branch that puts into "Poplar Creek" above "Obed Denham's mill-dam", thence down said branch to the creek, thence to "Denham's mill", one from the mouth of "Sugar-Tree Run" up to the State road leading from Williamsburgh to the mouth of Indian Creek, near the mouth of "Thomas Page's lane", and one to begin at Kelly Burk's mill, to intersect the first-mentioned road at Denham's mill-dam,---the viewers were John Brown, William Brown, and William Smith, and John Boggess surveyor.

October term, 1813, Levi Pigman, elected commissioner in place of Amos Smith, whose term had expired, appeared, and was sworn in. Foot & Tweed, for printing the expenditures of the county for year ending June 13, 1813, were allowed six dollars. The following grand jurors were ordered to be paid each two dollars and twenty-five cents: Isaac Ellis, Daniel Light, Jesse Justice, Reuben Leacock, Benjamin Smith, Abraham Leming, Nathaniel Barber, Jesse Smith, Joshua Davis, Luther Crane, William White, John Morris, Andrew McGrue, and John McLeadder. The official bond of George Ely, sheriff, in sum of four thousand dollars, with Robert Townsley, John Townsley, Thomas Cade, and Oliver Lindsey as securities, was presented, approved, and recorded.

December term, 1813, prison-bounds of the jail for debtors were fixed.

March term, 1814, fixed the license for ferries over the cast fork at fifty cents, and the ferriage rates as follows: For man and horse in high water, twelve and a half cents; for a foot-person, six and a quarter cents. Nicholas Sinks, for building a bridge (the second in the county) across "Little Stirling Creek", ten dollars. On the petition praying for an alteration of the road laid out from Augusta on a direction towards Franklinton (now part of Columbus, Ohio), to begin near "Three-Mile Tree", thence south on the ridge between White Oak and Bullskin, to intersect the Williamsburgh road near "First-Mile Tree", the viewers were Henry Thomas, Nathaniel Norris, and John Ross, and Joseph Wells as surveyor. Jeremiah Beck, coroner, for inquest held on the body of John Edmonds, was allowed fifteen dollars and ninety-three cents,---the second inquest on the county records. On the proposed road from near Zachariah Chapman's, on the north side of the east fork, thence, after intersecting Williamsburgh road, up "Full Grape Run" to the southwest corner of Jonathan Clark's survey, passing Jones' survey, intersecting the Obannon road from Milford to Warren County, the viewers were Benjamin Collins, Michael Swing, and Andrew Megrue, and Thomas Gatch surveyor. For the year 1814 the lands were rated, to wit:
Acres.
First-rate lands………………… 3,533
Second-rate lands…………. 149,391 ½
Third-rate lands………… …. 48,189 ½
Amount of taxes………… …. $1793.43

May term, 1814, for boarding Joseph Knott nine days in jail, there was allowed two dollars and twenty-five cents.

June term, 1814, Nicholas Sinks, county treasurer, presented his official bond in the sum of three thousand dollars, with Jacob Huber and John Norris securities; approved and filed. Ferry licenses were rated for the year as follows: on the Ohio River, at Staunton (mouth of Red Oak), six dollars; at Sell's, at Samuel Ellis', at Neville, three dollars; at Boude's, eight dollars; at Bullskin, four dollars; at all others to be established, three dollars; and at all other places where ferries are or may be established on the Little Miami or east fork, two dollars. Tavern licenses were rated, to wit: In Williamsburgh and Bethel, eight dollars; and all other points, six dollars. Ordered the clerk to the board to make out the levy on the county duplicates at the rate of twelve cents for each horse (studs excepted) and four cents per head of cattle, and on stud-horses at the rate each stands at the season for one mare.

September term, 1814, on the proposed road from the mouth of Sugar-Tree Run to the mouth of Boat Run, on the Ohio River, the viewers were Joseph Doly, George Brown, and Josiah Kerns, and Joseph Jackson surveyor. On the road wanted beginning at Ezekiel Hutchinson's, thence until it intersects "Anderson State road" at the east fork, the viewers chosen were Thomas S. Foote, Amos Smith, and George C. Light, the latter to act also as the surveyor.

November term, 1814, five dollars were appropriated to pay the board of Wray and Case, prisoners in jail.

