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Hancock County, Ohio
Genealogy and History
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Biographies
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ALLEN DORSET, farmer, P. O. Van Buren, was born in what was formerly Cass Township, this county, February 22, 1834, son of David and Rosanna (Weand) Dorsey, natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a farmer and one of the first settlers in Allen Township, this county, and helped organize the township, serving as justice of the peace for several years. He came to this county in 1833, and died in this vicinity. Of his family of seven children who grew to maturity four are now living: George, Allen, Cordelia and Henry; William and James, members, respectively, of the One Hundred and Twenty-third and Twenty-first Regiments, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, were both killed in service during the war of the Rebellion; David, died in Idaho. The father of our subject married, for his second wife, Margaret (Deal) Adams, who is now living in Wood County, Ohio. The subject of this sketch has all his life resided in this county, engaged in farming and stock dealing. He has farm property to the extent of 180 acres, most of which lies in Portage Township, this county. He is a member of Hay wood Lodge, No. 333, I. O. O. F. Mr. Dorsey first married Miss Mary A. Howard, daughter of James Howard, a farmer of this county, and by this union there are two children: Ardinell and Allen D. Our subject's present wife, Margaret J., is a daughter of James McMurray. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


H. WALTER DOTY
DOTY, H. Walter, lawyer; born  Findlay, Ohio, August 15, 1860; son John and Margaret (Walters) Doty; English descent; educated National Institution, Lebanon, Ohio; graduate of same B.S. 1882; married Ida L. Cooper of Ohio, September 12, 1883; member K. of P. (Past Chancellor); served during three terms as Mayor of McComb, Ohio, 1889-93; member of Ohio Senate from 1895-97; 1882 began reading law with Hon. Henry Brown at Findlay, Ohio, and admitted to bar of Supreme Court of Ohio June 1, 1885; admitted to practice in that court and Federal courts; practiced law in Ohio until 1907, when he removed to Chattanooga and formed partnership with G.L. Tyler, which was dissolved August 1, 1909; author of bill passed in Ohio Assembly in 1890 limiting trial judges in civil courts in granting more than one new trial on the weight of the evidence; law has in recent years been adopted in Tennessee, and a number of other States; Democratic candidate for Congress in 1898 from Eighth Ohio Congressional District; member First Christian Church. [Source: Who’s Who in Tennessee, Memphis: Paul & Douglass Co., Publishers, 1911; transcribed by Kim Mohler]



WARREN L. DRAPER, farmer, P. O. Wineland, was born in Washington County, N. Y., October 5, 1824, son of Moses and Marilla (Wilson) Draper, former of whom, a son of Jonathan Draper, a Revolutionary soldier, devoted his life to farming and saw-milling. Warren L. Draper moved from Pennsylvania when six years of age to Summit County, Ohio, and in 1853 came to this county, where he has since resided, engaged in farming. He has at present 1 80 acres of improved land in Allen Township. Our subject was united in marriage with Miss Louisa Sobercole, and by her he had five children: Ann, Warren C., Edward, Elizabeth and Jane. His present wife, Hannah (King) Draper, is a daughter of John King, formerly a resident of this county, and by her our subject has two children: Emma and Belle. Mr. Draper is a much respected citizen of this county. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


WILLIAM DOWNING (deceased), son of George Downing, was born in Maryland, in 1797, of English parentage. He was reared on a farm in Pike County, Ohio, received a good English education and, from his youth, was engaged in agricultural pursuits. He served in the war of 1812. He came to this county in 1830 and helped organize Blanchard Township. William Downing was appointed the first postmaster in Blanchard Township, this county, and served in that capacity for many years; the office was established in 1848 and was kept in his house. Mr. Downing was twice married, the first time to Elizabeth Henderson. His second marriage was in 1858 with Margaret Thompson, daughter of Isaac and Anna Underwood, the former a native of Virginia, of Irish descent, and the latter of Pennsylvania, of English descent. As a farmer Mr. Downing was successful, owning 180 acres of valuable land at the time of his death, which occurred in 1863. He was a member of the M. E. Church; in politics a Democrat. His widow is the owner of 206 acres of land on which she resides, and she has managed the farm since her husband's death. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


