Genealogy Trails - Finding Ancestors wherever their trails led
Gallia County, Ohio

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Biographies
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Claudius Cadot
Claudius Cadot was born February 17th, 1793, in Gallipolis. He was probably the first male child born in Gallia county, and at the time of his death was the oldest male child born of the French colonists of Gallipolis. His parents, Claudius Cadot and Jane Bastine, were married in Paris, France, in 1790, shortly previous to the emigration of the French colonists, with whom they embarked, arriving with them in the fall of that year at Gallipolis. On January 28th, 1791, Marin Louise Cadot was born, the first child born in Gallipolis; about two years later, as stated above, was born her brother Claudius, the subject of this sketch; two years later, was born a younger brother Lemuel. For a time all went well with the young married pair, but Mons. Cadot early fell a victim to the malaria of the climate, leaving his wife with three helpless babes to struggle for an existence in this wild country, a life for which she was wholly unprepared, except with the energy inspired by a brave spirit. Within about three months she marred a young Frenchman of the colony named Charles Francis Dutiel, who immediately made preparations and removed his family to their lots on the grant in the fall of 1797, being among the first families that went down. He was accompanied by Mons. Bureau, the subject of a former sketch.
Young Claudius was employed for a number of years in working on the farm in the summer, and in his father’s distillery in the winter; distilling wines and liquors being a very general business among the early settlers of the grant. He had the advantage of eleven months of schooling at that time, which was all he ever obtained. In October, 1809, his sister Marie Louise married Mons. Francis Le Clercq, the subject of a following sketch.
In the spring of 1812 Governor Meigs issued a call for volunteers in defence [sic] of the frontiers from the depredations of the Indians, and war was then imminent with Great Britain. Two companies went from Scioto county, and Claudius, being at that time eighteen years of age, enlisted in one of them, commanded by Captain John Lucas, for one year. They received their arms at Chillicothe, from whence they marched to Dayton, where they formed the 1st Ohio Regiment, under Duncan McArthur. They went to Urbana, which was the frontier town, and joined a detachment of the United States regulars, under Colonel Miller. Here was organized that little army, which, under command of General Hull, marched through the wilderness to Detroit. While on this march war was declared by Congress against England. The dispatches notifying Hull, never reached him, as the messenger fell into the hands of the enemy. On the 16th of August, Mons. Cadot, with some of his companions, walked across to the Ohio river at Georgetown, below Pittsburgh, and started down the river in canoes, the ordinary mode of traveling in that day. When they arrived at Gallipolis, Mons. Cadot stayed at the house of his sister, Mad. Le Clercq.
As a parole of honor had been given, and he was not exchanged, he soon went back to work upon the farm. When the war was over he followed keel-boating upon the river for four years, accumulating means with which he purchased a farm in Vinton township, paying the government therefor [sic] four dollars an acre. He was married in 1818 to Nancy Ball, and two years later moved onto his farm, and commenced the real business of his life. His first wife died in a few years, and he then gave up the farm to his son Claudius, and lived with his oldest daughter, Mrs. Mary Hayward, at the grant. He afterwards purchased a home and lived at Wheelersburg, where he spent the remainder of his days.
He was noted as being the first male child born at Gallipolis. He was among the last of the keel-boatmen, that peculiar class that was once very numerous, now nearly extinct. He drew a pension for his services in the war, and was the last of his company to survive. He had a family burial ground upon the farm where his remains were placed.  
[SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardestty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


Rev James E Caldwell
Was born in Giles County, Virginia, July 28, 1823. His father, Henry Caldwell, was born May 27, 1781, and died January 16, 1859. His mother, Mary (Ferrier) Caldwell, was born May 14, 1785, and died February 4, 1855. Mr. Caldwell has been twice married. His first wife was Nancy E. Montgomery, a daughter of Thomas and Tacy (Swindler) Montgomery. She was born September 25, 1826, and died March 26, 1863. She is mother of the following children: Felix M., born July 25, 1846, died October 23, 1852; Chloe P., May 19, 1848, died January 17, 1867; Madison G., December 13, 1849, resides in this township; Leathy S., February 11, 1831, died January 27, 1867; Alexander L., June 5, 1853, died July 27, 1854; Jasper N., June 28, 1855, resides in this township; Vienna V., January 21, 1857, died January 22, 1869; Laura E., February 5, 1859, died October 21, 1859; Theadocia A., August 28, 1860, died April 1, 1867. The second wife of Mr. Caldwell is Climena E. Haskins, who was born in this county February 28, 1836. They were married in Gallia county July 26, 1863. The children are: Rosannah E., born July 14, 1864, died February 3, 1867; Arnon S., November 12, 1865, died January 31, 1867; James S., October 25, 1867, resides at home; Francis S., August 3, 1869, died August 4, 1870; Minnie E., September 25, 1871, resides at home; Emery A. C., June 4, 1874, resides at home; Willie W., November 20, 1875, resides at home; Carey, December 25, 1878, resides at home. The parents of Mrs. Caldwell are Hiram and Elizabeth (Garlick) Haskins, settlers of this county in 1805. Mr. Caldwell has held the office of justice of the peace three years, assessor a number of years, constable five years, clerk two years, treasurer three years, ministerial treasurer, and, in short, all the township offices except trustee. He was licensed to preach in the Providence Missionary Baptist church in 1848, was ordained in the same church in 1857, by Levi McDaniel, Thomas Harrager and A. J. Warner. In 1829 Mr. Caldwell came to this county, settling in Guyan township, where he is engaged as a farmer and minister. His postoffice address is Mercerville, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


James Calhoon
Is the son of James and Elizabeth (Stephenson) Calhoon, both of whom are deceased. He was born in Huntington township, March 4, 1852. He still resides in the township, where he is engaged in farming. He was married to Esther a. Deckard, in this township, April 13, 1879; she is also a native of Huntington township, born February 20, 1859. Her parents are Julius N. and Eliza (Price) Deckard, settlers of this county, May 13, 1853. Mr. Calhoon was elected supervisor in this township for one year in 1877, and school director for one year in 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Calhoon have one child, Pearly, born January 25, 1880. Mr. Calhoon is engaged in farming; his postoffice address is Thurman, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardesty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882] 


