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Madison County, Ohio
Genealogy and History

 


Biographies



WILLIAM V. ALLEN
ALLEN, William Vincent, a Senator from Nebraska; born in Midway, *Madison County, Ohio*, January 28, 1847; moved with his parents to Iowa in 1857; attended the common schools and Upper Iowa University at Fayette; served as a private during the Civil War; studied law at West Union, Iowa; admitted to the bar in 1869 and practiced in Iowa until 1884, when he moved to Madison, Nebr.; judge of the district court of the ninth judicial district of Nebraska 1891-1893; permanent chairman of the Populist State conventions in 1892, 1894, and 1896; elected as a Populist to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1893, to March 3, 1899; unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1899; appointed and subsequently elected judge of the district court of the ninth judicial district of Nebraska and served from March 9, 1899, until December 1899, when he resigned to return to the Senate; appointed to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Monroe L. Hayward, and served from December 13, 1899, to March 28, 1901, when a successor was elected; was not a candidate for election to the vacancy; chairman, Committee on Forest Reservations and Game Protection (Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Congresses); resumed the practice of law in Madison, Nebr.; again elected judge of the district court of the ninth judicial district of Nebraska in 1917 and served until his death; died in Los Angeles, Calif., January 12, 1924; interment in Crown Hill Cemetery, Madison, Nebr.
[Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present; transcribed by A. N.]

CHARLES AMANN
CHARLES AMANN, Cashier of the Exchange Bank, Plain City, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1842. His parents were Xavier and Bridget (Duplar) Amann, the former a native of France and the latter of Switzerland. His father emigrated to America when a young man, and, after stopping a short time in New York, located at Cincinnati, where he worked at his trade - tailoring. He was twice married, Charles being the only child by his first wife. Our subject enjoyed the advantages afforded by the graded schools of Cincinnati until eight years of age, when he went to Sidney with his father, who engaged in the merchant tailoring business there, and Charles attended the Sidney Public Schools. He then learned the molder's trade, which he followed until 1862, when he enlisted from Adams Township, Champaign County, in Company H, Forth-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Capt. Rhodes. On the 20th of Oct. 1863, he was captured, at Philadelphia, Tenn., together with a large number of others, and taken to the rebel prison at Belle Isle, afterward being removed to Danville, Salisbury and Florence. From the last-named place he was taken to Charleston, S. C., in 1864, and placed, with 600 Union officers and 600 Union men, in a building, under the fire of the Federal guns then shelling the city. On the near approach of Gen. Sherman, Mr. Amann was removed to the prison at Goldsboro, from whence the records show he was paroled Feb. 24, 1865. He well remembers seeing emaciated and fever-stricken prisoners, in great numbers, left by the rebels to die. He was fever-stricken at Goldsboro, and, while unconscious, was thrown into the dead-wagon" and hauled off for burial, the records of Wilmington, where the Goldsboro dead were buried, showing that "Charles Amann, of Company H, Forty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, died Mar. 26, 1865," and the buried in the National Cemetery. He has no recollection of his release, and does not know how he regained his release. It is said that, according to the prison records, he was a prisoner longer than any Ohio soldier, with but one exception, during the war. After the war, he engaged in business at Plain City, with marked success, for twelve years, in the drug business, with Isaac Leonard, and in 1881 he took his present position. He is a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge, and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and a Republican in politics. He has been Township Clerk and Trustee, and Mayor and Councilman of Plain City.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

