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Clermont County, Ohio
Genealogy and History


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HISTORY OF
CLERMONT COUNTY, OHIO

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BY J. L. ROCKEY AND R. J. BANCROFT, published 1880


Transcribed for Genealogy Trails by Nina Kramer


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CHAPTER XII.

INTERNAL IMPROVEMENTS, AND GENERAL STATISTICS FROM 1824 TO 1879
In the preceding chapter an account is given of the early county roads and by whom located, but the first public road laid out through the county that was Newtown to Williamsburgh, ordered to be established by the justices of the Court of Quarter Sessions of Hamilton County, Nov. 24, 1797. It had been previously surveyed by John Donnell, assisted by Daniel Kain and Robert McKinney. In the summer of 1798 it was opened for travel, and was for so many years the principal east-and-west thoroughfare. Shortly afterwards the road from West Union to the mouth of Clough Creek was established, and in 1804 the General Assembly declared it a post-road. In1804 was also passed an act authorizing the building of the Anderson State road, running from Chillicothe to Cincinnati through the townships of Jackson, Stonelick, and Miami. It was opened for travel in the summer of 1806. In 1808 the Legislature enacted that the road from the mouth of Bullskin to Xenia be ordered to be laid out as a State road. Subsequently other State roads were located in Clermont and through its territory, the one from Neville to Hillsboro in 1820.

Acts were passed in 1815 and 1821 under which the toll-bridge over the Little Miami at Milford was built, and in 1822 was constructed the bridge over Twelve-Mile Creek, in Ohio township. In 1838 was enacted the law authorizing the Williamsburgh bridge to be built, over the east fork, on the highway which had been declared a State road in 1834.

The first turnpike opened in the county was the Cincinnati, Columbus, and Wooster, incorporated in 1827. The length of this road was twenty-two miles, or nearly that distance, and it commenced at the corporation line in Cincinnati, ran through Milford, terminating at Goshen. This was, and is yet, a fine pike, and as early as 1831 paid an annual dividend of twenty-four per cent. The amount of its capital stock (3032 shares) was $151,600; amount of the subscription of the State, $75,800; amount of the subscription of individuals, $75,800.

To show what this road of twenty-two miles did before the full inauguration of railways, we give its amount of tolls received for the year ending Nov. 15, 1847, which were $18,585.22. The total expenses for the same year, including repairs and salaries, were $6188.18, leaving for dividends $13,644, to be equally divided between State and the individual stockholders. This road had no construction debts, and was therefore a rich mine to its lucky stockholders and a great benefit to the county.

In 1831 the Legislature incorporated the Milford and Chillicothe Turnpike Company, which constructed a road from Milford to Chillicothe, a distance of seventy-eight miles, forty-two and a half of which was splendidly macadamized, thirty-two and a half graded, and three ungraded. It passed through Perin's Mills, Boston, and Marathon, and was an important factor in building up the north of Clermont, contributing wonderfully to the development of Milford, then the great commercial mart of the county. Its capital stock was $344,000, held in equal portions by the State and individuals, and for many years its president was Governor Allen Trimble, of Hillsboro. For the year ending Nov. 15, 1849, its receipts were $10,498.60, and its expenditures $4115.72,---leaving the profits at $6382.63, to be divided between the State and individual stockholders.

In 1831 was also incorporated the Ohio Turnpike Company, from Cincinnati to Portsmouth, but the road was built only twenty-one and a half miles in length, commencing at the Little Miami River, at Union Bridge, Hamilton Co., and ending at Bethel. For the year ending Nov. 29, 1846, its receipts were $4294.71, and its profits, after paying all expenses and repairs, $1617.63, which were paid over to the receiver appointed by the Clermont Common Pleas Court. The original charter gave this road the privilege to be built into Cincinnati; but an amended act, repealing part of its first act, subsequently limited it to running to Union Bridge, where it intersected the Wooster pike. Maurice Witham was its president, and Thomas Sheldon secretary, in 1846 and 1847. The total amount of stock in this pike paid by the State was $55,000; by individuals, $50,000. For the year ending Nov. 15, 1847, the tolls received were $5151.24; amount expended for repairs and salaries, $2962.18; amount paid William Howard, late receiver, $542.46; and amount left in hands of treasurer, John Quinlain (at that time receiver), $1646.60. In 1834 was incorporated The Batavia Turnpike and Miami Bridge Company, whose pike began at Union Bridge and terminated at Batavia. The amount of stock subscribed by the State was six hundred and five shares ($30,250), and by individuals six hundred and fifteen shares ($30,750). Its receipts for the year closing Nov. 3, 1847, were $4513, of which $274.66 were paid to the State treasurer; $1920.46 to its receiver, S.F. Norris; and the balance went for repairs and salaries. Its length was thirteen and one-half miles. William Edwards was its president from 1847 to 1849. In 1849 its tolls amounted to $4011.96, of which $1825 went into the receiver's hands for benefit of creditors.