Elias Campbell
Elias Campbell and Rachel Wellington were married at Bladensburg, Ohio, July 9, 1864. He is a native of Gallia county, born January 24, 1835; his wife was born July 11, 1846, in Jefferson county, Ohio. They have two children: James, born June 10, 1865, and Ella, November 22, 1869. Elias Campbell is a son of George and Cassa Campbell, settlers of this county in 1806. The parents of Mrs. Campbell are John and Mary E. (Jarvis) Wellington, who came to this county in 1858. Mr. Campbell is a cooper and farmer, his farm being located in Ohio township. His postoffice address is Eureka, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


George Campbell
Was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, April 7, 1806. He is a son of Daniel and Ellen (Ross) Campbell, who settled in this county in 1806. His father was born in Culpepper county, Virginia, and died in this county in 1851. His mother died in 1813. During the war of 1812 the family of Mr. Campbell were in great danger from the Indians, and his mother has often hid the children through the day under a drift at the bank of the river. They had to do their trading at Gallipolis, and their mill was twenty-seven miles distant; the corn for their bread they ground by hand; their meat consisted of deer and wild turkeys; the bears would not allow them to raise any hogs, and the wolves used to destroy all their sheep. Whenever they went to church or to visit a neighbor they had to carry their rifles. The father of Mr. Campbell was drafted in the war of 1812. George Campbell and Cassey Campbell were married in Ohio township May 27, 1830; she was born in Mason county, West Virginia, September 11, 1813. She is the mother of the following children: Thomas J., born January 19, 1832, resides in Cincinnati; Elias, January 24, 1836, resides in Ohio township; Charles, April 24, 1839, died October 31, 1844; Francis M., May 26, 1841, died July 10, 1852; Chloe E., December 27, 1843, died August 18, 1869; George A., June 22, 1851, resides at home. The parents of Mrs. Campbell are Elias and Chloe (Swindler) Campbell, settlers of this county in 1814. Mr. Campbell is a cooper and also a farmer. His postoffice address is Swan Creek, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]



James Campbell
Hallie Miller, Reporter
Audrey Meighen, Author-Editor
Folklore: Ex-slaves
Gellia County, District 3


JAMES CAMPBELL, Age 86
"Well, I'se bo'n Monro' County, West Virginia, on January 15, 1852, jes' few miles from Union, West Virginia."
"My mammy wuz Dinnah Alexander Campbell an' my pappy wuz Levi Campbell an' dey bof cum frum Monro' County. Dat's 'bout only place I heerd dem speak 'bout."
"Der wuz Levi, Floyd, Henry, Noah, an' Nancy, jes' my haf brudders an' sistahs, but I neber knowed no diffrunce but whut dey wuz my sistahs an' brudders."
"Where we liv? On Marsa John Alexander's farm, he wuz a good Marsa too. All Marsa John want wuz plenty wurk dun and we dun it too, so der wuz no trubble on ouah plantashun. I neber reclec' anyone gittin' whipped or bad treatment frum him. I does 'members, dat sum de neighbers say dey wuz treated prutty mean, but I don't 'member much 'bout it 'caise I'se leetle den."
"Wher'd I sleep? I neber fergit dat trun'l bed, dat I sleep in.
"Marsa John's place kinda stock farm an' I dun de milkin'. You all know dat wuz easy like so I jes' keep busy milkin' an' gits out de hard work. Nudder thing I lik to do wuz pick berries, dat wuz easy too, so I dun my shar' pickin'."
"Money? Lawsy chile, I neber dun seen eny money 'til aftah I dun cum to Gallipolis aftah der war. An' how I lik' to heah it jingle, if I jes' had two cents, I'd make it jingle."
"We all had plenty an' good things to eat, beans, corn, tatahs, melons an' hot mush, corn bread; we jes' seen white flour wunce in a while."
"Yes mam, we had rabbit, wil' turkey, pheasunts, an' fish, say I'se tellin' you-all dat riful pappy had shure cud kill de game."
"Nudder good ole time wuz maple sugar makin' time, mostly dun at night by limestone burnin'. Yes, I heped with the 'lasses an' all de time I wuz a thinkin' 'bout dem hot biscets, ham meat, corn bread an' 'lasses."
"We liv in a cabin on Marse John's place. Der wuzn't much in de cabin but my mammy kept it mighty clean. Say, I kin see dat ole' fiah place wid de big logs a burnin' right now; uh, an' smell dat good cookin', all dun in iron pots an' skillets. An' all de cookin' an' heatin' wuz dun by wood, why I nebber seed a lump o' coal all time I wuz der. We all had to cut so much wood an' pile it up two weeks 'for Christmas, an' den when ouah pile wuz cut, den ouah wurk wuz dun, so we'd jes' hav good time."
"We all woah jeans clos', jes pants an' jacket. In de summah we chilluns all went barefoot, but in de wintah we all woah shoes."
"Ol' Marse John an' his family liv in a big fine brick hous'. Marse John had des chilluns, Miss Betty an' Miss Ann an' der wuz Marse Mike an' Marse John. Marse John, he wuz sorta spiled lik. He dun wen to de war an' runs 'way frum Harpers Ferry an' cum home jes' sceered to death. He get himsef a pah o' crutches an' neber goes back. Marse John dun used dem crutches 'til aftah de war wuz ovah. Den der wuz ol' Missy Kimberton—de gran'muthah. She wuz 'culiar but prutty good, so wuz Marse's chilluns."
"Ol' Marse John had bout 20 slaves so de wurk wuzn't so bad on nun ob us. I kin jes' see dem ol' bindahs and harrows now, dat dey used den. It would shure look funny usin' 'em now."
"I all'us got up foah clock in de mornin' to git in de cows an' I didn't hurry nun, 'caise dat tak in de time."
"Ouah mammy neber 'lowed de old folks to tell us chilluns sceery stories o' hants an' sich lik' so der's nun foah me to 'member."
"Travelin' wuz rather slo' lik. De only way wuz in ox-carts or on hoss back. We all didn't hay much time fer travelin'. Our Marse wuz too good to think 'bout runnin' 'way."
"Nun my fam'ly cud read er write. I lurned to read an write aftah I cum up Norf to Ohio. Dat wuz biggest thing I ebber tackled, but it made me de happies' aftah I learn't."
"We all went to Sunday School an' meetin'. Yes mam, we had to wurk on Sundays, too, if we did hav any spare time, we went visit in'. On Saturday nights we had big time foah der wuz mos' all'us dancin' an' we'd dance long as de can'les lasted. Can'les wuz all we had any time fur light."
"I 'member one de neighbah boys tried to run 'way an' de patrollahs got 'im an' fetched 'im back an' he shure dun got a wallopin' fer it. Dat dun tuk any sich notion out my head. Dem patrollahs dun keep us skeered to deaf all de time. One, Henry Jones, runned off and went cleah up Norf sum place an' dey neber did git 'im. 'Course we all wuz shure powahful glad 'bout his 'scapin'."