December term, 1814, on the proposed road beginning near Duckwall's farm, about six miles from Williamsburgh, thence down the river-hill to the lower fork of the east fork, crossing from George Ely's farm, thence crossing the creek, and from the creek to intersect the road near the house of Joseph Gest, deceased, the viewers were Daniel Kidd, Abraham Hulick, and James Gest, with James Townsley as surveyor. On the wanted road on the mouth of Boat Run to the mouth of "Sugar-Camp Creek" the viewers chosen were John Collins, David White, and George Swing,---that is, to make the prayed-for alteration.

March term, 1815, a road desired from the Little Miami, opposite to "Wallsmith's tail-race", through the lands of William Salter, near said "Salter's warehouse", till it intersects the lands of Jonathan Megrue, so on through his and Andrew Megrue's lands to the line between said Megrue and Thomas Yates until it intersects the road from Milford. The viewers appointed were George Conrad, Thomas Gatch, and Ambrose Ranson, Conduce Gatch to do the surveying. On the proposed alteration of the Augusta and Cincinnati road, as asked by Jacob and George Moyer and Jacob Nofgar, the following viewers were selected: David Hoover, Charles Baum, Jr., and Benjamin Sells. The lands of the county were voted as follows for the year:

Acres.
First-rate lands……………………… 3,574 ½
Second-rate lands………… …….. 157,980
Third-rate lands…………………….. 49,948
Amount of taxes………………….. $5264.39 1/10

On the projected road from the mouth of Nine-Mile Creek up said stream by "Johns' mill", and so on to "Perins' mill", thence to the Three Forks, thence up the "Blue Lick Branch", to intersect the Denhamstown road where the road commonly called "Nash's" crosses, Isaiah Ferguson, John Brazier, and John McKee were the viewers, and Daniel Bailiff the surveyor. A road was asked from the junction of the road leading from West Union to the mouth of Clough Creek, and the road leading from Williamsburgh to the mouth of Twelve-Mile, passing "Bethel Meeting-House", through the lands of John Collins and David White, crossing the east fork at "Slab Camp", thence on until it intersects the Deerfield road near Samuel Mayham, and John Collins, Daniel Kidd, and John Leeds were selected viewers, and Daniel Bailiff surveyor. On the prayed-for road from Kelly Burke's mill to and beyond the plantations of Solomon Wells and Aaron Wells, and there intersect the Bethel and Boude's Ferry road, the viewers were Gerard Parris, James South, and John Morris, with John Boggess as surveyor.

August term, 1815, the jailer was allowed five dollars for boarding prisoners,---Isaac Hulings, Morgan Wray, Samuel Keely, and Thomas Eldridge.

September term, 1815, on the proposed road beginning in the West Union road near James Downey's, to run in the direction of George Ely's on the east fork, and thereabouts intersect the Williamsburgh road, the viewers were Elijah Mattox, John Troy, and James Downey, with Daniel Bailiff as surveyor. On the road projected from Moses Broadwell's to tap the Denhamstown road, the viewers were Henry Apple, William Brunongin, and John Brazier, with Daniel Bailiff as surveyor. On the road from "Two-Mile Tree" on Cincinnati road to "Beckleshymer's mill", the viewers were Jacob Slye, Frederick Eppert, and Pherochas Thomas, and James Townsley surveyor. On the proposed road from "the town of Batavia" (mentioned for the first time in the county records, except the record of its plat in recorder's office), thence down the east fork to "Townsley mill", thence crossing the "mill-race" and through a lane between the farms of Ezekiel Dimmitt and Robert Townsley, to intersect Williamsburgh road near said Townsley's house, the viewers were Abraham Hulick, Jacob Vorhies, and Peter Emery, with James Townsley as surveyor. John Archerd, Everand Bettle, and David Brown were appointed to alter the New Richmond and Bethel road, asked for by Nathan Nichols and others. To view an alteration in the Milford and August road were John McCollum, William Huling, and George Brown were appointed.