In 1832 the Goshen, Martinsville, and Leesburg Pike Company was chartered, but never amounted to much; but in 1836 was incorporated the Goshen, Wilmington, and Columbus Pike. This pike was completed from Goshen to Wilmington,---a distance of twenty-five miles. Its total amount of stock was,---owned by the State of Ohio (two thousand and fifty-four and one-half shares), $102,725; by individuals, $119,050. In 1849, Isaiah Morris was its president. For the year ending November 15th its tolls, owing to the cholera epidemic and other causes, amounted to only $1948.95. These roads---while most of them were not profitable investments financially to the State and individuals---were of great value to the people at large, and aided greatly in developing the resources of this and adjoining counties, affording outlets for agricultural productions, and in the improved facilities for general travel.

There have been in the county at different periods other turnpikes than the old ones above noted.

The New Richmond and Bethel Turnpike Company was incorporated in 1849, and in a few years was completed to within two miles of Laurel. About four years ago it was turned over to the county, and it has since been used as a free turnpike.

The New Richmond, Nicholsville and Williamsburgh Turnpike Company was also incorporated in 1849. It was completed to within one and a half miles of Nicholsville. It was used as a toll-road a number of years, but in 1876 it was turned over to the county commissioners, who ordained it a free turnpike.

The Milford, Edenton and Woodville Plank-Road Company was incorporated in 1851, and its second installment of stock paid June 16th of that year. In a few years it was changed to a turnpike, and it is now in use as such from where it intersects the Chillicothe pike, a little more than a mile east of Milford, to the Dunkard meeting-house, near Edenton. James B. Shaw was the first president of the company. B.F. Clark is the present president and James Clark secretary of the company.

The Ten-Mile Valley Turnpike. running from the point of its intersection with the Cincinnati, Columbia, and New Richmond pike to Lindale, was incorporated about 1861, but was never fully completed; and about three years ago it was turned over to the county and made a free pike.

The New Richmond and Ohio Turnpike and Plank-Road Company, from New Richmond to the Ohio pike, east of Amelia, was built in 1852-1853, and is still in operation as a toll-road.

The Cincinnati, Columbia, and New Richmond Turnpike, along the Ohio River, was completed about 1865, and is yet maintained as a toll-road.

The Union Turnpike Company was organized in 1858 to build a turnpike from Batavia to Ohio pike, a little east of Amelia. John Johnston was the first president, and the road was completed in 1868. The turnpike is yet kept up, and most of the stock is owned by the heirs of Azariah Davis.

The Batavia, Williamsburgh and Brown County Turnpike was built in 1850-51, and on the 1st of July of the latter year its sixth installment of ten per cent was due. Thomas L. Shields was the first president of this road, which is yet in operation between Batavia and Williamsburgh.

The first installment towards the construction of The Moscow, Indian Creek and Point Isabel Turnpike was due June 24, 1851, and the first of the Felicity and Chilo Turnpike Oct. 25, 1856, but neither proved a success as a toll-road.

The famous and historical Madisonville, Camargo and Obannon Turnpike, which was built over a third of a century ago through Miami township, is now a county road free of tolls.

The free turnpikes were constructed in Clermont County under the laws of April 5, 1866, and March 29, 1867, which have proved of great benefit to the localities through which they pass. The laws provided that when a majority of the resident and real-estate owners living within two miles on each side of the contemplated road petitioned the county commissioners, a free pike might be built, if deemed a public necessity, by assessing the cost of its construction upon said owners of real estate in proportion to their distances and benefits to be derived from the road. On Dec. 4, 1866, a petition of residents and freeholders within two miles of the projected free turnpike from Bethel to Felicity was received by the commissioners, who appointed Robert Buchanan, Reuben Lanham, and Samuel Buchanan as viewers of the same. They reported it a public necessity and of general utility on March 5, 1867, and estimated its cost at $4250 per mile, including bridges. The commissioners decided to build it twenty-five feet in width, to be macadamized fourteen feet wide, twelve inches deep in centre and eight at each side, of four inches of coarsely-broken stone for foundation, and the balance of stone finely broken. The same viewers, on June 3rd, made return of their apportionment of the valuations of the different freeholders to be taxed, which was adopted, and the taxes for building it and the others were put in five annual payments, and bonds were issued by the county and sold to pay the construction debts as fast as they fell due. C.W. Page, county surveyor, was superintendent and engineer of the survey and construction.

The petition of the resident freeholders for the Felicity and Utopia pike, by way of Rural, was presented Dec. 4, 1866, and William Richey, Henry Bolander, and Thomas Hurley, as viewers, made their report for the following March, and also their assessment valuations of the lands and lots to be taxed. The assessments of taxes on this pike amounted to $22,572.92.

The petition for the Felicity and Moscow free pike was likewise filed Dec. 4, 1866, and the persons who viewed and made the land and lot valuations were William Dixon, Enoch Reed, and John Kinney, who estimated its cost as follows: First four miles at $3100 per mile, or $12,400; the remaining four miles at $1700 per mile or $6800; in all $19,200; but the assessments on the duplicates footed up $34,030.

The Felicity and Chilo free pike was petitioned for April 23, 1867, and the land apportionment of it was made by N.S. Stevens, A.J. Trees, and J.B. Brannen, its view having been made by Peter Camerer, J.B. Brannen, and George Thompson.

The petition for the Mount Carmel and Nine-Mile pike was filed March 6, 1867, and the road was viewed and the lands apportioned by Orin Temple, J.R,. Corbly, and Moses Elstun. Its entire assessments were $33,182.57, while its estimated cost was $3000 per mile.