"We'se neber 'lowed out de cabin at night. But sum times de oldah 'uns wud sneak out at night an'tak de hosses an' tak a leetle ride. An' man it wud bin jes' too bad if ol' Marse John ketched 'em: dat wuz shure heaps o' fun fer de kids. I 'member hearin' wunce de ol' folks talkin' 'bout de way one Marse dun sum black boys dat dun sumthin' wrong. He jes' mak 'em bite off de heads o' baccer wurms; mysef I'd ruther tuk a lickin."
"On Christmus Day, we'd git fiah crackahs an' drink brandy, dat wuz all. Dat day wuz only one we didn't wurk. On Saturday evenin's we'd mold candles, dat wuzn't so bad."
"De happies' time o' my life wuz when Cap'n Tipton, a Yankee soljer cumed an' tol' us de wah wuz ober an' we wuz free. Cap'n. Tipton sez, "Youse de boys we dun dis foah". We shure didn't lose no time gittin' 'way; no man."
"We went to Lewisburg an' den up to Cha'leston by wagon an' den tuk de guvment boat, Genrul Crooks, an' it brung us heah to Gallipolis in 1865. Dat Ohio shoah shure looked prutty."
"I'se shure thankful to Mr. Lincoln foah whut he dun foah us folks, but dat Jeff Davis, well I ain't sayin' whut I'se thinkin'."
"De is jes' like de worl', der is lots o' good an' lots o' bad in it."
[SOURCE: Library of Congress, Folklore: Ex-slaves - Transcribed by: Sandi Cummins]

John Campbell
Was born in Gallia county, Ohio township, on the farm where he now lives, November 20, 1823. His father, Henry Campbell, was born January 1, 1796, and died September 24, 1865. His mother, Nancy (Swindler) Campbell, was born January 31, 1804, and died April 25, 1879. When the subject of this sketch was a boy, he and his father would row a boat up the river two and a-half miles with two sacks of corn and take them on their backs and carry them half a mile to a horse-mill, where they would get it cracker; they pounded and grated their corn to make bread; the children had to go to school two miles by blazed paths through the woods; their house house was made of round log slabs; schools were held three months in the year, and were supported by subscription; preaching was had occasionally at neighbors' houses and at Hobbs' school house; their wagons were made entirely of wood, the wheels being blocks sawed off a round log; all their clothing was home-made and the material raised on the farm; all their plows were wholly wood. John Campbell was married to Juliet Kennedy in this county May 7, 1856. She is a native of this county, born November 13, 1833, the same night in which occurred the great meteoric shower. The following are the children by this marriage: Lewis E. born February 23, 1857, resides in Oregon; Willie F., November 7, 1861, resides at home; Jennie N., December 21, 1864, at home; Mary E., June 10, 1869, at home. The parents of Mrs. Campbell are Cornelius and Jane (Waugh) Kennedy. The father was born in 1790, and the mother October 8, 1795. Mr. Campbell has held the office of township treasurer three years, and also filled the office of township clerk. Mr. Campbell served his country during the Morgan raid in 1864. The postoffice address is of Mr. Campbell is Bush's Mill, Gallia county, Ohio.
[SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Louis Campbell
Was a son of Henry and Nancy (Swindler) Campbell, who died September 22, 1866, and April 25, 1879, respectively. Louis is a native of this county, born March 9, 1821. He was married to Harriet C. Kennedy, in Gallia county, November 6, 1849. She was also born in this county April 19, 1830. Her parents were Cornelius and Jane (Waugh) Kennedy. Her father was born in 1790, came to this county in 1800, and died July 3, 1833. Her mother was born October 8, 1795, and died September 2, 1865. The parents of both Mr. and Mrs. Campbell were among the pioneers of this county, settling here when it was nothing but a wilderness, and they endured many hardships. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are: Thomas H., born September 25, 1850, resides in Gallia county, Ohio; Lucetta F., May 17, 1853, resides at home; Juliet K., March 12, 1856, resides in this county; John L., June 9, 1858, resides in this county; Charles H., April 15, 1861, died January 16, 1863; Joseph E., October 29, 1863, resides at home; George H. P., December 11, 1867, died February 27, 1868; Jane A., April 22, 1869, resides at home. Mrs. Campbell has a farm located in Guyan township. Her postoffice address is Mercerville, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Rene Carel
Rene Carel was born in Paris, France, and came to Gallipolis in the spring of 1803, accompanied by his wife and two children, Franklin and Virgil. On the way from Pittsburgh to Gallipolis, by river, he stopped to visit Blennerhassett at his island, and he was in after years fond of mentioning the cordial courtesy with which he was received; the elegance, amounting to grandeur, of the palatial residence of Blennerhassett, its rich furniture and art embellishments, and the beauty of the grounds, the more remarkable from the fact that this section then was an almost unbroken wilderness. Mr. Carel immediately engaged in business pursuits after his arrival, establishing what was probably the first salt works in the State, the salt works being located just below Chicamauga creek, and the ground upon which it was situated is now within the corporate limits of the city. He lived a respected citizen and died March 27th, 1843.
[SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardestty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


