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Darke County, Ohio
Genealogy and History

 

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Biographies
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Henry W. Dorwin
Gettysburg, O., son of Philo Dorwin and Urania Dorwin, was born at Moncton, Vt., Dec 28th, 1822. He received his collegiate education at Onondaga acad., N. Y., and his general education at the Western Reserve general education at the Western Reserve med. coll., Cleveland, O., and graduated in February, 1852. He settled in Gettysburg, Darke co., in general practice. He is a member of the Darke and Miami co. med. socs., and one of the censors of the former; also member of the Ohio State med. soc. He was surgeon on the staff of Gen. Cranor, of Ohio. In December, 1844, he married Nancy Morrison.
[Source: The Physicians and Surgeons of the United States, edited by William Biddle Atkinson, page 664; submitted by Marla Zwakman]



Owen Yost
Somerset. Ohio. Lawyer and banker; b. near Somerset, Ohio, Nov. 22, 1855: s. of Isaac and Elizabeth (Person) Yost: German-Irish descent; B. A. Heidelberg Univ. Elffin. Ohio. 1879; m. Darke Co. Ohio. July 14. 1881, Alice Hursh; children; three sons, four daughters. Read law under Louis Schaefer. Canton. Ohio. 1879-80, and Hon. W. E. Finck, ex-member Congress. Somerset, Ohio, 1880-81; admitted to Ohio Bar Oct., 1881, practiced law In Somerset since: Instrumental In organizing and became v.-pres. Somerset Bank, 1891: pres, and dir. Somerset Storeroom Co. Recreations: Fishing, hunting, books, bees, athletic sports. Republican.
[Source: Who's who in Finance and Banking (1922)by John William Leonard; page 758; submitted by Marla Zwakman]


William Allen lawyer, jurist and statesman; was born in Butler Co., Ohio. Aug. 13, 1827. His father, John Allen, was born in Ireland, and emigrated to America in 1812; after residing six years in the State of New York, he moved to Butler Co., Ohio, in 1818; he moved his family into the woods of Darke Co. in 1838, his dwelling being a log cabin with puncheon floors and a mud and stick chimney; in the latter part of his life, he was a preacher in the United Brethren Church. Our subject was favored with no educational advantages, except those afforded by the common schools of the day, yet by making most of these, he was able to teach at the age of 15, and for several years followed that vocation; at the age of 19, he commenced the study of law. under the late Felix Marsh, of Eaton, Ohio; was admitted to the bar in 1849, and in the following year commenced practice in Greenville; in 1850, he was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Darke Co., and re- elected in 1852; in the fall of 1858, he was elected to Congress from the Fourth District, comprising the counties of Darke, Shelby, Mercer, Auglaize and Allen, and re-elected in 1860, thus serving in the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congress ; in the winter of 1865, he was appointed by Gov. Cox as Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the first subdivision of the Second Judicial District of Ohio, composed of the counties of Butler, Darke and Preble, to fill a vacancy made by the resignation of Judge D. L. Meeker; in 1878, Judge Allen was nominated for Congress by the Republicans of the Fifth District, but he declined. In 1851, he married Miss Priscilla Wallace, whose father settled in Darke Co. in 1834; the issue of this marriage was four sons and four daughters, of whom only one son survives ; four of his children died of diphtheria under the most afflictive circumstances, in the space of as many weeks ; this was in the winter of 1861, when he was summoned from Washington City to his despoiled home ; Mr. Allen, although he has risen from poverty to affluence by his own unaided exertions, is one of the most charitable of our citizens, and his integrity has never been questioned ; his positive character, while it wins friends true as steel, also makes bitter enemies, but even his enemies concede to him great ability and unflinching honesty of purpose ; he is at present, Vice President of the Greenville Bank, and President of the Greenville Gas Company.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 471; submitted by Marla Zwakman


ALLEN, MATTHEW T. - lawyer, Greenville; was born in Butler Township, Darke Co., Ohio, Sept. 17, 1848; he lived on his father's farm, and enjoyed the usual educational privileges of farmers' sons of that period (his father and mother are noticed in the sketch of his brother, Hon. William Allen); in the fall of 1864, he entered Otterbein University, at Westerville, Ohio; after a partial course at that institution, he removed to Winchester, Ind., where he was employed as clerk in a shoe store one year; he next taught school one year; in 1867, he commenced the study of law with D. M. Bradbury, of Winchester; after admission to practice, he was appointed Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, for the Nineteenth Judicial Circuit of Indiana, comprising the counties of Wayne, Randolph, Jay and Blackford; in the summer of 1872, he came to Greenville, and continued practice as junior member of the firm of Allen, Devor & Allen. In 1878, the firm dissolved, and, subsequently, young Allen formed a partnership with Hon. John Devor, under the style of Allen & Devor. In 1878, Allen was the Republican candidate for Prosecuting Attorney, and, such was his popularity, that he was fairly elected in a county giving 1,200 majority against his party, but was counted out by reason of mistakes in writing his initials on scratched tickets. Mr. Allen has already won an enviable distinction as a counselor and advocate, and his genial social qualities render him immensely popular with all classes. His marriage with Mary V. Whiteside, was celebrated upon the 23d of April, 1879. She was born in Camden. Preble Co., March 17, 1860.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 471-472; submitted by Marla Zwakman


ALTER, HENRY farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 12; P. O. Greenville; was born in Washington Co., Md., March 18, 1833; he was a son of Jacob Alter, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1799; emigrated to Maryland, and in 1866 came to Darke County; and after residing in Greenville one year, made his home with his son until his decease, which occurred in May, 1875. He was married, in 1819, in Maryland, to Eliza Tice; she was born in Washington Co. in 1806, and is now in her 73d year, and makes her home with her son. Henry Alter went to Clark Co., Ohio, in 1858, and followed farming there until 1866, when he came to Darke Co. and located upon his present place. His marriage with Elizabeth Ilges was celebrated in 1864; she died in 1870; one child was born to them - Mary L., born Aug., 18, 1866; his marriage with Mary Clew was celebrated Dec. 17, 1874; she was born and raised in Darke Co., and is a daughter of D. B. Clew, one of the early pioneers of Darke Co.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 472; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Joseph Amann Jr., deceased. The subject of this memoir was born in Dayton, Montgomery Co., Ohio, in 1840, and was a son of Joseph and Francis Amann; in early life he learned the blacksmith trade; in 1853, he came to Darke Co. and followed farming and blacksmithing until the breaking-out of the rebellion, when he enlisted and served four years in the Union army; after being mustered out of service he returned to Greenville, and in 1867 was married to Barbara Caron; six children were the fruits of this union, viz., Nora, Louisa, Joseph, Katie, William and Barbara. He engaged in business in Greenville soon after his return from the army, and in October, 1873, he purchased his brick buildings on Third Street, and followed the restaurant and saloon business until his decease, which occurred in October, 1879. The business has since been conducted by his widow.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 472; submitted by Marla Zwakman


John Aten, farmer; P. O. Jaysville. The subject of this memoir was born in Twin Township, Preble Co., Ohio, April 1, 1823, and is a son of Adrian Aten, who was a native of Kentucky but came to Preble Co. in 1822. John Aten was raised to agricultural pursuits upon the home farm, and, upon the 6th of April, 1854, was united in marriage with Lavina Russell, who died Sept. 19, 1875; nine children were the fruits of this union, viz.: Abraham R., born June 30. 1855; Adrian, April 29, 1856; John H., Oct. 3, 1857; James P., Jan. 25, 1859: Theodore C., Oct. 20, 1860 (died Aug. 8, 1863); Emma, July 11, 1862 (died June 29, 1863); William, Jan. 6, 1864; Charles, Oct. 23, 1865, and George W., June 1, 1867; upon the marriage of Mr. Aten, he continued farming upon the old homestead three years, when he purchased a farm in Preble Co., and, in the fall of 1860, purchased property at Arcanum, Darke Co., residing here five years; he then purchased the saw-mill at Jaysville, selling the following year, and, in 1866, purchased his present property where he has since lived; he has 110 acres upon his home farm, a large part of which he has reclaimed from a swamp by means of a ditch and tiling until it is now as productive as any land in the county. He is one of the self-made men of Darke Co., and has by his hard labor and correct business habits placed himself among the large landholders and successful farmers of Darke Co. He was raised to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason in the King Hiram Lodge, at Alexandria, Sept. 25, 1850, and is now a member of the order of A., F. & A. M. at Greenville.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 472-473; submitted by Marla Zwakman


J. B. Avery, farmer, Sec. 3 ; P. O. Woodington; an old settler of Darke Co.; born in New London Co., Conn., Aug. 27, 1826; at 17 years of age, he commenced farming and school teaching until 1847, when he came to Darke Co., and. in the following year, purchased his present place of 80 acres, where he has since lived for a period of thirty-one years; upon locating here, there were some 7 acres only partially cleared; no building, no fences; he first put up a small frame house in which he lived several years, and to which he has since attached a much larger residence; he has cleared some 55 acres of his place and brought the same to a good state of cultivation by his own hard labor. His marriage with Marcella Earhart occurred Nov. 14, 1848. She was born in Darke Co. Jan. 10, 1827, and has always lived within one mile of the place where she was born; she was a daughter of Samuel Earhart, one of the early pioneers, who was born in Warren Co., Ohio, in 1802, and came to Darke Co. in 1820, and located on Sec. 10, Greenville Township; he died January, 1854 ; he married Elizabeth Scribner; she was a daughter of Azor Scribner, who was the first permanent settler of this county; he established a trading post in Mina Town in 1806; Mrs. Earhart died March, 1873, at the age of 67 years. The children of J. B. and Marcella (Earhart) Avery were five in number - Prudence M., born Sept. 20, 1849; Franklin P., born Jan. 21, 1852 (died May, 1869); Emily M., born Oct. 8, 1858; Lizzie M., born July 28. 1862, and Ira J., born Feb. 28, 1869. Mr. Avery has been a member of the Presbyterian Church for upward of thirty years; his wife, for a period of thirty- eight years, and all the children, save the youngest, also being members of the same church.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 473; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Andrew Baird, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Greenville; the subject of this memoir was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Oct. 26, 1844, and is a son of Tunis Baird, also a native of Warren Co., Ohio, his father coming from New Jersey, and are of Scotch descent. Andrew was raised in the above county, his early occupation being that of a farmer's son; he obtained the advantages of a common-school education; he remained with his father upon the farm till the spring of 1864, when he enlisted in the 146th O. N. G., and went forward to battle for the Union. He was forwarded to West Virginia, where he served the full term of his enlistment, and received his discharge at Camp Dennison, Ohio, in September, 1864. He then returned to Darke Co., and farmed one year upon the old home farm, and in the latter part of the year 1865, he went to Illinois, where, upon the 22d day of June, 1866, he was united in marriage with Miranda Collett. She was born and raised in Darke Co. In September, 1866, he returned to Darke Co., since which time he has followed farming with the exception of some eighteen months, during which time he was engaged in the coal and wood business in Greenville. The children of Andrew and Miranda (Collett) Baird are five in number, four daughters and one son, viz.: Lula, Ella M., Franklin T., Cora D. and Kittie.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 472-473; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Jacob Baker, attorney at law. Greenville; born in Butler Township in 1840; practiced law in Greenville since 1864, where he has been connected with some of the most important legal proceedings had in the county; was defeated for the Legislature in 1865, and elected in 1867. He introduced and carried through several important pieces of legislation. He was a delegate from this Congressional District to the St. Louis Convention at which Mr. Tilden was nominated for President.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 472-473; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Charles Bachman, tailor and clothier, No. 88 Broadway, Greenville, Ohio. There are probably but few of the successful business men of Greenville, who have shown the energy, enterprise, and quick conception of the wants and demands of the public, as the subject of our sketch, who is among the popular clothiers of Greenville. He was born in Prussia June 1, 1836. and emigrated to to America when 18 years of age; in 1861, he located in Eaton, and followed the occupation of merchant tailor, until 1867, at which date he came to Greenville, where he has since followed the above business, with the exception of two years. As one of the patrons of the above gentleman, we can cheerfully recommend him as educated in his business, and to his honorable dealings, together with his large and carefully selected stock of seasonable goods and to his personal attention to the details of every branch of his business, may be attributed the secret of his success. A card of his business is to be found in the business directory of Greenville, in another part of this work. His marriage with Julia Marenthall was celebrated in 1861. She was also a native of Prussia. They are the parents of three children, viz.. Jennie, Samuel and Maley.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 473-474 submitted by Marla Zwakman


David Beanblossom (deceased); one of the early pioneers of Darke Co., was born in North Carolina, May 25, 1801; when 16 years of age, he came to Ohio and located in Darke Co., consequently he was one of its very early settlers. He was twice married; his first wife was Susannah Rarick; she died about the year 1834; eleven children were the fruit of this union, of whom one is now living - Joseph, now living in Greenville Township. His marriage with Mary Delk was celebrated Nov. 6, 1836; she was born in Darke Co., a few miles south of Greenville, Sept. 30, 1816; she was a daughter of Etheland Delk, who was born in North Carolina, and came to Darke Co. in a very early day. The children by the last marriage were fourteen in number, of whom two are deceased. The living are Ludena, born May 20, 1840; Enos, Jan. 6, 1842; Ann Eliza, born Oct. 25, 1843; Julia A., born Nov. 24, 1845; William, Jan. 6, 1848 ; Elizabeth S., born Oct. 22, 1849; Margaret M., born Feb. 9, 1852; David D., Jan. 14, 1854; John C., April 18, 1856; Rachel and Isabell (twins), and Henry A., born Jan. 13, 1859. Of the deceased, Nancy, born Aug. 28, 1838, died Feb. 26, 1854; the other died in infancy. Mr. Beanblossom died Dec. 8, 1861, upon the same place he located, in 1817, and where he lived forty -four years; his old residence, which he built in 1820, is now occupied by his son Enos. Mr. Beanblossom suffered all the privations and hardships of frontier life. He commenced without capital, and split rails at 25 cents per hundred to obtain his wedding ding outfit. He, with the assistance of his wife, fought the battles of life nobly, and at the time of his death, had accumulated upward of 400 acres of land; built his present residence in 1856. He took a deep interest in the cause of religion, and was a Deacon in the Christian Church and was a member of the same for forty years. He died respected and beloved by all who knew him.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 474 submitted by Marla Zwakman



Enos Beanblossom, Sec. 1; P. O. Pikesville. Another of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born upon Sec. 1, Greenville Township, Jan. 6, 1842, where he has always lived, with the exception of three years that he served in the army; he is a son of David Beanblossom who was born in North Carolina, and emigrated to Ohio, and located in Darke Co. in 1817; he entered Government land, upon which he lived until his death, which occurred Dec. 8. 1861, aged 63 years. The mother of Enos Beanblossom was Mary Delk, who was born in Ohio, and is now living in this county. Our subject was raised to agricultural pursuits, which he followed until July 10, 1862, when he enlisted in the 45th O. V. I; he served in the army of Gen. Sherman until the fall of 1864, when he was made prisoner in Tennessee and taken to Belle Island; after remaining there three months, he was taken to Andersonville, where the cruel treatment received here was in keeping with its well-known acts of barbarism; during his imprisonment his weight was reduced from 155 to 94 pounds; he remained in prison some five months, and was released in the spring of 1865, and received his discharge during the summer, at Columbus; thence returned home and engaged in farming, which business he has since followed. He now owns 100 acres of well-improved land. His marriage with Ann E. Sipple was celebrated March 31, 1872; she was born in Darke Co. Feb. 3, 1845; they have four children - Irene M., born May 17, 1873; Daisy V. born July 31, 1875; Ora E., born July 26, 1877, and an infant, born September 14, 1879. The residence in which Mr. Beanblossom now lives was erected by his father in 1820, and is now a good comfortable home.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 474 submitted by Marla Zwakman