June 27, 1867, came the petition for Lyndon and Nicholsville pike, beginning at the junction of the Ten-Mile Valley pike where it intersected the New Richmond, Mount Pisgah and Ohio turnpike to James Slater's, or to the contemplated road from Big Indian, near Israel Smith's via Point Isabel; Salt Air, and Nicholsville, to the Ohio turnpike, at Back Run bridge. The viewers and land-appraisers were J.R. Foster, William Eppert, and E.G. Ricker, and Thomas W. Rathbone surveyor. Its estimated cost was $7766.

The petition for the Newtonsville and Brownsville pike was presented on June 6, 1867, and its viewers and appraisers of lands and lots were M.S. Pickelheimer, Silas Muchmore, William McKinney, and J.D. Murphy,---the latter in the apportionment taking the place of M.S. Pickelheimer, appointed its engineer. It's estimated cost was $3000 per mile.

June 3, 1867, the petition for the Neville and Boat Run pike came in, and it was viewed and the lands appraised by William Padget, N.S. Stevens, and W.C. Page. Its estimated cost was $3500 per mile, but the apportionment and costs amounted to $37,721.13.

On Dec. 4, 1867, was received the petition for the pike from Felicity, by way of Laurel, to intersect the Boat Run and New Richmond road, near Carmel graveyard, in Monroe township. The viewers and appraisers were Samuel W. McKinney, James Waterfield, and James Goslin, who estimated it to cost $3500 per mile. It was finished only two miles, to Israel Smith's, and its cost was $10,800.

On Feb. 8, 1870, was presented the petition for the pike from Point Isabel to the elbow of the Felicity and Moscow road. Viewers and appraisers on the same were Samuel B. Smith, Enoch Patterson, and M. Winters. It cost of construction, when fully completed, was only $81,880.

The last free pike built in the county was under the laws of April 26, 1871, and Feb. 20, 1872, taxing the freeholders a mile on each side for its construction, and was the , but which was changed , and is now operated by the Baltimore and Ohio Company.

viewers were David W. Thompson, Thomas Sloane, and J.H. Prickett, and the road was built in 1874.

The Clermont and Woodville Graded Road Company was incorporated in 1838, but never proved a success; neither did The East Road and Bridge Company, incorporated in 1835.

But few counties in the State surpass Clermont in the number and substantial nature of its bridges. The finest is a suspension-bridge at Branch Hill, across the Little Miami, and was built jointly by Clermont and Hamilton. It was formally dedicated and opened for travel on July 4, 1872, with a great celebration and speeches by Governor Noyes and Samuel F. Hunt. At Loveland is also a very handsome iron bridge, composed of several spans, and at Remington and Miamiville, also across the Little Miami, a large bridge of modern invention and imposing architecture. In fact, all over the county, on its many streams, are found elegant bridges, built in the last twenty years, many of them exceedingly beautiful in design and finish, which have supplanted the common wooden bridges which were first erected.

The Little Miami Railroad Company was chartered in 1835 to build a railway from Cincinnati to Xenia,---a distance of 64.61 miles. In 1840 the road was completed to Milford, and at that town a grand demonstration took place to celebrate the arrival of the first train. John Kugler, then the principal business man of that place, sold to the railroad company the site in Cincinnati on which it built its depot for $60,000, and took his pay in its bonds, ever a great source of revenue to him; and he also furnished the ties for the tracks for many miles, all cut off his noted Tippecanoe farm of nineteen hundred acres in Goshen and Stonelick townships. The road was finished to Loveland in 1844, in the fall, very much against the wishes of many of the people who earned their living as teamsters, and thought they were ruined. This road has a double track running six and three-twentieths miles through this county, with about a mile of sidings, and depots at Loveland, Branch Hill, Miamiville, and Milford, at the latter place on the Hamilton County side. It is now leased to and operated by the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, and St. Louis Railway Company, and has the reputation of being the best-equipped and conducted road in the State.

The Marietta and Cincinnati Railway was built years afterwards, and has five miles of main track in this county, besides one and one-fifth miles of sidings. It passes through Loveland, where it crosses the Little Miami road, and the rest of the road in Clermont is in Goshen township. It was built about the year 1850 as the Hillsboro and Cincinnati Railroad, and is now operated by the Baltimore and Ohio Company.