November term, 1815, John Shaw appeared as the commissioner elected in place of Amos Ellis, whose term had expired. David Morris was now the public printer, and published the expenditures of the county for a year for six dollars. Oliver Lindsey, re-elected sheriff, presented his bond, of four thousand dollars, with Thomas Cade, John Earhart, T.S. Foote, John Kain, and R. Sharp as securities; same approved and recorded. On the proposed road from Benjamin Penn's, on Indian Creek, to the Cincinnati road or near "Nathaniel Chapman's saw-mill", and thence up "Chapman's Run" on to the Cincinnati road, Joseph Lakin, Israel Joslin, and Robert Brown were the viewers, and Benjamin Penn the surveyor. A road was asked beginning at the bank of the Little Miami opposite "James Pollack's mill", thence to cross a public highway between Silas Hutchinson and "Avery Riggs' improvement" on so far as Isaac Elstun, thence to intersect a road from John Hughes' to Mr. Sweet's, on the east fork, or to pass by Nathaniel Barber's to the Deerfield road. Robert Orr, Nathaniel Barber, and Alexander Brannon were viewers, and James Pollock the surveyor. On the road asked from New Richmond to intersect the road from "Ferguson's Ferry" to Williamsburgh, the viewers were Jonathan Donham, Jacob Ulrey, and Hugh Ferguson, and George C. Light surveyor.

March term, 1816, on the road from the forks of Bear Creek, where the road to Neville crosses, thence up the main branch of the creek, past "Jackson's tanyard" (the second one mentioned on the records), past Samuel Holland's, continuing up the creek past Mathew Boner's "sugar camp" (first recorded in the county), and to cross "Lubber Run", where "Manning's old mill" road crosses the same, to pass on between Elijah Wiley's and "Col. Gideon Minor", and so on past Elisha Manning's to intersect what is called "Penn's Head", near "Wiley's saw-mill", Joseph Daughters, Elisha Manning, and Joseph Lakin were viewers, and Gideon Minor surveyor. Viewers were sent out to view a way for a road beginning on the road from Bethel to Neville, near the plantation of John Trees, Jr., on between the line of James Hodges and Edward Sapp, thence on or near the line of Christopher Armacost and Frederick Sapp, thence on to intersect the road from Bethel to Point Pleasant. On the road from New Richmond to the State road near David Jernegan's, by way of Mark Stinchfield's school-house (third one mentioned on the records), the viewers were John Donham, Joseph Fagin, and George Brown, with Samuel Herrick surveyor. Eleven dollars and eighty cents was paid for keeping John Allison in jail forty days.

June term, 1816, the lands were rated as follows for the year:

First-rate lands……………………………………… 3,596 ¾ acres.
Second-rate lands……………………………………103,467 ¼ "
Third-rate lands…………………………………… .. 50, 933 ¾ "
Amount of taxes……………………………………$4, 549.94 9/10

Tavern and ferry licenses same as in year 1814. A number of petitioners wanted the dividing line between Washington and Ohio townships better defined, and the town of Point Pleasant attached to the former, and it was ordered that the line begin on the Ohio River, at the lower corner of Henry Ludlam's and upper corner of Henry Bushman's land, thence on a straight to the corner of Tate and Washington townships (it being near John Clingler's) and that Andrew McLaine survey the same. A road was ordered viewed beginning in Danby's road on the north side of east fork just below "McCollum's and Higby's saw-mill", to intersect the Twelve-Mile road. A road from Moses Fountain's, in Union township, to the east fork, and also one from the school-house opposite Dr. Allison's place up the east road to meet the road from Jacob Whetstone's, were asked, and Zebina Williams, Shadrach Lane, and Thomas Robertson were selected to view the same, and Mathew Fountain to survey them.

November term, 1816, the jailer was allowed twenty dollars and fifty cents for board of John Moore, William Landen, Robery Sanford Larrimora, prisoners in jail.

April term, 1817, Daniel S. Smith furnished irons for jail at one dollar sixty-two and a half cents, and Samuel Cade was allowed three dollars for services as court constable.

