Genealogy Trails - Finding Ancestors wherever their trails led
Gallia County, Ohio

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Biographies
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William L Garlic
William L Garlic and Emily Wise were married in Gallia county, Ohio, September 24, 1876. He is a native of Guyan township, born November 28, 1842, and his wife was born in Monroe county, Ohio, September 4, 1845. They have one child, Lelie C., born June 24, 1877. The parents of Mr. Garlic are William and Susan (Sheets) Garlic. Mr. Garlic was elected to the office of justice of the peace in 1877, and he is still acting in that capacity. Jonathan and Martha (Antill) Wise are the parents of Mrs. Garlic. The step-father of Mr. Garlic, William J. Sanders, was a soldier in the war of the rebellion; he enlisted for three years, and died in the service, at Ashland, Kentucky. Mr. Garlic's farm is located in Guyan township. His address is Saundersville, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


David M Gates
David M Gates - and Mahala B. Armstrong were married in Patriot, Gallia county, in April, 1842. They have had thirteen children: Jerusha A., born April 27, 1843, resides in Douglas county, Illinois; Mary E., May 5, 1845, died November 2, 1872; James R., June 27, 1846, resides in Douglas county, Illinois; Minerva C., February 3, 1848, lives in Walnut township; Joseph P., July 10, 1849, lives in Champaign county, Illinois; Stephen, January 27, 1851, resides in Champaign county, Illinois; Albert V., December 1, 1853; John M., January 29, 1856, resides in this township; Howard M., March 22, 1858, lives in Champaign county, Illinois; Irene C., April 2, 1860, at home; Alice L., April 1, 1861, resides in this township; Franklin S., February 14, 1863, at home; Anna B. B., June 2, 1865, at home. Mr. Gates was born in Perry township, Gallia county, Ohio, December 8, 1816. Mr. Gates was born in Perry township, Gallia county, Ohio, December 8, 1816. He is a son of Stephen and Jerusha (Perry) Gates, who settled here at an early date. His wife was born in Walnut township, Gallia county, June 7, 1822, and was the daughter of Loudon and Berthsheba (Ray) Armstrong, who also came to this county at an early date. Mrs. Gates died September 2, 1872. Mr. Gates' son, James R., served in the 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in the late war, for one year, and was discharged honorably. Mr. Gates has held the office of trustee and land appraiser. His business is farming and stock-raising. Address, Patriot, Gallia county, Ohio.  [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


William W. Gates, Jr.; William W. Gates, Sr.; Samuel Haskell Gates;
Numbered among the representative business men of the City of Portsmouth. Scioto County, Mr. Gates is here the treasurer of the Irving Drew Shoe Company, which is successfully engaged in the manufacturing of shoes and which represents one of the important industrial enterprises of the city.
Mr. Gates is a scion of a family that was founded in Ohio in the early pioneer days and that found representation in New England in the colonial era of our national history. On a farm one-fourth of a mile distant from the Village of Cheshire, Gallia County, Ohio, William W. Gates, Jr., was born on the 13th of March, 1863, and the place of his nativity was a house that had there been erected by his paternal grandfather, he is a son of William W. and Alvina Elizabeth (Nye) Gates.
William W. Gates, Sr., was born on a pioneer farmstead in the immediate vicinity of Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, on the 16th of October, 1827, and is a son of Samuel Haskell Gates, who was born in the Town of Kingston, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, on the 3d of September, 1792. The latter was a son of John Gates, who became the founder of the family in Ohio, to which state he came in the early part of the nineteenth century and numbered himself among the pioneer settlers of Washington County. There he purchased a tract of heavily timbered land and instituted the reclamation of a farm, this old homestead being situated about one mile northeast of the site of the present courthouse in the City of Marietta. His original domicile was a log cabin, sixteen fe.et square, with chimney constructed of sticks and mud and with the expansive fireplace that served both for warming and cooking purposes, a pony having been used in dragging the mammoth backlogs into the little building and making them ready for the fireplace. This primitive house continued to be the family home for several years and then a more pretentious structure was provided, though the latter also had no semblance of modern architecture and facilities. John Gates was a man of strong mental and physical power and great sincerity and force of character. He was a deep Bible student and devout Christian worker, and though not regularly ordained he was often called upon to serve as a local preacher. He was one of the influential and honored pioneers of Washington County and there both he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives at Marietta, the maiden name of the latter having been Haskell.