DAVID DOWNING, retired farmer, at present a resident of Findlay, Ohio, was born in Philadelphia, Penn., February 12, 1815, son of John and Mary (Boyler) Downing, the latter of German descent. His father, a native of Kentucky, of English descent, came to this county in 1832, and settled on a farm in Blanchard Township; he died in Kansas. Our subject, David Downing, the eldest in a family of eight children, was reared on a farm, acquired a common school education in the Pike County, Ohio, subscription school, and from his youth has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He is the owner of 300 acres of well improved land, and at one time owned 700 acres of land. He was united in marriage, in 1837, with Marietta Dorsey, a lady of English and Scotch descent, and this union has been blessed with five children: George T., Jane (wife of Oliver P. Shaw), Lavina, John, a farmer in Kansas, and Dora (wife of Miles Dukes). Mrs. Downing is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Downing has been township trustee and school director. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


GEORGE T. DOWNING, farmer, P. O. Oak Ridge, born December 28, 1839, is the eldest son of David and Marietta (Dorsey) Downing. He was reared on a farm, received a fair English education, and has made agriculture the business of his life. He is the owner of 272 acres of well improved land in Blanchard Township. In 1865 Mr. Downing was united in marriage with Mary E. Slusser, a lady of German descent, and three children have blessed this union: Florence, Chester and Sunnier. In politics Mr. Downing is a Republican. He has been township treasurer for four years, also trustee of Blanchard Township, this county. He united with the Masonic fraternity at Findlay in 1804. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


H. WALTER DOTY
DOTY, H. Walter, lawyer; born  Findlay, Ohio, August 15, 1860; son John and Margaret (Walters) Doty; English descent; educated National Institution, Lebanon, Ohio; graduate of same B.S. 1882; married Ida L. Cooper of Ohio, September 12, 1883; member K. of P. (Past Chancellor); served during three terms as Mayor of McComb, Ohio, 1889-93; member of Ohio Senate from 1895-97; 1882 began reading law with Hon. Henry Brown at Findlay, Ohio, and admitted to bar of Supreme Court of Ohio June 1, 1885; admitted to practice in that court and Federal courts; practiced law in Ohio until 1907, when he removed to Chattanooga and formed partnership with G.L. Tyler, which was dissolved August 1, 1909; author of bill passed in Ohio Assembly in 1890 limiting trial judges in civil courts in granting more than one new trial on the weight of the evidence; law has in recent years been adopted in Tennessee, and a number of other States; Democratic candidate for Congress in 1898 from Eighth Ohio Congressional District; member First Christian Church.  [Source: Who’s Who in Tennessee, Memphis: Paul & Douglass Co., Publishers, 1911; transcribed by Kim Mohler]


LEWIS DUKES, Sr., retired farmer, P. O. Oak Ridge, one of the early pioneers of Blanchard Township, this county, was born in Franklin County, Ohio, April 6, 1811; son of John and Mary (Haddox) Dukes, natives of Virginia, and who had twelve children. Lewis Dukes, Sr., who was very young when his father died, was reared on a farm and acquired his education in the common schools. At seventeen years of age he started out in life for himself as a day laborer, coming to this county about 1827, and commenced clearing the forest for the small pittance of 25 cents per day, in which work he continued for about seven years. He then purchased 700 acres of wild land with money which he had saved out of his earnings, and has been very successful in all his undertakings through life. He continued to add to his possessions until, at one time, he had 1,200 acres of fine land. He has disposed of a part, and at the present time owns 800 acres of well improved land, on which he and his family reside. Mr. Dukes was united in marriage in 1838, with Laura W. Bean, a Christian lady of rare accomplishments and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, who departed this life in 1874. After her death, in 1876, Mr. Dukes married Mrs. Harriet Alward, daughter of James and Mary A. (Bean) Caton, and widow of Alfred L. Alward. Mr. Dukes is one of the old living land-marks left to tell the tale of the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life in Blanchard Township; and one of the pleasures of his declining years is the knowledge of having lived an upright and honorable life. His wife has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for forty-one years. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


LEWIS DUKES, Jr., farmer and stock raiser, P. O. Oak Ridge, was born in Franklin County, Ohio, November 30, 1827; son of Richard and Mary (Blue) Dukes, the latter a native of Ohio, of German descent. The father of our subject was a native of Virginia, of English descent, came to this county in 1828 and settled on a farm of ninety-six acres of wild woodland in Blanchard Township. He was accompanied by his brother, John Dukes, who also took up 147 acres of wild land. Richard Dukes was a successful farmer and took an active interest in all that pertained to the improvement of the county. The first meeting-house in the county was erected on his farm, of hewed logs with a clap-board roof, and is still standing. He was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he was a Republican. He died in 1876. His family consisted of fourteen children, nine of whom grew to maturity, the subject of this sketch being the eldest. Lewis Dukes, Jr., was reared on the farm, received a common school education, and has followed agricultural pursuits with marked success. The farm on which he resides is one of the finest in the State. He now owns 1,400 acres of land, after having divided among his children (some of whom are married) 560 acres. Our subject was united in marriage, April 9, 1848, with Miss Laura Ann Spangler, daughter of Joseph Spangler, and of English descent. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Dukes are Parlee C., a prominent farmer residing in Blanchard Township, this county; Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Jackson, a prominent farmer in this county; Frances, wife of F. E. Alward, also a prominent farmer in this county; Miles W., married, a farmer in Blanchard Township, this county; Clark, married, operating a saw-mill, and R. B., at home with his father. Our subject and wife are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been steward and trustee. In politics Mr. Dukes is a Republican. He has been trustee and clerk and was also treasurer and school director, and was actively interested in the Grange movement. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