William Jefferson Carrell
A resident and farmer of Springfield township, was born in Point Pleasant, Mason county, West Virginia, September 9, 1825, and settled in this county in 1845.  His parents, William F. and Elizabeth Ann (Steed) Carrell, came to this county June 10, 1837.  Elizabeth A. deceased.  He was united in marriage with Hannah B., daughter of John and Caroline (Bishop) Smith, in Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio, December 7, 1847.  She was born in Warren township, Washington county, Ohio, July 5, 1832, and came to this county with her parents in April, 1835.  She is the mother of five children:  John W., born December 12, 1848; Emma C., May 3, 1852; Lizzie C., May 26, 1862; Samuel C., February 10, 1865; George R., August 17, 1870, all of whom except George, who is at home, reside in Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio.  John Smith died September 15, 1840.  Mr. Carrell served as pilot on a government transport in the United States service from May 12, 1861, to the close of the war in 1865, on the Great Kanawha, Ohio and Cumberland rivers.  He was at the battle of Scary Creek, in July, 1861, under command of General J. D. Cox, and at the battle of Fort Donelson, in a fleet of 153 steamboats, laden with troops.  Post office, Pine Grove, Gallia county, Ohio.      [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardestty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


John H Carter
Is a native of the township of Perry, Gallia county, Ohio, born May 10, 1832. His parents are Isaac and Alice (Armstrong) Carter, settlers of this county in 1812. His father was born in Virginia, October 4, 1805, and died April 16, 1876. His mother was born in Virginia, March 22, 1808. Abigail D. James became the wife of Mr. Carter, in this township, August 16, 1865, the Rev. J. D. Ray performing the ceremony. She was born in Green township, Gallia county, October 3, 1846. Her parents are Isaac and Mary Ellen (Gouldsby) James. Her father was born in Virginia and her mother in Gal county, Ohio. Mr. Carter was master of transportation during the rebellion, and held that office in Atlanta, Georgia; he commenced at Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 1864. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Carter are: Oscar Moore, born May 20, 1866; Sopha Alice, October 13, 1867, died January 20, 1870; Laura Effie, March 11, 1870; Isaac Newton, February 5, 1872. Mr. Carter is a farmer and stock-dealer and raiser. His postoffice address is Patriot, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


William A Carter
William A Carter and Fannie Spangler were married in Clay township, this county, August 1, 1867. He was born in Harrison, February 15, 1840. His wife was born in Clay township, November 26, 1849. They have the following children: Effie, born May 26, 1868; Mary M., January 19, 1870; Annie L., April 3, 1872, Nora C., November 2, 1874. They are all residents of Harrison township. The parents of the subject of this sketch are William and Caroline (Halley) Carter. John F. and Mary J. (Loucks) Spangler are the parents of Mrs. Carter. Mr. Carter enlisted in the late war in the three months' service, under Captain J. S. George, of Lawrence county, Ohio, which was an independent cavalry county. He served three months in West Virginia under General Cox; he received his discharge at Ironton, Ohio. After his return home he still continued to work on the farm of his father until September, 1862, when he volunteered for three years in Captain J. Gatewood's company, G, 117th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was mustered in the service at Portsmouth Ohio. He served in that regiment until February, 1863, when they were sent to Covington, Kentucky, and were transferred into the 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery, in which regiment they did garrison duty, and were engaged in building forts, until February, 1863, when they took up the line of march for Knoxville, Tennessee, by way of Lexington and Burnside Point, on the Cumberland river. They arrived at Knoxville, March 28, 1863, a few days after the battle of Fort Saunders. The regiment was never in any regular engagement, last performed some hard service in East Tennessee, from Knoxville to Carter's station, where Company G lost two men in a skirmish. They served in Tennessee until peace was declared, receiving their discharge at Nashville, Tennessee, July 3, 1865. He went right at his old avocation, farming, on his return home. His address is Moody postoffice, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


George L Chapman
Is a native of Gallia county, Ohio, born August 11, 1844. He is a son of John and Jane (Garlic) Chapman, natives of this county, the former born in 1816, when it was nothing but a wilderness. Sarah L. Lewis became the wife of George L. Chapman, in Lawrence county, Ohio, October 6, 1864. She is a daughter of Samuel and Rodia (Miller) Lewis, and was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, March 24, 1844. She is mother of the following children: William H., born September 3, 1865, died September 12, 1865; Louis M., February 5, 1867, resides at home; Thomas J., May 1, 1871, died December 7, 1871; John W., January 17, 1873, died August 13, 1874; Amos W., June 28, 1875, resides at home; Sarah J., June 29, 1878, resides at home. Mr. Chapman is a carpenter, residing in Crown City, Gallia county, Ohio, where all communications should be addressed. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


I. Floyd Chapman
Is the present recorder of Gallia county, elected in October, 1881, for the term of three years. He was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, April 11, 1847. His parents are Isaac and Sarah (Dawson) Chapman. His father is deceased, and his mother came to this county in 1826. Mr. Chapman was married in this county, December 26, 1868, to Mary e. Lewis, who is a native of Lawrence county, Ohio, born September 24, 1851. Her parents are John B. and Catherine (Wall) Lewis. The following are the children of Mr. and Mrs. Chapman: Grace M., born September 24, 1876; Sackie, January 18, 1878; Nellie, November 26, 1880. Mr. Chapman was a soldier in the war of the rebellion, enlisting in Company B, 173d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in August, 1864; he served until the end of war, and was mustered out of the service at Nashville, Tennessee. He had three brothers who were also in the army, one of whom was wounded. The postoffice address of Mr. Chapman is Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