Joseph Beanblossom, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Greenville; another of the old settlers; born in Darke Co., Ohio, Feb. 7, 1826, he was the oldest son of David Beanblossom, one of the early pioneers, whose biography appears among the sketches of Greenville Township in this work. The subject of our sketch was raised to agricultural pursuits upon the farm of his father, until he attained his majority, when, upon the 22d of February, 1847, he was married to Rhoda Brandon; she was born March 12, 1823, and died Sept 3, 1853, leaving three children- Thomas A., born Nov. 7, 1847 ; Mary A., born Oct. 19, 1849; David W., born Nov. 24, 1851. His marriage with Elizabeth Potter was celebrated Nov. 6, 1855; she was born in Greenville Township, Darke Co., Sept. 26, 1829, and was a daughter of David Potter, one of the early pioneers, who came to Darke Co. in 1812 or 1813, and died in 1869; his widow who survives him is now living upon the old place, where she has lived for upward of fifty years; her maiden name was Maria Ullery; the children by the union of Joseph Beanblossom and Elizabeth Potter are four in number, viz.: John R., born June 29, 1857; George N., born Aug. 24, 1858; Charles F., born May 26, 1860 ; Maria, July 27, 1864. Mr. Beanblossom located upon his present place in 1857, where he has since lived for a period of upward of twenty-two years. Upon locating here it was all woods; he has since cleared some 70 acres, and brought the same to a good state of improvement. His home farm contains 140 acres, with good buildings, located two miles northwest from Greenville. Mr. and Mrs. Beanblossom are entitled to a place in the front ranks of the old settlers of Darke Co., having been continuous residents of the county for upward of half a century.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 475; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Jacob L. Beatty, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Greenville. Among the settlers of Darke Co. in 1850, we mention the name of the above gentleman; he was born in Fayette Co., Penn., April 16, 1816, and was the only son of Thos. Beatty, who was born in New Jersey in 1787, and came to Pennsylvania with his parents in 1797, and to Guernsey Co., Ohio, in 1832, and, in the fall of 1848, came to Darke Co., and located in Neave Township, where he died Jan. 21, 1855. He married Mary Roury, in Pennsylvania, in 1815; she was born in Fayette Co., Penn., April 8, 1798, and is now living with her only son, Jacob, in the 82d year of her age, is in possession of all her faculties, and can read any common print without the use of glasses; there were two children by this union - Jacob L. and Eliza ; the latter is now Mrs. Dr. Thomas Duncan Stiles, of Neave Township. The subject of this sketch followed farming in Guernsey Co. until 1850, at which date he came to Darke Co. and located upon his present place, where he has since lived for a period of thirty years; he has 120 acres of land upon Secs. 8 and 5, 80 acres of which are under a good state of cultivation. His marriage with Hester Stiner was celebrated in 1840; they were the parents of six children - Mary E., born Sept. 18, 1841; William H., April 16, 1843 ; Sarah A., March 7, 1845, died Aug. 30, 1846; Eliza J., born Nov. 20, 1847; Thomas, May 10, 1851, and Reuben L., Dec. 21, 1860.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 475; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Samuel Bechdolt, farmer; P. O. Greenville; born in Miami Co., Ohio. Jan. 10, 1819; when an infant, his parents removed to Warren Co., where the subject of our sketch was raised to farm labor until 20 years of age, and, in the fall of 1849, he came to Darke Co., and located in Greenville Township, and, in 1852, purchased his present place, where he has lived for a period of twenty-seven years. He owns 132 acres upon his home farm, with good farm buildings, and one-half of the woolen-mills owned by the firm of Fox & Bechtolt. His marriage with Eleanor Vannote was celebrated in 1840; she was born in Warren Co., Ohio ; they have four children now living; lost two by death; the living are Catherine E.. Joseph, Mary E. and George the deceased died in infancy.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 475; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Lewis Beckler, farmer; P. O. Greenville; another of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, Aug. 30, 1837; at 10 years of age, he came to Darke Co., and made his home with Henry Beckler until 23 years of age, and, upon the 20th of December, 1860, was united in marriage with Elizabeth Dininger; she was born in Darke Co. April 14, 1843; they were the parents of two children. Mrs. Beckler is a daughter of Jacob Dininger, one of the early pioneers of Darke Co. Upon the marriage of Mr. B., he located upon his present place, where he has since lived; he owns 100 acres, upon which is his home farm, under a good state of improvement. He is a son of Peter Beckler, a native of Pennsylvania, who came to Montgomery Co., Ohio, where he married Hannah Dill. He died in Montgomery Co. in 1840. His widow was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, and is now living, at the advanced age of 73.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 475-476; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Charles Biltemeier, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes, etc., of the firm of Biltemier & Maitini, Broadway, Greenville. The above gentleman is the oldest continuous person in the above business in Greenville; he was born in Hessian Germany in 1822; at the age of 14 years, he commenced the trade of shoemaking, which he followed twelve years in his native country; he emigrated to America in 1848, and landed in Baltimore; coming directly West, he located permanently in Greenville in 1849, where he has since lived; upon locating here, he received employment as journeyman until 1855, at which date he engaged in business for himself, which he has since successfully followed; in 1864, he associated with his present partner, since which time they have conducted the business under the above firm name; they carry a large and complete stock of gents', ladies', youths' and children's goods, and employ from three to five hands. He was married to Carolina Dohm in 1852; she was born in Hessian Germany: they have four children now living, viz., Lizzie, Caroline, Henry and Anna. He, with his wife, have been members of the German Methodist Church since 1853.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 476; submitted by Marla Zwakman


William J. Bireley, retired, Greenville; was born in Frederick Co., Md., in 1812; was the son of John and Barbara Bireley; John was born in the same county, and Barbara was born in Hagerstown, Md.; her maiden name was Brindle; the grandfather, John Bireley, was born in Saxony, and emigrated to this country before the Revolutionary war. The grandmother was from Wurtemburg, Germany, and also came to this country prior to the Revolutionary war. Mr. Bireley's father came to Lancaster, Ohio, in the spring of 1822, and in the fall following came to Montgomery Co., where he lived till his death, which occurred in 1827. Mr. Bireley, the subject of this sketch, came to Darke Co. Oct. 15, 1830, and located in Greenville; he carried on the boot and shoe business for William Martin, Sr., and continued with him about five months, when he returned to his mother, in Montgomery Co., where he remained till 1833, when, on Jan. 24 of the same year, he was united in marriage with Elizabeth Martin, daughter of Christopher and Elizabeth Martin, Sr.; they were both born at Sewickley, Penn., and came to Ohio in 1814; they settled in Butler Co., and then moved to Darke Co. in 1815, and settled about five miles east of Greenville; after raising a large family of children, they moved to Greenville, where they lived and died. Mr. Bireley, in the next May after his marriage, in 1833, came back to Greenville and entered upon the manufacture of earthenware, which business he followed for twenty-eight years, doing an extensive business; he then bought a farm of 150 acres, one mile out of the corporation of Greenville; he then took his family and moved on to the farm, which was in 1851; in 1858, he sold this farm and bought another, five miles east of Greenville, upon which were several quarries of limestone, and went into the manufacture of lime, and continued at this business till January,1880, when he rented it to Martin Smith and Emanuel Hershey for five years, receiving $400 yearly, or $2,000 for the five years; Mr. Bireley moved from the farm into Greenville in 1870, where he has since resided. Mr. Bireley is the father of ten children, seven of whom are living, viz., Henry P., Elizabeth E., William W., Barbara C., Harvey H., Wade G. and Mary R., all married and settled in life except the youngest, who is still single, and remains at home. At the commencement of the rebellion, his three oldest sons enlisted in the 44th O. V. I., and. after being out eighteen months, they went into the 8th O. V. C., and in this they served through the war till honorably discharged, and all returned safely home. Mr. Bireley was one of the pioneers, coming here when all was a wilderness, and but few houses constituted Greenville; he has lived to see the wilderness pass away, and now a flourishing town of 4,000 inhabitants occupies the spot where then all was woods and wild animals; even the citizens who lived here then have all passed away, with but few exceptions, viz., Henry Arnold and wife, Dr. I. N. Gard and wife, John Wharry, Esq., Allen La Mott and Mrs. Farrer. Mr. Bireley and wife are active members of the M. E. Church, having united in 1834. Mr. Bireley started in life upon sound principles, having resolved never to take the wine cup or waste his time and means in attending shows and theaters, which resolution he has firmly kept; he is one of the few whose life is filled up with usefulness, and whose business interests in his various undertakings have met with remarkable success, and we may trust that from his Christian life he will enter that " life beyond the vale " in due time, with the same assurance of success and happiness, unalloyed with the cares and conflicts which attend this life, and that the record he has here left upon the pages of time will be a worthy example for all future generations.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 476-477; submitted by Marla Zwakman



William F. Bishop, retired; P. O. Greenville ; another of the old settlers ; born in New Jersey April 27, 1800; is a son of Frazee Bishop, who was also a native of the same State, born in 1775 and married, in 1797, Elizabeth Lamb, also a native of the same State. Our subject came to Ohio when 5 years of age, and was raised in Butler Co.; in 1842, he came to Darke Co. and purchased 217 acres of land upon Section 9, southwest of Greenville, where he lived until 1865, when he purchased his present residence on Fourth street, where he has since lived, retired from active business. His marriage with Maria Bogus was celebrated Sept. 6, 1825; she was born in Kentucky Dec. 6, 1805. They are the parents of ten children, of whom seven are now living, Thompson L. being the oldest, and is prominently mentioned among the sketches of this township. Mr. and Mrs. Bishop have peacefully trod the path of life together for a period of upward of fifty-four years; the anniversary of their golden wedding was celebrated, at their residence on Third street, Greenville, upon Sept 6, 1875, to which were gathered some 300 persons, representatives of all ages, from childhood to old age, to pay their respects to this aged couple. They came loaded with costly gifts, among which we mention a gold-headed cane and gold spectacles to Mr. Bishop; Mrs. Bishop received her full share. Mr. Bishop has been a member of both the I. O. O. F. and Masonic Orders for many years, and is held in respect and esteem by all who know him.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 477; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Thompson L. Bishop, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Greenville; one of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born in Butler Co., Ohio, Nov. 8, 1829; he attended the common and high schools, until 12 years of age, and in 1842 came to Darke Co. with his parents, and located on Section 9, where he assisted his father in agricultural pursuits, until he attained his majority. In 1850, he went to Warren Co. and for three years was employed by the month as farm laborer; the first year he received for his wages $144, and for the next two years he received $15 per month; in 1853, he returned to Darke Co. and cropped with his father two years, receiving one-third of the proceeds. The summer of 1855 he passed in traveling through the Western States, and in the spring of 1856, he purchased an interest in the saw-mill at Gordon, Twin Township, and followed this business four years, and in the spring of 1860 purchased ninety acres of his place, and has since added, by purchase, three acres, and has made improvements upon the buildings to the amount of $5,000, and has brought the same to a fine state of cultivation, located one mile from the city limits of Greenville. He was united in marriage with Cynthia A. Dunham, in Warren Co., Ohio, Dec. 10, 1856; she was born in the same county in 1836. They have three children, viz., Sylvan E., Cora, and William G. Mr. and Mrs. Bishop have been members of the Baptist Church for a period of twenty years.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 477; submitted by Marla Zwakman


James J. Blease, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes, No. 9 Third Street, Greenville. Ohio. Greenville, like all cities of its size, has its representative business men in nearly every branch of trade, and to the above gentleman must be accorded the honor of being the representative merchant, in his line, of the place. He is a native of Birmingham, Warwickshire, England, and was born April 18, 1843. At 7 years of age, he emigrated to America with his parents, lauding in New Orleans March 17. 1851; thence to Cincinnati, where he attended public school continuously until the spring of 1857, at which date he removed to Richmond, Ind., and learned the shoemaker's trade, and, in 1863, engaged in the boot and shoe business, which he continued to follow until 1868, at which date he came to Greenville, and in October, 1869, engaged in the above business, which he has successfully followed. He has given a great deal of attention to the manufacturing of boots and shoes to order, and also manufacturing for his retail trade; he gives employment to from five to ten hands, and carries the largest stock of boots and shoes in Greenville, and by honorable and fair dealing, together with his personal attention given to every detail of his business, has built up a large trade, which is yearly increasing. His marriage with Martha A. Pannel was celebrated in 1869; she was a native of Eastern Virginia; they were the parents of three children, of whom two are deceased ; the living is James S.

Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 477-478; submitted by Marla Zwakman



B. Blottman, grocery and provisions, queensware, fruits and country produce, Greenville. Among the most enterprising and energetic business men of Greenville, the gentleman whose name heads this sketch requires more than a passing notice; he was born in Baden, Germany, May 6, 1846; at 9 years of age he emigrated to America, coming to Greenville Dec. 31, 1854; he was employed at various pursuits for several years, among which were draying, ditching and farming, and as hostler; in 1864, he had accumulated $90, with which he purchased a dray and harness, then purchased a horse on time and commenced draying as his first business adventure, and by close attention, hard labor and correct business principles, he succeeded beyond his most sanguine expectations; in 1868, he disposed of his draying, and with the fruits of his previous earnings embarked in the grocery trade, which business he has since successfully followed, his sales having increased until 1879, and exceeds upward of $30,000; Mr. B. is one of the self-made men of Darke Co., commencing in life without capital, and has, by his energy and correct business principles, placed himself in the front ranks of the successful merchants of Greenville. His marriage with Mary A. Kelly was celebrated in Greenville, Sept. 15, 1868; she was a native of Pennsylvania; they have three children now living, having lost one by death - the living are William B., Mary M. and James F.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 478; submitted by Marla Zwakman