PARLEE C. DUKES, farmer and stock raiser, P. O. Benton Ridge, was born in this county August 24, 1851, in the first brick house built in Blanchard Township. His father, Lewis Dukes, Jr., reared a family of seven children, our subject being the second. Parlee C. Dukes was reared on a farm; received a good English education, and chose farming for his occupation in life. He is the owner of 312 acres of valuable land in Blanchard Township, this county, on which he resides. He was united in marriage, in 1876, with Harriet E., daughter of Jacob Grose, and three children have blessed this union: Albee LeClare, Edith Lela and Grace D. Mr. and Mrs. Dukes are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Sabbath-school of which he is trustee and assistant superintendent. In politics he is a Republican. He holds the office of school director. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


ELI DUKES, farmer and stock raiser, P. O. Oak Ridge, was born in Blanchard Township, this county, May 16, 1841, son of Richard and Mary (Blue) Dukes, the latter born in Ohio, of German descent. The father of our subject was a native of Virginia, of English descent; came to this county in 1828, and settled on a farm in Blanchard Township, where he passed the remainder of his life, dying in 1876 at Findlay, Ohio. Of his family of fourteen children, nine grew to maturity, our subject being the tenth. Eli Dukes acquired his education in the common schools, and in Oberlin and Delaware Colleges. He was clerk in a dry goods store for one year, and taught school four winters, but his principal business in life has been farming and dealing in stock. He is the owner of 486 acres of valuable land. At the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion, Mr. Dukes promptly enlisted in Company A, Twenty-first Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served three years as a soldier in the ranks. He was in the battle of Chickamauga, and also at Stone River. When his regiment was captured, he, with twenty-five others, escaped. Mr. Dukes was united in marriage, in 1865, with Mary H. Delaney, daughter of Mark Delaney, a pioneer minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church. She is of Irish, French and English descent. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dukes: Delevan D., Nannie B., Gustavus, Clemma I. and Laura G. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he has been class-leader for a number of years. Eli Dukes' father was one of the prime movers in founding the first church erected in this county. This building, a relic of the olden time, is still standing on the farm belonging to our subject. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


JEREMIAH DRAKE, Jr., farmer, P. O. Mount Blanchard, was born May 15, 1848, in Southampton County, Va. His father, Jeremiah Drake, Sr., was born in Southampton County, Va., October 15, 1804, of English descent; married, January 5, 1830, Miss Priscilla Williams, a native of North Carolina. They lived in Sussex County Va., from 1853 to 1860, then came to Madison Township, this county, and finally settled in Delaware Township, this county, in 1862. To them were born the following named children: Benjamin, residing in Marion County, Ohio; John W. and William Allen (they were soldiers in the One Hundred and Thirty-third Regiment Ohio National Guards, and died at New Creek, Va.), Henry (deceased), Eliza (Mrs. Priscilla Osborne), Mrs. Temperance Eldert and Jeremiah, Jr. Our subject came to this county with his parents when twelve years of age. June 8, 1871, he married Miss Tamsen R. Harris, and to them was born one son, who died in infancy. They have adopted and reared in their family Wilbert L., son of William Warner, of this county. Since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Drake have lived one year in Morrow County, and five years in Marion County, Ohio. They purchased their present farm in Delaware Township, this county, in 1883. Mr. Drake devotes a great deal of attention to buying and shipping live-stock. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