Many attempts were made towards building other railroads running through the county, but without success until 1876, when, on Jan. 10, 1876, the Cincinnati and Eastern Railway Company was formed at Batavia, under the name first of The Cincinnati, Batavia, and Williamsburgh Railroad Company, but which was changed at the following May term of Clermont Common Pleas Court to its present name. Its corporators were Samuel Woodward, M. Jamieson, G.W. Hulick, William Mansfield, George H. Wilber, W.B.C. Stirling, G.W. Gregg, Peter F. Swing, C.H. Thomas, Byron Williams, and W.A. Kain. On May 6, 1876, the stockholders unanimously voted to extend the line from Williamsburgh to Portsmouth, its present projected terminus. Since its organization Samuel Woodward has been president, Milton Jamieson treasurer, and William Mansfield auditor, and the following persons directors (thos emarked with asterisk still in office): Samuel Woodward*, George H. Wilber*, Stephen Feike, Peter F. Swing, Azariah Davis, Daniel Turner, Charles H. Thomas*, O.H. Hardin*. W.R. McGill*, James Hulick*, F.M. Smith*, S.E. Carey*, N.R. Thomson*, George W. Gregg, John M. Neeley*, and James P. Duckwall*. Its proposed main line is one hundred and eight miles long, of which fifty-three miles is in full running operation from the Miami Valley Railway junction (three and a half miles from Cincinnati) to Winchester, in Adams County, and beyond Winchester, towards Portsmouth, the grading is nearly completed to the Scioto county-line, about twenty miles. In February, 1880, the branch from Batavia Junction (on the Little Miami road) to New Richmond---a distance of fourteen and three-tenths miles---was completed and is now in successful operation, making, with the aggregate of sidings, seventy miles daily operated by this road, on which the freight and passenger traffic is constantly increasing. At Sardinia it crosses the Maysville and Columbus narrow-gauge road, now completed and running from Sardinia to Hillsboro, and this summer (1880) to be finished from Sardinia, via Georgetown, to Ripley and Maysville. It is contemplated this year to finish the Miami Valley road the remainder of the way (three and one-half miles) to Cincinnati, when the transfer of freight and passengers to the Little Miami road at Batavia Junction will cease. This well-managed narrow-gauge railroad---the best in Ohio---runs through one of the richest and most productive and thickly-populated regions in the State, and was completed to Batavia, Oct. 18, 1876; to Williamsburgh, March 1, 1877; to Mount Oreb, April 19, 1877; to Sardinia, June 4, 1877; and to Winchester in September following. In this county, including its New Richmond branch and sidings; it has thirty-six miles of track, and the stations on the main line are South Milford, Elstun, Cohoon, East Liberty, Batavia, Hulick's, Summit, Afton, and Williamsburgh; and on the New Richmond branch are New Richmond, Blairville, New Palestine, Ohio River, Pleasant Hill, Tobasco, and Mount Carmel. This road was built by subscriptions raised by stockholders along its main and extension lines, and by bonds issued on mortgage securities. Its principal bridges on the main line are over the Little Miami, a Howe truss, wood, three hundred and twenty feet; east fork at Batavia, wood, one hundred and sixty feet; at Williamsburgh, one hundred and twenty feet; west fork of White Oak and east fork of same, each one hundred and twenty feet. This was the first railroad built through the heart of Clermont, and the first of any kind to penetrate the adjoining counties of Brown and Adams.

The next road---Cincinnati and Portsmouth Narrow-Gauge Railroad --- to be built was incorporated in January, 1873, with the following corporators: Thomas Donaldson, Benneville Kline, John Carlisle, Chilton A. White, Henry W. Kimball, Joseph Clare, Paul Mohr, Z.D. Kyle, Josiah Kirby, and H.H. Wellman; but its construction did not begin till three yaers subsequently. It is a narrow gauge, and is finished from Columbia, on the Little Miami road, to Cleveland's, a mile east of Amelia, through which town, Judd's, Centreville, Olive Branch, Willowville, Glen Este, Kyles, and Mount Carmel, it runs and is altogether in running operation a distance of twenty and four tenths miles. From Cleveland's to Bethel the grading is all completed, and between Bethel and Georgetown over half finished. It is contemplated by its management to put down the track in the season of 1880 to Bethel and Georgetown.

The Cincinnati, Milford, and Fayetteville Narrow-Gauge Railroad was incorporated a few years ago, and a road-bed graded from Milford northeast, through the northern townships of the county. As yet no track has been laid, but the early completion of the road, possibly as a standard gauge, is confidently expected the coming season.

Five lines of telegraph pass through the county,--- viz., along the Little Miami, Marietta, Cincinnati, and Eastern (on main line and New Richmond branch), and along the Ohio turnpike via Amelia and Bethel. The townships of Miami, Goshen, Union, Batavia, Williamsburgh, Pierce, and Ohio are thus afforded telegraphic facilities, and the same townships enjoy railway communication.

The wonderful progress and advancement in internal improvements and material prosperity the county has made is most strikingly shown in the following pages of statistical matter, contrasting the old with the new times, and showing the condition of the county at different periods from 1825 to 1879.

GENERAL STATISTICS
For the year ending June 8, 1825, the receipts at the county treasury were $6440.97. Of this amount there were apportioned to the several townships for road purposes: Wayne, $45; Williamsburgh, $104.46; Tate, $129.93; Franklin, $31; Miami, $99; Union, $98. A balance of $321.20 for road purposes remained undistributed, and the other balances due the State and for county purposes amounted to $1275.56, showing how moderate were the expenses of the county at that period; and this amount was largely in excess of the usual rate, on account of the court-house edifice at New Richmond, the cost of building which was settled on the payment of $1193.28 when Batavia became the seat of justice.

The rates of taxation for 1827 were as follows:


So in Batavia the tax-payer paid on each one hundred dollars, 77 ½ cents; in Williamsburgh, 68 ¾ ; in Tate, 76 ¼ ; in Franklin, 68 ¾ ; in Washington, 72 ½ ; in Monroe, 71 ¼ ; and in Ohio, 75.