EDWARD ARMSTRONG
EDWARD ARMSTRONG, of Armstrong & Minshall, dealers in furniture and queensware, London, was born on the "Old Bradford farm,'' in Union Township, this county, January 1, 1850. His father was Robert Armstrong, a native of Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio. He was twice married. His second wife, and the mother of our subject, was Mrs. Maria (Cowling) Cover, a sister of Maj. Cowling, so favorably known throughout Madison County, and a native of England. There were born to this union five children, four living. Mr. Armstrong was the father of fifteen children by both marriages, and his wife, being also twice married, was the mother of eleven children. The father died in 1865, and the mother in 1873. Our subject was the fourth child of this union, and grew to manhood on the farm. When fifteen years of age, he came to London, and entered the public schools. In 1869, he entered the drug store of Dr. Caldwell, of Cedarville, Greene County, Ohio, as a clerk with him altogether about two years. He then returned to London and engaged in the drug business with Dr. J. T. Houston, the firm doing business for seven years. Mr. Armstrong then formed a partnership with E. J. Robinson in the same business, and, three years later, in January, 1880, sold his interest to Dr. Platt King. In June, 1882, he formed a partnership with Leon Minshall, in his present business, and, on the 23d day of the month, the firm opened out with an elegant assortment of plain and fancy furniture, queensware, etc. Their trade has exceeded their most sanguine expectations. Mr. Armstrong is a member of Chandler Lodge, No. 138, Masonic, the Methodist Episcopal Church, and, politically, is a strong Republican. He was married, October 12, 1876, to Alice, daughter of H. W. Richman, a prominent citizen of London. Miss Armstrong is also a member of the Presbyterian Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

FULTON ARMSTRONG
FULTON ARMSTRONG, farmer and stock-dealer, P. O. London, was born in Union Township January 31, 1825. He is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Earl) Armstrong, natives of Ohio, where they spent their lives. His father was an extensive farmer and stockdealer, and at one time owned 3,500 acres of land in this county. His people were among the very early settlers in this vicinity. Our subject received a limited education in the schools of his native county, and early in life adopted the occupation of farming. He commenced life by farming and stock-dealing in Vermillion County, Ill., where he spent eighteen years. He owns 1,000 acres of very fine land in the county, in addition to which he rents about 500 acres to increase his facilities for his extensive stock operations. He usually keeps about 200 head of cattle on his place, in addition to his stock cattle, and now has 350 head. He married Mary Rankin, who died in 1868. She was the mother of four children, all now deceased. In 1869, he married Elizabeth (Truitt) McMillan, widow of George McMillan, deceased. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Armstrong is a Republican in politics, but he has neither desired or accepted any offices.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JONATHAN ARNETT
JONATHAN ARNETT, surveyor and civil engineer, London, was born in Ross County, Ohio, August 30, 1819. His father, William D. Arnett, was a native of Eastern Maryland, and a farmer by occupation. He came to Ohio in 1817, locating in Ross County, where he resided twelve years. He then removed to Jefferson Township of this county, and lived there till his death, in 1859. He married Margaret Vickers, also a native of Maryland. They had twelve children, six now living. Mrs. Arnett departed this life December 30, 1874. Jonathan Arnett was the sixth child of this large family, and grew to manhood on the home farm. His early educational facilities were those of pioneer days, and rather limited. He was engaged in farming until twenty-two years of age. and then attended what was termed the "Ohio Conference High School," at Springfield, Clark County, remaining there two years. He then taught school in this and adjoining counties for about ten years. During this time, he spent his leisure moments in studying his present profession, and finally engaged in that occupation. From 1854 to 1864. he was engaged in mercantile transactions in this and adjoining counties. He was Acting Chief Engineer of the Dayton & Michigan Railroad for eight years, surveying the line from Springfield to Troy, Ohio, and subsequently to Union City, Ind. He has been a resident of London since 1866. and during this period has devoted the daytime to his labor, and the evenings to the study of his profession. He was Surveyor of Madison County two terms; has been School Examiner of Madison County for sixteen years: of Union School, London, same length of time, and was a member of the London School Board for nine years. Mr. Arnett is a member of Chandler Lodge, No. 138, Masonic, and a Master Mason. Politically, he has always held the views adopted by the Democratic party, but on local questions votes for the man and not for or with the party. He has never been an aspirant for office. Mr. Arnett was married in March, 1847, to Esther M. Fellows, a native of Hanover, N. H. Two children were born to them, one living—Delia A., wife of Clinton Morse, County Surveyor. They have one daughter—Edna. Mrs. Arnett was a member of the M. E. Church, and died in that faith, August 25, 1871. Mr. A. was again married, April 22,1874, to Mrs. Permelia Morse, daughter of Dr. Colliver, of Jefferson, Ohio. She is a native of Kentucky and a member of the Baptist Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