John Chapman
Was born in the county of Gallia, June 28, 1816, the year that his parents came to the county. At that date the township was not organized; there were no schools except those supported by subscription; they had to go fifteen miles to mill, which was situated on Raccoon creek; they grated and pounded full half of their corn for bread; meat was mostly wild venison and turkeys; the trading point was Gallipolis deer were very plenty, and Mr. Chapman has seen one hundred in a flock; he has stood in one place, and shot three without moving. His parents names are Archibald and Elizabeth (Mills) Chapman. Jane Garlic became the wife of Mr. Chapman, in Guyan township, June 24, 1841. She is a native of Ohio township, born October 14, 1814. She is mother of the following children: George L., born August 11, 1844; William H., January 31, 1846; Thomas J., September 25, 1847; John H., October 2, 1849; Eliza J., May 26, 1852. Mrs. Chapman's parents are William and Elizabeth (Cook) Garlic, settlers of this county in 1814. Mr. Chapman has held the office of township trustee for a number of years; he was captain of the 6th Rifles for a number of years. He has a farm which he tills, located in Guyan township. His postoffice address is Crown City, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Rev Augusta A Chapman
Was born in this county December 17, 1844. He is a son of Isaac and Sarah C. (Dawson) Chapman, settlers of this county in 1817. His father was born April 10, 1812, and died September 8, 1878; his mother was born in 1818. Mr. Chapman and Dorcas Sowards were married in Gallia county October 30, 1871. She was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, January 31, 1853. Their children are: infant daughter, born and died October 12, 1872; Sallie, September 26, 1873; Nannie (twins) September 26, 1873; Bertha, August 13, 1875; Barnard O., September 29, 1877; Archie F., August 28, 1879, died March 3, 1880; Alwilda, September 13, 1880. The parents of Mrs. Chapman were Isaac and Nancy (Burham) Sowards; they died in 1880 and 1859, respectively. Mr. Chapman served three years in the late war in Company G, 4th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. He was wounded by grapeshot, at the battle of Vicksburg, on the 18th of May, 1862; he also participated in the famous Lynchburg raid, battle of Lookout Mountain, and other. His grandfather, Archie Chapman, was one of the early settlers of this township, and endured all the privations of a pioneer life. Mr. Chapman is a farmer, and is also engaged in teaching in Guyan township. His postoffice address is Chapman's Mills, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Clem W Cherington
Is a son of John M. and Lydia (Waddell) Cherington, both of whom are natives of Gallia county, and who still reside here. The former was born August 5, 1820, and the latter, August 4, 1820. Clem is also a native of this county, born in the year 1851. He is now engaged in farming in Huntington township, and teaching. In this township, on the 22d of May, 1878, he was married to Carrie McGrath, who was born in Berlin, Jackson county, Ohio, in 1857. She is a daughter of Martin and Lucinda (Soule) McGrath, who settled in this county in 1870. The children of Mr. Cherington are: Lola L., born January 22, 1880, and Grace, June 4, 1881. The postoffice address of Mr. Cherington is Ewington, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardesty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


Pennel Cherrington
Is a native of the county of Greenbrier, West Virginia, born November 20, 1802. He came to this county with his parents when he was but three years of age. Things in the county at that time were very primitive; there were no roads nor mills. Pennel's father made the first handmill in the township, and neighbors used to come for miles around to grind their corn. Salt was a very scarce article and it was hard to get any. At that date there were but two stores in Gallipolis. Tea sold for three dollars per pound and coffee brought fifty cents, and other things were in proportion. Leather was hard to secure, and the family had to make a pair of shoes last them a year. All the schools were supported by subscription, and it was impossible to obtain a good education. William Cherrington, the father of Pennel, was born in Pennsylvania, and died in 1833. His mother, Lettitia (Douglass) Cherrington was married in Gallia county, August 2, 1825, to Jennette Jonston, who was born in the city of Melrose, Scotland, April 14, 1802; she died February 11, 1881. She was the mother of the following children: James J., born January 13, 1827, died June 13, 1833; William, August 7, 1828, resides in Gallipolis; Margaret, February 14, 1830, resides in Gallipolis; Edward, June 7, 1831, died in California, December 19, 1881; John G., February 9, 1833, resides in Gallipolis; Eliza, February 22, 1835, resides in Gallipolis; Thomas, March 21, 1837, resides in Ironton, Lawrence county, Ohio; Lettitia, December 4, 1838, resides at home; Mary, May 1, 1840, died September 20, 1850; Jennette, February 6, 1842, resides at home. The parents of Mrs. Cherrington were James and Margaret (Cowen) Johnston. They were both born in Scotland, and died in 1820 and September 17, 1836, respectively. They came to this county, from Scotland, in 1818. Mr. Cherrington has served two terms in the State legislature, has been justice of the peace for six years, township trustee three years, and was a lieutenant-colonel of militia during the early days. His son Thomas served in the first call for volunteers during the late war. After the expiration of his term he recruited a company and served as their captain during the whole of the war. Mr. Cherrington's farm is located in Addison township. His postoffice address is Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Charles Chick
Charles Chick was born in Gallia County, this state, on the 23d of December, 1823, and was a son of William Chick, a native of Somersetshire, England, where he was born in 1794. In 1817 William Chick, accompanied by his brothers, Charles and John, immigrated to the United States. In his native land he had learned the trade of stonemason, at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, and after coming to America he followed his trade several years, in Scioto County, Ohio. In 1828 he purchased a farm of 5OO or 600 acres in the French Grant and removed his family there. In 1846 he purchased a tract of 237 acres, including the present site of the Burgess Steel and Iron Works, but while preparing to move to his new house was taken sick and died at the old homestead in the French Grant, his wife, whose maiden name was Nancy Skinner, having preceded him to the "Great Beyond" the year previous. Both were members of the Baptist Church, in the faith of which they reared their eight children.
Charles Chick devoted his entire active life to agricultural pursuits and became one of the representative agriculturists and stock-growers of Scioto County. He purchased the interests of the other heirs to his father's extensive farm and on the same he continued to reside until his death, his widow having thereafter removed to the City of Portsmouth, where she maintained her home during the residue of her life. In 1854 Charles Chick wedded Miss Sarah Lawson, daughter of John and Rebecca Watson Lawson, June, 1854. Thomas Lawson, grandfather of John Lawson, was a native of Hampshire County, Virginia, and a representative of that fine old commonwealth as a patriot soldier in the War of the Revolution. William Lawson, grandfather of Sarah Lawson, was one of the first settlers in Scioto County, Ohio, having located on the tract of land now occupied by the City of Portsmouth. Michael Watson, great-grandfather of Mrs. Gates on the maternal side, was a native of Maryland, whence he removed to Kentucky in 1790), and from the latter state he came to Ohio in 1804 and became one of the very early settlers of Adams County, where he continued to reside until his death.
[SOURCE: A Standard History of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio Volume II (pp. 658-663) Published: 1916; The Lewis Publishing Company. Transcribed by: Michelle Kennedy Spalding]