H. Bornstein, wholesale and retail dealer in wines, liquors, etc., Greenville. Born in Berlin, Prussia, Sept. 18, 1827, where he received his education in the subscription school, and was engaged as clerk in the dry-goods store of his father until 17 years of age, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York in 1844: he then devoted several years traveling in the Southern and Western States, and in 1853, located in Dayton, Montgomery Co., and until 1875 was engaged in business in Dayton and Cincinnati; in the fall of 1875, he removed to Greenville, where he has since successfully followed the above business; a card of his business appears in the business directory of Greenville in another part of this work. He was married in Cincinnati in 1860, to Sarah Childs, who was born in that city: they have four children - Rosa, Eddie, Malcolm and Blanche.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 478; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Dr. Leo Myers Buchwalter, physician and surgeon, Greenville: the paternal ancestry of Dr. Buchwalter, whose portrait appears in this work, can be traced, not without many missing links, however, to the year 1527, at which time the Mennonites or Anabaptists (to which denomination they belonged), on account of their peculiar belief, were compelled through religious persecution to flee from their native canton, Berne, Switzerland, first to the Netherlands, and subsequently to the United States, arriving in Lancaster Co., Penn., about the year 1709. From the time of their exodus until the birth of Gerhardt Buchwalter, grandfather of Dr. Buchwalter, the line of genealogy cannot be traced with certainty. He, it appears, was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., June 9, 1771. Married Maria Brobsten in 1796, who bore him thirteen children : Benjamin, the oldest, father of Dr. Buchwalter, was born August 9, 1797; married Catharine Miller, daughter of Joseph Miller, of Middletown, Md., in 1824, the fruits of which were eight children, two of whom survive; in 1826, he removed to Dayton, Ohio, and after remaining here ten years, went to Laurel, Franklin Co., Ind., where he followed his calling of millwright, erecting many of the best mills in the country; in 1842, he left Laurel and located in Harrison, Hamilton Co., Ohio, at which place he was appointed Postmaster in 1852, in which capacity he served until 1861, when he was elected Mayor, the duties of which office he creditably discharged for a period of ten years; after this he came to Darke Co., and soon after died at Euphemia, Preble Co., Ohio; his wife followed him July 11, 1877. Dr. Buchwalter, the subject of this sketch, was born April 11, 1831, in Dayton, Ohio; his boyhood days were passed in the usual routine incident to youthful life in general up to a suitable age to attend school, which in those early days was not over a stone pavement a few blocks distance to a fine schoolhouse, but, when the boy was determined enough to encounter the difficulties, he took his lonely way through the woods, along a winding path for many miles to a rude log cabin; these very hardships, stamped upon that boy an energy of purpose, which intensified by maturer years, defies all opposition; at the tender age of 12, Dr. Buchwalter's father placed him in his mill, requiring his time eighteen hours out of the twenty- four - six of which, however, viz., from 6 P. M. until 12 M., being watch duty, he employed in reading and study, thus acquiring a very fair education in the English branches; in his 16th year he began teaching, which he followed about four years, then entered the store of Michael Miller, at Euphemia, as clerk; having thus by his own industry secured the necessary funds, he, in the fall of 1855, began reading medicine in the office of Dr. G. S. Goodheart, of Harrison, Ohio; before completing his course of reading, however, he was compelled to resume the counter, first with Miller & Moore, and subsequently with Moore & Winner. On the 1st day of November, 1864, he married Miss Matella Wilson, second daughter of Hon. William Wilson, of Greenville, by whom he had one child - Anna. In the spring of 1866, Dr. Buchwalter graduated from the Miami College of Medicine, and immediately located in Hollandsburg, in which he remained nine years, in the mean time building up an extensive practice; in 1874, he removed to Greenville, where he has by his indomitable will, untiring perseverance, and thorough acquaintance with his profession, built up a practice, which, while it is inferior to none in the county, is rapidly and permanently increasing. Dr. Buchwalter possesses an excellent library, which he is constantly enlarging by the addition of the leading medical and scientific productions of the day; he is, in the broadest sense of the term, a self-made man, and has won his way, conquering step by step, every opposing element that has impeded his pathway to that success and high professional skill to which he has at length fully attained. In the Biographical Cyclopaedia, appears a biographical sketch of the Doctor, to which, through more recent information, we are enabled to add some additional facts and recommendations.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 478-479; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Abraham N. Brewer, harness-maker, Greenville. The gentleman whose name heads this article was born in Warren Co., Ohio, July 1, 1833, and is a son of Abraham and Ann Brewer; his father was born in Kentucky Jan. 17. 1800, and departed this life July 27, 1843; his mother was born in Pennsylvania March 18, 1797, and died Aug. 26, 1873. Our subject's early days were spent on the farm, and, after he had attained a proper age, he learned the carpenter trade, which he followed for five years, and then followed wagon-making in Arcanum, where he settled in 1858; in 1865, he turned his attention to the manufacture of harness, in which ever since he has been successfully engaged; none know better how to do their patrons justice, and Abraham will always be found ready and willing to give his patrons the best stock in the market, and his jobs are turned out in a workmanlike manner. His first marriage was consummated with Mary Hough June 8, 1858; to their union, five children were given, viz., Lorenzo, Thomas N., Ella H., and two dying in infancy; Mrs. Brewer departed this life Nov. 9, 1863; his second marriage was celebrated with Miss Emeline Baker, in November, 1874.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 479-480; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Joseph Bryson, farmer and stock-raiser; resides on Sec. 9, Township 11 , Greenville Township ; P. O. Greenville. Among the old settlers of Darke Co., the gentleman whose name heads this sketch is assigned a place in the front ranks, being born upon the place where he now resides, on the 30th of November, 1821; he was a son of James Bryson, one of the early pioneers of Darke Co., who came from Bedford Co., Penn., and located upon the above place in 1817: he was born near Hagerstown, Md., May 21, 1786, and died March 20, 1863, upon the place where he had lived for nearly half a century. He married Mrs. Rachael Rush Aug. 12, 1817; her maiden name was Rachael Creviston; she was born March 3, 1784, and died Feb. 14, 1855; she came to Darke Co. in 1810; her first husband was Henry Rush, and Lemuel Rush, now living three and a half miles north of Greenville, is the only child now living by that union, and is probably the oldest continuous male resident of Darke Co.; the children of James and Rachel Bryson were six in number - Morris, whose sketch appears in this work, born May 13, 1818; Mary Ann, born Jan. 29, 1820, died Dec. 15, 1854; Joseph, born Nov. 30, 1821; Rachel J., born Dec. 25, 1823; Eliza, born Jan. 23, 1826, and James H., born Feb. 26, 1829. Until 25 years of age, Joseph followed farming on the old place; he then followed carpentering and fanning during the summer, and school- teaching during the winter, for seventeen years, since which time he has devoted his whole attention to farming; he has resided upon his present place for a period of fifty-eight years, and is the oldest continuous resident upon any one place that the writer of this article has yet found in Darke Co.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 480; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Morris Bryson, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 8 ; P. O. Woodington; one of the old settlers of Darke Co., Ohio; born in Darke Co., what is now Greenville Township, May 13, 1818; his father, James Bryson, was born in Washington Co., Md., May 21, 1786, and came to Darke Co. in 1816. He held various offices in the county, among which was County Commissioner, and served a term in the Assembly of Ohio; was County Judge some ten years, and was Justice of the Peace many years, and held other offices. He died March 20, 1863. He married Mrs. Rachel (Creviston) Rush; she was previously the wife of Henry Rush, who died in Ft. Rush, during the campaign of Harrison; his brother Andrew was killed in 1812, by the Indians, upon their first depredation: the first white child born in Darke Co. was Thomas Rush, a half-brother of the subject of our sketch; the latter was raised to agricultural pursuits, and, upon the 8th of April, 1846, was united in marriage with Mary Ann Cole; she was a daughter of Joseph Cole, one of the early pioneers of Darke Co., who located here in 1818; upon his marriage, he farmed rented land two years, and, in 1848, purchased 80 acres of his present place, where he has lived for a period of thirty-one years; he now has 287 acres of land, all of which he has earned by his own hard labor, with the exception of 80 acres. The children of Morris and Mary Ann (Cole) Bryson were ten in number, of whom seven are now living, viz.: James W., Rachel, Joseph C., Isaac N., Anna C., Volney D. and David H.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 480; submitted by Marla Zwakman



John K. Butt, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. Greenville; born in Butler Co., Ohio, Oct. 22, 1824; when 5 years of age, his father died; he lived with his mother until 16 years of age, when he commenced to learn the blacksmith trade, which business he followed with the exception of six years, until 1871; he then came to Greenville Township, and purchased 12 acres of land upon Secs. 12 and 13, where he lived until the spring of 1879, when he rented the farm upon which he lives. He is now farming 89 acres, and is engaged in raising corn, wheat and tobacco; he first came to Darke Co. when 13 years of age, and, after a residence of three years in Palestine, went to Preble Co. and has since lived in Preble, Montgomery and Darke Cos. He has been twice married; his first wife was Delia Arnett; they were married Oct. 10, 1844; she was born in Montgomery Co. and died Oct. 22, 1858, leaving two children, viz.: Sarah A., born Sept. 12, 1845, now Mrs. Jacob T. Miller, of Montgomery Co.; Marion A., born Feb. 8, 1852, now Mrs. Philip Hartzell, of Darke Co. His marriage with Eliza Lantz was celebrated in Montgomery Co. Dec. 6, 1859; she was born in Berks Co., Penn., June 3, 1837; they have three children- Flora F., born July 18, 1861; William P., born Oct. 3, 1864; Franklin E., born July 11, 1867.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 480-481; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Andrew Robeson Calderwood, attorney at law, Greenville; another of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, Sept. 14, 1818, and was a son of George and Margaret (Robeson) Calderwood, natives of Huntingdon Co., Penn. They were married Sept. 14, 1811; in the fall of 1817, they removed to near Dayton, Ohio, and from there, in 1832, to Darke Co., where George Calderwood died Sept. 7, 1849; his wife survived him until Aug. 12, 1873, when her decease occurred. George Calderwood was of Scotch parents, and, though uneducated, was a man of sound judgment, great firmness and very courageous; of large stature and possessed an iron constitution; he was kind and generous to a fault. Margaret Robeson descended from Scotch, Welsh and Irish ancestry, and was a woman of remarkable good sense, fine natural talent and great kindness. Our subject was employed in early life upon the farm, digging ditches, mauling rails, etc.; his education was meager; being called upon to serve as juror, he was so inspired by the eloquence of some of the attorneys in the case that he resolved to become a lawyer, and at once commenced the study of the same, being admitted to the bar and commenced the practice of law in 1851. Was elected Probate Judge in 1854; after serving three years, he entered the Union army as Second Lieutenant; was promoted Captain of Co. I, 40th O. V. I.; resigned his commission on account of injuries received from being thrown from a horse; on regaining his health he was recommissioned as Captain by Gov. Tod, and, by Col. Cranor, assigned to the command of his old company; after six months' service, in the above position, by loss of his voice and previous injuries he was again compelled to leave the active service of the army and acted in the capacity of recruiting officer until the close of the war, after which he again resumed the practice of the law. On Dec. 3, 1876, he assumed the editorial control of the Sunday Courier, a leading organ of the Republican party of Darke Co. He has been three times elected Mayor of Greenville, and, in 1868, the Republicans of Darke Co. presented his name in the Fourth Congressional District of Ohio, his opponent, Mr. McClung, being nominated by a small majority over Judge Calderwood. He has a liberal share of the practice in this county, and enjoys somewhat more than a local reputation as a criminal lawyer; at the forum, his abilities are best shown; he has an original faculty of developing a subject by a single glance of the mind, detecting as quickly the point upon which every controversy depends. There is a deep self- conviction and emphatic earnestness in his manner and a close, logical connection in his thoughts; he wears no garlands of flowers to hang in festoons around a favorite argument, yet for impromptu appeals and eloquence he stands among the first in his profession, and, by his great knowledge of human nature, he is acknowledged to be one of the best judges of a jury at the bar.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 481; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Henry Calkins, lawyer, Greenville. The subject of this memoir was born in West Burlington, Bradford Co., Penn., upon the 5th of December. 1832, and is a son of Moses and Eveline (Broflett) Calkins, who were married in Pennsylvania about the year 1826; Moses Calkins was born in Bradford Co., Penn., April 6, 1797, his father being one of four men who first settled in the county in 1790, was the father of five sons and four daughters, and died at the advanced age of 80; his widow's decease occurred two weeks later, at the age of 78; of their children, three now survive, viz., Moses, the father of our subject, now 84 years of age, and two daughters, aged 82 and 86 years, all in good health; the children of Moses and Eveline (Broffett) Calkins were six in number, of whom five are now living, viz., Charles, born Feb. 11, 1827, and whose biography also appears in this work, our subject being the next surviving member; Edward, born in 1836, a prominent lawyer of Richmond, Ind., since 1862; Alfred, born in 1838, a resident of and Mayor of New Paris, Ohio; Emma, born in 1841, now Mrs. C. B. Northrup, of New Madison. The maiden name of the great-grandmother of our subject on his mother's side was Gore; her husband was killed at the Wyoming massacre; she, with two children, one of them the grandmother of Mr. Calkins, escaped with other fugitives by boat up the Susquehanna River, then across the mountains, and located in the Sheshequin Valley, Bradford Co., Penn., where she died in 1833, being 90 years of age; her daughter Rebecca, the grandmother of Mr. Calkins, was born in 1774; was married, in 1794, to James Broflett, and were the parents of five children, all of whom were early settlers of Darke Co.. viz.. Silas and Alfred Broffett, at Broffettsville, Harrison Township; Celinda, wife of Judge Jaqua, of New Madison, and Lucinda, wife of Rial Lawrence; her second husband was Joseph Bloom, by whom she had four children - Charles, Guy, Hiram, and Celinda, now the wife of A. L. Northrup, residing in New Madison; she died at the age of 84; the parents of Mr. Calkins are now living at New Paris, Preble Co. they came to Darke Co. in 1852, and settled in Harrison Township. The education of our subject was obtained in the common schools up to 16 years of age; he then received an academical course at Troy, Bradford Co., Penn.; then was a student of the Delaware (Ohio) College two years; afterward studied medicine and attended a course of lectures at Cincinnati Medical College: in the spring of 1856, he went across the Plains, remaining until 1859. Upon Dec. 12, 1862, he was married to Harriet E. McClure, at Peru, Ind. The following August, he enlisted a company of 101 men, and went out as Captain of Co. C. 87th Ind. V. I, serving through Kentucky and Tennessee. After returning from the army, he returned to Illinois and engaged in farming, stock-raising, etc. Was Police Judge of the city of Jerseyville, Ill., in 1868; was admitted as a member of the bar in 1870, and was afterward elected two terms as City Solicitor; in 1874, he came to Greenville, and engaged in the law business with his brother Charles. Was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Darke Co. in 1877, and re-elected in 1879. Has always voted the Democratic ticket. Henry Calkins is the father of three children now living, having lost three by death. During the residence of Moses Calkins in Pennsylvania, he was largely identified with the lumber trade, and, upon locating here, has been engaged in loaning money, etc.; he is a man of sterling worth, and a great champion of the cause of temperance.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 481-482; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Charles Calkins, attorney at law, Greenville. The subject of this sketch was born in Burlington Township, Bradford Co., Penn., Feb. 11, 1827, and is a son of Moses Calkins, who is prominently mentioned in the biography of Henry Calkins in this work. The early education of our subject was obtained like other boys of the age, in an old log schoolhouse; at 16 years of age, he entered the academy at West Troy, where he received his academic education under the instruction of Ezra Long. Afterward, his father becoming largely indebted to the Bank of North America, in Philadelphia, for lands then owned by him, required all his efforts, as well as of his son, to liquidate the same; accordingly he built four saw-mills, and Charles run one of them one-half of the time, day and night, until his majority, the balance of the time being employed in rafting and running lumber down the Susquehanna River. At the age of 21, he commenced the study of law at Towanda, Penn., with John C. Adams, who was an able lawyer, a just man, and distinguished throughout the State for his prominence and ability. He continued his studies with the above gentleman until April 11, 1849, when through the kindness and generosity of Allen and Eliza McKean, he was furnished with means to take him to the gold mines of California, and to the above parties he holds the deepest feelings of gratitude and esteem. After remaining in California some eighteen months, meeting with fine success, he returned to Bradford Co., Penn., thence to Darke Co., with a cousin, in 1851, with the expectation of remaining but two weeks, but through the fortuity of Providence, he has made it his home for nearly thirty years. Upon the 1st of June, 1852, he formed a partnership under the firm name of Collins & Calkins, this partnership continuing until September, 1855, when it was dissolved by the death of Mr. Collins. In 1854, he was elected Prosecuting Attorney for two years; re-elected in 1866 for two years, and again in 1868 for the same length of time, and has had an honorable and lucrative practice since being admitted to the bar in 1852. His marriage with Elizabeth Stamm was celebrated in the spring of 1853. She was also a native of Pennsylvania. They have four children now living, viz., Leulla, Harriet and Henry (twins) and George.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 482-483; submitted by Marla Zwakman


L. E. Chenoweth, attorney at law, Greenville; was born in Washington Township, on the 3d of December, 1840. His father, Thomas F. Chenoweth, came to Darke Co., from Franklin Co., Ohio, in 1818, and entered the farm on which he has since resided. L. E. Chenoweth was brought up a farmer, but with three brothers learned the trade of bricklaying. He received a good common-school education, and, at the age of 16, taught a district school. He taught school several terms. On the 13th of May, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Co. K. 11th O. V. I., for three months' service, and was honorably discharged Aug. 17, 1861; re- enlisted Oct. 25, 1861, in Co. E, 69th O. V. I.; was appointed Commissary Sergeant of said regiment, Feb. 1, 1863, at Murfreesboro, Tenn., and soon after appointed Quartermaster Sergeant of said regiment. Re-enlisted as veteran volunteer, Feb. 26, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tenn.; was discharged from service as Quartermaster Sergeant, at Sister's Ferry, Ga., Feb. 1, 1865, and was mustered in on same day as First Lieutenant of Co. H, 69th O. V. I., and, on same day, was appointed Quartermaster of said regiment. Was appointed Brigade Quartermaster on the staff of Gen. George P. Buell, commanding 2d Brigade, 1st Division, 14th Army Corps, at Goldsboro, N. C., March 27, 1865. Was commissioned and mustered as Captain of Co. I, O.V.I., June 16, 1865, at Louisville, Ky., and was discharged on the 17th of July, 1865, at the close of the war. Was present at the following battles: Stone River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Ringgold, Snake Creek Gap, Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Marietta, Chattahoochie River, Peach Tree Creek, siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro and Savannah and Goldsboro, N. C. Since the war, has been engaged in the grocery business, miller, engineer, merchant tailoring, boot and shoe store, foundry and machine shop and a traveling salesman, handling school furniture and supplies, in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Canada. On the 5th day of December, 1876, in the Supreme Court of Ohio, was duly admitted to the practice of the law, since which time he has been engaged in the business of his profession. He married, on the 3d of July, 1867, Effle A. Arnold, daughter of Noah Arnold, Esq., of Jaysville. Darke Co. Has two children - Millie and James.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 483; submitted by Marla Zwakman


B. H. Clark, Sec. 4; P. O. Woodington; an early pioneer of Darke Co.; born in Lebanon Co., Penn., Sept. 16, 1821; he was a son of Samuel Clark, who was born in Pennsylvania March 31, 1796; he came to Darke Co. in 1831, and located in Washington Township, where he lived until his decease, which occurred in November, 1872. He married Margaret Hofnagle in Pennsylvania; she was born in the same State in 1797, and died in Washington Township in February, 1863. Our subject came to Darke Co. with his parents in 1831, and is, consequently, one of the early pioneers, and among the oldest continuous residents of the county, having lived here nearly half a century; his education was obtained in a log schoolhouse with stick-and-mud chimney, a large fireplace in which they used logs as large as two or three of the largest boys could handle, and the desks and seats were made of slabs, as well as the writing-desks which extended around the house; he remained with his father until 21 years of age, when he commenced farming for himself, and in 1857, moved upon his present place, where he has since lived; he has about 80 acres of land, with good farm buildings, which he has secured by his own hard labor, in which he has been nobly assisted by his amiable wife, to whom he was united in marriage April 25, 1844; she was born in Washington Township, Darke Co., April 18, 1830; her maiden name was Mary Ann Martin, a daughter of Hugh and Eve (Cox) Martin; her father was one of the early pioneers, emigrating from Pennsylvania in 1818, and locating in Washington Township; her mother was a daughter of Jacob Cox, who located here in 1816; he was born in 1801 and died April 7, 1842, upon the farm he first settled on after his marriage; her mother was born in 1796, and died Dec. 13, 1866. The children of B. H. and Mary Ann (Martin) Clark were thirteen in number, of whom eleven are now living - William H., Isaac X., John C., Frank, Margaret E., Clatie F.. Angeline M., Jennie, Sherman, Walter and Arthur; the deceased were Charles and Baxter, dying in infancy.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 483-484; submitted by Marla Zwakman