WILLIAM I. BALLINGER
WILLIAM I. BALLINGER, M.D., Plain City, is the oldest son of Joshua and Delilah (Inskeep) Ballinger, of Logan County, Ohio, where he was born Oct. 18, 1828. The former, who was born in New Jersey, came to Ohio with his parents in 1810, and settled on the head-waters of Big Darby Creek, where he died. The latter was a native of Ohio, and still lives. The subject of this sketch spent his youth and boyhood with his parents, brothers and sisters, on a farm, until the spring of 1848. Then, having no special appetite for the gymnastics and manual duties of farm life, he was sent to the "Old Academy," in Marysville, Ohio, at that time under the auspices of the Rev. James D. Smith, who was assisted by the Rev. James A. Sterrett, as Principal. He spent three summers in this institution, the last two of which were under the tutelage of the now Hon. James W. Robinson, of Marysville, Ohio, who took charge of the academy as Principal in 1849. Here he acquired the rudiments of algebra, Latin and of such branches as are usually taught in the high school departments in the graded system of the present day. The winters were passed in teaching district schools, and our subject remembers, with much regret, the mistakes of those whose duty it was to employ teachers, and to look after the moral and mental welfare of the youth, in employing young men and young women to perform these sacred duties, whose only qualifications were a "certificate to teach," and a sufficiency of muscular development to assert their authority in the schoolroom by the help of the rod. In Sept., 1850, he was sent to the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, Ohio, and entered the Senior Preparatory Class, and remained in the university for three years, pursuing the classical course of study. In the fall of 1863, he commenced the study of medicine in the office of Dr. D. W. Henderson, of Marysville, Ohio; taught a district school at Amity, in this county, during the following winter months; resumed his studies in the office in March 1865, and, in October of the same year, entered Starling Medical College at Columbus, Ohio, for his first course of lectures. In March of 1855, he returned to Dr. Henderson's office, and there remained till the October following, when he went to Cleveland, Ohio, and entered the Cleveland Medical College, where he was graduated a Doctor of Medicine early in March, 1856. Through the kind offices of his much esteemed preceptor and friend, Dr. Henderson, he was introduced to Hon. Dr. John N. Beach, then in Pleasant Valley, now Plain City, this county, a partnership for business purposes agreed upon, and, on the 9th of April, 1856, the subject of our sketch became the object of curious eyes among the inhabitants of Pleasant Valley and vicinity, trying to weigh the acumen and mental force of the "new doctor." First impressions of Pleasant Valley were not favorable. It was at a time of the year when mud reigned supreme over foot-paths and highways. Teams were bemired in the main streets, and had to be pried out with poles. Sidewalks were few and far between. The town had a railroad and depot, but to reach the same you had to travel - man, woman, child, horse, hog and cow - from McCloud's corner over the entire length of Railroad street, through a sea of much and water, the exact depth of which no man, perhaps ever exactly fathomed. The late sleeper was aroused from his dreams, of mornings, by the sonorous notes of "P-o-o-i-g, p-o-o-i-g, piggy, piggy!" couple with the pleasing strain, "S-o-o-k, boss! s-o-o-k, boss!" and, upon gaining the front door, the foot-paths and streets were found to be the common feeding-yards; and for the balance of the day Mr. Porker plied his snout diligently to plowing the streets and grass plats. The moral and social status was not wholly out of keeping with the physical comforts and conveniences of the place. Although there were a number of intelligent, generous-hearted and Christian people there, yet there were a great many who had their "peculiar views" and their peculiar ways. Bad whisky then, as now, was not unknown; and for many, Saturday was the day of days for settling old scores. This element mostly came from the country. They would commence coming in about 9 or 10 o'clock A.M., and by 2 o'clock P.M. their ranks would be full, and the early comers well fired up. Accounts were called, and the swearing would begin. After exchanging a great many oaths and vulgar epithets, and passing the bottle around several times, the preliminaries of battle would be arranged; but not many hard battles were over fought. Pleasant Valley at the time was a dead town so far as business and building enterprises were concerned. From 1856 to 1866, one had to count in all the barns built to make an average of one building per year; and the business of the place was limited to three small dry goods stores, one grocery, one drug store and one restaurant. To return to our subject. The "new doctor" was kindly received by his new acquaintances, and, in course of time, was intrusted with a fair share of the afflicted portion of humanity to care for. He found many warm hearts, and true and genial friends. On the 18th of February, 1857, he was united in marriage with Miss Matilda Taylor, the oldest daughter of John and Eliza Mark Taylor, who were both born and raised in Madison county, and still reside two miles south of Plain City. They have had five children, viz.: Charles, who died in infancy; John T.; Oliver, who died aged fourteen months; James Llew and Eve. Mr. Ballinger is a member of the Methodist Church and of the Masonic Order, and in politics is a Republican. The Doctor pursued his professional duties assiduously until the spring of 1873, when he, in company with Mr. Richard Woodruff, a merchant of Plain City, conceived the project of building a flouring mill in Plain City. Neither party knew anything about mills or milling, but he scheme was put into execution, and the mill, a substantial brick structure, with two run of buhrs for wheat, and one for corn, was put in operation about Christmas of the same year, costing about $13,000. Mr. Woodruff dying in 1875 left the entire care of the mill in the Doctor's hands. This so interfered with his professional duties that he has given but little attention to them since. The Plain City Mills have had a fine reputation for the quality of their flour for several years, and any one visiting the Doctor's sanctum will find his table covered with both medical and milling literature, and will find him as ready to discuss the best methods of milling as he is to discuss the best methods of preventing and treating diseases. He is now decidedly in favor of bread pills.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