Alexander Clark
Was born in Clay township, Gallia county, June 23, 1838. His parents are William and Mary (Ward) Clark, who settled in this county in 1824. He married Mary M., daughter of Isaac and Eleanor (Northup) Jeffers, in Gallipolis, September 13, 1865. Her parents settled in this county in 1835. They have five children to bless their union: Emily F., born October 20, 1866; William J., April 5, 1870; Mary E., February 20, 1872; Alice G., September 5, 1877; John E., August 20, 1881; all live at home. His residence is Clay township, Gallia county, and postoffice is Mercerville, Gallia county, Ohio. He is a teacher and farmer, and held the office of assessor one year of Clay township. He had one brother, George W. Clark, who served in the 193d Regiment, Company B, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, seven months. His parents were among the early pioneers of this county, and endured all the privations and hardships of early settlers. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Amos Clark
Has been married twice. His first wife, Frances H., daughter of James and Mary Riggs, was married to him June 2, 1863, and died November 24, 1874. She was the mother of three children: Mamie Laura, born July 23, 1864; James Stephen, March 8, 1869; Ada Frances, November 7, 1871. His second wife, Mrs. Sallie B. Harper, was married to him in Gallipolis, Ohio, October 10, 1881. She was born in Gallia county, Ohio, October 24, 1851, and is the daughter of Jesse and Mary A. (Waddell) Ingels. Her father came to this county in 1826. Her mother was born here in 1830. Mr. Clark is a resident of Clay township, and settled in this county in 1859. He was born in Frankfurt, Maine, December 8, 1839, and his parents, Stephen and Prudence M. (Martin) Clark, now deceased, were residents of Waldo county, Maine. He entered the late war July, 1861, and was appointed orderly sergeant of Company I, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was commissioned second lieutenant of Company G, 36th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in March, 1862, resigned April, 1863, on account of disability. Occupation, farming. Address, Eureka, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Samuel V. Clark
Residing in Clay township, was born in Gallia county, Ohio, March 25, 1833. He is a son of Isaac and Annie (Lee) Clark, who were early settlers in this county, and was married in Gallia county, on December 20, 1860, to Elizabeth Dickey, Born February 7, 1840, in the same county as her husband. Her parents are Wilson L. and Elizabeth (Riley) Dickey, who were also early settlers. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Clark are: Mary E., born April 28, 1861; Elma L., March 10, 1864; Annie A., July 3, 1866; Edgar M., October 21, 1868; Emit H., March 19, 1871; Cora F., August 11, 1874; Curtis, October 26, 1878; Arthur, November 2, 1881 - all reside at home. Mr. Clark has held of the office of justice of the peace for several years, and holds the same office at present. He enlisted in the late war, in 1865, for one year, and served about five months, when he was discharged on account of sickness and returned home; the regiment in which he served was the 193d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in Company B. Mr. Clark is a farmer and school-teacher.  [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


William W Clark
William W Clark and Christenia Caldwell were married in Morgan township July 1, 1852. They are both natives of this township, be born February 21, 1828, and his wife December 23, 1835. The following comprise their children: Joseph R., born April 9, 1853, resides in Morgan township; Jacob, December 4, 1855, resides in Huntington township; Mary R., July 14, 1857, died February 8, 1864; Elmer E., July 17, 1861, resides in Morgan township; Eva, August 29, 1865, resides in Morgan township; Alpha, December 8, 1868, resides in Morgan township; John W., June 28, 1870, resides in Morgan township; Arthur, January 28, 1872; Stella, August 25, 1875. The parents of Mr. Clark are Joseph and Rachel (Watkins) Clark. Mrs. Clark is a daughter of Jacob and Christenia (Vance) Caldwell. Mr. Clark was a soldier in the late war, enlisting in Company C, 194th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, February, 1864, and was discharged on account of disability after serving six months. Mr. Clark is engaged in farming in Morgan township. His address is Pine Grove postoffice, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Lemuel Z Codot
Was born in Scioto county, Ohio, in 1838, and settled in this county in 1858. His parents are Lemuel and Catherine (Baccus) Codot; his father is deceased, and his mother resides in Scioto county, Ohio. Mr. Codot was married in Gallipolis, in 1863, to Josephine Carel, who was born in that city in 1839. She is a daughter of Franklin and Sallia (Whitney) Carel, residents of Gallipolis. Mr. Codot is clerk of the board of education and has been a member of the board since 1869. He is also deputy revenue collector for Gallia county. He was a soldier during the late war, a member of the 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, being captain of company A. After nine months' service as captain he was promoted to major, and he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, December 9, 1864. He served to the close of the war, through West and East Virginia, through the valley of the Shenandoah with Sheridan and Crook. He has two children: Charles C., born September 15, 1864, and Harry L., September 29, 1874. They both reside in Gallipolis. The business of Mr. Codot is a tobacco merchant. His postoffice address is Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Rev Chester B Cofer
Was born in Montgomery county, southwestern Virginia, April 16, 1834. He is a son of Joseph and Margaret (Dobbins) Cofer. Cynthia A. Allison became the wife of Mr. Cofer in Pulaski county, Virginia, October 3, 1855. She was born in Wythe county, Virginia. July 25, 1834. Their children are: Margaret J., born November 18, 1856; Martha E., April 7, 1858; Nancy A., December 30, 1859; Joseph S., April 27, 1863; Mary C., December 16, 1864; Francis R., January 1, 1867; Charles E., October 2, 1869; Sarah A., September 11, 1871; Chester N., August 5, 1875; Hinton P., August 21, 1878 - the last seven reside at home, and the first three in Gallia county. The parents of Mrs. Cofer were Francis and Martha (Howard) Allison. Her father was born in April, 1805, and died June 6, 1879. Her mother was born January 6, 1803, and died in March, 1875. Mr. Cofer came to this county, in 1866, where he is engaged in farming. His postoffice address is Mercerville, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Joseph T Colwell
Joseph T Colwell and Imogene Towbridge were married in Gallia county, Ohio, June 4, 1875. They are both natives of this county, he born October 7, 1856, and she March 2, 1858. They have the following children: Lottie M., born May 29, 1877; Cora O., March 22, 1879; and Richard E., January 2, 1881. The parents of r. Colwell are William F. and Jane (Sheets) Colwell, settlers of this county in 1829. His father was born November 19, 1812, and his mother May 19, 1817. The latter died May 6, 1881. Mrs. Colwell's parents are Ferguson and Ruth (Crawford) Towbridge, settlers of this county in 1831. Her father was born September 9, 1821, and died December 1, 1864. Her mother was born April 9, 1825. Mr. Colwell had five brothers in the late war. Four of them served four years each, and one of them served one year. Mr. Colwell is occupied in Guyan township as a farmer. His postoffice address is Mercerville, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