John C. Clark, firm of Breaden & Clark, attorneys at law, Wilson & Hart's Block, Greenville. The subject of this memoir was born in Washington Township, Darke Co., on the 17th of January, 1849, and is the son of B. H. Clark, another of our old settlers, whose biography also appears in this work. The early occupation of our subject was that of a farmer's son, his education being obtained in the common schools, until 18 years of age, after which he attended the graded schools of Greenville for three years; the following three years he devoted to school-teaching, and, during vacation, gave his whole attention to study; in 1873, he commenced the study of law with Calderwood & Cole, was admitted to the bar in 1877, and, shortly after, associated with J. E. Breaden, Jr., under the firm name, now doing an extensive law business, which is yearly increasing.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 484; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Henry M. Cole, lawyer, Greenville; was born in Darke Co., March 17, 1845. His grandfather, Samuel Cole, Sr., was a native of Sussex Co., N. J.; he was one of the earliest settlers, and the first Justice of the Peace of Washington Township; his father and mother are natives of the same township; his father, Samuel Cole, Jr., is a substantial farmer; his mother was Elizabeth Cox; of a family of eleven children, our subject is the eldest; by arduous study, with only common-school advantages, he obtained a fair English education; he entered the service of the United States in the war of the rebellion in 1864, and was fifer-boy in Co. G, of the 152d O. N. G.; he read law with Messrs. Knox & Sater, of Greenville; graduated from the Cincinnati Law School in the spring of 1869; was at once admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in Greenville; in August, 1872, he formed a law partnership with Judge A. R. Calderwood, of Greenville, and is still so associated. Politically, he is a Republican. He possesses good legal talent, is a close student, and is devoted to his profession; as a pleader and advocate, he is effective; in legal and general literature, he is well informed, and has the manners of a polished gentleman.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 484; submitted by Marla Zwakman


William Cole, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 14; P. O. Greenville; born in Greenville Township, Darke Co., March 3, 1849; he is a son of Samuel Cole, who was one of the early settlers of Darke Co., and is one of the oldest continual residents of the county, and is now living in Washington Township, and is a brother of Joseph Cole, whose biography appears among the sketches of Washington Township in another part of this work. Wm. Cole received a common-school education, and assisted his father upon the farm until he attained his majority; in 1872, he located upon his present place where he has since lived; he has 160 acres on his home farm, with good buildings. He married Clarissa Alexander Aug. 3, 1871; she was born in Preble Co., Ohio, Sept. 7, 1852; they have five children- Baxter, born April 11, 1873; Samuel G., Aug. 8, 1874, John, Sept. 21, 1875; George, March 25, 1877, and an infant, July 10, 1879. Mrs. Cole was a daughter of Samuel Alexander, who died in Washington Township Oct 7, 1873; her mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Roberts, who died in 1874.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 484; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Jacob W. Cox, manufacturer of boots and shoes, Sec. 31; P. O. Greenville. One of the old settlers, born in Greenville Township, Darke Co., Ohio, Aug. 12, 1841. He was a son of Jesse Cox, the first white child born in Washington Township (date of birth, 1817), whose occupation was farming; his death occurred on Oct. 4, 1873. He married Prudence J. Wintermute, a native of New Jersey, born in 1820, who is still living in Greenville Township. Jacob W. raised to farm labor until 14 years of age, when he commenced to learn the shoemaker's trade, which business he followed in connection with farming until 1873, since which time he has devoted his whole attention to his trade upon Sec. 31, where he resides. Upon the 14th of March, 1869, he was married to Mary E. Bechtold, daughter of Samuel Bechtold, whose sketch appears among the biography of Greenville Township; they have three children - Charles N., Francis M. and Bellzoria.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 484-485; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Frank Conkling, book-keeper, Greenville; born in Hamilton Co., Ohio. Feb. 27, 1858; his early education was obtained in the common schools of his native place, and completed by a study of eight years in Cincinnati; in 1875, He came to Greenville, and in July, 1876, accepted a position as book-keeper of the Greenville Bank, which situation he has since filled with credit to himself, and satisfaction to his employers.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 485; submitted by Marla Zwakman


David Craig, retired; P. O. Greenville; another of the early pioneers of Darke Co. is the gentleman whose name heads this sketch; born in Montgomery Co., Oct. 5, 1804, and was a son of John Craig, a native of Virginia, who had a hatred to the institution of slavery, and emigrated to Kentucky, then a free State, but upon slavery being admitted as one of its institutions, he came to Montgomery Co., Ohio, where his death occurred in 1812; in the spring of 1816, our subject came to Darke Co., being then 12 years of age, and he and his twin brother contracted and cleared several acres of land in Wayne Township, by which they cleared upward of $1 per day each; at 15 years of age, he went to Butler Co., and learned the blacksmith trade; his skill and reputation in the making of edge tools soon became established, and for three years he found employment at Amanda, most of the time making stonecutter's tools for the contractors of the Miami Canal; he was a witness to the commencement of the building of the canal, and saw the first dirt thrown out by Gov. Merrill, of Ohio, and Gov. Clinton, of New York; in 1828, he and his twin brother purchased two lots on Main street, Greenville, erected a wagon and blacksmith shop, and carried on the above business in connection with the manufacture of plows and agricultural implements until 1850, when he located upon his farm, two and a half miles south of Greenville, and here he engaged in farming until the spring of 1877, when he disposed of his farm, removed to Greenville, where he has since lived. Mr. Craig has suffered the privations and hardships of frontier life; upon locating here he had to go to Montgomery Co., purchase corn at $1 per bushel, and bring it to Greenville upon horseback; it may be said of him that he is one of the self-made men of Darke Co.; coming here at 12 years of age, he battled against adversity for many years, and now at the advanced age of 75 years is in possession of all his faculties, and has accumulated sufficient property by his hard labor and correct business habits to carry him and his amiable wife through their declining years. Upon the 3d of August, 1834, he was united in marriage with Ruhanah Shanon, who was born in Cumberland Co., Penn., Feb. 17, 1816, and came to Darke Co. with her parents in 1832. They were the parents of three sons and four daughters, viz., Elizabeth A., born Sept. 15, 1835; James M., Nov. 29, 1836, now in Government employ at Washington; Thomas A., born March 2, 1839- died Feb. 22, 1845; Marietta, May 5, 1842; Martha J., Jan. 18,1844; Phoebe S., Dec. 17, 1845, and David Edgar, June 1, 1852.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 485-486; submitted by Marla Zwakman


T. W. Culbertson, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Greenville; was born Oct. 25, 1828, within sight of the place where he now resides; he is the son of Samuel Culbertson, a native of Pennsylvania, who was born in June, 1801, and imigrated with his family to this county at quite an early day, settling on a piece of land in Van Buren Township. At that time, this county was almost entirely covered over with dense forests and immense swamps; the labors of the pioneer had not yet made extensive inroads on the vast wilderness. He was united in marriage with Miss Rebecca Westfall in 1823; six children were born of this union, to wit: Orin, Mary J., T. W. Elizabeth and James; Orin and Elizabeth are deceased; the others are settled in this county. The privations and hardships of pioneer life soon told upon the health of the elder Culbertson, and in 1837, he was called to bid farewell to his family and take his departure to that "undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns," leaving a loving wife and six small children to contend with the trials and difficulties incident to frontier life; his wife remained upon the homestead and survived him about sixteen years, dying in 1853. Our subject was quite small at the death of his father, after which he remained with his mother till her death, assisting in sustaining her and giving her the comforts of a home; he early learned the brickmason's trade. His educational advantages were necessarily limited, as a pioneer's life is one of constant exertion for sustenance, but what opportunities did offer in this direction were well improved. At the death of his mother, the home was broken up and he went to live with his sister, Mrs. Studabaker. Nov. 26, 1857, he celebrated his marriage with Elizabeth Harper; she is the daughter of William S. Harper, a native of Pennsylvania, who also emigrated to this county at quite an early day. Immediately after the marriage of our subject, he moved upon a piece of land in Sec. 7, which he had previously purchased; this was all in the woods, and he was obliged to clear off a spot large enough to erect a cabin on; this constituted the first home of his own; here, in the dense forest, he set out with his helpmeet, on the course of life, and by their own exertions they have caused the golden grain to wave where once stood the mighty forest; in his rich fertile farm, we again behold industry and frugality bountifully rewarded. They are the parents of seven children, to wit: Frank, Edward, Charlie, William H., Harry, Cora B. and Purley, all of whom are yet living and residing under the parental roof. Mr. Culbertson, realizing the advantages of an education in this advanced day, is offering his children all the opportunities now afforded by this county in this direction, and they, we are glad to chronicle, are making good use of them.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 485-486 submitted by Marla Zwakman



John W. Deardourff, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes. No. 13, Third Street, Greenville. The subject of this memoir is a native of Preble Co.,
born June 3, 1845; he is a son of Daniel Deardourff, who was born in Adams Co., Penn., and came to Preble Co. about the year 1849. He married Elizabeth Stouffer; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., and is now living in Greenville, at the advanced age of 79 years. John W. was raised in Preble Co. until 20 years of age, during which time he attended the common schools, and learned and worked at the shoemaker's trade, which he followed until August, 1862, at which date he enlisted in the 50th O. V. I., and went forward to battle for the Union; he was in many severe engagements, among which was the battle of Perryville, and in the three months' campaign against Atlanta, during which time he was engaged some eighty-four days; after the capture of Atlanta, he returned to Franklin, and after the battle of the latter place, the army fell back to Nashville, where he was engaged in the three days' fight; in the spring of 1865, he joined Sherman at Goldsboro, and was with his army at the surrender of Johnson; he then lay in Salisbury some thirty days, then returned to City Point and Baltimore; thence to Cleveland, where he received his discharge, in the latter part of July, 1865, having served in the Union army three years. Upon receiving his discharge, he came to Darke Co. and was employed at his trade until the spring of 1877, when he engaged in business for himself, which he has since successfully followed; a card of his business is to be found in the business directory of Greenville, in another part of this work. His marriage with Phebe S. Craig was celebrated in March, 1869; she is a daughter of David Craig, whose sketch appears among the biographies of this work; they have two children - Harry A. and Charles.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 486; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Josiah B. Deeter, Sec. 4; farmer and manufacturer of all kinds and sizes of drain tile; P. O. Woodington; his factory is located one-fourth of a mile
south of Woodington Station; he may be considered one of our old settlers, being born in Greenville Township, Darke Co., June 3, 1844; his father, Daniel M. Deeter, was born in Pennsylvania in January, 1801, and came to Darke Co. somewhere about the year 1825, where he has since lived. He married Anna Bolinger in Pennsylvania; she died in the spring of 1879; the subject of this sketch followed agricultural pursuits during the early part of his life, and subsequently purchased an interest in the tile factory of Hime, Martin & Co., which, after two years he became the sole owner of; since that time he has conducted the business in his own name; his yearly sales in tile have exceeded $3,000; he also owns 94 acres of land, which extends to the station, his residence being located one-fourth of a mile from the same. His marriage with Hattie A. Crosson was celebrated July 17, 1873; she was born in Cincinnati July 18, 1855; she died in April, 1875; one child was born to them - Claud M., born Aug. 29, 1875; died Feb. 19, 1876.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 486-487; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Aaron S. Demise, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 27; P. O. Greenville; one of the early pioneers of Darke Co., born in Butler Co., Ohio, Jan. 16, 1825; he was the oldest son of John S. Denise, who was born in the State of New Jersey March 25, 1803, and came to Ohio when quite young. He was united in marriage in Warren Co., Ohio, with Margaret M. Clark March 18, 1824; she was born in Warren Co. Aug. 15, 1804; they were the parents of ten children, of whom
seven are now living ; they were among the early settlers of Darke Co., coming here in 1829, and locating upon Sec. 27, Greenville Township, which at that time was a howling wilderness, and upon this spot Mr. Denise passed the remainder of his days; his decease occurred April 25, 1852; his widow now lives upon the same place, and although upward of 75 years of age, is in possession of all her faculties; our subject came to Darke Co. with his parents in 1829, and is consequently one of the old settlers of the county; he remained upon the old homestead until 1855, after which he went to Illinois and remained four years, thence to Missouri, staying there two years, and, in 1861, returned to Darke Co., and. in September of the same year, enlisted in the 40th O. V. I., and went forward to battle for the Union; he was first forwarded to Kentucky, where he was in several battles, after which he was transferred to the Army of the Cumberland; participated in the battle of Chickamauga, then the siege and capture of Atlanta, continuing upward of four months fighting; in the fall of 1864 and the early part of the winter of 1865, he was in the Fourth Army Corps, under Maj. Gen. Thomas, operating in Tennessee in protecting the cities of Nashville, Chattanooga and other points, during which time he was engaged in the battle of Nashville for two days, at the expiration of which time the rebel army under Gen. Hood were badly defeated; he was also in many other engagements; in the spring of 1865, he was forwarded to Texas, and stationed at Galveston and San Antonio for several months, and in the fall of 1865, returned to Columbus, where he was mustered out of service and received his discharge in October of the same year, having served in the Union army upward of four years; after two years' service, he veteranized, and at the expiration of three years, was transferred to the 51st O. V. I., and remained with the same until the close of the war; he was never taken
prisoner, but had many narrow escapes; he was twice wounded, but only kept from duty a short time; he returned home Oct. 25, and located upon his present place, where he has since resided; he has 100 acres in his home farm, of which 80 are under a good state of cultivation, one mile west of the city of Greenville; also 40 acres in Daviess Co., Mo.; Mr. Denise is no politician, but is a strong Republican, and labors for the success of his party, and to make use of his own words, he always votes as he fought.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 487; submitted by Marla Zwakman


John G. Deubner, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 13; P. O. Greenville; one of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born in Saxony, Germany, July 2, 1825, where he received a good German education and followed farming and working in woolen mills until 23 years of age, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York in May, 1848; he immediately came to Darke Co., and was employed working in the Broadway Hotel, Greenville, some five years, and, in 1853, he located upon Sec. 13, where he has since lived for a period of twenty-six years; he now has 82 acres under a good state of improvement, with good farm buildings; when locating here, there were only 15 acres cleared; he has since cleared 35 acres and brought the same to a good state of cultivation; when Mr. Deubner purchased his first land, he had a capital of about $50; he has since accumulated all the above property by his own hard labor, and it can be truly said of him that he is one of the self-made men of Darke Co. He is a Democrat in politics, and always labors for the success of the party; he has held the office of Township Trustee of Greenville Township for three years during his residence here. His marriage with Wilhelmina Bildemeyer was celebrated March 8, 1853; she was born in Hessen, Germany. Sept. 11, 1835; they were the parents of thirteen children - John C., born Nov. 21, 1853; Frederick H., born Sept. 17, 1855; Charlotte, Feb. 25, 1858 (died Aug. 10, 1871); Lewis H., July 19, 1859; John W., Sept. 10, 1861: Wilhelmina P., Nov. 29, 1863; Charles A., July 14, 1866; Caroline S. and Louisa (twins), born Sept. 25, 1868; Sophia, March 6, 1871 (died July 20, 1874); Powell G. born Feb. 14, 1874; May, June 11, 1876, and Amelia M. Dec. 3, 1878.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 487-488; submitted by Marla Zwakman