Samuel Haskell Gates, grandfather of him whose name initiates this article, was a youth at the time of the family removal from Massachusetts to the pioneer wilds of Ohio, and he and his brother Eben succeeded eventually to the ownership of their father's old homestead farm, upon which they erected a substantial two-story house of hewed logs, near the site of the original cabin. In Washington County he learned the trade of cooper, which he successfully followed in connection with his farming industry. Later he purchased another farm in the same vicinity and there he continued to reside until 1835, when he sold the property and removed to Gallia County. In the spring of 1836 he purchased a tract of land in Cheshire Township, where he reclaimed a productive farm and in Gallia County he became also a successful dealer in farm produce, which he transported by flat-boats down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans, in which city he found a profitable market for his produce, besides selling his boats, which were virtually impossible of the return navigation up the river. He made the return voyage to his home by means of the old-time packet steamboats, and he continued to reside on his old homestead in Gallia County until his death, which occurred March 23, 1847. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Wheeler, was born at Rutland, Vermont, and was a daughter of John Wheeler, who set forth for Ohio in company with his family, the household effects having been loaded on a sloop for transportation by the Great Lakes, but disaster having overtaken the little vessel; so that the goods of the sturdy pioneer was lost. Upon his arrival in Ohio Mr. Wheeler established the family home in Licking County, where he passed the residue of his life. Mrs. Mary (Wheeler) Gates survived her husband and was summoned to the life eternal on the 8th of August, 1855, their eight children having been : William W., Henry W., Lucy A., Samuel H., John B., Abbie A.. Harriet C. and Franklin O.
William W. Gates, Sr., was reared to manhood under the sturdy discipline of the home farm and finally he removed with his family from Gallia County to West Virginia, where he remained for a comparatively short period. On his return to Ohio he established his residence in Scioto County, where he leased a farm near Portsmouth and for several years there gave his attention to diversified agriculture and stock- growing. Venerable in years, he lived retired in the City of Portsmouth, secure in the high regard of all who knew him until his death, July 7, 1915. His wife was born on a farm near Pomeroy, Meigs County, Ohio, and is a daughter of Melzar Nye, who was born at Litchfield, Connecticut, in 1785, a son of Ebenezer Nye, who likewise was a native of Connecticut and who came thence to the Northwest Territory, then including Ohio, in the year 1790. This was soon after the little settlement had been established at historic old Marietta, Ohio, and in the stockade there established as protection against the Indians he and his family resided five years. Later he purchased a tract of land nine miles distant from the now thriving city of Marietta, on the banks of the Muskingum River, and there he resided many years, as one of the sterling pioneers who aided in the social and material development of the Buckeye State in the early stages of its history. He had been a valiant soldier of the Continental Line in the War of the Revolution and he passed the closing period of his long and useful life at Barnesville, Belmont County, where he died in the year 1829. His wife, whose maiden name was Desire Sawyer, had passed to eternal rest in 1800.
Passing the days of his boyhood on the farm,
William W. Gates, Jr., acquired his preliminary education in the district schools and supplemented this by attending the public schools of Portsmouth. At the age of seventeen years he here entered the employ of the Drew-Selby Shoe Company, in various departments of whose factory he gained practical experience in all details of the business. He continued with this concern until the dissolution of the partnership of the principals, in 19O2, and he then became associated with Mr. Drew and others in organizing the Irving Drew Company, of which he became treasurer, an office of which he has been the incumbent from the time of the incorporation of the company. He has been one of the influential factors in the development of the large and substantial business of the company and is known as an able executive as well as a man of broad and accurate knowledge of the practical details of the industrial enterprise with which he is identified.
Mr. Gates is not only one of the substantial business men and liberal and progressive citizens of Portsmouth but has also ordered his life in such a way as to merit and receive the confidence and esteem of all with whom he has come in contact. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and both he and his wife are members of the Second Presbyterian Church in their home city, he having served for more than a decade past as superintendent of its Sunday school.
In the year 1888 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gates to Miss Harriet S. Chick, who was born on a farm in Clay Township, Scioto County, and who is a daughter of Charles and Sarah (Lawson) Chick, the former of whom died in 1877 and the latter in 1910.
[SOURCE: "A Standard History of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio" Volume II (pp. 658-663) Pub. 1916; The Lewis Publishing Co. Transcribed by: Michelle Kennedy Spalding ]

Samuel H Gates, Junior
Is a native of Washington county, Ohio, born October 29, 1832. His parents were Samuel H., senior, and Mary T. (Wheeler) Gates, who came to this county in 1834; they died in March, 1847, and April, 1854, respectively. The father of Samuel H., junior, was one of the pioneer mail-carriers of this county. He carrier the mail from Marietta, Washington county, Ohio, to Gallipolis, Gallia county, on horseback, going around by the way of Jackson. He was a county commissioner of Gallia county at the time of his death, at 54 years of age. Samuel, junior, was married in Gallia county, October 17, 1866, to Frances M. Guthrie; she was born in Gallia county, February 21, 1836. Her parents were Augustus S. and Cynthia A. (Knowles) Guthrie, settlers of this county in 1832; her father died July 11, 1865, and her mother May 8, 1859. Mrs. Gates had a brother, Sidney L. Guthrie, who served in the late war. He enlisted in 1862, in the 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served in the late war. He enlisted in 1862, in the 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served to the close of the war. Mr. Gates is at present serving as school director, and has filled the same office for six years. He is now filling his second term as township trustee. He is a farmer by occupation. His postoffice address Addison, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]