The smallness of the school-tax strikes every one, but it now began to gradually increase year by year under the acts of 1825, 1826, and 1827, and those subsequently passed by the Legislature. In 1827, Wayne, Goshen, Stonelick, Union, and Miami townships levied no township tax, and in that year the county treasurer, John W. Robinson, spent two days in each of the then twelve townships between August 20th and September 15th to receive taxes, the county collector up to that time doing the collecting. For the year ending June 2, 1829, the total receipts of Clermont were $10,866.83.2, and the entire disbursements, covering the State, county, township, and school purposes, $9195.57.4, of which $2.25 was to Thomas Kain for refreshments furnished a jury in a State case.

In 1829 the average rate of taxation throughout the county was eighty-four cents on the hundred dollars.

For the fiscal year closing June 4, 1833, the receipts of the county for all purposes were $16,368.72, and the expenditures $13,019.86. In 1841 the rates of taxation by mills in the different townships were as follows on the dollar: Batavia, 12 3/8 ; Williamsburgh, 11 7/8; Tate, 11 3/8; Franklin, 10 1/8; Washington, 10 1/8; Monroe, 9 7/8; Ohio, 11 7/8; Union, 9 3/8; Miami, 13; Gosheen 10 3/8; Stonelick, 10 1/8; Wayne, 9 7/8; Jackson 9 3/8; which made the average rate in the county 107 9/10 cents on the hundred dollars. Of the above tax, 5 mills was for State and canal tax; 4 ¼ for schools; 1/8 of a mill for Union bridge; and balance for township purposes. We give some general statistics of three periods.

 

1836

1840

1845

Value of lands and buildings

$1,378,959

$1,401,764

$1,504,034

Value of town-lots and buildings

253,625

272,698

167,530

Value of horses

218640

243,200

274,960

Value of cattle

50,880

57,856

64,504

Merchant’s capital and money at interest

90,878

101,823

181,194

Total Valuation of taxable property

$1,994,492

$2,083,441

$2,208,778

The duplicate of 1846 shows as follows: State taxes, $18,813.02; county and township taxes, $16,296.98; lawyers' and doctors' taxes, $17,325; delinquencies, $1071.19; and for same year the assessors returned 8400 horses, valued at $265,217; 52 mules, at $1332; 10,732 cattle, at $85,167; 26,604 sheep, at $14,829; 31,659 hogs, at $64,450; 592 pleasure-carriages, at $30,392; 799 watches, at $11.169; 7 pianos, at $1260.

In 1849 the duplicates showed:

 

Acres of Land.

Value of Land

Value of personalty

Batavia

25,440

$460,746

$154,921

Williamsburgh

17,418

274,107

81,258

Tate

28,561

425,217

113,073

Franklin

24,333

458,601

126,396

Washington

22,224

429,236

153,027

Monroe

19,448

344,020

83,102

Ohio

22,470

504,583

176,209

Union

18,075

431,378

107,054

Miami

22,995

549,562

172,535

Goshen

20,056

264,908

83,530

Wayne

19,079

144,057

31,246

Stonelick

19,029

257,125

70,065

Jackson

18,470

153,306

36,571

       
Totals

277,598

$4,696,848

$1,388,987


From $2,083,441 in 1840, the duplicate jumped up to $6,085,833 in 1849, showing a marked era of prosperity. The following was the value in 1849 of real estate in the villages: Batavia, $55,930; Williamsburgh, $46,676; Bethel, $37,787; Felicity, $78,149; Chilo, $5746; Rural, $3852; Utopia, $2363; Neville, $13,279; Moscow, $23,751; Point Pleasant, $9789; Van Buren, $4889; Freetown, $510; New Richmond, $55,798; Palestine, $5460; Milford, $58,420; Newberry, $1224; New Salisbury, $4200; Miamiville, $1785; Goshen $24,233; Woodville, $1762; Edenton, $739; Newtonville, $663; Boston, $7405; Cynthia Ann, $1664; Monterey, $299; total, $448,381.


The new constitution went into effect in 1851, and the necessary legislation under it, and the increase in population, made a corresponding increase of Clermont's duplicate, which ran up to $85,809.85; being the average increase that obtained in the other counties of the State under the new system of officers and laws regulating the body politic. In 1862 it was $149,447.40, and in 1868 it was $189,272.06, showing a marked advance and rise as necessary result of the long inflation period of prices and speculative manner of business.

The taxes in 1879 for all purposes were $224,862,299 divided as follows: Delinquencies and forfeitures, $16,497.69; county tax, $26,073.36; poor tax, $8691.12; bridge tax, $14,485.20; building tax, $7242.60; $18066.24; township tax, $21,186.36; school tax, $59,758.70; dog tax, $3434; town and village tax, $7425.64; and State tax, $42,007.08. The duplicate stood: Real property in lands, $9,894,000; in lots, $1,148,770; and in personal property , $3,442,430; total duplicate, $14,485,200. The county's taxes have increased in about the same proportion as those of other counties, all brought about by the same rules of political economy to meet the requirements of the wants of the people and to keep pace with the progress of the age.