DAVID M. DREISBACH, farmer and stock raiser, P. O. Mount Blanchard, Ohio, was born September 28, 1845, in Pickaway County, Ohio. His father, Rev. Abraham E. Dreisbach, a native of Berks County, Penn., was a son of Rev. John Dreisbach, one of the first preachers of the Evangelical Association and the founder of their present extensive publishing interests. Rev. John Djeisbach will be remembered as having done a large pioneer work for the church in Ohio, at Cleveland, Circleville, Dayton and other points; he died August 20, 1871, in his eighty-third year. 'While living in Pennsylvania he was twice elected to the Legislature. Rev. Abraham E. Dreisbach married Miss Marianna Miesie, in 1840, and they moved to Seneca County, Ohio, near Tiffin, about 1852. He made that place the center of his work in the ministry nearly all the remainder of his 'life. He was well known as a popular preacher in many of the churches in this county, where he traveled for four years as a presiding elder. He died August 28, 1876. Of his ten children four are now living in this county: Cornelius M., Gabriel M., Marianna M. and David M. The mother died February 9, 1857. David M. Dreisbach, the subject of this sketch, gave ten months of his time (from February to December) in 1865 to the service of his country, after which he carried on a grocery business and a grist-mill at Benton Ridge, Ohio, for two years. He married, October 15, 1867, Miss Caroline Wagner, who was born May 6, 1846, a daughter of Jacob and Mary Wagner. Our subject and wife resided in Findlay Township, this county, for ten years, and settled on their present place in Delaware Township, this county, in 1881. Here they have a fine farm of 240 acres of well improved land. Mr. Dreisbach is a successful breeder of fine stock and has a fine flock of French merino sheep, a herd of thorough-bred short horn cattle and several Poland China hogs. . The children born to our subject and wife are Lillie W., Silas W., Helena W., William H. W., Aaron W., David W. and Arthur W. Mr. and Mrs. Dreisbach are members of the Evangelical Association. He is an earnest Republican in politics and takes a deep interest in public affairs. He pays a great deal of attention to the education of his family, and has one of the finest private libraries in Delaware Township. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and the G. A. R. and is a F. & A. M. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


J. H. DECKER, deputy sheriff of Hancock County, Findlay, was born in Marion Township, this county, August 9, 1848, only son and the youngest in the family of six children of John and Sarah (Zimmers) Decker, who came to this county from Pennsylvania in 1833. He was reared in Marion Township, this county, on a farm, and at the age of seventeen years he engaged in the drug business with S. & J. M. Huber, continuing with them for five years, after which he embarked in same line for himself, which he carried on successfully for ten years, retiring from it in 1882 and engaging in railway business, representing the Indiana, Bloomington & Western Railway, till accepting his present position in January, 1885. Mr. Decker was united in marriage, in 1876, with Annie McManness, sister of the present worthy sheriff of this county, and to them have been born three children: Lemuel, Tod and Ina. Mrs. Decker attends the Lutheran Church. Mr. Decker is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the Encampment; is also a Master Mason. In politics he is a Republican. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


DR. WILLIAM M. DETWILER (deceased) was born in Mifflin County, Penn., August 23, 1832, son of George and Julia A. (Matter) Detwiler, who came of worthy German pioneer ancestry of Pennsylvania and Maryland. The subject of this sketch learned his father's trade (plastering), and in 1851 came West and located in Findlay, this county, where he carried on his trade for some time. He subsequently moved to Illinois, and, on returning from there, in 1859, entered the office of Dr. Osterlen, where he prosecuted the study of medicine. On the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion our subject left his worthy preceptor's office and enlisted his services in defense of the Union; three years of his time, however, were devoted to service as hospital steward, and upon the close of the war he returned to his medical studies, graduating from the Homoeopathic Hospital College of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1867. Dr. Detwiler located in Findlay, and for ten years was prominently identified with the profession of medicine in this portion of the State. The Doctor's death occurred April 30, 1877. He was at that time president of the Ohio State Homoeopathic Medical Society, and also president of the Alumni Association of Cleveland College. The Masonic, Odd Fellows and K. of P. societies, the Findlay Guards and the ex-soldiers all took part in the funeral ceremonies in his memory. Dr. Detwiler was an ardent Sabbath-school and church worker, and was an acknowledged leader in all interests he sought to serve. In politics he was a Republican. He was a liberal contributor to measures conducing to the public welfare, and was a kind friend and an exemplary husband. He was happily married, December 19, 1854, to Miss Harriet Tritch, by whom he had no children, but they adopted and reared a son and a daughter: William M., now a merchant tailor, and Victoria, now the wife of E. H. Young. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