Mons . Jean Gabriel Gervais

Mons. Jean Gabriel Gervais was born in 1764 in Paris. His first visit was to the island of Cuba, and returning to France after accumulating considerable wealth, he came to this country, in 1790, with the French emigrants. The terrible disappointment which they experienced at the deception which had been practiced upon them discouraged him, and he soon went back, but returned again in 1792. From this time until the autumn of 1796, he was variously engaged, remaining most of the time at Gallipolis. He was fond of hunting, a man of excellent culture, and gained some reputation as a poet. He was present at the wedding of General Newsome, an old resident of Gallipolis, and the next morning composed and presented to the town a poem, written in answer to a question which came up the previous evening, which was long sung and admired by the French, and is yet extant.
He was one who was most influential in procuring the 25,200 acres from Congress for the French settlers; was the bearer of the petition, and his valuable and efficient services were recognized by an award of 4,000 acres in addition to the 217-1/2 acres which were allotted to each. As the grant was awarded upon the condition that a settlement should be made within a specified time, M. Gervais settled upon his land for that purpose, erecting shanties in the fall of 1796, for the reception of his effects the following March, when he started for this new home, in company with Mons. Duduit, Bertrand, Lacroix and Duteil, landing at the grant on the 21st. He was at Gallipolis when the news of the proclamation of peace arrived, and celebrated the occasion by a grand display of sky-rockets of his own manufacture. He was fond of music and dancing, and a fiddle for which he paid fifty dollars, brought from Paris, and used by him for many years, is exhibited by the descendants of General Newsom.
The village of Burrsburg, now Haverhill, was laid out as a town in 1806, by M. Gervais, who employed M. LeClercq, the subject of a preceding sketch, as surveyor. He sold his lot of 4,000 acres in two parcels – 200 acres to P. S. Duponceau, the lawyer employed by him at Phiadelphia in obtaining the grant, for $600, September 23, 1805; the balance, 3,800 acres, May 26th, 1806, to a Yankee named Samuel Hunt, for two dollars per acre, and also his grant of 217-1/2 acres. The land for which he received about $8,750, is now worth over a quarter of a million.
After selling his land he spent the remainder of his sojourn in America at Gallipolis, in the society of his old friends. He deposited his money with Mr. Menager, a merchant, for safe-keeping, receiving his board for the use of it, and agreeing to give six months’ notice when it would be required. He continued to reside here until June 1817, when he returned to the land of his birth. Before leaving he presented his horse, which he loved and valued very highly to E. S. Menager. He died, unmarried, at Paris, in 1824, aged 60 years.
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SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882. St. Peter's Episcopal Church (Gallipolis, Ohio)]

Columbus C Ghrist
Son of Peter W. and Maria (Morton) Ghrist was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, January 15, 1846, settled in this county in 1866. His business is farming and mining. He was united in marriage with Mary Jane, daughter of Nathan and Ida (Blankenship) Earwood, in Gallia county, May 24, 1866. She was born in Gallia county June 23, 1848. Her parents settled in this county in 1818. Nine children blessed their marriage: Nathan E., born March 7, 1867, resides at home; Oliver P., September 22, 1868, resides at home; Peter W., April 2, 1870, lives in Lawrence county, Ohio; Sophronia L., February 5, 1872, lives in Gallia county; Roena, March 23, 1874 died the same day; Millard C., October 1, 1875, resides at home; John S., April 2, 1878, resides at home; Nettie E., August 16, 1880, died August 6, 1881; Columbus C., May 18, 1882, resides at home. He served in the 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery eighteen months, was promoted from the ranks to first lieutenant of Company K, 5th Tennessee Mounted Infantry, and served to the end of the war, participating in the engagements of Strawberry Plain, Mossy Creek, Bull's Gap, Carter's Station, Bean Station, Knoxville, and several other engagements. He was elected township clerk in 1881 and 1882. Address, Thivener, Clay township, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Henry Austin Gillette
Physician in Eureka, Clay township came to this county in 1870. He was born in Rome township, Lawrence county, Ohio, April 8, 1839. His father, Alanson Gillette, was born in Schenectady county, New York, August, 1802, and lives in Rome township, Lawrence county, Ohio. His mother, Sarah F. (Radford) Gillette, was born in Somersetshire, England, June 12, 1812, and died February 26, 1866. He was united in marriage with Anna D., daughter of Alexander B. and Amanda F. (Moss) Sollers, in Clay township, Gallia county, Ohio, November 27, 1862. She was born in Jefferson county, Kentucky, August 2, 1845, and has had only one child: Effie A., born November 9, 1863, who lives at home. Dr. Gillette held the office of corporation clerk from 1877 to 1879. He has also been a member of the school board for six years, from 1876 to 1882. Postoffice address is, Eureka, Gallia county, Ohio.  [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