Rates of taxation in the county in 1879 by townships. Special school-districts and corporations by mills on the hundred dollars:

TOWNSHIPS.

Total
State Tax

Tax Levied
by Cty
Authorities

Tax Levied by
Twp and School
Authorities

City and
Town
Taxes

Rate in Mills
on ea. $100 for
yr. 1879.

Batavia

2.9

4.2

7.5

0

1.26

Williamsburgh

2.9

4.2

4.5

0

1.16

Tate

2.9

4.2

5.7

0

1.28

Franklin

2.9

4.2

5.3

0

1.24

Washington

2.9

4.2

4.5

0

1.16

Monroe

2.9

4.2

5.8

0

1.29

Ohio

2.9

4.2

10.9

0

1.8

Pierce

2.9

4.2

3.9

0

1.1

Union

2.9

4.2

5.3

0

1.24

Miami

2.9

4.2

6.3

0

1.34

Goshen

2.9

4.2

5.9

0

1.3

Wayne

2.9

4.2

5.5

0

1.26

Stonelick

2.9

4.2

6.1

0

1.32

Jackson

2.9

4.2

5.3

0

1.24



SPECIAL SCHOOL-DISTRICTS
OUTSIDE OF CORPORATIONS
Batavia 2.9 4.2 8.1 0 1.52
Williamsburgh 2.9 4.2 8.9 0 1.6
Bethel 2.9 4.2 11.3 0 1.84
Felicity 2.9 4.2 7.9 0 1.5
Neville 2.9 4.2 8.7 0 1.58
Moscow 2.9 4.2 12.7 0 1.98
New Richmond 2.9 4.2 12.3 0 1.94
Mount Carmel 2.9 4.2 9.3 0 1.64
Milford 2.9 4.2 9.3 0 1.64
Miamiville 2.9 4.2 6.3 0 1.34
Loveland 2.9 4.2 9.3 0 1.64
Boston 2.9 4.2 5.5 0 1.26



TOWNSHIPS.

Total
State Tax

Tax Levied
by Cty
Authorities

Tax Levied by
Twp and School
Authorities

City and
Town
Taxes

Rate in Mills
on ea. $100 for
yr. 1879.

Batavia 2.9 4.2 7.1 2.4 1.66
Williamsburgh 2.9 4.2 7.9 3 1.8
Bethel 2.9 4.2 10.3 2.6 2
Felicity 2.9 4.2 6.9 2.6 1.06
Neville 2.9 4.2 7.7 1.6 1.64
Moscow 2.9 4.2 11.7 6 1.94
New Richmond 2.9 4.2 12.3 6 2.54
Milford 2.9 4.2 8.3 5 2.04
Loveland 2.9 4.2 15.4 7 2.24
Boston 2.9 4.2 3.5 6 1.12

The increase of population is shown by comparing the number of inhabitants in the different decades: in 1810 there were 9965 inhabitants; in 1820, 15,820; in 1830, 20,466; in 1840, 23,106; and for the next three decades the population is given by townships:

  1850   1860   1870
Batavia 2,791   2,960   3,336
Franklin 3,061   3,392   3,298
Goshen 1,937   1,832   1,876
Jackson 1,241   1,579   1,659
Miami 2,690   2,995   3,491
Monroe 1,897   1,944   2,089
Ohio 4,479   3,220   3,375
Pierce (formerly in Ohio) -------   1,804   1,773
Stonelick 1,840   2,053   1,880
Tate 2,901   2,780   2,483
Union 1,799   2,005   1,921
Washington 2,540   2,700   2,821
Wayne 1,394   1,631   1,690
Williamsburgh 1,884   2,085   2,389
           
Total 30,455   33,079   34,281

We give the census reports for four previous decades: 1810, 9965; 1820, 15,820; 1830, 20,466; 1840, 23,106. The census of the present year (1880), now being taken, will show the number of inhabitants to have increased to about 37,000.

FARM, ORCHARD, AND STOCK STATISTICS
 

WHEAT.

RYE

BUCKWHEAT

OATS

BARLEY

CORN

 

Acres.

Bushels.

Acres.

Bushels.

Acres.

Bushels.

Acres.

Bushels.

Acres.

Bushels.

Acres.

Bushels.

Batavia

1816

22,772

151

1,306

8

58

1080

25,212

13

390

3,984

135,085

Wmsburgh

1464

16,965

85

571

24

230

655

14,241

--

--

3,403

99,704

Tate

2004

20,391

243

2,022

3

19

1208

23,332

14

258

4,442

100,637

Franklin

1971

22,303

456

3,808

1

8

772

14,157

--

--

3,554

86,417

Washington

1861

21,625

403

3,295

--

--

857

18,980

--

--

3,735

96,270

Monroe

1351

16,323

183

2,144

4

37

917

21,670

---

--

2.583

69,360

Ohio

455

5,082

22

255

--

--

225

5,293

2

53

1,090

37,990

Pierce

315

3,578

55

590

--

--

338

7,006

--

--

963

28,360

Union

655

8,467

54

562

9

69

825

21,302

1

20

3,088

107,900

Miami

1301

16,031

41

305

21

322

1036

25,002

33

515

6,088

117,175

Goshen

1868

26,725

195

1,721

42

620

1101

32,386

--

--

3,745

107,800

Wayne

1550

21,607

29

420

23

345

953

27,077

--

--

3,038

92,445

Stonelick

1540

28,679

172

1,698

14

140

895

20,976

--

--

3,011

92,455

Jackson

1556

18,806

50

704

7

66

1004

28,600

--

--

3,877

93,240

Total

19707

249,254

2,139

20,401

156

1,914

11,866

285,324

63

1,236

46,601

1,270,838


 