John Devor, lawyer, Greenville, was born in Darke Co. in 1831. His grandfather, John Devor, was born in Pennsylvania, and came to Darke Co. in
1808; he entered the first half-section of land in the present limits of the county, and laid out the town of Greenville in 1810; in 1816, he moved his family to the county, they having, for eight years previously, lived in Montgomery Co., Ohio. Upon the organization of the county, in 1817, he was appointed Treasurer, and served as such three years. He followed the business of surveying for some years. His son, James Devor, was born near Maysville, Ky., while the family were on their way from Pennsylvania, in 1795; he learned surveying from his father, and, for a number of years, was County Surveyor. He was the first Auditor of Darke Co.; from May, 1844, to October, 1847, he was County Treasurer, and, for a number of years, he was a Justice of the Peace; he died October, 1855. His wife, Patience Dean, was a daughter of Aaron Dean, one of the early settlers of the county; they were married March 1, 1828, and ten children were born to them, of whom the second son is our subject. He received a common-school education, and acquired a knowledge of surveying under his father's instruction; at the age of 19, he commenced the study of law with the late Hiram Bell, Esq., of Greenville, and was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1852, and at once opened an office in Greenville. In 1855, he was elected County Surveyor, and was re-elected in 1858, serving six years; from 1854 to 1867, he was a law partner of the late Michael Spayd, of Greenville; in the fall of that year, he formed a law partnership with Hon. William Allen, which continued eleven years. For four years, he was Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue for the Fourth District of Ohio; he was also Registrar in Bankruptcy for the same district during the existence of the bankrupt law, which went into effect March, 1867, and terminated September, 1878. July 29, 1856, he married Miss Elizabeth Travis, daughter of John Travis, of Butler Co., Ohio; Mrs. Devor died Oct. 22, 1878. Formerly a Whig, Mr. Devor naturally became a Republican, and, for many years has been Chairman of the Republican Central Committee of Darke Co. Mr. Devor is eminently social, and is an industrious and energetic business man. He is at present a law partner of M. T. Allen, and the firm is one of the strongest of the Darke Co. bar.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 488; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Elijah Devor, attorney at law, Greenville. The subject of this memoir was born in Darke Co., Ohio, Oct. 16, 1849, and is a brother of John Devor, whose sketch and portrait both appear in this work. Our subject was the son of
James Devor, one of our early pioneers, and who, as well as the grandfather, are prominently mentioned in the sketch of John Devor, as well as in the historical part of this work. Elijah Devor obtained a common-school education, and, at 19 years of age commenced the study of law with Allen & Devor; he attended the Cincinnati Law School, at Cincinnati, Ohio, one term, graduated from the same, and was admitted to the bar in April, 1871; commenced the practice of law with M. T. Allen, as a partner, in 1872, and continued the same two years; in 1875, he associated with his present partner, and they have since conducted their business under the firm name of Devor & Bodle. He is, also, Treasurer of the Greenville Gas Co. On the 8th day of October, 1875, he was united in marriage with Emily A. Webb, daughter of H. A. Webb, of Greenville; they have two sons by this union, viz., Henry Webb Devor and John Devor.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 488-489; submitted by Marla Zwakman


William H. Dill, merchant, Justice of the Peace and Postmaster, Pikeville; another of the old settlers of Darke Co., born in Beamsville, Richland Township, June 8, 1839; he was the oldest son of John H. C. Dill, who was born in Germany March 16, 1805; he emigrated to America and located in Butler Co., and, about the year 1837, came to Darke Co. and settled in Beamsville, where he lived until 1855; he then removed to Dallas and engaged in the grain trade one year, after which he followed farming three or four years; he then returned to Dallas and engaged in the dry -goods trade for one year, when he came to Pikesville, in the spring of 1862, and engaged in the general merchandise trade and the purchase of grain up to the time of his death, which occurred April 2, 1865. He married Martha C. Seigment, in Ohio, Nov. 17, 1834; she was a native of Germany, born Oct. 23, 1815, and died in Darke Co. March 7, 1858; they were the parents of eleven children, of whom eight are now living, six in Ohio, one in Indiana and one in Missouri. Our subject resided in Beamsville until 16 years of age, where he received some experience in the mercantile store of his father; he then assisted his father in farming, in Brown Township, some four years, when he commenced clerking in Dallas, and, the following year, his father located in Dallas, in the merchandise business, and he then assisted his father in his store one year; in the spring of 1862, he came to Pikeville with his father, and remained with him until the latter's death ; he continued the business two years, and, in 1867, the store and stock were destroyed by fire; he was then engaged in various pursuits until the spring of 1879, when he engaged in the merchandise trade, which business he now follows. He received the appointment of Postmaster under the administration of Lincoln, in 1862, and was the first Postmaster of the town; he has also held the office of Justice of the Peace for twelve years in succession. His marriage with Julia A. Reed was celebrated in Darke Co., Ohio, Sept. 8, 1861; she was born in Darke Co. March 28, 1843; they have two children - Ida E., born Sept. 3, 1862, and Frank E., April 26, 1874.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 489; submitted by Marla Zwakman



John Dininger, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 32; P. O. Greenville. The subject of this memoir is justly entitled to the credit of being one of the early settlers of Darke Co.; he was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, Nov. 7, 1823, and was the oldest son of Jacob Dininger, who was born in Germany Sept. 26, 1798; he emigrated to America when 18 years of age, and located in Montgomery Co., Ohio, and, in 1834, came to Darke Co. with his family, and followed farming in this township until his decease, which occurred June 11, 1875. He married Margaret Swank; she was born in Montgomery Co. in 1806, and is now living upon the home farm, where she has resided for forty-five years. John Dininger made his home with his parents until 30 years of age; at the age of 24 he commenced to clear his present place, and has since cleared some sixty-five acres of his home farm, which contains 100 acres, besides upward of one hundred acres in Washington Township, with good farm buildings upon each place. He has taken a deep interest in the cause of religion, having been a member of the Lutheran Church for upward of twenty years, his wife and son also being members of the same church. His marriage with Catherine R. McClure was celebrated Oct. 1, 1857; she was born in Montgomery Co., Aug. 25, 1834; they were the parents of three children - Ira, born Aug. 31, 1858, died Oct. 8, 1879; John L. and Hattie (twins), born March 31, 1864; Hattie died April 2, 1864, and Ira died from quick consumption at the home of his parents, after an illness of one year. Mrs. Dininger was a daughter of George and Maria (Merkles) McClure, who came to Darke Co. in 1843; her father was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., April 23, 1803, and died in Darke Co. in 1870; her mother was born in Berks Co., Penn., March 8, 1812, and died Aug. 25, 1879.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 489-490; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Michael W. Dininger, farmer. Sec. 32; P. O. Greenville. The subject of this sketch is a brother of John and Lewis Dininger, who are also mentioned in this work, and a son of Jacob Dininger, who is prominently mentioned in the sketch of John Dininger. Michael W. was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio. Jan. 29, 1833, and came to Darke Co. with his parents in 1834; his education was obtained in a rude log schoolhouse, and, by hard study, he obtained a fair common-school learning; he assisted his father in agricultural pursuits until 21 years of age, when, on the 21st of September, 1854, he was united in marriage with Mary A. Kerst; she was born in Pennsylvania in 1835; they are the parents of five children, of whom four are now living - -Sarah E., Isaac, Mary C. and Margaret R.; the deceased died in infancy. Upon the marriage of Mr. D., he located upon his present place, where he has since lived: his home farm contains 100 acres, with good farm buildings, which he has brought from a wilderness to its present high state of cultivation by his own hard labor. He has been a member of the Lutheran Church for many years, his wife and three of his children being members of different churches.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 490; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Lewis Dininger, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 6; P. O. Greenville. This gentleman is a brother of John and Michael W. Dininger and a son of Jacob Dininger, all of whom are mentioned in this work; Lewis Dininger was born in Greenville Township, Darke Co., Ohio, March 30, 1840, and has always followed agricultural pursuits. At 26 years of age, he was united in marriage with Miss A. E. Kerst, their marriage nuptials being celebrated on the 8th of February, 1866; she was born in German Township, Darke Co., in 1844; six children were the fruits of this union, viz., Flora S., Anna M., Charles, Achie E., Harley and Otto S.; Charlie died at the age of 1 year and 10 months. Mr. Dininger erected his present residence in 1870, where he has since lived, and upon this place he has lived since his birth; he now has 100 acres of land, with good farm buildings. He has been a member of the Lutheran Church since early boyhood, his wife also being a member of the same church.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 490; submitted by Marla Zwakman



J. N. Ditman, merchant tailor, Greenville; the subject of this sketch was born in Germany Sept. 25, 1837, and is a son of Henry and Louisa Ditman: our subject emigrated with his parents to this country in 1840 and landed at Baltimore; he was reared in Carroll Co., Md., and removed to Richmond. Ind., in 1863, where he remained for a short time; thence to Connersville in 1864: thence back to Richmond in 1873 and remained about two years, when he moved to Bradford, Ohio, and resided upward of two years, and then came to Greenville and engaged in his business, which he is prosecuting with considerable energy, giving employment to several workmen. He was united in marriage with Sarah Ann Slaugenhaupt Feb. 17, 1861; they are the parents of six children, viz : Mary L., born Nov. 10, 1861; Gertrude E., Dec. 2, 1864; Inez E., Nov. 30, 1866 ; Laura B., Dec. 1, 1867; J. Willard, Sept 5, 1872; Maud, March 13, 1877.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 490; submitted by Marla Zwakman


F. M. Eidson, tanner and currier, Greenville; born in Preble Co. Ohio, Dec. 14, 1835, where he passed his boyhood days, receiving a common-school education, and also learning his present trade; he came to Darke Co. in 1860, where he has since resided, with the exception of five months which he served in the late rebellion. In 1862, he was united in marriage with Miss Lucetta Kester, and by this union they have four children, viz., Clara D., Boyce G., Virginia K. and George M. Mr. E. has, since a resident of Greenville, been a member of the Board of City Councilmen six years, and is at present President of the Union Public School Board, and is also Vice President of the Home Relief Association. A card of his business will be found in the business directory in another part of this work.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 490; submitted by Marla Zwakman

William Emrick, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Greenville; born in Preble Co., Ohio, Nov. 6, 1836; he was a son of Jacob Emrick, who was born in Berks Co., Penn., in the year 1795; he came to Montgomery Co. at an early day, then to Preble Co. in 1830, where his decease occurred May 18, 1872; he was
married three times, his second wife being the mother of the subject of our sketch; her maiden name was Elizabeth Detmore, who was born in Virginia in 1810, and died in October, 1838. William Emrick, after obtaining a good common-school education, remained with his father and assisted him in agricultural pursuits until Dec. 29, 1857, when he was united in marriage with Mary J. Collins, who died May 18, 1868, leaving four children, viz., Franklin, Valorous, Elmer E. and Cora. Oct. 15, 1868, he was married to Susanah Emrick; they have two sons by this union - Orpheus and Elihu. In the spring of 1858, he commenced farming in Preble Co., and continued the same until January, 1866, at which date he came to Darke Co., and purchased a farm of 40 acres in Twin Township, which he afterward disposed of, then purchased 80 acres, which he also sold, and, Jan. 26, 1876 purchased the place where he has since lived; he now owns upward of 100 acres, with good farm buildings, under good improvement, located three miles from Greenville. During his residence in Preble Co., he held the office of Township Clerk of Twin Township in the latter county for four years.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 490-491; submitted by Marla Zwakman



James Esty, retired farmer and stock-raiser; Sec. 31; P. O. Greenville; another of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born in the province of New Brunswick Sept. 17, 1814 his father, David Esty, was born in the above province July 31, 1792; he came to Ohio in 1822, and located in August of the same year, having been two months on the way he engaged in farming and milling until his death, which occurred Nov. 20, 1874; he was married, in New Brunswick, to Ann Knoop, Sept. 30, 1813; she was born March 19, 1792, in New Brunswick; they were the parents of eleven children, all of whom lived to grow up; ten are now living, of whom James Esty is the oldest; Mrs. Esty died Aug. 21, 1873. The Bible from which the above record was copied was purchased by David Esty in 1829, and is now valued very highly as an heirloom to our subject, who came to Miami Co. with his parents in 1822, being then 8 years of age; he was raised to farming and running a saw-mill until Jan. 1, 1842, when he was united in marriage with Jane McDowell; she was born in Franklin Co. Feb. 20, 1817; they have one son by this union - John C., born Dec. 4, 1842. Upon the marriage of Mr. Esty, he commenced farming for himself in Miami Co., and continued there until March 4, 1856, when he located upon Sec. 31 in Greenville Township, where he has since lived; he now has 165 acres of land, with good farm buildings, located two miles from Greenville. John C. Esty, the only son of James and Jane (McDowell)
Esty, has always lived upon the home farm, and for the past two years has been a partner with his father in the products of his farm. He married Ellen Greenawalt on Dec. 18, 1873; she was born in Greenville Jan. 5, 1847; they have one child- Eva May, born March 8, 1875.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 491; submitted by Marla Zwakman


B. F. Fertick, dealer in and manufacturer of lumber, Greenville; was born in Wayne Co., Ind., June 28, 1849, where he remained until 1859, when he with his mother moved to Delaware Co., Ind., after which, in 1863, he engaged in school teaching for five successive years, and in 1868 opened a drug store in Parker, Ind., which he continued until 1871, then commenced the retail dry-goods trade which he followed until 1873, when he commenced in his present business, and in 1879 came to this county and located in Greenville, where he has one of the first-class mills located on the side track of the D. & U. R. R., thereby making conveniences of transportation better than any mill in the county; it is valued at about $5,500. Our subject was united in marriage with Miss Hannah C. Morris, of Randolph Co., Ind., and by this union has two sons - Theodore B., born Nov. 29, 1875, and Henphon. March 14, 1878. Mr. F. is a live, energetic citizen of Greenville.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 491; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Charles Fletcher, retired stonecutter, Greenville; one of the old settlers of Darke Co. The subject of this memoir was born in Townsend, Windham Co., Vt. July 20, 1811. His grandfather, Samuel Fletcher, was one of the generals in the American army during the Revolutionary struggle, and served under the command of Gen. Washington; after the close of the war, he located in the above county, and laid out the village of West Townsend, where he died. The
father of Charles Fletcher- Squire Fletcher - was born in West Townsend, and was engaged in merchandise trade where he passed his days, his death occurring about the year 1814. The subject of our sketch was left fatherless when 4 years of age, and made his home with his mother until 9 years old; he then started in life for himself, and lived in various places, and when old enough he learned the stonecutter's trade, and at 19 years of age, he removed to New York, living there one year, then seven years in Erie Co., Penn., and came to Ohio in 1841 and located in Greenville Township, Darke Co. where he engaged in the nursery business and cutting stone, and was the first stonecutter of the place; he continued the above business in Greenville some fifteen years, when he removed to Piqua and resided in Miami Co., Ohio and Clay Co., Ind., being engaged in stonecutting, farming and nursery business, and in 1874 purchased his present place where he has since lived; he has 94 acres under a good state of cultivation which he has made by his hard labor. He was married to Amanda Burns in 1841; she was born in Greenville Township, Darke Co., and was a daughter of Barney Burns, one of the early pioneers who is mentioned in the historical part of this work; the children of Charles and Amanda Fletcher were ten in number, of whom two are deceased, the living are Chester B., Elizabeth, Mary, Charles, John W., Edward F., Emma B., and William; the deceased are Nancy and Newton. Mr. Fletcher also owns 240 acres of land in Adair Co., Ohio, and 290 acres in Nebraska and some town property.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 491-492; submitted by Marla Zwakman