June term, 1817, the road from Batavia through Gray's and Troy's lands to Charles Robinson's, thence to Catlett's survey, thence to Twelve-Mile road, was ordered to be viewed by Shadrach Lane, Joseph Dole, and Joseph Jackson, with Samuel Herrick as surveyor. The county paid Samuel Cade, the jailer, eight dollars and fifty cents for boarding the prisoners in jail,---to wit: Samuel Hulings, John Pyle, Isaac Ford, and Jonathan Bullin,---and ferry licenses for the year were rated as follows: On the Ohio River, at Ripley, eight dollars; at Abraham Sell's, four dollars; at John Boude's, ten dollars; at the mouth of Bullskin, five dollars; at all other points where ferries are or may be established, three dollars; for all places on the Little Miami, where they are or may be put up, two dollars; and for Bullskin, over its mouth, one dollar. The tavern licenses were priced as follows: At Williamsburgh, eight dollars; at Bethel, Milford, Batavia, Ripley, and Point Pleasant, seven dollars; and at all other points, six dollars. The report of the viewers---Nathan Corbin, Jeptha Moore, and Nathan Nichols---on the alteration of the Cincinnati and Augusta road was confirmed. Samuel Shaw was allowed twelve dollars and ninety-five cents for services as coroner in holding an inquest on the dead body of Joseph Knott, killed on Stonelick by the citizens acting as vigilance committees for the dispersion of horse-thieves and offenders generally. On the road wanted from Neville beginning at the ferry occupied by Jacob Iler to the foot of the hill, thence to intersect a road leading to "Wiley's saw-mill", near the forks of Bear Creek, the viewers were Lemuel Stephenson, Samuel Holland, and Thomas Jones, with Gideon Minor as surveyor. A road was asked beginning on a road leading from "Benjamin Penn's mill" to William Winter's, crossing the Augusta road, and to intersect the road to West Union, and Thomas Jones, Richard Lamar, and William Coshoe were viewers, with Gideon Minor as surveyor. On the road wanted to begin in the road running from Ferguson's ferry to the Round Bottom, thence past "Durham's improvement", to intersect the road from "Jarret's Station" to the county-line, the viewers were John White, William Robb, and John Hunter, with Daniel Bailiff as surveyor.

August term, 1817, on the petition of Martin Pease and others to lay out a road from the West Union road near John Temple's till it intersects the Ten-Mile road, the viewers were Chapman Arther, Andrew Pinkham, and Charles Robinson, and Daniel Bailiff the surveyor. To lay out a road beginning at the farm of William Harris, near the mouth of a run formerly called "McKinney's Run", thence up Stonelick to the county-line, the viewers were Josiah Prickett, Abraham Leming, and William Sloane. On the road wanted from Mechanicsburgh (now Chilo) to intersect the road from Bullskin to William Fee's, the viewers were Joseph Lakin, Samuel Holland, and William Bartley, and Gideon Minor surveyor.

December term, 1817, Andrew Foote appeared as the commissioner elected at the October election. To lay out a road from Jesse Glaney's, on the Williamsburgh road, thence to O'Bannon Creek through the farms of Jacob Stroup and Frederick Doughm, and on to the county-line, the viewers were Lewis Fryberger, John Glaney, and Daniel Mangen, and John Hill the surveyor. To lay out the road wanted from Milford up the lane of Andrew Megrue, intersecting and following the road to the Little Miami, thence up to "Kugler's mill" to the mill-dam, thence up to and on Harner's Run to "Abner Hixon's mill", thence through the lands of Kugler and Wallsmith till it intersects the public road between William Havison's and Samuel Potts, the viewers were Thomas Gatch, Robert Orr, and John Stroup, and Conduce Gatch the surveyor.

March term, 1818, on the alteration of the Bolanders' road, the viewers---John Logan, Naaman Chapman, and Allen B. Hughes---made their report, and same approved. Samuel Cade, jailer, for boarding William Riley, a criminal, thirty days, John McLean twenty-eight days, and John Williams nineteen days, was allowed sixteen dollars and twenty-five cents. The three associate judges, Alexander Blair, John Morris, and Philip Gatch, each for ten days' services at the March term of Common Pleas Court, were allowed thirty dollars. The lands for the year were rated as follows:
Acres.
First rate…………………………… 3,334 ¾
Second-rate………………………. 181,411 ¼
Third-rate…………………………. 59,640 ½
Amount of tax……………………. $3384.44
Interest and penalties………… $232.74 ½