David Glassburn
Was born in this county January 28, 1805, and was the first white child born in Springfield township. His parents, John and Mary (Richerdson) Glassburn, were among the first settlers in the county, settling here in 1804, and possessing one horse, a cow and gun. David Glassburn was united in marriage with Polly, daughter of Phineas and Catherin (Lasley) Sawyer, in Gallia county, June 2, 1831. She was born in this county, December 2, 1810, and died December 26, 1853. Her parents settled in 1804. Their family consisted of seven children: Mary C. (Prefftzs), born August 29, 1832, lives in this county; Lewis, March 14, 1834, resides in Illinois; Daniel, June 24, 1837, lives in Gallia county; Nathanial, January 10, 1839, lives in Gallia county; Arius and Alonzo, twins, March 27, 1842, the former residing in Nebraska, the latter died August 8, 1864; L., March 11, 1844, resides in this county. Mr. Glassburn held the office of supervisor for about twenty-eight years. He is now occupied at farming. Address Heatly Post office, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardesty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]



James Glassburn
Is a native of this county, born February 6, 1818. He is a son of David and Rachel (Fox) Glassburn, who settled in Gallia county in 1816. Mr. Glassburn's first marriage was to Rebecca Russell, in this county, October 28, 1841. She was a daughter of William and Susan (Denney) Russell, and was born March 10, 181, and died June 20, 1874, leaving her husband and the following children: Charles L., born August 19, 1842, died October 12, 1868; Louisa E., October 28, 1843, died July 2, 1863; Lemuel P., June 4, 1845, resides in the State of Nebraska; Emily C., February 5, 1847, resides in Pike county, Ohio; Lucretia J., August 10, 1849, died August 3, 1850; Amos B., June 21, 1851, resides in Mason county, Virginia; Amanda M., October 2, 1853, died July 14, 1854; Silvanus D., July 11, 1856, died June 20, 1882; Sarah A., July 19, 1860, died May 23, 1869; Rosa D., an adopted child, May 12, 1865, resides at home. The second wife of Mr. Glassburn is Asenith E. Denney, who was born in this county August 25, 1843. They were married by the Reverent Hiram Howe, in this county, September 24, 1874. She is a daughter of Lewis and Philisty (Lachlair) Denney, settlers of this county in 1814. She is the mother of the following children: Clara P., born July 7, 1875; Laura I., September 7, 1877, died September 28, 1877; Arthur J., September 16, 1878. Mr. Glassburn is a resident of Raccoon township, and is a farmer. His address is Harris, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardesty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