MEADOWS

CLOVER

FLAX

POTATOES

TOBACCO

BUTTER

CHEESE

 

Acres

Tons Hays

Acres

Tons Hays

Bushels
Seed

Manure
Acres

Acres

Bushels
Seed

lbs.
Fibre

Acres

Bushels

Acres

Pounds

Pounds

Pounds

Batavia

1,443

1,280

535

57

--

175

--

--

--

819

39,989

86

110,230

53,045

--

Wmsburgh

1055

977

114

32

4

76

--

--

--

458

22,106

14

13,200

42,432

--

Tate

2116

1,576

153

21

8

26

--

--

--

234

11,747

178

108,383

41,261

25

Franklin

1300

776

1,546

207

3

673

--

--

--

168

8,490

789

684,900

44,787

--

Washington

854

537

1,766

180

--

197

--

--

--

250

13,965

729

667,750

39,930

--

Monroe

1076

899

473

62

8

59

--

--

--

333

14,163

269

254,990

33,099

125

Ohio

340

318

48

41

--

--

--

--

--

85

6,506

15

8,400

6,032

--

Pierce

504

540

137

45

--

--

--

--

--

244

9,926

9

8,945

15,065

--

Union

952

900

75

113

6

42

--

--

--

812

37,540

----

------

52,840

--

Miami

1040

1,044

147

92

--

90

--

--

--

494

27,540

----

------

69,975

--

Goshen

1786

1,754

173

62

27

 

63

582

2,600

705

46,460

----

------

46,443

--

Wayne

1469

1,456

72

28

63

10

90

693

--

665

49,250

----

------

24,915

--

Stonelick

1218

1,251

156

51

5

33

14

125

--

822

43,520

3

300

45,380

--

Jackson

1369

1,373

4

3

--

--

--

--

--

913

53,120

5

5,000

48,675

--

Total

16,522

14,681

5,399

994

124

1,439

167

1,400

2,600

7,002

384,322

2,097

1,862,096

563,929

150



SORGHUM

Maple - Sugar

Bees

 

Acres.

Pounds

Gallons
Syrup

Pounds

Gallons
Syrup

Hives

Pounds
Honey

Batavia

39

--

2,840

15

348

8

115

Wmsburgh

30

--

2,263

--

65

101

1,383

Tate

42

--

1,692

--

236

144

1,880

Franklin

66

--

1,922

96

--

115

2,371

Washington

19

--

1,170

--

--

149

2,285

Monroe

21

--

1,647

25

108

47

803

Ohio

1

--

105

--

--

66

660

Pierce

16

--

1,381

--

40

39

380

Union

10

--

753

--

108

180

2,850

Miami

3

70

140

--

142

121

4,150

Goshen

9

--

273

--

189

132

3,782

Wayne

5

--

413

--

200

116

2,650

Stonelick

24

--

1,964

--

--

219

5,085

Jackson

27

--

2,140

--

--

95

640

Total

312

70

18,712

136

1,436

1,532

29,038



 

GRAPES AND WINE

SWEET POTATOES

 

Acres
Planted in 1879

Acres in
Vineyard

Pounds
Grapes

Gallons
Wine

Acres

Bushels

Batavia

8

2

22,400

700

5

72

Wmsburgh

1

--

--

25

------

-----

Tate

--

--

--

--

2

35

Franklin

2

47

36,500

9,920

41

740

Washington

--

60

16,500

1

35

------

Monroe

19

42

8,580

795

1

30

Ohio

52

--

6,600

--

45

50

Pierce

3

69

69,802

1,418

26

1,415

Union

3

23

36,750

320

15

1,600

Miami

2

17

13,400

98

7

520

Goshen

--

1

15

40

10

------

Wayne

--

1

3,000

--

¼

20

Stonelick

1

45

55,450

659

10

1,261

Jackson

--

--

--

--

------

------

Total            
 

91

307

268,997

13,976

197 ¼

5,743

° "Acres for manure" means acres plowed under for manure.
* "Acres planted" means the number set out in the year, and acres in vineyard means total acreage of vineyards, but the acreage was often imperfectly given to assessors.