Total amount…………………… $3617.18 ½

May term, 1818, bills for the boarding of Benjamin Moore and John McCaw in jail were paid. The board made an appropriation of a part of the twenty per cent of land-tax to be laid out in making roads and bridges, as follows: On the road from Point Pleasant through Neville to county-line, and known as the river road, one hundred dollars, under the superintendence of John Hunter; on the road from Neville passing Alexander Case's to where it intersects the State road, near William Fee's, the sum of seventy-five dollars, under the superintendence of John Newkirk; on the road from Neville to Williamsburgh, passing Lemuel Stephenson's and intersecting Penn's road at "Richard's saw-mill", seventy-five dollars, under the superintendence of Gideon Minor; on the road from Milford to Williamsburgh, one hundred dollars, under person to be appointed at June term; on the road from Williamsburgh to Lebanon (or that part that lies between Stonelick and Jesse Smith's), seventy-five dollars, under charge of Ambrose Ranson; a further appropriation of two hundred and fifty dollars towards the erection of a bridge (the third mentioned on the county records) across the east fork of the Little Miami at the town of Williamsburgh, likewise the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars towards the erection of a bridge over same stream at Batavia, under charge of persons to be selected at the coming June term. These were the first regular appropriations for roads in the county, and the third and fourth for bridges, and the total sum appropriated---nine hundred and twenty-five dollars---was considered a new departure from the old ruts and the harbinger of future and still greater internal improvements soon to follow.

June term, 1818, tavern licenses were rated as follows: At Williamsburgh, eight dollars; at Milford, Batavia, and Bethel, seven dollars; at New Richmond, Point Pleasant, Neville, and Felicity, six dollars; and at all other places where inns may be opened, five dollars. The ferry licenses were priced on the Ohio River, to wit: At mouth of Bullskin, five dollars; at all other points where ferries are or may be established, three dollars; on the Little Miami, two dollars; on the east fork, one dollar and a half; and across Bullskin at its mouth, one dollar. On the proposed road from "Higby's grist-mill" to "Collins & Blackman's saw-mill", thence to Batavia, thence to "Dennison mill", thence to intersect the road from Williamsburgh to Milford, the viewers were David White, Daniel Husong, and Malichi Medaris, and Alexander Blair surveyor. The report of James Robb, Robert Donham, and Nathan Nichols on the road, beginning on the Hamilton county-line, thence through New Richmond to Point Pleasant, was presented and approved. Nicholas Sinks was allowed an order for two dollars and twelve and a half cents, that being the amount paid by him to the postmaster of Williamsburgh for postage for the county during the year past. Allen Stevens, jailer, for keeping William Amann, a prisoner, twenty-one days in jail, received five dollars and twenty-five cents. Board reappointed Nicholas Sinks county treasurer; he had been in this office since 1804.

The commissioners made further appropriations of the twenty per cent land-tax collected by law for the use of roads and bridges: On the road from Cincinnati to Augusta, known by the name of "River road" (on that part that runs from the Hamilton county-line to Big Indian Creek), one hundred dollars, under the superintendence of Micah Gilbert; likewise on the road from New Richmond to Williamsburgh, one hundred dollars, under the charge of James Robb. On the Milford and Williamsburgh road improvements, Thomas Gatch was appointed commissioner, and Alexander Blair to superintend the building of the Batavia bridge; on the proposed road from Moscow to the Buchanan Settlement, Gideon Minor was ordered to make the survey.

July term, 1818, on the road from "Warren's mills" up to and passing "James Robb's saw-mill", to intersect the Milford road at the lower end of Jacob Fisher's lane, Daniel Bailiff made the survey. An order was issued to the Franklin township trustees to open a road from the mouth of Bullskin to "Shinkle's saw-mill". On the road from Chilo (then called Mechanicsburgh) to "Levi and Joshua Pigman's mill", on Willow Creek, thence to intersect the county road on Bear Creek at or near Samuel Holland's, the viewers were William Botts, William Barkley, and Joseph Lakin, and James Sargent as surveyor. The county taxes of the various townships this year were: Ohio, $229.95; Miami, $158.22; Batavia, $71.87; Tate, $120.40; Stonelick, $71.44; Williamsburgh, $148; the amounts of Union and Washington not stated.