James A. Fleming, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Jaysville. Another of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born in Greenville, Jan. 17, 1832. He is the oldest son of Aaron Fleming, who was born in Butler Co., Ohio, in 1803 and came to Darke Co., with his parents in the year 1816, and was consequently one of the earliest pioneers of Darke Co. He married Rachel Arnold. ___ 31, 1831; she was born in Warren Co., Ohio, 1810, and came to Darke Co., with her parents in 1819. They were the parents of three children, who lived to grow up - James A., Henry D. and William. Upon the date of the above marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Fleming located upon Sec. 7, Greenville Township, where he had previously purchased 80 acres of land, which was then a howling wilderness, there being no clearing. He then commenced clearing and by his own hard labor succeeded in placing it under a good state of cultivation; there was a log cabin on the land, and they lived in it some twenty years; and at the time of his death he had secured 160 acres in Greenville and Van Buren Townships. He was a Democrat in politics, but never aspired for office. He died Feb. 2, 1877. Mrs. Fleming now lives upon the old homestead, where she has continued to live for a period of nearly one-half a century, and is one of the oldest continued residents in this part of Darke Co., having lived here for a period of sixty years. She has a vivid recollection of the Indians, the wolf, the deer, and the wild game, which at that time was to be had in abundance. Our subject obtained his education in an old log schoolhouse, which, at that time had the improvements of a stove. The seats were split logs with no backs; the writing seats extending around the room, made with planks placed upon wooden pegs inserted in the logs. He now has a residence of forty -eight years upon the place where he lives, having assisted his father in the management of the farm, until the decease of the latter, since which time he has farmed for himself. He now owns 120 acres, 80 acres of which is a part of the original farm purchased by his father about the year 1829, for which he gave two horses valued at $50 each, and which is now valued at $60 to $70 per acre. Mr. Fleming, with his wife, is accorded a place in the front ranks of the early pioneers of Darke Co.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 492; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Jesse Folkerth, (deceased). The gentleman whose name heads this sketch was one of the early pioneers of Darke Co. He was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, April 6, 1808, and was a son of William Folkerth, who was born in Maryland, and came to Montgomery Co. about the beginning of the present century. In 1815, he came to Darke Co., where his death occurred Aug. 15, 1848. His wife, Maria Bryant, was born in Maryland and died in Darke Co. in 1845. Jesse Folkerth came to Darke Co. with his parents. He assisted his father in agricultural pursuits until Nov. 23, 1837, at which date he was united in marriage with Anna Curtis. She was born in 1818, and died Feb. 21, 1846: five children were the fruits of this union, of whom William. Lorenzo D. and Maria A. now survive. His marriage with Elizabeth Smith was celebrated May 22, 1847. She was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, Feb. 8, 1828. They were the parents of six children by this union - Henry C., born April 8, 1849; Jennie C., June 17, 1850; Jesse A., March 19, 1854, died April 5, 1879; John E., Feb. 10, 1857; Eben Lee, Jan. 19, 1860, and one who died in infancy. Of the deceased, Jesse A. had been telegraph operator and station agent of the Pan Handle Railroad at Greenville, for about three years, and, although in the last stages of consumption, he remained at his post of duty until one month previous to his death. He was a young man of great promise, and died in the belief of the promises of his Savior, esteemed and beloved by all who knew him. In the spring of 1838, Jesse Folkerth commenced farming for himself upon the place where he spent the remainder of his days and where his widow with the two unmarried children now reside. He was a man of sterling worth; was, politically, a Whig, until the organization of the Republican party, after which he was a hard worker for the success of the latter. He was a strong champion of the cause of temperance, and did not make use of tobacco in any form. He was a member of the Methodist Church for a period of forty years previous to his death, and lived and died a consistent Christian; his death occurred Sept. 20, 1871. Mrs. Folkerth has been a member of the Methodist Church for upward of thirty-five years. She was a daughter of Timothy T. Smith, a native of New Jersey. He married Anna B. Baum, a native of Kentucky. They came to Darke Co. in 1836. Mr. Smith died in Darke Co. in 1865. Mrs. Smith died Dec. 3, 1873, aged 81 years and 5 months.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 492-493; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Isaac Funk, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 3; P. O. Greenville; one of the early pioneers of Darke Co.; born in Adams Co., Penn., Dec. 28, 1810, he was the
oldest son of Jacob Funk, who was also born in the same county, in January, 1779, during the Revolutionary struggle; his father was Daniel Funk, born in
Lancaster or York Co., about the middle of the seventeenth century; they were the descendants of Martin Funk, one of three brothers, who emigrated from Holland or Germany, in the beginning of the seventeenth century. Our subject was raised upon the farm of his father until about 21 years of age, when he commenced life for himself, and for two years was employed as farm laborer in Adams Co.; he then emigrated to Ohio and located in Warren Co., where he farmed and cleared land, and in 1835, came to Darke Co. and settled on the place where he now lives, and where he has lived, with the exception of four years, for nearly half a century; he still owns the land which he entered in 1835 ; he has 110 acres in his home farm, which he has secured by his own hard labor and correct business habits. He is a Republican, and while he has not aspired to office, has filled the office of Supervisor and Director of the Dalton & Union Railroad for two years; he has taken a deep interest in the cause of religion and education, having been a member of M. E. Church some forty years, and held the office of Steward and Class Leader, one or both, for thirty-six years. His marriage with Eliza Ann Deardorff was celebrated May 15, 1834; she was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Sept. 29, 1818; she died Feb. 1, 1879, leaving eight children now living, having lost three in infancy, the living are Elizabeth, born Sept. 20, 1836; Daniel D., born Nov. 9, 1840; Allen Wesley, born Oct. 20, 1843; William P., born March 4, 1841; Ancil L., born Dec. 25, 1849 ; Mary C., born Aug. 1, 1852; Charles E., born March 13, 1855; Laura D., born April 21, 1858. The above children are all members of the M. E. Church; the two youngest make their home with their father. Daniel is now in business in Greenville; Allen, farming and teaching; William P., blacksmith, at North Star; Ancil, Professor of the College at Red Cloud, Neb.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 493-494; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Calvin P. Funston, farmer; P. O. Greenville; born in Clark Co., Ohio, Jan. 11, 1826; he obtained a common-school education, and assisted his father in farming until 20 years of age, at which date his father died, after which, Calvin P., being the oldest son, remained at home and managed the old place for the support of the family until 1863, when he came to Darke Co. and purchased his present place, where he has since lived; he has about fifty acres in his home farm, under a good state of cultivation, with good farm buildings located one mile from Greenville, and valued at upward of $5,000. Upon April 10, 1861, he was united in marriage with Rachel T. Little; she was born in Clark Co. April 28, 1837; they have no children of their own, but have raised from a youth of 5 years, a promising young man by the name of Charles Bell, who was born Jan. 1, 1861. Mr. and Mrs. Funston have treated him as their own child, and have extended to him the benefits and privileges of a liberal education. Mr. and Mrs. Funston are members of the Presbyterian Church, and take a deep interest in the cause of religion.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 494; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Dr. Isaac Newton Gard, physician and surgeon, Greenville; is the oldest continuous resident physician and surgeon of Darke Co.; he was a native of Butler Co., Ohio; born March 20, 1811, and was a son of Stephen and Rachel (Pearce) Gard, both natives of New Jersey, who emigrated to Ohio about the beginning of the present century; Stephen Gard was a Baptist minister, and organized nearly all of the early churches in the Miami Valley, among which was the First Baptist Church at Dayton, and the First Baptist Church of Trenton, Butler Co., over which he presided for a period of upward of half a century; he was twice married: his first wife was the mother of the subject of our sketch, she died in Butler Co., April 1, 1816, aged 36 years the Rev. Stephen Gard died Aug. 14, 1839; Isaac N. Gard obtained his general education in the common schools, and received his preparatory education at the Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, and graduated from the Ohio Medical College, in Cincinnati, 1831; he then commenced the practice of medicine in Butler Co., and in 1834, located in Greenville, where he has since successfully followed his profession for nearly fifty years; in the early days of the Doctor's locating here the practice of medicine was a work of labor and hardship, the country being sparsely settled, and his practice extending over half a degree of latitude and longitude, the roads being nearly impassable, save by horseback; and in this manner the Doctor made his visits, dispensing his medicine from his saddle-bags; he organized the first medical society of Darke Co., and for many years was President of the same; he also organized the first agricultural society of Darke Co., and was also President of this for several years ; he has had many offices of honor and trust thrust upon him, among which we mention the presidency of the Greenville & Miami, now Dayton & Union Railroad, during its construction; in 1841, was elected and represented the counties of Miami, Darke, Mercer and Shelby in the State Legislature; in 1858-59, he represented the counties of Miami, Darke and Shelby in the State Senate; in 1861 or 1862, he was appointed by the Governor of Ohio as one of the Trustees of the State Lunatic Asylum at Dayton, which office he filled some sixteen years; he has almost continually held some office or position of trust, and has in every instance performed his duty with credit to himself and satisfaction to the public. Upon the 6th of January, 1835, he was united in marriage with Lucy Tod, who was born in Kentucky March 20, 1816. They were the parents of five children, viz.: Henrietta T., born April 6, 1837, died Aug. 16, 1839; Charles T., born Sept 30, 1840, died Jan. 4, 1864; Catherine E., Feb. 16, 1843; Mary, March 11, 1850, and Stephen, Jan. 11, 1854.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 494; submitted by Marla Zwakman



D. Glander, retired brewer; Greenville. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch was born in Germany May 3, 1818, and in 1836 came to America, and to Preble Co., Ohio, where he followed distilling, and in 1877 came to Greenville, where he engaged in his former business until June, 1879. Mr. G. was united in marriage to Lena Hagar and by this union they have nine children living.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 494-495; submitted by Marla Zwakman


John V. Gordon, manufacturer, Greenville; was born in Hunterdon Co., N. J., Jan. 21, 1844; was the son of William and Henrietta Gordon, who were born and raised in New Jersey; William was the son of Elias and Frances Gordon; Henrietta was the daughter of John and Rebecca Volk; John, the grandfather, was born in New York, and Rebecca was born in New Jersey. Mr. Gordon, the subject of this sketch, served with his father in the chair and furniture manufacturing business till 21 years of age, and then he entered upon the spoke and hub manufacturing business, and has followed that occupation to the present time. He came to Greenville in September, 1877, and entered upon spoke and hub manufacturing, under the firm name of Finney, Closson & Co., which business has been conducted with great success up to this time.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 495; submitted by Marla Zwakman



David Griffin, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. Greenville; another of the old settlers of Darke Co., born in Butler Co., Ohio, Dec. 14, 1808; his grandfather was killed by the Indians, in Kentucky, at an early day; his father, Francis Griffin, was born in Pennsylvania, 1788, and came to Butler Co. about the beginning of the
present century, and served in the war of 1812. He married Sarah Holmes; she was in Kentucky in 1790; Mr. Griffin died, in Butler Co., about the year 1844; Mrs. Griffin died, in Indiana, in 1877. Our subject was raised to agricultural pursuits, in Butler Co., until Nov. 4, 1835, when he was married to Mary Ann Conover; she was born in New Jersey Oct. 2, 1811; they were the parents of six children, of whom two are now living, viz.: Amanda, born Feb. 14, 1836, now the wife of Rev. Lewis E. Jones; Ella J., living at home, March 17, 1852. The deceased were Francis, born Nov. 3, 1837, died Nov. 7, 1837; Emeline, born Dec. 13. 1838, died Jan. 11, 1879; Francis E., born Nov. 21, 1844. died Feb. 9, 1845: Charles E., born May 31, 1849, died Sept. 21, 1850, After the marriage of Mr. Griffin, he followed farming in Butler and Montgomery Cos., until 1857, when he came to Darke Co. and purchased his present place, where he has since lived; he has 160 acres upon his home farm with good farm buildings, located one-half mile from the city of Greenville. Mr. and Mrs. Griffin, with both of their daughters, are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. G., though in the 72d year of his age, attends to the light duties and labors of his farm.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 495; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Daniel Grubs, grain-dealer, Greenville, firm of Zimmerman & Grubs, grain merchants. The subject of this memoir is a native of Montgomery Co., Ohio; he was born Feb. 25, 1833; his early occupation was that of a farmer's son; his father died when our subject was but 16 years of age; he then lived with his mother until 27 years of age, when, in 1860, he was united in marriage with
Katie Denise, a native of the same county; they have one child, Edgar A., now in his 21st year, and a graduate of the Cincinnati Commercial College, and is a bookkeeper for the above firm, his ability to fill the above position being beyond the average. Upon the marriage of Mr. Grubs, he continued to live in Montgomery Co. for three years, when he removed to Preble Co. and continued farming until 1874 when he located in Greenville, and, in 1876 associated with the above gentleman, since which time they have done business under the above firm name. They are largely engaged in buying and shipping grain to the Eastern markets. A card of their business appears in the business directory of Greenville.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 495-496; submitted by Marla Zwakman



John Guntrum, farmer and brick manufacturer; P. O. Greenville. The subject of this memoir is a native of this county, born in 1839, within half a mile of where he now resides; he is youngest son and child of John Guntrum, Sr., who was a native of Pennsylvania and emigrated to this county in 1837, and located on the farm where our subject was born and where he remained till his death. Mr. Guntrum, Sr., celebrated his marriage in his native State with Martha Ginridge; they were the parents of ten children, two sons and eight daughters, three of whom are deceased. He departed this life in 1868; his wife survived him until Feb. 13, 1873, when she, too, passed away. Thus we record the death of two
more esteemed citizens of Darke Co.; their life work done, they passed peacefully away, leaving a large circle of acquaintances and a loving family of children to mourn their departure and revere their memory. The subject of our sketch was raised a tiller of soil, assisting in the duties of the farm till he was 22 years of age, at which time he began life for himself, cultivating his father's farm on the shares; the duty of taking care of his parents fell to his lot; this filial duty he discharged faithfully till their death. He was united in marriage to Rebecca Jeamison Feb. 19, 1863; she is also a native of this township and comes of an early pioneer family. Our subject moved to the place where he now resides about seven years ago; he is now, in addition to his farming, engaged in the manufacturing of brick; in this business his motto is excellence in quality, integrity in transactions and low prices. Mr. and Mrs. Guntrum are the parents of six children, all living- Willie, born in 1863; Barbara, 1865; Mary E. 1868; Flora and Laura (twins), 1872, and Hester in 1878.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 496; submitted by Marla Zwakman


August Gutheil, restaurant, and dealer in wines, liquors, cigars, etc., Greenville; born in Bavaria, Germany, on the 22d of April, 1834; he received a good education in German, and, from 14 to 18 years of age, assisted his father in the tanning business, as well as hotel-keeping and farming; at the latter age, he emigrated to America, landing in New York March 30, 1852, coming directly to Cincinnati, thence to Dayton, Ohio, where he followed the butchering business one year; thence to Miamisburg, and engaged in the tanning business until 1856, at which date he came to Greenville, and, after working one year as tanner, he engaged in the saloon and restaurant business, which he has since successfully followed, and is the oldest continuous gentleman in his business in the city of Greenville. In 1865, he made a tour over his native country, visiting the scenes of his childhood, this trip consuming some six months, during which time his business was conducted by his brother-in-law, John King. Mr. Gutheil is a gentleman of genial disposition and of very pleasing address. In 1876, he was elected as one of the Trustees of Greenville Township, which office he held for three years; during the years 1878 and 1879, he was one of the Democratic Central Committee of Darke County. Upon arriving in New York, he came across the Alleghany Mountains by mule teams, thence down the canal to Pittsburgh, and thence down the river to Cincinnati. His marriage with Fredericka Limkulh was celebrated Feb. 28, 1856; she was born in Bavaria, Germany, and came to America in 1830; her maiden name was Rolhhaas; they have two sons and one daughter - Ona J., Otto and Julius D. Mrs. Gutheil has one child by her former husband, viz., Amelia Limkulh.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 496; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Amos Hahn, Treasurer of Darke County, Greenville. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is the present efficient Treasurer of Darke Co.; he
was born in Columbiana Co., Ohio, Feb. 1, 1818; his parents, Samuel and Hannah Hahn, are natives of Frederick Co., Md.; his father was born March 9, 1791, his mother in 1795, and departed this life in 1861; Mr. Hahn, Sr. is still living, and resides with his son Amos; they were the parents of ten children, of whom six are now living. Our subject was reared on the farm, but followed carpentering for a number of years, when he turned his attention to mercantile pursuits, and for sixteen years did business in Gettysburg; his long and active business career has eminently fitted him for the responsible position of honor and trust he holds, as a gift from the people of the county. His marriage with Catherine Finfrock was consummated Oct. 3. 1843; she was the daughter of Peter and Mary Finfrock, who were natives of Pennsylvania, now deceased; Mr. and Mrs. Hahn are the parents of three children, viz., Clement C., born Nov. 16, 1845; Albert J.. April 23, 1847: Luella M., in September, 1857; Clement was united in marriage with Nannie Compton Oct. 7, 1868; Albert J. consummated his marriage with Virginia Johnson Dec. 22, 1874; Luella celebrated her marriage with W. D. Johns March 28, 1877
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 496-497; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Jacob Halderman, farmer; P. O. Greenville. The subject of this memoir may be classed among the self-made men of Darke Co; he was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, Oct. 25, 1837: he was a son of John Halderman, who was born in Lancaster Co., Penn., and came to Montgomery Co., Ohio, in 1836, where
his death occurred in 1840. He married Hannah Cook, a native of Pennsylvania; she died in Illinois, in December, 1875. Jacob Halderman was thrown ' upon his resources when 6 years of age, and made his home among friends and strangers, until old enough to work and receive wages; at 18 years of age, he learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed seven years ; in I860, he located upon his present place, where he has since lived; he has 220 acres, with good farm buildings, which he has secured by his own hard labor and correct business habits, and has by the above means placed himself among the large landholders and successful farmers of Darke Co.; the perseverance and energy displayed by Mr. H. accomplish what he has attained are well worthy of example by the young men of the present day. He has been twice married; his first wife was Mary Baker, to whom he was married Dec. 22, 1859; she was born in Darke Co. in 1841 and died December, 1875, leaving six children, having lost one by death; the living are Leoti, born Aug. 22, 1861; Alice. Feb. 10, 1863; Herschel V. Feb. 2, 1865; Idabird, Jan. 6, 1868 ; Elnora, July 2, 1870 ; Pearl, Dec. 30, 1872. Upon the 11th of October, 1877, he was united in marriage with Francis Helm, who was born in Darke Co., Sept. 13, 1845; they have one child- Roily, born Sept. 4. 1878. Mrs.
Halderman was a daughter of Eli Helm, one of our early pioneers of 1834 or 1835; he was born in Pennsylvania, and died in Darke Co., in October, 1874. He married Catherine Zimmerman, who is now living in Greenville. Mr. Halderman is Democratic in politics, and labors for the success of his party; has been Township Trustee two years, which office he filled with credit to himself and satisfaction to the people.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 497; submitted by Marla Zwakman


John W. Hall, firm of Hime & Hall, livery, feed and sale stable, northeast of public square, also, of firm of Hall & Co., importers and breeders of French,
Norman and Clydesdale horses. The above gentlemen is another of the old settlers, being born in Greenville Township May 4, 1834, and is a son of James Hall, who at a very early day came from South Carolina to Miami Co.; thence to Darke Co., among the early settlers; he was engaged in contracting and building to a certain extent; he built the first letter boxes for the post office of Greenville, selecting at that time box Number 96, which box has always been retained in the family, and is now the box of John W. Our subject continued farming in Darke Co. until 1855, when he went to Logan Co., Ill., and followed farming and stock-raising until 1861, at which date he returned to Darke Co. and continued the same business until 1875, when he was elected Sheriff of Darke Co., re-elected in 1877, serving until January, 1880, when, upon the expiration of his office, he associated with Mr. Hime in the above business; in 1874, he associated with Harrod Mills and James Esty in the stock business, under the firm name of Hall & Co., which firm still exists. His marriage with Frances D. Carnahan was celebrated Aug. 29, 1854; she is a native of Darke Co.; they have eight children - James M., Isaac W., Sarah C., Elias M., Idela May, Charles C., Julia E., Rollie S.

Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 497; submitted by Marla Zwakman




William Sanford Harper, the subject of this sketch, was born in Trumbull Co., Ohio, July 11, 1810; moved with his mother to Butler Co., Ohio, in the spring of 1815, and from there to Darke Co., Ohio, in 1823, with his step-father, B. Koll, and settled on a small farm on the Greenville & West Milton road, four miles southeast of Greenville, there being no house southeast on said road for nine miles; wolves, deer and smaller animals were numerous in the unoccupied forests at that time; schools were few and far between. The subject of this sketch acquired, in addition to a common school education, practical surveying. He was married, in 1832, to Delila daughter of William Arnold, and in 1833 moved into the green forest to open up a farm; for about twenty years, taught school in the winter and cleared ground and farmed in the warm season. In 1852, he was elected County Surveyor, and filled that office as principal and deputy for about ten years, and unofficially for about the same length of time, and yet at his advanced age works at civil engineering, when called on. From a youth, he was of a sober, pious turn of mind, and made a profession of Christianity in 1833, and became a member of the Christian Church ; his zeal for the cause of Christ has steadily increased as he has become better acquainted with the sacred Scriptures; he sometimes amuses himself by writing articles for our secular journals, signing them W. S. H.; he is also an ardent advocate of temperance, of the prohibition class. His sons, William Marion and John Harper, are prominent business men in Greenville; in the year 1860 they erected a business house on Broadway, where they are still engaged in business; the former in the jewelry trade, and the latter in the photographic art. Their uniform courteous, honorable, obliging habits have made for them many friends.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 497-498; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Manning F. Hart, retired, contractor and merchant. Greenville. Among the early pioneers of Darke Co., the gentleman whose name heads this sketch is
accorded a place in the front ranks; he was born in Hampshire Co., W. Va. April 7, 1821, and is a son of Dr. William Hart, a native of Berks Co., Penn. He was married, in Pennsylvania, to Elizabeth Pettit, also a native of the same State; they were also among the early settlers of Darke Co., locating in Adams Township in 1839, with three sons and three daughters; about the year 1846, he, with his family, located in Greenville; he was a physician, and followed his profession until his decease, which occurred after a short residence in Greenville. Our subject came to this county with the family in 1839, and the following ten years his residence was divided between Darke and Montgomery Cos.; in 1849, he located permanently here, and followed the occupation of contractor and builder for several years; he then engaged in the grocery and provision trade until 1879, since which time he has been retired from active business. He has been twice married; his first wife was Mary Hoover; their marriage was celebrated in 1844; one son and two daughters were the fruits of this union, all deceased; she died in 1849; his marriage nuptials with Rebecca A. Knoop were celebrated in 1850; she was born in Miami Co.; they were the parents of five children, of whom two are deceased: the living are Ralph B., Abraham Lincoln and Carrie K., all residing in Greenville.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 498; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Jonas Hartzell, retired farmer; P. O. Greenville; another of the old settlers of Darke Co., born in Adams Co., Penn., May 10, 1803; he was one of six
brothers, who came to Darke Co. between the periods of 1833 and 1836; Jonas
located upon Sec. 8. Greenville Township, where he has since lived - a period of nearly half a century; he purchased 120 acres, and afterward added until he had accumulated 400 acres; he devoted his attention to farming until about the year 1865 when he retired from active labor; during the past three years, he has been confined to the house by sickness, and has been kindly cared for by his sons Charles and Jonas, who are managing the home farm. Jonas Hartzell, Sr., and Elizabeth Welty were united in marriage, in Pennsylvania. Feb. 12, 1829; she was born in Pennsylvania Aug. 9, 1807; they had twelve children, of whom ten are now living, viz.: Louisa J. born March 11, 1830; William, born March 3, 1832, died in infancy; Elizabeth and Catherine (twins), born Feb. 9. 1834; Sarah Ann, born Nov. 20, 1836; Charles Wesley and Edward Spencer (twins), born Sept. 1, 1831; Jonas W., born May 2, 1841; Hannah M., born March 18, 1843; Lauretta D., born Feb. 23, 1845; James, born April 28, 1847, and one who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Hartzell have been members of the Methodist Church for a period of thirty years. Of the above children, Charles Wesley may be considered one of the old settlers, having always lived upon the home farm, upon which he was born in 1839; he was married, March 7, 1867, to Sarah E. Shephard; she was born in Twin Township, Darke Co., March 20, 1846; they had four children by this union - Jonas Elmer, Lillian R., John H. and Olive M; the latter is deceased.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 498-499; submitted by Marla Zwakman


George Hartzell, farmer; P. O. Greenville; the subject of this sketch is another of our old settlers; he was born in Adams Co., Penn., Oct. 3, 1835 and was the oldest son of Philip Hartzell, who was born in the year 1811, in the above county and State; in 1836, he came to Darke Co. and in 1838, purchased several lots in Beamsville, and erected the second house of the place; here he followed carpentering, wagon-making, cabinet-making and school-teaching for ten years: he was the first Postmaster of the town, which office he held for ten years, as well as Justice of the Peace two terms; he was a great champion of the cause of temperance - is probably entitled to the honor of putting up the first building ever erected in Darke Co. without the use of intoxicating liquor; he died upon his farm two miles north of Greenville, in April, 1873. He married Julia Harman, who was born in 1810 or 1811, who is now residing in Greenville. George Hartzell assisted his father, until May 12, 1859, when he was united in marriage with Lucy A. Fettery; she was born in Darke Co. June 8, 1838; they were the parents of ten children - Hollis, Clarinda M., Luella M., P. Harman, Viola E., George F., Julia and John C., twins (John C. died Oct. 12, 1872), Henrietta and Mamie. Mrs. Hartzell was a daughter of John Fettery, who came from Lebanon Co., Penn., to Darke Co. in 1836; he died February, 1874. He married Catherine Bowman, also a native of Pennsylvania; she died in Darke Co., in July. 1862. Since the marriage of Mr. Hartzell, he has been engaged in carpentering, milling and farming, and has a small farm, one mile from Greenville. His father was one of six brothers, who came to Darke Co. - Henry, George and Jeremiah came in 1833; Philip and Jonas in 1836, and Daniel probably in 1837 or 1838; of the above, Jonas and Daniel now survive.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 499; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Philip S. Hartzell, Sec. 12; P. O. Pikeville; one of the old settlers of this county; born in Greenville Township June 6, 1847; he was a son of George Hartzell, who was born in Adams Co., Penn., July 4, 1813: he was one of the early settlers of Darke Co., locating upon Sec. 12, Greenville Township in 1833; he entered eighty acres of Government land, and purchased the same amount, and afterward added by purchase, until he owned 240 acres in his home farm, and here he lived until his death, which occurred Oct. 22, 1857. He married Rachel Schriver in 1840; she was born in Pennsylvania, Jan. 31, 1813; they were the parents of six children, of whom five lived to grow up; Mrs. Hartzell is now living with Philip S., and at 67 years of age is in possession of all her faculties, with the exception of failing eyesight. After the death of Mr. Hartzell, Philip S. lived with his mother on the old homestead, until 26 years of age when he associated with his brother, William Hartzell, in 1870, and followed farming together until 1875, upon the old farm, and in 1877 Philip S. purchased the shares of his brother upon the homestead, where he has continued farming, having 105 acres. He has given his attention to the raising of corn and wheat; he is one of the industrious, persevering and hard-working citizens, and during the past two years has paid off indebtedness on his place to the amount of $2,400; had previously paid upward of $5,500. His marriage with Susan R. Baumbaugh was celebrated June, 1870; she was born April 29, 1847, in Maryland, and emigrated to Ohio with her parents, in 1862. They were the parents of four children, all of whom died in infancy.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 499; submitted by Marla Zwakman


P. H. Hartzell, teacher, Greenville; is a son of Philip Hartzell, a native of Pennsylvania, who came to this county in the early pioneer days, and lived in the county until his decease, which occurred in April, 1878; the subject of this sketch was born in this county Nov. 6, 1846, and lived with his parents until several years after his majority; he then taught school during the winter
seasons and worked at carpentering during the summer for ten years. He married Miss Alice M. Butt, a daughter of John K. Butt, whose biography appears in this work; she was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, in February, 1852; they were married Dec. 22, 1872, and have four children, two boys and two girls, viz., John Ollie, Forest Herbert, Cordie May and Alice Lanessa.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 500; submitted by Marla Zwakman


C.W. Hartzell, farmer; P.O. Greenville.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 500; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Samuel Heffner, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 32 ; P. O. Greenville; another of the old settlers of Darke Co.; born in Berks Co., Penn., Oct. 30, 1818; he was a son of Jacob Heffner, who was born in the above county, and came to Darke
Co. in 1857, and located in Neave Township; he died in Greenville Township. Darke Co., about the year 1867; our subject was brought up to agricultural pursuits in Pennsylvania until 18 years of age, when he learned and worked at the carpenter trade in Pennsylvania until 1848; he then emigrated to Ohio and located in Butler Co., and, in 1849, came to Darke Co., and. after a residence of two years in German Township, removed upon his present place where he has lived for a period of thirty years ; upon locating here, there were but 40 acres cleared; he has since cleared 80 acres and brought it to a good state of cultivation by his own hard labor, and now owns 122 acres of good land, with good farm buildings; he has also three acres in Hill Grove, the whole being valued at upward of $10,000. Mr. Heffner commenced here with no capital save a strong arm and willing hand, and has accumulated all the above property by his energy and industry, and has, by the above means, placed himself among the large land-holders and successful farmers of Darke Co. In October, 1850, he was united in marriage with Dorotha Dininger: she was born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, Jan. 25, 1838; they were the parents of six children, viz.: Sarah E., born Nov. 6, 1851; Lewis C., Jan. 11, 1854, died Jan. 22, 1854; Mary S., born July 19, 1855; Amanda L., Dec. 28, 1859; Samuel, Oct. 15, 1862, and Jacob, born Dec. 20, 1866; Mrs. Heffner is a daughter of .Jacob Dininger, one of the early pioneers of Darke Co., who located here in the spring of 1834. Mr. and Mrs. H., with four of their children, are members of the Lutheran Church.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 500; submitted by Marla Zwakman


William Heffner, farmer; P. O. Greenville; the subject of this memoir was born in Berks Co., Penn., in the year 1824, and is a son of Jacob and Eliza Heffner, who came to Darke Co. in 1853, and settled in Greenville Township; William Heffner's early life was that of a farmer's son, being raised to agricultural pursuits, his education being mostly confined to the common schools. In the year 1840, his marriage with Eliza M. Hinkle was celebrated in Cumberland Co., Penn.; they have three children by this union, viz., Jacob, William and Nason. Mr. Heffner resides upon Sec. 9. this township, where he is engaged in agricultural pursuits; he came to this county in 1853, and has been a resident for upward of a quarter of a century.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 500; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Clark Henkle, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Greenville; born in Springfield, Clarke Co., Ohio, Nov. 6. 1837; his father, Silas Henkle, was born in Virginia and
came to Clarke Co. at an early day; he died in August, 1840. He married Margaret Milholland, who was born in Ohio, and died in Clark Co. June 13, 1860; after the death of his father, he lived with his mother until 10 years of age, and the following seven years lived with an uncle, after which he removed upon the home farm with his mother, and remained there some two years after her death. Aug. 14, 1862, he enlisted as private in the 94th O. V. I.; he was in many severe battles, among which we mention Perryville, Stone River, Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, siege and capture of Atlanta; the following winter was on detailed duty at Chattanooga, buying up supply trains, and, in the spring of 1865, joined the main army of Sherman in North Carolina, and was with the above army at the surrender of Johnson; he then marched through Richmond to Washington, and after the grand review of the army he was mustered out of service and received his discharge at Camp Chase June 14, 1865, having served in the Union army nearly three years; he took part in every battle in which the regiment was engaged excepting two, when he was on detailed duty; after receiving his discharge, he returned to Clarke Co., and, in the spring of 1869, came to Darke Co., and located upon his present place, where he has since lived; he has a nice farm of 100 acres, with good farm buildings. His marriage with Mary S. Forgy was celebrated March 31, 1869; she was born in Clark Co., Ohio, July 4, 1837; they were the parents of three children - Cora M., Willie Otho and Mary Elsie; all died in infancy.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 500-501; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Daniel Henne, dealer in grain and seeds, Greenville. The subject of this sketch was born in Mindersback Oberamt Nagold Kmigreich,Wurtemberg, Germany, in 1839, where he attended school until 14 years of age, obtaining a good education in German; he then learned the milling trade, which he followed four years, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York in 1857; coming directly West, he located in Hamilton, Ohio, and remained until 1863, at which date he made a two- years visit to his native country; returning in 1865, he again located in Hamilton, and was employed as farm laborer by the month, for one year; and in the latter part of 1866, came to Greenville, and associated in the milling and grain business under the firm name of Poak & Henne, and has since successfully followed the above business, the past ten years doing business alone; he makes a specialty of buying and shipping grain to the Eastern market; his shipments reaching 200,000 bushels in a singe season. His marriage with Anna M. Weithbrecht was celebrated in Greenville Feb. 17, 1867; she was born in Germany, and emigrated with her parents to America, when but 1 year of age; they have three children by this union - Rosenia Gertrude, Jacob Frederick and Daniel. In 1878, he was elected
Township Treasurer, which office he now holds, being re-elected in 1879; he is also Secretary of the Board of Education, of Greenville. A business card will be found in the business directory of Greenville in this work.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 501; submitted by Marla Zwakman