John S. Goldcamp
It was well within the province of the ambition and individual powers of the late John S. Goldcamp to give to the world assurance of large and worthy achievement and to so order his course as to leave a reputation untarnished and a memory that is revered by those who came within the compass of his generous and kindly influence. Mr. Goldcamp was a native of Ohio and a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of this favored commonwealth, which it was given him to dignify and honor by his character and achievement. He was one of the prominent and influential citizens of Ironton, the metropolis and capital of Lawrence County, for many years prior to his death, which here occurred on March 5, 1909. In according to him a brief tribute in this publication it is found expedient to reproduce the gracious estimate published in an Ironton newspaper at the time of his death, but in perpetuating the article certain paraphrase and minor eliminations arc indulged, to make the data more nearly in consonance with the specific functions of this history.
"Death is, indeed, laying a heavy hand upon Ironton, and is gathering many of her most prominent, honorable and influential citizens. The last to be laid low by the Grim Reaper, who is no respector of age or person, was John S. Goldcamp, whose name was known throughout the city as a synonym of honesty, sobriety, industry and all that the term 'good citizenship' implies. His eyes closed in everlasting sleep Tuesday night, at five minutes past ten o'clock, and the end came as peacefully and sweetly as could be. As gently as the breath of spring his pure spirit fled his weary body, and, with scarcely a noticeable throb, his big heart was stilled—and John S. Goldcamp was no more. When the final summons came, his bedside was surrounded by his devoted wife and his loving children, with their wives and husbands, a suitable end for one who loved his family as did he. What a genuine sorrow this announcement will cause throughout the city! John S. Goldcamp was a man honored and respected by all and was a citizen whom the city can ill afford to lose.
"While Mr. Goldcamp's death will cause universal regret throughout Ironton and Lawrence county, it came not as a surprise, for he had been in impaired health for the past five years and his condition had been most grave for the last week. His death was due to diabetes.
"John Stephen Goldcamp was born at Pine Grove, Gallia county, Ohio, on the 15th of May, 1840, and resided there until he reached manhood's estate. On the 12th of February, 1861, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Elizabeth Frische, who was spared to care for him. during his declining years as only a true and loving wife can. In 1862 Mr. Goldcamp and his family removed to Ironton, where he resided until his death, save for one year passed at Lawrence Furnace. When Mr. Goldcamp came to Ironton he was employed as a contractor for shipping iron, but later he succeeded his father in the milling business. In March, 1887, Mr. Goldeamp organized the Goldcamp Milling Company, of which he was president and a director from its inception until his death. He was also president and a director of the Hannan-Cowden Dry Goods Company, the name of which was changed to the Bauer Dry Goods Company only a few days prior to his death. For many years Mr. Goldcamp was a member of the directorate of the First National Bank of Ironton and he was closely connected with and financially interested in many of the city's prominent business and industrial enterprises.
"Mr. Goldcamp had no political aspirations, being content to do what he could for his fellow-citizens in his own quiet, unassuming way, but, in deference to the wishes of his friends, he served for six years as a member of the city council, with credit to himself and the municipality. He was a Democrat in his political adherency and was a zealous communicant and liberal supporter of St. Joseph Catholic church, where his funeral services were held."
The widow of Mr. Goldcamp still survives him and is one of the loved and gracious women of Ironton. Of the twelve children nine are living—Frank, F. J. and Mrs. Edward F. Hannan, of Ironton; Mrs. James S. McJoint, of Norwood, a suburb of the City of Cincinnati, Ohio; Mrs. Hugh J. Loder, John X. and Mrs. Fred M. McPherson, of Iron Gate, Virginia; Mrs. William D. Crossing, of Columbus, Ohio; and Miss Victoria, who remains at the old homestead with her widowed mother.
[SOURCE: "A Standard History of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio" Volume II (pp. 682-685); Pub. 1916; The Lewis Publishing Co. Transcribed by: Michelle Kennedy Spalding]


James R Gothard
James R Gothard and Mary J. Smith were married in Gallia county, Ohio, March 3, 1880. They have one child, Charles, born January, 1881. Mr. Gothard was born in this county January 16, 1852, and his wife is a native of Noble county, Ohio, born November 28, 1859. John R., and Rachel A. (Clark) Gothard are the parents of the subject of this sketch. They came to this county about 1850. The parents of Mrs. Gothard are James and Elizabeth (Wise) Smith. Mr. Gothard is a manufacturer of wagons and buggies, and is also engaged in blacksmithing. He warrants all his work. His postoffice address is Crown City, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


William D Graham
Son of Reuben and Nancy Graham, was born in Eureka, Gallia county, October 18, 1839. He is a farmer and has been married twice. His first wife was Martha E. McCormack, born in this county in 1842, and died in 1870. She was a daughter of John and Sarah E. McCormack. She had one child: Clara A., born January 12, 1864. He married his second wife, Laura F. (Riggs), daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth M. (Guthrie) Riggs, in Clay township, November 19, 1872. She was born in Clay township, May 20, 1849. They had three children, as follows: still-born baby, born May 14, 1874; John E., July 22, 1875; Fred R., January 24, 1881, born live in Clay township. His father was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia. His mother's maiden name was Hutsinpiller, and she was born in Greenbrier county, Virginia. Postoffice address, Eureka, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Harry C. Grayum
Grayum Harry C., St Paul. Res 160 E Congress st, office 360 Jackson st. Manufacturer's agent. Born May 31, 1864 in Gallipolis, O, son of Henry and Mary E (Day) Grayum. Married Sept 22, 1892 to Ida M Mample. Educated in the graded schools of Gallipolis, O and private school of Evergreen O. Engaged in railroad work at the age of eighteen; moved to St Paul 1890 and was employed with the Edison Electric Light & Power Co as engineer and electrician until 1905. Now St Paul representative of H W Johns-Manville Co of Milwaukee. Member of Masonic order. [Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ. 1907 Transcribed by Nancy Overlander]