E. G. De WOLFE, editor of the Republican, Findlay, was born in Centreville, Butler Co., Penn , April 16, 1837. He is the fourth son of Dr. E. Gibbons and Sarah A. (Harris) DeWolfe, of Pennsylvania, the former of French Huguenot stock, descended from one of three brothers of that name who fled from persecution in their native land and settled in New England about the year 1690, after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes. At the death of his father, in 1846, the subject of this sketch resided with an uncle, T. R. DeWolfe, in Vernon, Trumbull Co., Ohio, until 1850, when he entered the office of the Whig, Butler, Penn., as an apprentice, but completed his trade on the Record, Prospect, Penn. His health failing he was compelled to relinquish the printing business and settled on a farm, teaching school in the winter. In 1861 he removed to Ohio and in 1863, in company with his brother Joseph, purchased the Pike County Republican, which they published at Waverly for three years, during which time he held the position of deputy assessor of internal revenue. Refusing to follow Andrew Johnson into the Democratic party he was removed from office, sold out his paper and accepted a position as foreman of the Ohio State Journal, at Columbus, Ohio, where he remained until September of 1868, when in company with Dr. A. P. Miller, of the Toledo Blade, he purchased the Findlay Jeffersonian, with which he was connected until May 1, 1876, when he retired to accept the appointment of postmaster by President Grant, was reappointed by Hayes in 1880 and reappointed by Arthur in 1884. In 1881 he purchased an interest in the Findlay Republican, with which he is still connected. In 1855 he married, in Butler County, Penn., Miss Emma Flemming, and the union has been blessed with four sons and four daughters, five of whom are yet living. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


EDWARD DIETSCH, furniture manufacturer and dealer, Findlay, was born in Ehorsdorf, kingdom of Saxony, March 12, 1838, son of Charles and Christina Diotsch, who came to America in 1849 and settled in Findlay, where Charles Dietsch carried on his trade of cabinet-making, and eventually engaged in the furniture business. He died here in 1883, leaving his widow, three sons and a daughter: Edward; C. H., proprietor of the Commercial Hotel: Anthony, with Edward in the firm, and Euphemia, wife of Richard Honnesy, of Findlay. The subject of this sketch was roared to his present business, and embarked in it in 1861 with his father, and in 1871 Anthony united with him in the business. Mr. Dietsch married, in 1861, Wilhelmina-Karg, a native of Boenuingheim, Wurtemberg, Germany. They have one son and two daughters; Clara, wife of Christian Heyne of Findlay; Charles Edward and Lela. The family attend the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Mr. Dietsch is an active citizen and public spirited man, and has served in several of the city official positions. In politics he is a Democrat. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


FREDERICK DUDUIT (deceased) was born in Scioto County, Ohio, in 1807, son of William and Agnes Duduit, natives of Paris, France, who came to America in 1790 and finally settled on the French grant. He married September 22, 1833, Miss Helen H. Gilruth, daughter of Rev. James Gilruth, a clergyman widely known in connection with Methodism in Ohio, and a son of Thomas Gilruth, Esq., a native of Scotland and of old Covenanter stock. He came to this county November 22, 1833, and cleared land and made a home. To Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Duduit were born ten children: James Gilruth, supposed to have lost his life at the burning of the steamer "Sultan," April 2, 1858; Agnes, deceased wife of Capt. Oliver P. Capelle, who lost his life at the battle of Stone River, Georgia; Mary, deceased at the age of fourteen years; John Wesley, who died in 1870, leaving a widow and three children; William, at home; Naoma, wife of C. C. Godman, of Lincoln, Neb.; Sarah, wife of W. E. Snyder, of Findlay, Ohio; Grace, at home; Kate, at home; Edward, at home. Mrs. Frederick Duduit died January 12, 1886, and Mr. Frederick Duduit March 28, 1886. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Duduit was a Republican. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