William Coon
Farmer, came to this county in 1854. He was united in marriage with Letitia Thornily in Washington county, Ohio, August 7, 1842. He was born in Green county, Pennsylvania, August 27, 1819. His wife was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1817. They have five children: Evelyn, born November 30, 1843, lives in Gallia county; Walter, March 22, 1845, lives in Gallia county; Caleb E., May 13, 1846, resides in Laclede county, Missouri; Augusta, May 15, 1851, lives in West Virginia; William J., February 11, 1858, resides at home. He is a son of William and Margaret (Stackhouse) Coon; and his wife's parents, Letitia (Archer) and Caleb Thornily, both died in 1823. He had one son, Caleb, who served in the 133d Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry six months. Address, Eureka, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


David Coughenour
David Coughenour and Rachel McCarty were married in Cheshire, October 26, 1843. He was born in Augusta county, Virginia, August 6, 1820, and his wife in this township February 4, 1822. Their children, numbering eleven, are as follows: Mary J., born August 2, 1844, resides at home; Augusta, January 31, 1846, married December 25, 1872, to Flournoy C. Bowling, and he died August 20, 1878; Marilla, March 12, 1848, married December 19, 1866, to J. Q. Evans, resides in Cheshire; John M., March 22, 1850, married April 11, 1874, to Milessa Butcher; Derthula, June 1, 1852, married May 10, 1882, to Clement Hooper, of Athens, Ohio; Albert A., October 27, 1854, married April 7, 1880, to Susan S. Kent; Annie E., June 24, 1857, resides at home; Jennie E., April 22, 1859, resides at home; Luella, August 25, 1861, married February 15, 1882, to James L. Butcher, resides in Cheshire township; Abie M., May 26, 1864, died August 26, 1864; Minnie A., January 25, 1867, resides at home. The parents of Mr. Coughenour were Christian and Margaret (Dice) Coughenour, who came to this county in 1830 from Augusta county, Virginia. His father died January 1, 1873, aged 87 years, and his mother October 11, 1859, 67 years old. The parents of Mr. Coughenour are Jonas and Esther S. McCarty, who came to this county in 1800 from Greenbrier county, Virginia. Her father died May 28, 1852, and her mother, who was born March 23, 1791, is still living, in good health, in Cheshire township at the age of 91 years. Mr. David Coughenour has accumulated a very pleasant and comfortable home, consisting of 140 acres of which thirty contain coal, the balance being principally bottom land. He is an earnest worker in the Baptist church. Besides attending to his farm duties he is engaged in milling, and also in stock-raising. The date of his arrival in this county is 1830. His address is Cheshire, Gallia county, Ohio.  [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Isaiah Coughenour
Was born in Augusta county, Virginia, January 14, 1808. His father, Christian Coughenour, came to this county from Eastern Virginia in 1830. Jacob Coughenour, father of Christina, was married to a Miss Kline, of Pennsylvania. The mother of Isaiah was Margaret (Dice) Coughenour. Her father's name was Christian Dice, and he was married to Margaret Reed, of Pennsylvania. Isaiah Coughenour was married to Margaret Swisher, in Rockbridge county, Virginia, June 4, 1828. She was born in that county July 24, 1810. She is a daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Harry) Swisher. The following comprise the family of Mr. Coughenour: Washington, born December 15, 1829, resides in this township; John, February 19, 1832, resides in this township; William, September 21, 1834, resides in Missouri; Mary, December 24, 1837, resides in this township; Martin V., September 12, 1840, resides in this township; Selah F., December 7, 1843, resides in Cheshire township; Harriet, April 11, 1847, resides in this township; Margaret, January 14, 1849, died August 3, 1849; Melissa, January 24, 1851, resides in Cheshire township; Perry, May 11, 1857, resides at home. Mr. Coughenour had a farm of about 600 acres, which he has divided between his children, and all are comfortably located around him but William, who lives in Missouri. Mr. Coughenour has been a member of the Freewill Baptist church for a great many years, and has filled the office of clerk for a considerable time. He has attained his seventy-fifth year, and is respected by all classes of citizens. He filled the office of township assessor for three years, in 1872-3-4. He had two sons in the war of 1861: Martin and Selah. Martin served three years, until the close of the war, and Selah was in the 100-day service. Mr. Coughenour has retired from attending to the duties of a farm. His postoffice address is Malaby, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Jacob Coughenour
Was born in Augusta county, Virginia, December 5, 181, and came to this county October 20, 1830, the trip occupying fourteen days. He located in Cheshire township where he engaged in farming, and now has accumulated a splendid property. Located on his farm is a coal mine, turning out from forty to sixty tons a day, on which Mr. Coughenour receives a royalty of one-half cent per bushel. The mine is operated by C. A. Carl under a lease. The number of acres in the farm is 240,100 of which are unmined coal, and 140 farming land. It is located on the county line of Meigs county. Among the relcs located on the farm is the grave-stone of George Washington Putnam, who was buried here in 1812, having come here from Brooklyn, Connecticut, a number of years before. The parents of Mr. Coughenour are Christian and Margaret (Dice) Coughenour, who settled in this county in 1830. Jacob Coughenour was married in Cheshire, on his farm, September 26, 1839, to Ann Rothgeb, who was born in Page county, Virginia, October 2, 1815. She is a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Spitler) Rothgeb, settlers of this county in 1828. The children of Mr. Coughenour are: Charlotte, born July 8, 1840, died March 22, 1876; Mary M., February 4, 1842, married to Wesley King, and lives in in Cass county, Missouri; Samantha, February 4, 1844, married to G. W. Bing, resides in Addison; Esther Ann, February 14, 1846, died March 11, 1854; Orin, September 15, 1848, married February 3, 1878, and resides in Cass county, Missouri; Joseph C., January 19, 1851, was married to L. E. Morton, who died January 18, 1879 - Joseph C., resides at home; John J., July 31, 1853, was married November 24, 1880, to Miss S. J. Swanson, and resides on his father's farm; Laura A., May 2, 1856, resides at home; Lela E., September 28, 1859, resides at home. Mr. Coughenour has held the office of county commissioner for three years, trustee of Cheshire township for two terms, and he is also a member of the board of trustees of Rio Grande College. He was one of the four abolitionists who first east their votes in Cheshire township. Mr. Coughenour is a considerable raiser of stock. His postoffice address is Cheshire, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Francis Cousins
Was born in the State of Virginia November 7, 1811. His parents were John and Lizzie (Anderson) Cousins. On the 5th day of April, 1853, Francis united his fortunes for life with Pantha (Mayhew) Liggens, who resided in the state of North Carolina. The fruit of this marriage is but one child, Annie E., who was born on the 25th day of January, 1871, and resides in Gallia county, Ohio. Mrs. Cousins was born in Hallifax county, North Carolina, on the 5th day of August, 1826. She is the daughter of John and Betsey Mayhew, of that State. Francis Cousins is a merchant by profession, and is exceedingly industrious and attentive to business. He first settled in Gallia county in 1857, and has since been identified with its best interests. His postoffice address is Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Daniel Coverston
A farmer and miller of Springfield township, was born in Shenandoah county, Virginia, October 2, 1805, and came to this county with his wife and three oldest children in 1835.  His parents are Jacob and Elizabeth (Miller) Coverston.  Elizabeth, his wife, was born in Shenandoah county, Virginia, November 7, 1811, and is a daughter of Jacob and Margaret (Hisey) Niswander.  They were married in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, May 8, 1828.  Eight children are the result of this union:  Franklin, born January 25, 1830, died April 5, 1848; Silas, March 9, 1832, lives in Gallia county; Samuel A., March 3, 1834, died April 19, 1864; Lucy A. (Frederick), August 13, 1836, resides in Gallia county; Mary E. (Davis) January 5, 1839, lives in Gallia county; Caroline J., March 19, 1841, died April 29, 1844; William H., June 7, 1843, died March 31, 1844; Rebecca L., August 16, 1846, resides at home.  His wife died August 31, 1877.  Mr. Coverston's son, Samuel A., served in the late war, enlisting in 1863, in the Trumbull Guards.  They were stationed at Gallipolis and engaged in provost duty.  He took sick while in service and returned home on a sick furlough, and died April 19, 1864.  Address Mr. David Coverston at Rodney post office, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardestty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