ORCHARDS
   

Apples

Peaches

Pears

 

Acres

Bushels

Bushels

Bushels

Batavia

791

39,395

195

483

Wmsburgh

456

27,045

3

197

Tate

668

32,140

------

50

Franklin

591

36,875

322

426

Washington

834

33,195

1,692

185

Monroe

540

25,435

1,345

140

Ohio

456

10,323

182

190

Pierce

449

23,135

892

171

Union

750

44,635

685

1,569

Miami

1,442

35,630

1,790

1,600

Goshen

628

22,230

------

233

Wayne

379

12,245

------

------

Stonelick

628

37,940

1,105

262

Jackson

367

23,175

------

15

Total

8,979

403,408

8,161

5,521



 

HORSES

CATTLE

MULES

SHEEP

HOGS

 

Value

Value

Value

Value

Value

Batavia

$32,815

$14,155

$6,565

$1,490

$4,030

Wmsburgh

26,828

16,244

5,235

2,362

5,619

Tate

39,280

22,362

3,415

4,167

6,879

Franklin

33,130

14,665

1,875

945

6,295

Washington

29,395

12,495

2,320

860

5,270

Monroe

29,523

13,791

1,340

1,901

5,389

Ohio

15,890

14,225

1,425

1,329

1,823

Pierce

16,510

8,522

5,270

1,365

2,156

Union

24,770

15,927

9,005

635

4,570

Miami

30,610

22,545

5,415

2,475

6,697

Goshen

31,233

16,523

1,900

2,098

6,500

Wayne

25,107

11,573

4,689

1,066

4,967

Stonelick

21,775

10,975

5,200

761

4,093

Jackson

20,245

11,426

3,520

1,305

4,567

Total

$377,111

$205,428

$57,394

$19,059

$60,755


 

CARRIAGES

WATCHES

PIANOS
and
ORGANS

 

No.

Value.

No.

Value.

No.

Value.

Batavia

660

$23,340

106

$2,465

76

$5,875

Wmsburgh

455

12,714

90

568

40

3,560

Tate

548

1,182

100

1,782

46

3,121

Franklin

507

14,750

75

1,995

60

3,055

Washington

490

13,075

91

2,090

50

3,765

Monroe

332

11,602

61

897

36

1,920

Ohio

340

10,734

135

3,273

54

5,295

Pierce

391

14,596

36

958

26

2,070

Union

623

24,100

107

1,578

41

2,975

Miami

682

22,175

157

4,175

118

7,560

Goshen

416

14,255

85

1,669

18

1,780

Wayne

381

10,596

49

415

12

675

Stonelick

339

9,666

61

792

24

1,560

Jackson

323

7,370

19

240

8

200

Total

6,287

$211,177

1,172

$19,797

609

$43,501

OHIO'S SURPLUS REVENUE
Just before the expiration of President Jackson's second term Congress divided out among the several States pro rata, according to their population, all the surplus public money arising from the sales of the public lands, and of this sum Ohio received as its share the then no inconsiderable sum of $2,007,260.34. The General Assembly of the State passed an act on March 28, 1837, for the distribution and investment of its proportion of the surplus revenue as aforesaid, by which act it was divided out pro rata among the several counties according to their population, and put into the hands of the county fund commissioners for investment in loans as could be done to the best advantage. On March 30, 1837, Clermont County received its first and second installments, $23,778.35; in August, 1837, it received its third and last installment, $11,889.12; total surplus revenue received, $35,667.37. The county fund commissioners began loaning it out, at 7 per cent interest, to various persons throughout the county, taking both real estate (by mortgage) and personal security. In 1840 and the two subsequent years the following persons borrowed of this fund on mortgage security: Ezekiel Dimmitt, $200; John Wheeler, $300; Joseph Fagin, $400; Elijah and James Dennis (for the noted "Tunnel Mill"), $1,680; James W. Gudgeon, $300; Abram Teeter, $1000; Joseph Post, $100; Farman White, $200; John M. Brown, $300; Alexander Blair (the old judge), $224; Gerard Riley, $300; William Sloan, $400; James Picken, $600; and Harvey Irwin, $200; and it was all paid back with interest, as the names themselves indicate.

Of the amount received from the State in 1843, 1844, and 1845 there was paid back (by paying over to county treasury) $8052.26, and $3000 in 1846, leaving then in the county $24,615.11, which was loaned as follows:
To Batavia township………………………………………. $3,335.00
" Williamsburgh township…………………… ……… 2,400.00
" Tate township…………………………………………… 2,420.00
" Franklin township……………………………………… 1,200.00
" Washington township………………………………… 700.00
" Monroe township……………………………………….. 1,200.00
" Ohio township……………………………………………. 3,250.00
" Union township…………………………………………… 1,415.11
" Miami township………………………………………….. 2,100.00
" Goshen township………………………………………… 2,100.00
" Wayne township…………………………………………. 500.00
" Stonelick township……………………………………… 2,200.00
" Jackson township………………………………………… 900.00
" Clermont township……………………………………… 880.00
……..……..……..……..……..……..……..……..…….. $24,615.11
12 month's interest on $23,730.11 at 7 per cent…………. 1,661.10
12 month's interest on $880 at 6 per cent………..……. 52.80
Total interest due…………………………..……..…….. 1,713.90

But that year (1846) some persons were behind in their interest to the amount of $175.00

To manage all that fund for that year there was paid to the county fund commissioners (distinct and separate officials from the county commissioners) as follows: Robert Donham, $18; Abram Teetor, $20; and to Robert Temple, $18; to John Goliffe as attorney fees, $34.50; to L.B. Leeds and A.M. Gest each for printing report, $7.50; and to John M. Brown, agent of the fund, $75; in all $180.50,---about three-fourths of one per cent. In a few years later the fund was wiped out by the State getting it all back, and thus the business was closed up.



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