Henry Grayum
Deceased January 26, 1877. He was united in marriage to Mary E. Day in this county, June 12, 1854. She was born in the same county June 8, 1835, and her parents are Hamilton and Cynthia A. (Hall) Day. The former was born in this county in 1810, and the latter in Mason county, West Virginia, in 1812. Mr. Grayum, son of Joseph and Mary (Entsminger) Grayum, was born in this county November 14, 1818. He is the father of eight children, namely: Cynthia E. (Cherrington), born August 31, 1856, resides in Gallia county; Joseph E., February 10, 1857, resides at home; Esther M., December 12, 1859, resides at home; Mattie A. M., August 20, 1861, resides at home; Harry U., May 30, 1864, resides at home; William G., November 14, 1867, resides at home; Howard R., October 18, 1872, died July 3, 1873, Edna E., July 19, 1874, resides at home. Mr. Grayum and his brother William were in the late war, William enlisting in Gallipolis, Gallia county, in Company G, 4th Virginia Volunteer Infantry, 1861, Mr. Grayum being captain of this company, which he former at Mason, West Virginia. He was wounded at the battle of Vicksburg, May 19, 1863, and returned home on a furlough, remaining about two months, when he joined his regiment again, and was appointed major to fill the vacancy of the former major who had been killed in battle. He served as major about fourteen months, when he was compelled to resign and return home on account of the wound he received in the battle of Vicksburg. William, soon after enlisting, was appointed lieutenant of Company G, and after the battle of Vicksburg was appointed captain, serving to the close of the war, when he resigned and returned home. Mr. Grayum has held the following offices: township trustee, United States revenue collector one term; county surveyor, three terms, until his death. He also held several other offices. His occupation was that of a civil engineer. His widow, Mary Grayum's post office address is Kerr, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardesty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


Alonzo J Green
Is the son of Oliver H. and Margaret A. (Lasher) Green, and was born in Madison, Indiana, October 3, 1845. Coming to Gallipolis in 1876, where he is engaged as an attorney-at-law. His father is deceased. Mr. Green was city solicitor of Gallipolis, from April 1, 1879, to April 1, 1881. He was married to Sarah P. Parker, who is deceased, and by whom he had the following children: Norma P., born April 23, 1871; William O., March 2, 1873, died March 22, 1873. The second wife of Mr. Green is Julia C. Shaw, who was born in Salem, Meigs county, Ohio, November 29, 1852. Her children are: Lynn C., February 5, 1875; and Edna S., December 23, 1876. Her parents are Jaben and Elizabeth (McClure) Shaw. The father of Mr. Green was a soldier in the late war, a sergeant in the 13th Indiana Battery, and was killed at Hartsville, Tennessee, December 7, 1862. Alonzo J. Green was a private in the 13th Indiana Battery from December 16, 1861, to January 13, 1863; he then enlisted as a private in the 2d West Virginia Volunteer Cavalry Company A, and was taken prisoner at Lynchburg, Virginia, June 17, 1864, and was confined at Andersonville Prison, Georgia, and discharged at Wheeling, June 30, 1865. The postoffice address of Mr. Green is Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Griffith D Griffiths
Was born in Cardiganshire, Wales, in March, 1804. He settled in Gallia county in 1845. His parents, David and Sarah Griffiths, died in Wales. Mr. Griffiths has been thrice married, and has a family of nine children. His first wife was Elizabeth Davies, and she was mother of the following children: David, born March 26, 1831, resides in Perry township; Mary, in 1833, resides in Kansas; Sarah, January 28, 1836, resides in Perry township; Elizabeth, in 1838, resides in Jackson county, Ohio. Mary Davies was the second wife of Mr. Griffiths, and she was the mother of one child, who is deceased. The present wife of Mr. Griffiths is Margaret Herbert, who was born in Cardiganshire, Wales, in March, 1840. They were married in Perry township, in July, 1867; Rachel G., April 28, 1873; Samuel, February 7, 1875; Annie, March 30, 1877; they all reside at home. The parents of Mrs. Griffiths are David and Mary (Evans) Herbert. Her mother is deceased, and her father lives in Wales. Mr. Griffiths is engaged in farming in Perry township. His address is Cora, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