November term, 1818, Shadlach Lane, elected commissioner at October election, appeared and was qualified. On the road from Milford crossing the Deerfield road near John Glancy's, thence to Stonelick Creek near John Shields', the viewers were Samuel Perrin, John Pollock, and Robert Orr, with Thomas Gatch as surveyor. On the proposed Clover Lick road past Adam Bricker's to Williamsburgh, the viewers were John Shotwell, Isaac Line, and David Light, with George C. Light as surveyor. On the road wanted from Ezekiel Hutchinson's to Williamsburgh, thence crossing Pleasant Run, thence crossing "Stony Road", till it intersects a road near "Grassy Run", the viewers were Ephraim McAdams, Jacob Huber, and William Hunter, with Benjamin Ellis as surveyor. A road was asked from Batavia to James Glancy's, then to the Anderson State road, thence to "Glancy's mills", and John Feree, Isaac Voris, and Daniel Husong were the viewers, with Alexander Blair surveyor.

January term, 1819, Thomas Kain presented his official bond as coroner elected, in the sum of two thousand dollars, with the following securities: David C. Bryan, George S. Bryan, Daniel Kain, and John Kain; same approved and recorded.

March term, 1819, on the road from the "tan-yard" of John Richards, on Big Indian, through John Whorton's lane, to intersect the State road at Robert Carr's, the viewers were William Thompson, William Higgin, and Aquila Taylor, and John Boggess surveyor. On the road wanted from the State road in Union township, crossing Matthew's survey, thence through the lands of the Days and Broadwell to county-line, the viewers were George Stockton, John White, Samuel Lane, and Isaac James surveyor. On the road from Thomas Brunton's by Reuben Crossley, intersecting a road up the east fork at Robert Townsley's, the viewers were Christopher Troy, Samuel Lane, and Thomas Robinson, with Alex. Blair surveyor. The road from Batavia to John Brazier's, to intersect the Nine-Mile road, was ordered, with Robert Townsley, Robert D. Lane, and David White as viewers, and E. Chichester surveyor. On the proposed road beginning at the "Upper Cincinnati road" near a school-house, thence by John Marsh to Hezekiah Bainum, thence to John Trees, thence to intersect the river road near "Isaac Moreton's saw-mill", the viewers were Leonard Simmons, Thomas Hitch, and Thomas Ashburn, and Joseph Jackson surveyor. Out of the twenty per cent, land-tax for bridges and roads was appropriated: For the Williamsburgh and Cincinnati road, to be used between Christopher Apple's and the farm lately owned by Moses Broadwell, one hundred dollars, under the superintendence of Samuel Lane; on the road from Williamsburgh to Lebanon, between Jesse Glancy's and James Coombs, fifty dollars, under the charge of Jesse Smith; on the Cincinnati road, from Nine-Mile to Point Pleasant, seventy-five dollars, under supervision of Levi Moss; on the road from Williamsburgh to the mouth of Bullskin, seventy-five dollars, under the direction of Joshua Hicks; and on the road from Bethel to the mouth of Clough Creek, one hundred dollars, under charge of Thomas West. Lands this year were rated as follows:

First-rate…………………….. 1,491 ¼ acres.
Second-rate………………...135,618 "
Third-rate………………… 45,542 ¾ "

Amount of tax……… … $2866.02.4
Interest and penalties… .. 179.43.3

Total amount……… …. $3045.45.7

The land-rates above given were for resident proprietors only.

June term, 1819, in making out the duplicate the following rates were observed: On all horses, mares, mules, or asses, eighteen and three-fourth cents per head; on each head of neat cattle, six and one-fourth cents; and on all town-lots, one half of one per cent on their valuation, exclusive of improvements thereon. Ferry licenses were this year rated: At mouth of Bullskin, six dollars; at Neville, Point Pleasant, and New Richmond, five dollars; at all other points on the Ohio where ferries are or may be established, four dollars; at all places on the Little Miami, two dollars; and on all other waters in the county, one dollar. The rates of ferriage on the Ohio were made the highest the law allows, and on other waters: For each foot-person, six and one-quarter cents; man and horse, twelve and one-half cents; loaded wagon and team, fifty cents; for any other four-wheeled carriage or empty wagon and team, thirty-seven and one-half cents; for loaded cart and team, twenty-five cents; for any empty cart and team, sled, sleigh and team, eighteen and three-quarter cents; for every horse, mule, mare, ass, or head of neat cattle, five cents; and for every head of hogs or sheep, two cents. Nicholas Sinks, reappointed county treasurer, gave bond, with D.C. Bryan, George Brown, and Benjamin Ellis as securities. Lemuel Stephenson was appointed county collector of State taxes and of the county levies for this year. On the proposed road from the east fork below "Dryer's mill", to intersect the road leading from Williamsburgh to "Beckleheimer's mill", near John Wageman, the viewers were Charles Robinson, Michael Roseberry, and Robert Doughty, with Daniel Bailiff surveyor. Lemuel Stephenson's bond as county collector, with Gideon Minor, Elisha Manning, Absalom Wood as securities, was approved.