William Craig
Was born in Ohio, June 1, 1829. He is a son of James and Elizabeth (Kitts) Craig, and settled in this county in 1857. In Washington county, Ohio, May 4, 1848, Hannah Coon became the wife of William Craig. Her birth took place in Woodsfield, Monroe county, Ohio, May 14, 1828, and she is a daughter of Coonrod Coon, who was born in 1802, and Nancy A. Coon. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Craig are: Robert, born March 13, 1849, resides in Ohio township; John W., November 4, 1850, in Ohio township; Amanda A., January 30, 1853, died June 17, 1871; Augusta Woolford, March 19, 1856, in Ohio township; Mary E., October 13, 1859, in Ohio township; William W., June 5, 1861, in Missouri; Elonidas, May 18, 1865; Lucy, January 25, 1867; Thomas, January 29, 1871 - the last three reside at home. Mr. Craig is a farmer residing in Ohio township, and his postoffice address is Bush's Mill, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Charles Creuzet
Charles Creuzet was born in the city of Lyons, France, May 15th, 1793, and came to this country in 1803, at ten years of age, landing in New York. In the same ship, and of the same party, came Genevieve Pistor, who afterward became his wife. From 1803 to 1817 hi lived in New York and Baltimore, and made several trips to the West Indies, where his mother was then living. He volunteered and served in the defence [sic] of Baltimore when that city was threatened by the British during the war of 1812. In 1817 he was married in New York city, [sic] and at once started for the West, accompanied by his wife and her mother and family. Of the latter was the sister of Mrs. Cruezet, Mrs. Margaret Menager, who is still an honored resident of Gallipolis – the last one of those who crossed the ocean together and sought a home here. At Pittsburgh he embarked in a flatboat, and landing at Gallipolis, was induced to remain.
Here he lived all his life, and from 1825 in the same house. He engaged in mercantile pursuits in which he prospered. Later he became interested in manufacturing, and by careful and skillful management built up a large business, retiring from active life in 1863. He was enterprising and liberal, sympathetic and kind to the unfortunate, and rich in all those qualities which are the elements of complete manhood.
It was probably not until after his death that the great charity and unostentatious benevolence of the man was fully appreciated. He was never known to bestow anything for the sake of personal aggrandizement, or for gaining popularity. His favors were granted in a manner such that the recipients knew not whence they came, until by after investigation conclusive evidence was, without his knowledge, gained of their source. A score or more of men in this vicinity who are now enjoying the comforts of an ample fortune, testify to the fact that they owe it all to the unexampled and disinterested kindness of mr. Creuzet, who was a friend in the time of need.
It is sufficient to say of his wife, that, in all those noble benevolent attributes for which he was distinguished, she was fully equal. Mr. Creuzet died at Gallipolis, on Saturday evening, July 31st, 1880, aged 87 years. His wife died February 17th, 1870, aged 77 years.
[SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardestty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]

 



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