John Colby Gross
John Colby Gross and Catherine J. Fulton were married in Gallia county, Ohio, June 1, 1854. They are both natives of this county; he was born November 20, 1832, and his wife July 20, 1833. He is engaged in merchandising and is also a farmer. His parents, Jacob and Lydia (Rife) Gross, were among the early settlers of this county, settling here in 1812. The parents of Mrs. Gross also came here when the county was a wilderness, in 1805. Their names are James and Esther (Sawyer) Fulton. The following are the children of Mr. Gross: Alphins A., born December 3, 1855, died September 15, 1856; Laura E. (Smith), July 23, 1857, resides in Rio Grande; John Charles, December 12, 1858; Lewis E., October 31, 1861; Howard F., July 25, 1869; Lydia S., July 27, 1872. The last four reside at home. Mr. Gross was a soldier in the late war. He enlisted in 1861 in the 55th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and reenlisted in the same regiment in 1864; he was promoted to commissary sergeant of his regiment in 1863; he served four years and three months, and participated in the following battles: Fort Donelson, Pittsburg Landing, siege of Corinth, in the White River and Yazoo Pass expeditions, battles of Jackson, Champion Hill, and the siege of Vicksburg under General Grant. He was also in the Red river expedition under Banks, and in other engagements. Two of his brothers also served in the war; Abner Gross enlisted in 1861 in the 56th Ohio Volunteer infantry, and was discharged for disability January 17, 1863; Martin Gross was a member of the 2d Ohio Heavy Artillery, and served three years. Mr. Gross has been a republican since he has been old enough to vote, and he is also a member of the Temperance, Law and Order party, having attended the meeting held at Columbus, Ohio, in March, 1882, in the interest of that party. Both himself and wife have been members of the Freewill Baptist church since 1854. The postoffice address of Mr. Gross is Rio Grande, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: "History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c"; James P. Averill; Hardesty & Co., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882]


Martin R Gross
Was born in Gallia county, Ohio, August 17, 1844. He is a son of Jacob and Lydia (Rife) Gross, the latter of whom is deceased. Mr. Gross' father settled in this county in 1811. Eliza E. Gates became the wife of Mr. Gross in Wood county, West Virginia, October 4, 1866. She is a daughter of Thompson and Sarah (Gould) Gates, both of whom are deceased. Mrs. Gross was born in Wood county, West Virginia, August 2, 1841. She is the mother of the following children: Lottie M., born December 11, 1867, resides in Gallipolis; Edwin E., April 17, 1879, resides in Gallipolis; Marion E., October 25, 1872, deceased; Herbert S., July 29, 1877; Bernice W., February 2, 1880. Mr. Gross was a soldier in the late war, enlisting on the 22d of July, 1862, in Battery F, Second Ohio Heavy Artillery; he served to the close of the war, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee, August 29, 1865, and was honorably discharged at Camp Chase, Ohio. Martin R. Gross is the senior partner of the firm of M. R. Gross & County., undertakers, No. 59 State street, four doors north of postoffice. Calls from the city or country are promptly attended to; two elegant hearses are always in readiness for funerals, and their charges are moderate. Night calls are answered at the residence of Mr. Gross, corner Fourth and Cedar streets, and at Jeffers' livery stable. They also deal in wall paper, baby carriages, etc. All communications should be addressed to Gallipolis, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


William H Grover
Is a farmer and stock-dealer, residing in Cheshire township, where he has a farm of 200 acres, ninety of which is coal. He was born in Essex county, Massachusetts, April 2, 1818, and came to this county from there in 1820. His parents are deceased. The first wife of Mr. Grover was Elizabeth Catherin Weekes, who was born in London, England, in 1812, and died in the fifty-fourth year of her age. She was mother of the following children: John R., born February 17, 1838, resides in this township; William B., in June, 1841, resides in this township; Mary M., in May, 1844, married and lives in Gallipolis; E. Catherine Price, March 26, 1847; Sophia E.. January 31, 1849, married to Dr. A. J. McCann, died May 31, 1880, of consumption; Thomas E. W., July 11, 1853, resides in Glenwood, West Virginia, where he is practicing medicine. The present wife of Mr. Grover is Sarah Williams, who was born in New Haven, Connecticut, September 13, 1833. They were married in Rutland township, Meigs county, January 23, 1867. They have had one child, Eliza, who is deceased. The parents of Mrs. Grover are Hezekiah P. and Eliza (Allen) Williams. They are both natives of Connecticut, both in 1802 and 1800 respectively, they came to this county in 1836. Mr. Grover had two sons in the late war. W. B. and J. R. served all through the service with much credit, and received their honorable discharge at its close. A brother of Mr. Grover died of measles while in the service of the government. The address of Mr. Grover is Kyger, Gallia county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Charles A Guthrie
Has an interesting genealogy. Previous to the revolutionary war, about 1705, three brothers named Robert, James and John Guthrie came to America from Scotland. John settled in Litchfield county, Connecticut. His third son, Joseph, was married in that county, in 1795, and moved to Newberry settlement, Washington county, Ohio, where they made their home in a block house. He died in 1808. By a marriage previous to this he had two sons, Abagail and Truman. The last named came to Ohio July 1, 1788, and in the fall of that year he returned to Connecticut, where he remained a year, returning to Ohio the next summer. On his route he stopped at Yohagany river, Pennsylvania, where he helped in the harvest, and received as part pay a peck of wheat, which he brought on the saddle behind him to Warmer, Washington, county, Ohio, on the Muskingum river, where he sowed it, covering it with a hoe, and from this seed sprang the first wheat grown in Ohio. He was married to Elizabeth stone in 1796, and Charles Lysander Guthrie, the father of the subject of this sketch, was one of his sons, there being a family of seven boys. Charles L. settled in Cheshire township in 1835. He was born September 16, 1806, and was married to Almira Dunham, who was born November 20, 1812. They are both still alive, and reside in this township. Charles A. Guthrie was born in Cheshire township April 15, 1840. He was behind the counter as a clerk, book-keeper and partner in a general supply store for fifteen years. He was also interested in a flouring mill. In 1871 he went to Nebraska on a prospecting tour, returning in about two months, when he bought and settled on a part of the old Lindsey homestead, situated on Story's run, three miles west of the Ohio river. He was married to Sarah Lindsey in this township, April 15, 1863. She is a native of the township, born June 23, 1842. They have the following children: Augustus Lindsey, born February 24, 1866; Almira, November 5, 1867, died November 5, 1872; Homer Hiram, June 3, 1874; Hannah Laura, March 18, 1878. Mr. Guthrie was a soldier in the war of 1861. He enlisted in Company D, 141st Ohio National Guards, and served three months. Mrs. Guthrie's half-brother, James Lindsey, was a member of the 116th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was killed by a shell at Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1865. He left a wife and three children. Mr. Guthrie is interested in stock-raising, beside his farming. His wife's parents are William and Hannah (Lewis) Lindsey. Her father was born July 19, 1793, and her mother March 6, 1798. They came to this county in 1838. The postoffice address of Mr. Guthrie is Middleport Meigs county, Ohio. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]