E. W. BARLOW
E. W. BARLOW, undertaker, furniture-dealer and manufacturer, Plain City, was born in Darby Township, Mar. 6, 1835. He is a son of E. W. and Polly C. (Lawrence) Barlow, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter of New York, and both of English descent. They emigrated to Clark County, Ohio, and in 1820 moved to Madison County, coming to Plain City in 1852. His father was a carpenter until he came to Ohio, when he followed farming until his death in 1865. Our subject has worked in the shop where he is now employed since he was seventeen years of age. He was married, Nov. 4, 1857, to Electa I. Bigelow, a daughter of Dr. D. K. Bigelow, and by her has one child, Cora I., the wife of John R. Hill. Mrs. Barlow died Mar. 9, 1858, and in 1859 he married Lucinda A. Kent, by whom he has four children - Linden C., Elva R., Earl W. and Eddie B. The parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which the father has been a Class Leader fifteen years. He was a Republican, but is now a Prohibitionist. His father was a Major in the war of 1812.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JOHN BARRETT
JOHN BARRETT, a native of Maryland, was a brother-in-law of John Arbuckle, they having married sisters; came to Ohio soon after Mr. Arbuckle came, and settled on the same tract of land, and lived here till his death, dying with that prevalent yet much-dreaded disease, milk-sickness. He had six children, but all have moved away and sought other homes. Jacob Steele settled where Rev. Overturf now lives about 1815. Thomas Taylor came from Chillicothe, Ohio, and settled on Deer Creek, near the gristmill, about 1815, where he lived about five years; thence he settled on the place now owned by Thomas Woosley, on the old Columbus & Springfield stage road, and there kept a tavern in an early day. He made good improvements; was an excellent and intelligent man, and a good citizen. He raised a family of six children, who all became honored and worthy members of society. Late in life, he moved to the village of Somerford, where he died at the age of about eighty years.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

RICHARD BALDWIN
Richard Baldwin, it is believed, came here from Chillicothe and settled on the Rigdon place, in Surveys 9,285 and 10,626, about 1820, where he resided till about 1837 He moved to Mechanicsburg. where he resided till death. He was one of this township's best citizens, and served as a Justice of the Peace several years.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

ANSEL BATES
ANSEL BATES came to this township and settled just north of Tradersville, on land now owned by Thomas Bales, about 1818. He finally died in Champaign County. Of his children, we mention Asa, Ansel, Elijah, William, Sylvanus and Zenas. The last two mentioned were twins. These sons for several years were quite prominent and well known in the affairs of the township, but finally they all emigrated to the West.