ELIJAH T. DUNN, attorney at law, Findlay, was born in Knox County, Ohio, June 20, 1840. His father was a farmer and tobacco grower. In 1844 he removed with his people to Wood County, Ohio, in what was then known as the "Black Swamp," where, around a hickory bark fire, and three terms of winter school, his early education was finished. At the age of thirteen he entered the office of the Herald of Freedom, at Wilmington, and became an expert printer. He taught several terms of school in Clarke and Hancock Counties, pursuing in the meantime the study of law. On the breaking out of the Rebellion he united with the Union party, while yet a minor, and did service for a short time as a member of the Twenty-first Regiment Ohio Volunteers. Becoming unable to perform duty as a soldier, he continued for a while in a clerkship in the quartermaster department at Nashville, Tenn. Returning to Findlay he completed his law course, and on the 2d of August, 1862, was admitted to the bar. He was then twenty-two years of age. He then settled down in Findlay, and has ever since been creditably identified with the legal profession. Mr. Dunn is a very busy man. Besides a large law practice, he owns and controls a good farm, and devotes considerable attention to fine cattle. He is a stockholder and director in the Farmer's National Bank, director and secretary of the Findlay Gas Light Co., of the Findlay Oil & Gas Co., and President of the Wood & Hancock Oil & Gas Company. He devotes a great deal of attention to financial matters. He favors public improvements, and on all questions involving public enterprises he takes a leading and aggressive part.
January 12, 1865, he was married to Martha I., daughter of Anthony Strother, of Findlay, and by her has had three sons: Bernard L., John A. and James C. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Mr. Dunn of Stoker Post, G. A. R. and Hancock Lodge, I. O. O. F. He is not a politician, but votes with the Democrats. Has held the offices of justice of the peace and collector of internal revenue. Of his family, so far back as they are known, it may be said that they have been honest, industrious, intelligent and generous. Never was one convicted of crime. They have not been distinguished, but along the vale of life have kept the even tenor of their way. Yet the " simple annals of the poor'' are, to those interested, well worth preserving, because we may all meet again on the morning of a better day. Indebtedness is due to J. B. Dunn, of Deshler, Ohio, for the following genealogy of the Dunn family. He has preserved it with great care, and it is believed to be correct. Genealogy of the Dunn family as given by Jacob B. Dunn, of Deshler, Henry Co., Ohio: "About the year 1720 one George Dunn, with two brothers, all Protestants, came from North Ireland (near Londonderry), to Long Island. One brother subsequently settled in New Jersey, and George Dunn in Maryland. From these brothers, the Dunns of Hamilton County, Ohio, or Indiana, and part of those of Kentucky, Virginia and Pennsylvania, derive their descent. The above mentioned George Dunn was a Baptist preacher, and carried his ' rather damp' gospel west of the Allegheny Mountains, through what from his name was called 'Dunn's Gap.' The date of his birth, death and marriage, and the name of his wife, are not within the knowledge of the writer, but there lived such a man called George Dunn. His son (also named George), was a farmer, living near Harper's Ferry, in Maryland or Virginia. This second George Dunn had four sons and two daughters: John, George, Jacob and Peter; Catharine married James Schnebly, and with him settled near Xenia, Ohio; Mary (or Polly) married a man named Elam, and settled in western Ohio. Their father (the second George Dunn) died February 22, 1817. Of the sons, Peter died in Kentucky, a few years before the war of the Rebellion. Jacob died in Knox County, Ohio, about 1862. John died in Washington County, Md., about 1831. George (the second son of the second George Dunn, and the third bearing the name), was born in Washington County, Md., January 8, 1779. He died in Wood County, Ohio, December 13, 1865. The wife of the 'second George,' and mother of the above six children, was named Susanna, maiden name unknown. She died April 27, 1811. The third George Dunn was married near the close of the eighteenth century, to Sarah Mills, who was born 1776 (day not known), and died in 1845. "Their children (all born in Maryland), were as follows: Robert, born September 8, 1798; died August 21, 1872; married to Mary Forsyth. John, born December 1, 1799; died March 9, 1851; married to Elizabeth D. Boolman. Susanna, --- ; died August 7, 1802, in infancy. Jacob, born July 8, 1803; died --, 1879; married to Sally Boolman. George, born February 20, 1805; died, 1881; married to Rachel Hills. James, born February 20, 1807; died March 16, 1867; married to Margaret Coplin. Moses, born January 20, 1809; died August 22, 1829; never married. William, born January 29, 1811; died February 1, 1859; never married. Maria, born December 16, 1812; alone survives, widow of Jonathan Dean (deceased). Elizabeth, born June 19, 1814; died January 31, 1817; in infancy. Peter, born May 4, 1816; died August 19, 1855; never married. Elizabeth Dorothea Boolman, wife of John Dunn, second son of the third George Dunn, was born January 1, 1803, in Washington County, Md. Her father's name was Nicholas Boolman, whose father (first name unknown), came to Maryland from Germany, about 1765. Nicholas Boolman was born about 1774, his wife, Magdalene Troxel, was born about the same time. Of her family we know very little, except that she had a brother named David. The children of Nicholas and Magdalene Boolman, were as follows: Catharine, born about 1796; died, --; married to Hiram Lynch. Samuel, born in 1798; died in 1864; twice married; wives were sisters, last named Sarah A. Jacob, born , 1800; died about 1817; never married. Elizabeth D., born January 1, 1803; died March, 1883; married to John Dunn. Sally, born 1804; died 1856; married to Jacob Dunn. Nancy, born about 1806; died about 1822; unmarried. "John Dunn, his wife Elizabeth D., and their three eldest children removed from Maryland, with his (John's) father, George Dunn, to Fairfield County, Ohio, in 1826. From thence they removed to Green County, Ohio, thence to Knox County, Ohio, and in 1844 John Dunn and family removed to Wood County, Ohio, where he died as above shown. The children of John and Elizabeth D. Dunn, are as follows: Ann, born December 5, 1820; married Adam Cosner April 15, 1841. Jacob [B.], born September 30, 1823; married Angeline Culp September 23, 1847. Joseph, born January 1, 1826; married Mary Niebel April 12, 1883. George, born October 3, 1827; died August 29, 1855; unmarried. Maria, born September 22, 1829; married Wilson Stretcher July, 20, 1865. Aaron, born December 16, 1831; died October 20, 1846; unmarried. Samuel, born May 4, 1834; married Margaret Bishop March 3, 1859. Phebe, born May 7, 1836; married Joseph Hoot July 7, 1861. Nathaniel, born September 5, 1838; died October 14, 1846; unmarried. Elijah [T.], born June 20, 1840; married Martha I. Strother January 12, 1865. Mary Magdalene, born June 5, 1842; died October 17, 1846, in infancy. John [R.], born March 24, 1844; died August II, 1865; unmarried. Thomas Corwin, born November 3, 1847; married Emma T. Lewis March 9, 1871.
The above names (not including the initials in brackets) are the names by which the children of John and Elizabeth D. Dunn were christened, the initials 'B.,' 'T.' and 'R.' being afterward chosen by Jacob, Elijah and John, partly to aid in distinguishing from others having similar first initials, and partly to preserve traces of the old family names of Boolman, Troxel and Rench, though in what way we are related to the Rench family does not appear on any of our records. Our mother was related (though whether through the Boolmans or Troxels does not appear) to the Hagers, after one of whom Hagerstown, Md., was named. A family named Chambers, of Chambersburg, was also in some way connected with our ancestors." [John and Jacob Dunn were brothers.]
[History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