October term, 1819, the official bond of Holly Raper, elected sheriff in October, in sum of four thousand dollars, was presented with the following securities thereon: John Kain, Nicholas Sinks, Thomas Kain, Isaac Foster, Daniel Hankins, Titus Everhart, and David C. Bryan; duly approved.

December term, 1819, on the proposed road from near the mouth of the lane between James Ward and Geo. W. Stockton, till it intersected the West Union road near Gideon Witham's house, the viewers were Nathan Sutton, John Brazier, and Samuel Lane, with Isaac James as surveyor.

June term, 1820, appropriations were made, to wit: On the river road from Point Pleasant to Hamilton county-line, the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, under direction of Levi Moss; on the same road, from Point Pleasant to Brown county-line, the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars, under the control of Joshua Pigman; on the road from "Feestown" to Williamsburgh, one hundred dollars, under the supervision of John Morris; on the road from Williamsburgh to Lebanon, one hundred and twenty-five dollars, under the charge of William Glancy; on the road from Williamsburgh to Cincinnati,---that is, on that part between Batavia and the Brown county-line,---one hundred and twenty dollars, under the superintendence of Henry Kain, and on that part from Batavia township line to that of Hamilton County, ninety dollars, in charge of Samuel Lane; on the road from Batavia to Milford, one hundred dollars, under direction of Alexander Blair; on the road from Williamsburgh to Cincinnati,---that is, that part between the east fork and Batavia township line,---forty dollars, under control of Robert Townsley; and on the road from Bethel to mouth of Clough Creek, fifty dollars, under charge of Martin Pease. John Earhart was appointed county collector of the land-tax, with orders to collect the county levy of such townships where the township listers refuse to accept the collection. The making of a suitable board fence around the public buildings was awarded to Isaac Line, at eighty-seven dollars. On the new road beginning at the mouth of Townsend Thacker's lane, in Wayne township, on the road from Milford to the head of Stonelick, thence by Jacob Binkley's to "Nathan Shumard's grist-mill", on Stonelick, to intersect the road from John Shields to Conrad Hersh's, the viewers were Jacob Binkley, Josiah Prickett, and Samuel Shumard, with John Hill as surveyor.

August term, 1820, on the road beginning on the Warren county-line near "William Eaton's grist-mill", thence through Gabriel Kern's lane to the "market-house in Goshen", thence on the nearest and best way to Townsend Thacker's house, the viewers were Mahlon Smith, John Gest, and Silas Hutchinson, with John Hill as surveyor. On the road from Robert Donham's lane to "John Donham's mill", on Twelve-Mile Creek, the appraisers were John Shaw, Hezekiah Lindsey, and James Robb, with George C. Light as surveyor. The report of Andrew Pinkham, Wm. Brown, and Abram Conrey on the New Bethel and New Richmond road was received.

October term, 1820, Nicholas Sinks, the county treasurer for sixteen years, having resigned, John Kain was appointed to the vacancy, and gave bond in four thousand dollars, with Daniel Everhart, Titus Everhart, Daniel Hankins, David Light, Stephen Smith, and Daniel Smith as securities.

November term, 1820, no business was done save the swearing in the new commissioner, George J. Troutwine.

December term, 1820, on the road from "Glancy's mill", past William Megrue's, to intersect the road from the "Company's mill", on the Little Miami, to Nathaniel Barber's, the viewers were John Gest, Mahlon Smith, and John Charles, with Conduce Gatch as surveyor. On the new road from "William Plummer's mill", on Bullskin, to intersect the road from Boude's Ferry to Bethel, the viewers were James Johnson, David Owens, and Samuel Truett, with Joseph Wells as surveyor. On the new road beginning on the Indian road, near Charles Henderson's farm, to intersect the Boat Run road near the school-house, and on the road between Reeve's and Morgan's lane, to intersect the road leading to "John Denham's mill", the viewers were Jesse Justice, Jr., Isaac South, and Jonathan Vandike, with William Lytle as surveyor. On petition of twelve land-owners, a view for a way of a road was ordered, beginning where the Nine-Mile road crosses Shaylor's Run to Robert D. Lane's place. Peter Emery, James Thomas, and Robert Townsley were the viewers, and Samuel Ewing the surveyor.