VALENTINE BAUER
VALENTINE BAUER, merchant tailor, London, was born at Gerbach, Rhine Bavaria, Germany, April 14, 1838. His father, Peter Bauer, came to America in 1849. He located in Columbus, Ohio, where he was engaged in keeping tavern, and died in 1868. He married Catherine Bauer, also a native of Germany. Of their eight children, four are now living—two sons and two daughters—and only two residents of Madison County. Mrs. Bauer departed this life in Germany, January 12, 1848. Our subject was fourteen years of age when his father removed to Columbus, and he resided in that city eight years. He there finished learning his trade, which he had previously commenced in Germany. On October 9, 1860, he came to London, and for eleven years was superintendent of the merchant tailoring department in the house of J. M. Winchester. On June 25, 1871, he commenced business for himself. Although having met with some reverses, Mr. Bauer still presses forward, and now enjoys a good patronage. He is a member of Chandler Lodge, No. 138, Chapter No. 73 (Masonic), Madison Lodge, No. 70 (Odd Fellows), of London, and Palestine Commandery, No. 33, Knights Templar, of Springfield, Ohio. Politically, Mr. Bauer is Republican, and has served several terms as member of the City Council. He was once the Republican nominee for Treasurer of London and defeated by only thirteen votes. He was married, April 23, 1859, to Eva Michel, a native of Stahlberg, Rhine Bavaria, Germany. Ten children have been born to them, six living—Emma, Frank, Clara, Edward, Eva and Robert. Mrs. Bauer is a member of the Presbyterian Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

I. W. BEACH, undertaker, and manufacturer and dealer in furniture, Plain City, was born in Franklin County, Ohio, July 21, 1850. He is a son of Uri and Elenore (Downing) Beach, the former a native of this county and the latter of Pennsylvania, and both of English descent. Our subject received his education in the common schools, at Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware, and at a commercial college in Pittsburgh, Penn. He worked at farming until thirty one years of age when he came to Plain City and embarked in his present enterprise, with Mr. Barlow, under the firm name of Barlow & Beach. He was married, in 1874, to Ruth Alma Slyh, a daughter of Matthias Slyh. They have one child, Lulu Ann, born Jan. 6, 1875. Mr. and Mrs. Beach are Baptists, and he is a Republican, He served one term as Township Assessor. ["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