PHILIP DILLMAN, farmer, P. O. Arlington, was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, July 4, 1834, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Dame) Dillman, natives of Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, former of whom was a farmer and a noted hunter. Our subject's grandfather, Adam Dillman, was a farmer in the old country. The parents of our subject came to America in 1831, and to this county in 1839, and here Philip has resided since, engaged in farming. Our subject married, April 23, 1861, Miss Catherine Wilch, daughter of Philip P. Wilch, and this union has been blessed with ten children: Charles, Peter, Elizabeth, John, James, Margaret, Frederick, Emma, Eva and Mary. Mr. Dillman is one of the many respected and substantial German citizens of Madison Township, and gives his support to all enterprises for public good. In politics he is a Democrat. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


AARON R. DALLY, farmer, P. O. Bluffton, Allen County, born in Orange Township, this county, August 14, 1839, is a son of Ohio and Eliza (Reinhart) Dally, natives of Trumbull County, Ohio, and Green County, Penn., respectively, the former of Irish and the latter of German descent. They married in Wayne County, Ohio, January 6, 1832, moved to Knox County, Ohio, the same year, and in 1836 came to Orange Township, this county, where they entered and cleared the farm on which they now reside. Ohio Dally was a pump-maker by trade, a Democrat in politics, a member of the Disciples Church. He was the father of eleven children: Marion F. (deceased); Sarah-J., now in Grundy County, Mo.; Henry L. (deceased); Aaron R. and Mansir M. (twins), the former the subject of this sketch, the latter now living in Greeley County, Neb.; Mary E., in Boone County, Neb.; Joseph R., in Burt County, Neb.; Eliza A., in Greeley County, Neb.; John L., in Hardin County, Ohio; James (deceased), and Benjamin F., in Barry County, Mich. The father died, and the mother resides with her son Aaron R. Dally, and has followed weaving all her life. Our subject married, August 14, 1869, Miss Mary J. Montgomery, a native of Orange Township, this county, born August 18, 1852, daughter of Albert and Isabelle (Warren) Montgomery, and by this union there are five children: William R., Cora M. (deceased), Anna L., Hattie B. and Albert O. During the late war Mr. Dally served about three years in Company B, of Sherman's Body Guards. After his return home, he lived three years in Barry County, Mich., and returned to Orange Township, this county, in 1869. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church; in politics he is a Democrat. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