Truman Guthrie, Senior
Was born in Washington, Litchfield, Connecticut, January 14, 1765; in the spring of 1788 he migrated for the Ohio. After assisting in harvesting in Pennsylvania, he arrived at Marietta on July 3, 1788, and took up his residence there, having a share in the Ohio Company's purchase, also a lot near Mound Cemetery. During the summer he enclosed about haf an acre of ground, made a brush fence around it, and having brought some wheat from Pennsylvania, sowed it, covering it with a hoe, which was the first wheat sown in Ohio. He then returned to Connecticut, and in the spring he and his brother Stephen came to Ohio with a yoke of oxen, a cart and stone tools - among the rest a crowbar, which is in the possession of Mr. Edwin Guthrie, now living on the farm. That summer Truman and Stephen built a log-cabin on the harmer side of the Muskingum, on a lot near where the old steam mill was built. Truman Guthrie, senior, was married to Miss Elizabeth Stone, of Adams, Washington county, Ohio, July 21, 1796 by whom he had seven sons. Following is the genealogy of the Guthrie family, as related to J. H. Guthrie by his father, Truman, in 1840: About the year 1710, Robert and James Guthrie, two brothers, from the north of Scotland, emigrated to the province of Pennsylvania, and soon after John, a younger brother, emigrated to the province of Connecticut, and married a lady by the name of Cone. By this union a family of ten children were raised, viz: John, James, William, Joseph, Ephraim, Ebenezer, Mary, Abagail, Sarah, and Lydis. Joseph, the fourth son in this family, married a widow lady named Cary, whose maiden name was Carpenter. The widow Cary's family consisted of three sons and one daughter. Joseph Guthrie and Mrs. Cary were blessed with two children, Truman and Abagail. The latter died at the age of nineteen from smallpox. Joseph Guthrie married as a second wife the widow Curby, whose maiden name was Hand. The widow Curby's family consisted of one son and three daughters. This marriage was blessed with five children. Two died in infancy; Stephen, Eliza and Joseph being those who survived. Joseph Guthrie married for his third wife, the widow Cogshall, which union was blessed with two daughters, Abagail and amy; both died in infancy. Joseph Guthrie came from Connecticut to Ohio, and settled in Troy, Athens county, where he died May 30, 1808. The following is the genealogy of the Stone branch of this family: John Stone was born in Massachusetts, of Welsh descent; married and raised a family of two sons and five daughters. Israel, the youngest of the family, married Miss Lydia Barrett, and raised a family of children, viz: Sardine, Elizabeth, Matilda, Jasper, Lydia, Augustus, Israel, Franklin, Columbus, Mary and Harnet. Israel Stone married for his second wife the widow Connor, an English lady, by whom he had one son, John Brodherst Stone. [SOURCE: History of Gallia County: Containing A Condensed History of the County; Biographical Sketches; General Statistics, Miscellaneous Matters, &c; James P. Averill; Hardesty & CO., Publishers, Chicago and Toledo. 1882.]




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