EPHRAIM W. BIDWELL
EPHRAIM W. BIDWELL, deceased, was born Oct. 28,1817, and was the fourth son of Elisha Bidwell, one of the earliest settlers of Madison County, having settled here as early as 1814. His mother's maiden name was Dorothy Willy, and they came to Ohio from the State of Vermont, and were Yankees, or New Englanders. Ephraim was a farmer, know only to the early settlers of Madison County. Ephraim was a farmer, as also were his father and most of his brothers. He received only the limited education to be obtained in the district schools of those days, and was a self-made man, being well informed on all subjects, both political and religious. He held many offices of trust both township and county offices, and was a member of the State Legislature during the years of 1864 and 1865, and was also a teacher in the district schools the years of 1864 and 1865, and was also a teacher in the district schools both before and after his marriage. He was united in marriage to Miss Laura Lombard, Nov. 4, 1841. Ephraim and wife were the parents of six children - three daughters and three sons - all of whom are living. The eldest daughter, Olive, is now the wife of David D. Brooks, and resides in Nuckolls County, Neb. The second daughter, Dorotha Ellen, is now the wife of J. H. McKinnon, and now resides in Cass County, Neb. The third daughter, Virginia Ann, now the wife of John D. Crego, resides near Sedalia, Mo. Their husbands are all farmers. The eldest son, Monroe Bidwell, married Miss Martha C. Kreamer and resides on the old home farm, in the family homestead, where he was born and raised and where his parents lived for thirty-three years. Monroe is a farmer and stockraiser. The second son, Webster Bidwell, who married Miss Sarah Buswell, also resides on a part of the home farm, and is a farmer. The third and youngest son, Hamilton Bidwell, married Miss Nettie Spink, of Wooster, Ohio, and now resides in Lincoln, Neb. He is by profession a lawyer, Ephraim Bidwell and wife commenced life without means, but, by their united industry and economy, they succeeded in securing an ample fortune, consisting of a fine farm of 500 acres, situated in securing an ample fortune, consisting of a fine farm of 500 acres, situated between the Big and Little Darby. Ephraim also owned a fine town property and residence near Plain City, where he resided at the time of his death, and where his widow now resides. He and wife were firm believers in universal salvation, and members of the Universalist Church. He was very public-spirited, and well-informed on all political and religious topics of his day, and ever ready to uphold the right and denounce the wrong. In politics, he was an ardent worker and a thorough Republican. He died July 10, 1881, in the sixty-fourth year of his age, and lies in the family burial grounds at Foster Chapel, Madison County, Ohio. We will now give a short genealogy of Jesse Lombard and wife, parents of Laura E., wife of Ephraim Bidwell; Jesse was one of the earliest settlers of Madison County, having come here in an early day, from the State of Vermont, and settled on what is known as the Darby Plains, where his children still reside. He was a New Englander. His wife, Olive Carlton, was of German parentage, her mother being a German. Jesse and wife were the parents of six children - three sons and three daughters - five of whom are living. Jesse was a farmer, a firm believer in universal salvation, and a Whig politically. He died in 1874, in the eighty-second year of his age. His wife, Olive, died in 1858, in the sixty-fifth year of her age.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

FILMORE C. BIGELOW
FILMORE C. BIGELOW, P. O. Danville, Ill., born Jan. 23, 1848, at Plain City, Madison Co., Ohio. His parents were Dr. Daniel K. and Lydia (Custer) Bigelow. He was engaged in farming and clerking in a grocery store up to 1866; then attended College at Columbus, Ohio, and began telegraphing in 1867. He was married in April 14, 1875, to Miss Annie M. Ball, at Clarksville, Tenn., after which he settled in Danville, Ill. Has two children, Edith I., born Nov. 13, 1878, and Pearl K., born Nov. 11, 1880. In 1880, he quit telegraphing and commenced as billing clerk for the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railroad Company, which position he still holds. Mrs. Bigelow's parents were Ephraim and Sarah (Peek) Ball. Her grandparents were John and Mary (Grimes) Ball. Mrs. Bigelow was born May 10, 1857 at North Manchester, Wabash County, Ind.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

NATHAN BOND BLAIR
NATHAN BOND BLAIR, retired merchant, London, was born in London on the present site of Houston & Burnham's hardware store, June 24, 1824. He is a son of John and Jency Blair, of Scotch and Irish descent. John Blair was an early pioneer of this county, and a moderate land-holder. He was also an early resident of London. He traded his town property for a small farm, on what is known as the "Lower Glade," five miles south of London, to which he removed when our subject was but nine years of age. There the latter's time was occupied in tilling the soil and attending school. When he had secured such an education as the schools of those days afforded, he returned to London, being eighteen years of age. He served a three years' apprenticeship as carpenter and joiner, receiving, during this time, the munificent wages of $3 per month. After serving his apprenticeship, he commenced jour work, being recognized as a skillful carpenter and builder. In 1847, he was married to Mary Penny. To this union was born one son—Henry C. Mrs. Blair died in the spring of 1849, and the son the following fall. In the fall of 1850, Mr. Blair was again married, to Mrs. E. A. Lamb, who had one son—Oscar E. They have three children—Anna M., Amanda and Harry Nathan, all of whom are living. The latter is managing editor of the London Enterprise. At the time of his second union, Mr. Blair was engaged in milling at Blairtown (named after a member of the family who owned large tracts of land near there), but subsequently returned to London and resumed work at his trade. He was engaged at that for the next seven years, employing from ten to fifteen men. He again bought the sawmill at Blairtown, and operated it for seven years. He then went to Jefferson and engaged in the furniture and undertaking business in connection with his brother, J. C. Blair. After some time, the partnership was dissolved, and Mr. Blair continued the business until the spring of 1877, when he removed his stock to London. He there carried on the same business for two years, and then disposed of his stock and trade to Lohr & Son. Mr. Blair united with the Methodist Episcopal Church when seventeen years of age. He is a charter member of Jefferson Lodge, No. 412 (I O. O. F.), and the Republican party. He is an honest, upright citizen, and highly esteemed by all.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