D. S. Hime, firm of Hime & Snyder, livery, feed and sale stable; another old settler of Darke Co., Ohio; born in Montgomery Co., Ohio, in 1835; he is a
son of Daniel Hime, who was a native of Pennsylvania, and came to Montgomery Co., Ohio, in 1838, and located in the northwest part of Greenville Township; he died in Washington Township in 1875. The subject of this sketch was raised to agricultural pursuits until 11 years of age, when he was apprenticed to learn the shoemaker's trade for seven years, after which, he remained upon the home farm, and in 1858, was united in marriage with Amelia D. Martin, of Greenville; she was born in Miami Co.; they have two children - Adelia Bell and Sarah Catherine. He purchased his home farm in 1864, and disposed of the same about the year 1870; he then came to Greenville, where he has since lived.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 501; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Absalom Hoffert, farmer and stock-raiser, Sec. 36; P. O. Greenville. The subject of this memoir was born in Rush Creek Township, Fairfield Co., Ohio,
Jan. 25, 1827; he was a son of Solomon Hoffert, who was probably born in Pennsylvania in 1795, and came to Ohio when quite young and located in Fairfield Co., where his death occurred April 4, 1876, at the advanced age of 91 years. He married Margaret Hendricks, who was born in 1790, and died in 1861, aged 71 years; they were the parents of ten children, of whom eight are now living. Our subject obtained a common-school education in his youth, and was raised to agricultural pursuits until June 5, 1851, when he was united in marriage with Nancy Fantz; she was born in Fairfield Co., Ohio, Nov. 20, 1832; they were the parents of five children, viz.: Elizabeth, now Mrs. James Westfall, of Brown Township, born June 4, 1852; Matilda, born May 8, 1855, died April 23, 1858; Ellen, born April 25, 1857, now Mrs. Wesley Slade, Neave Township; Margaret, born March 20, 1859, now Mrs. Charles Fletcher, of Miami Co.; Emma P., born Feb. 8, 1862, now Mrs. George Hathway, living upon the home farm. Mrs. Hoffert was a daughter of Michael Fantz, who was born in Baden, Germany, in 1792, and came to America in 1819; he died in Hocking Co., Ohio, May 23, 1863, aged 71 years 8 months and 19 days. He married Elizabeth Stacer; she was also born in Baden, Germany, in 1791, and died in Fairfield Co., Ohio, Sept. 10, 1860, aged 69 years 4 months and 28 days. Upon the marriage of Mr. Hoffert, he commenced farming for himself, which business he followed in Hocking and Fairfield Cos. until April, 1864, when he disposed of his property in Fairfield Co., and purchased 40 acres in
Darke Co., and located upon his present place where he has since lived; he now owns 47 acres upon his home place, located less than a mile and a half from Greenville. He with his wife and two children are members of the Reformed Church, and one daughter a member of the Church of the United Brethren; Mr. and Mrs. Hoffert having been members for the past ten years.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 501-502; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Moses Huhn, clothier and merchant tailor, was born in Grand Duchy Saxony, Germany, May 13, 1835, and is a son of L. and Hannah Huhn, natives of the same place; his father was born in 1784, and departed this life in 1853, aged 67 years; his mother was born in 1800, and is still living in Germany, aged 80 years. Our subject emigrated to America in 1851, and landed in New York, his voyage occupying sixty -three days; he repaired to St. Joseph, Mo., immediately, and remained there for seven years, engaged as salesman, and then came to Greenville, where he was employed as salesman for Warring Bros., which position he held for four years; he then embarked in business for himself, and is one of Greenville's successful business men; he carries a full and complete stock in his line, consisting of men's, boys' and children's clothing, and does a general merchant tailoring business. He is an honorable member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows' organizations, and his motto is "onward and upward."
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 502; submitted by Marla Zwakman


William Hunter, farmer and stock-raiser; P. O. Ansonia; another of the old residents of Darke Co.; born in Greenville Township April 26, 1831: he was the oldest son of William F. Hunter, who was born in Warren Co., Ohio, Jan. 2, 1801; he was one of the early settlers of Darke Co., locating here about the
year 1825; he was married in Darke Co. to Elizabeth Earheart; she was born in Virginia April 14, 1804, and came to Darke Co. with her parents when quite
young, making the journey on horseback. They were the parents of three sons and four daughters, of whom all are living but one son. Mr. Hunter died Sept. 26, 1840. Mrs. Hunter died May 11, 1853, upon the old homestead; William Hunter has lived upon the homestead and upon the place where he was born for nearly half a century, his mother making her home with him until her decease; the log house in which all the family was born is now standing upon the place where it has stood for a period of fifty years. The nuptials of William Hunter and Mary Shultz were celebrated June 15, 1854; she was born in Dauphin Co., Penn., July 1, 1834; she was a daughter of George Shultz, who emigrated from Pennsylvania to Warren Co., and then to Darke Co., about the year 1846; the children of William and Mary (Shultz) Hunter were nine in number, of whom eight are now living, viz., Thomas H., William S., Charles E., Edmond A., Mary E., John I., Prudence O., David D.; the deceased, Ada, died April 22, 1877.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 502; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Daniel Jamison, manufacturer of and dealer in brick; P.O. Greenville; the subject of this memoir was born in Darke Co., Sept. 8, 1849, where he has since resided, and where he obtained a common-school education, and at the age of 21 commenced life for himself, and has since, by his own exertion, accumulated a liberal amount of means for a person of his age.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 502; submitted by Marla Zwakman


ADAMS TOWNSHIP
John Brewer, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. Stelvideo. Peter, his father, was born in Pennsylvania in 1777; he married Holy Babe Larern, a native of Pennsylvania,
born about 1779; they emigrated to Ohio in 1804, locating in Hamilton Co., and in 1819 he moved to Darke Co., where he resided till his death, which
occurred in 1855; his wife died in 1843. John, the subject of this sketch, is one of Darke Co.'s old settlers; born in Pennsylvania on the 7th of October, 1802;
came with his parents to Darke Co. in 1819; his education, which is very meager, he obtained by his own exertions; he lived with his parents till he was about 24 years of age, when, on the 8th of June, 1826, he celebrated his marriage with Elizabeth Coppess, who is a native of Greene Co., Ohio, born on the 2d of November, 1807; after his marriage, he rented a farm on Stillwater, where he remained for two years; he purchased 80 acres in Adams Township, for which he paid $50, erected a log cabin and moved, and began the task of opening up his farm; has added 93 acres more, making in all 173 acres, with 125 acres in a good state of cultivation, the whole valued at $11,000; he also owns a house and lot in Stelvideo. Mr. and Mrs. Brewer are among the oldest settlers of Adams Township, and have lived to see the mighty forest disappear before the woodman's ax; and where the old log cabin stood, a large two-story frame house is in its place; they have passed through the many struggles, dangers and incidents so common to the pioneer of the West, but with an indomitable will, associated with frugality, industry and correct business habits, they have accumulated considerable amount of property; ten children have been born to them, of whom nine are living, viz.: Alfred, born March 10, 1827; Mahala, born Dec. 25, 1828; Peter, born Aug. 8, 1831; Adam, born Nov. 25, 1833; Daniel, born Oct. 4, 1835; Jesner, born Aug. 29, 1840; Phoebe, born Oct. 9, 1843; John, born July 2, 1847; David, born May 30, 1850. Mr. Brewer is not a church member, but a true religionist, and is known as a man of good principle and full of humanity; he has raised six grandchildren, besides his own family - one for Mahala, two for Alfred, and three for Phoebe.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 540-541; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Henry Brown, carpenter and farmer; P. O. Gettysburg, Ohio. Samuel, his father, was a native of Pennsylvania, born in Lebanon Co. in June, 1803; he
married Frances Kopp, who is a native of the same place, born in June, 1803;
they emigrated to Ohio in May, 1834, locating in Wayne Co., eight miles north of Wooster, where they remained till the fall of 1847, when they removed to Montgomery Co., remaining there till spring, after which they removed to Miami Co., locating near where Bradford now stands, remaining till 1850, when he moved across the line into Darke Co., where he resided about four years, during which time he purchased a tract of land in Section 24, consisting of 124 acres, Adams Township, all of which was under heavy timber; during the time between 1850 and 1854, he, with the help of his boys, erected a hewn-log house and cleared several acres, and in 1854 he moved his family, where he resided till his death, which occurred on the 3d of March, 1866, leaving a family of eight children, of whom seven are living at present, viz., Jacob, Henry, Daniel, Reuben, William, Fanny (now Mrs. Brandle), Elizabeth; his widow still lives on the old home farm, being 76 years old; Henry, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Ohio, born in Wayne County on the 27th of August, 1834; spent his boyhood days on the farm, assisting his father in the clearing and the cultivation of the soil, receiving his education in the district schools; he remained at home till he was 22 years old, when he quit his parental roof and went in search of his fortune; he commenced to work at the carpenter's trade when he was about 25 years old, in Gettysburg, Ohio, which trade he has followed ever since, making his home with his mother on the old home farm, assisting in the farming, etc. Mr. Brown is a live, energetic, thorough business man, strictly temperate in all his habits, and is highly esteemed by his many friends and acquaintances. He is a member of the Lutheran Church.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 541; submitted by Marla Zwakman



Abraham Byrd Sr., farmer; P. O. Webster, Darke Co., Ohio; was born Feb. 18, 1804, in Shenandoah County, and raised in Rockingham Co., Va.; in 1840, he came to Ohio and stopped for a part of the first summer in Montgomery County, and then settled in Darke County; worked at his trade, bricklaying, for two years. He then married Emma Radefelt, who was born Nov. 17, 1820, in
Adams County, Penn.; about the time of his marriage, he bought 80 acres of land in Sec. 36, Adams Township, on which he is still living; he has 65 acres cleared, all of which he accomplished but about 15 acres; they are the parents of ten children-George S., born June 2, 1843; Hannah C., Nov. 27, 1844; Jacob F., March 31, 1847; Sarah I., Nov. 11, 1849; Mary M., Jan. 17, 1852 ; Abraham and Emma, July 27, 1854; Henrietta, April 16, 1858; Lucy A., Feb. 27, 1860, and Silvester, Aug. 4, 1862.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 541; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Solomon B. Christian, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. Bradford; Solomon, his father, was a native of Pennsylvania, born in Huntingdon County on the 25th of December, 1789. He married Mary Bauslaugh, who was a native of the same State and county, and was born March 4, 1794; in 1814, Mr. Christian made a visit to
Darke County, Ohio, and while here entered the east half of Sec. 9, and in 1829 he settled on his tract of land, which at that time was a dense forest; his wife did not come till 1834, as she was afraid of the Indians; she came with a firm determination to share the trials, dangers and hardships with her devoted husband, in the then almost unbroken wilderness, with here and there a family, at the mercy of the bloodthirsty red man, and for twenty-five years she nobly acted her part of the great drama of life; on the 26th of September, 1859, the messenger of death entered the household, removing her from earth to heaven; Solomon, her husband, survived the storm of life till Feb. 10, 1862, when he, too, sank peacefully to rest in the blessed knowledge of the immortality of the soul; they were the parents of seven children, of whom four are living, viz.: Susan, now Mrs. Brakebill; Anna, now Mrs. Katherman; Sarah, now Mrs. Wise, and Solomon B., the subject of this sketch, who is a native of Darke County, Ohio, born Jan. 9, 1836; he received his education in the district schools by the time he was 19 years old, during which time he assisted his father in the clearing and the cultivation of the soil. On the 19th of January, 1854, he celebrated his marriage with Miss Mary Brumbaugh, who is a daughter of Jacob and Susan Brumbaugh, natives of Montgomery County,
Ohio; Mary was born in Miami County on the 27th of December, 1830, being the fourth child in a family of eight children, viz.: Catharine, John, Carrad, Mary, Emanuel, Esther, Elizabeth and Susan; after his marriage, he farmed the old homestead, where he has resided ever since; he came in possession of the home farm at the death of his father; Mr. Christian has accumulated a considerable amount of property by his hard labor, in which he has been nobly assisted by his good and amiable wife; he is strictly temperate in all his habits, being a member of the Masonic Order, also of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Patrons of Husbandry. He is a firm Democrat; Mr. Christian is not a political aspirant, although he has been identified with the township offices, served as Township Trustee two terms, one year as Pike Superintendent and as School Director ten years. Mr. and Mrs. Christian are highly esteemed by their many friends and acquaintances for their good qualities; Mrs. Christian is a member of the German Baptist Church; they are the parents of eight children, of whom seven are living, viz.: Susan, born May 18, 1855; Philip, Jan 1, 1858; George W., July 4, 1860; Mary, July 14, 1863; Martha, Jan. 13, 1866; Solomon, Sept. 7, 1868; John S. R., Oct. 31, 1871. Jacob Brumbaugh was born March 14, 1803, died Jan. 27, 1843; Susan, his wife, was born Nov. 11, 1807, died March 29, 1852.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 541-542; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Gideon J. Coblentz, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. Bradford, Ohio. Daniel, the father of Gideon J., is a native of Maryland; born in Frederick County in April, 1814. He married Margaret Worman, who was born in Ohio in 1815; she departed this life in 1855. Mr. Coblentz celebrated his second marriage with Sarah Shepherd; they now reside three miles east of Dayton, Ohio. Gideon, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Ohio, born in Montgomery County, on the 17th of October 1838; he spent his boy-hood days in Montgomery County, assisting his father on the farm till he became of age, obtaining his education in the district schools. On the 7th of January, 1863, he celebrated his marriage with Mary E., daughter of John and Sarah Hinsey, who was born in Mad River Township, Montgomery County (now in the Corporation of Dayton), on the 29th of April, 1838. After his marriage, he moved on his father's farm, where he remained about two years: after which he rented the Barlow farm, remaining for a period of about three years; when he moved near Fort Wood, on a small farm for which he paid money rent, remaining three years; he followed farming for four years on three different farms, and in March, 1876, he purchased 40 acres in Adams Township, Sec. 28, where he moved and resides at present; has since added 8 acres more, making in all 48 acres in a good state of cultivation. Mr. Coblentz has accumulated some property by his hard labor, in which he has been nobly assisted by his good and amiable wife; is strictly temperate in all his habits; two children have been born to them, viz.: John D. W., born July 20, 1865; Sarah E. M. A., born March 27, 1872. Mrs. Mary E. Coblentz is a clairvoyant and has remarkable powers in the faculty
of clairvoyancy; to diagnose disease and prescribe for the same, and has a large practice in the counties of Darke, Miami and Montgomery. After an illness of ten years, receiving treatment from the most able physicians of the county, but all to no avail until the 4th day of July, 1874, when the faculty of clairvoyancy was brought into action, and the beautiful " Beyond " was opened up to her vision; in which a tall, venerable old gentleman, with gray hair and beard, spoke to her, saying: "I come to cure you." She was then ordered by her control to read the thirty-fourth chapter of Ezekiel; after which she was ordered to go where there was a pool of dead water and remove from her person all but three garments and dip herself seven times, after which burn the three garments, which she did and in six weeks she had recovered from her illness so as to be able to do her housework. We now leave the reader to draw his or her own conclusions, however, the writer can truthfully say that she possesses remarkable magnetic powers, and has great power over disease.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Pages 542-543; submitted by Marla Zwakman


Solomon Creager, farmer; P. O. Gettysburg; was born in Maryland in 1809; was the son of Henry and Susannah Creager; they had seven children, viz., Polly, Thomas, Charlotte, Rebecca, Valentine and Solomon; the grandparents,
Conrad and Susannah, were born in Germany; Susannah's maiden name was Wolf. Henry and Susannah Creager came to Montgomery Co., Ohio, in 1810, when Solomon was about 9 months old, and located six miles south of Dayton, where they lived and died. Mr. Creager, the subject of our sketch, was married in 1833 to Maria, daughter of George and Susannah Martin; George was born in England, and Susannah in Maryland; Maria had two brothers and four sisters, viz., Elizabeth, Maria, Ann, Mary, George and John Thomas; the eldest and youngest being dead, and the rest are living; they have had as the issue of their marriage six children, three of whom are living, viz., Henry, George M. and Cora Francis, all married and settled in life. Mr. Creager after his marriage, lived with his father about six years, till the year 1840, when they came to this county; having entered eighty-three acres of land about five years previous and settled upon it while it was a wilderness, and cut the first stick of timber; made an opening and put up a small cabin, into which they moved; then commenced clearing up, working and toiling from day to day and year to year; making such improvements as time and means would admit, till at present they have about 65 acres cleared and in cultivation, and a good comfortable house, a large barn and other buildings for comfort and convenience. When Mr. Creager started in life he began without any capital, and has made all his property by his own industry and diligent labor, except a very small amount received from their parents. Mr. Creager has always been an active Democrat; has been School Director and Trustee of his township some six years; and also filled other township offices. He is a member of the Reformed Church, having belonged to the same for nearly half a century; he and his wife were two of the six constituent members who organized the Zion's Church, the first Reformed Church established in this county; he has been Elder in the church for eighteen years. Thus, while we have here a sketch of one of the old settlers of the county, we have also a sample of pioneers in the church work rarely excelled in length of time of service; here we have a noble example of the coupling together of pioneer work in opening out the forests, and that of building up the church, which shall ever stand upon the pages of history as a bright and shining light to guide the children's children and future generations to industry in life, and a sure way to a happy immortality beyond.
Source: The History of Darke County, Ohio, by W. H. McIntosh, Beers, W.H. Beers & Co - Darke County (Ohio) 1880; Page 543; submitted by Marla Zwakman




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