FLAVIUS J. DEWESE, farmer, P O. Mount Cory, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, January 17, 1835, son of Thomas and Sarah (Watkins) Dewese, the former born March 4, 1809, and the latter July 18, 1811; they married in Wayne County, Ohio, October 2, 1830, and came to this county, settling in Union Township in 1836, where they entered and improved land. They were parents of nine children: Mary A., Flavius J., Susannah, Thom as, Eve, Adam, Elizabeth, Sarah J. and Francis M., of whom Flavius J. is the only survivor. Thomas Dewese assisted in organizing the first schools in Union Township, this county, and was prominently identified with the Methodist Protestant Church. He also served in many of the township offices. He passed from this life April 13, 1853. After the death of her husband Mrs. Thomas Dewese was again united in marriage, this time, April 13, 1857, with Levi Showalter, and August 13, 1881, she departed this life. Flavius J. Dewese, the subject of this sketch, married, January 1, 1860, Miss Susannah D. Showalter, a native of Union Township, this county, and daughter of Levi and Mahala (Wade) Showalter. Mr. and Mrs. Dewese are the parents of eight children : Sanford H., born May 6, 1866; Milton O., born June 4, 1868; Alvin V., born March 3, 1871 ; Grace E., born January 25, 1875 ; Francis M., born October 11, 1876; and Harry C., born November 28, 1881 (all now living), and Louretta O. (deceased) and Victoria A. (deceased). Mr. Dewese enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Eighteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, August 22, 1862, at Findlay, Ohio. His regiment was assigned to the Second Brigade, Second Division of the Twenty -third Army Corps. For three years he was actively engaged in all the battles his regiment took part in, including many of the most important engagements of the war. Mr. Dewese was wounded in the left knee at the battle of Resaca. He was in various hospitals for three months, and this wound has been a source of great pain and has impeded him in all labor he has performed since. Mr. Dewese is now engaged in agricultural pursuits, and has one of the most beautiful homes in the county. He is an active member of the Republican party. His wife is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


THOMAS DRAY, farmer, P. O. Bluffton, Allen County, born in 1804, is a native of Trumbull County, Ohio, where he was reared and where he lived till 1865, then came to Orange Township, this county, where he still resides. By his first wife, Hannah Willick, born February 29, 1812, to whom he was married by John Carlton September 24, 1829, he had five children: Martha Jane, born in Knox Township, Columbiana Co., Ohio, January 24, 1834; Lemuel, born June 2, 1837, also in Knox Township; Mary, born August 29, 1840, also in Knox Township, died August 17, 1844; William W., born September 22, 1843, in Wellsville, Columbiana Co., Ohio; Hannah L., born May 24. 1848, also in Wellsville, Columbiana Co , Ohio, died August 28, 1878. The mother of this family dying July 4, 1848, Mr. Dray was married, by Thomas Duncan, May 12, 1853, to Malissa Sheffelton, born August 24, 1824, and by her had four children: John S., born February 28, 1854; Charles H., born June 22, 1856, died February 12, 1858; James W., born February 17, 1858; Eliza F. J., born November 13, 1863, died September 5, 1866. Mr. Dray has been a very active man in his day, but is now living a retired life upon his farm, which is operated by his son James W. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


JOSIAH DUNLAP (deceased) was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, August 15, 1828, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Philips) Dunlap, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Trumbull County, Ohio, in an early day. In 1856 they removed to Orange Township, this county, where they ended their days. They were the parents of seven children, four of whom are still living: William P., in Trumbull County, Ohio; Harlan S. and James F. in Mahoning County, Ohio, and Mary, in Allen County, Ohio. The subject of this sketch was married, September 7, 1848, to Mary A. Blunt, of Trumbull County, Ohio, a native of Denbighshire, Wales, born November 26, 1828, daughter of Edward and .Ann (Richards) Blunt, who came to America in 1829, located in Schuylkill County, Penn., resided also a short time in Pittsburgh, Penn., and, about 1832, came to Trumbull County, Ohio, where they died. They were parents of ten children, of whom those still living are Thomas and Margaret, in Mahoning County, Ohio; Edward I., in Trumbull County, Ohio; Hannah in Ft. Wayne, Ind., and Mary A. in Orange Township, this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Dunlap were born seven children: Sarah A., now residing in Trumbull County, Ohio; Cyntha E. (deceased); Thomas L., in Orange Township, this county; Emma A. (deceased); Clara J. (deceased); Ida E. (deceased), and Maggie in Putnam County. Ohio. Mr. Dunlap was a highly respected citizen; a Democrat in politics. His death occurred August 2, 1878. His widow still operates the farm with the help of her son, Thomas L. [History of Hancock co, Chicago: Warner Beers & Co., 1886]


 


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