June term, 1821, a road was laid out beginning at Jonathan Megrue's "peach-orchard", passing "John Hixton's mill", on Harner's Run, and the viewers of same were Philip Smysor, Bethual Covalt, and John Leming, Thomas Gatch making the survey. John Kain was appointed county treasurer, and Elijah T. Penn collector of both State and county levies.

June term, 1822, the commissioners audited and allowed the accounts of the following listers and appraisers for services:

James Fox, Stonelick, eleven days, $11.
Benjamin Laymon, Wayne, five days, $5.
Elijah Shaw, Franklin, thirteen days, $13.
Jacob Webber, Franklin, three days, $3.
Joseph F. Bocum, Ohio, nineteen days, $19.
John Swem, Ohio, two days, $2.
Rezin Hill, Goshen, nine days, $9.
Daniel Weaver, Goshen, one day, $1.
Laban Brazier, Batavia, eleven days, $11.
Israel Whitaker, Batavia, three-fourths of a day, 75 cents.
Isaac L. Malott, Union, three-fourths of a day, 75 cents.
Samuel Shaw, Miami, thirteen days, $13,
Isaac Covalt, Miami, two and a half days, $2.50.
William Dowdney, tate, twelve days, $12.
John Fasemire, Washington, thirteen and three-fourths of a day, $13.75.
Isaac Mitchell, Washington, two days, $2.
John Earhart, Williamsburgh, twelve days, $12.
Isaac Foster, Williamsburgh, two days, $2.

Thomas Kain appointed county treasurer, and John Beatty collector, and the former gave bond, with Thomas Kain, John Kain, William Waters, and Daniel S. Smith as securities.

June term, 1823, the board voted to give the collector of land-tax five per cent on all moneys collected, and the collector of county levies ten per cent.

June term, 1824, the following listers and appraisers made their reports, and were paid as follows:
Absalom Manning, Franklin, $14.50.
Alfred Holland, Franklin, $3.
William Dowdney, Tate, $13.25.
Aaron Wells, Tate, $1.
James Wilson, Washington, $13.50.
Jeremiah Woods, Washington, $3.
Christian Binkley, Wayne, $6.
Reason Hill, Goshen, $7.
Gamaliel Hooker, Goshen, $1.
Ralph Carnes, Ohio, $20.
Seneca Palmer, Ohio, $3.
Francis Shumard, Miami, $13.
Henry Shumard, Miami, $2.
Thomas Cook, Stonelick, $9.
Benjamin South, Stonelick, $1.
Isaac L. Malott, Union, $8.
John Earhart, Williamsburgh, $12.
Isaac Foster, Williamsburgh, $2.
Israel Whitaker, Batavia, $9.50.
Jesse Ellis, Batavia, $2.

The following rates of taxation were levied: On each head of horses, mares, mules, or asses, thirty cents; on each head of neat cattle, ten cents; and on all town-lots, one-half of one per cent on the valuation, exclusive of the improvements.

March term, 1825, a further appropriation of one hundred and nine dollars thirty and a half cents was made towards the completion of the Batavia bridge.

June term, 1826, Thomas Kain was appointed keeper of the standard measure at the seat of justice, to keep said standard and seal agreeably to an act regulating measures.

December term, 1827, made an appropriation of twenty-five dollars and sixty-two and a half cents, balance of the three per cent fund, for the road from Chillicothe to Cincinnati, towards repairing the bridge at Batavia, and also an additional sum of twenty-four dollars and thirty-seven and a half cents to be so applied.

August term, 1829, the contract for building the new Batavia bridge was awarded to W.H. Robinson, at three thousand five hundred and seventy-nine dollars, but not given to him, it being considered too high, and at December term was finally given to James Robb, at two thousand eight hundred and thirty-three dollars.



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