A. J. BLUE
A. J. BLUE, farmer, P. O. London, was born in this State October 31, 1849. He is a son of Harvey A. and Emily (Bowman) Blue, of German descent, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. Our subject attended the district schools of his native county and the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, graduating from the latter in 1871. He then chose milling for an occupation, and accordingly purchased a grist-mill in London. He followed farming until January 31, 1877, when he married Carrie A. Rankin, a daughter of Albert and Margaret (With low) Rankin. She fell. heir to 100 acres of land near London, on which they now reside. They have two children, viz., Harford and Emily A. Mr. Blue is a member of the Baptist Church, and his wife of the Methodist. He is a Republican in politics. His father was born in 1816, and is still living. His mother was born in 1826, and died in 1881.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

T. J. BOLDS
T. J. BOLDS, the oldest boot and shoe merchant in London, and probably of Madison County, was born in Maryland October 20, 1828. His father, Thomas Bolds, was also a native of Maryland, and a shoe-maker by trade. He came to London in 1851, and resided there till his death, in 1864, at which time he was the senior member of the boot and shoe firm of T. Bolds & Son. He married Louisa Jarman, a native of Maryland. They were the parents of eight children, two now living. Mrs. Rachel L Haynes, of Jefferson, and our subject. Mrs. Holds departed this life February 19, 1837. Our subject was the fourth child of this family, and has been engaged in his present business all his life. He was a member of the firm of T. Bolds & Son, at the time of his father's death, and has since continued the business alone. Mr. Bolds is one of the oldest and most prominent merchants and citizens of London, and a man well respected by the entire community. He is a Republican in politics. He was married, July 18, 1865, to Amanda F. Bryan, a sister of M. L. Bryan, of the Madison County Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. Bolds are members of the Episcopal Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

EMELINE BOND
MRS. EMELINE BOND, whose maiden name was Emeline Phillips, was born in the State of New York in 1818. She was a daughter of Aaron and Catharine (Lawson) Phillips, the former a native of Long Island of English descent, and the latter a native of New York State, of German descent. They came to Ohio in 1819. They had seven children, all of whom are deceased but our subject. She was married in 1839, to S. O. Worthington, of Franklin County, and in 1841 they moved into Plain City and built the hotel in which she now resides. Mr. Worthington died in 1853, leaving one child, Wilson S., who was born Jan. 29, 1843, and died Jan. 7, 1876. In 1876, Mrs. Worthington married Hiram Bond, a native of Ontario County, N. Y., where he was born in 1818. He is a miller by trade, but since 1876 has been conducting the business of the hotel.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

DANIEL BOYD
DANIEL BOYD, stock dealer, Plain City, was born in Washington County, Penn., May 1, 1828. He is the son of James and Martha (Millikin) Boyd, natives of Pennsylvania, who emigrated to Ohio in 1831 and settled in Canaan Township. Our subject was reared and educated in Canaan Township, and has made stock-dealing a life occupation. He has also given some attention to the wool trade during the past thirty years. He was married, Feb. 14, 1850, to Mary A. Smith, a daughter of Samuel Smith. By this union four children were born, viz.: John S., a farmer of the township; Ella W., who died aged four years; Dwight S., a farmer of this township; and Charles, at home. Mr. Boyd is a Republican, and he has held the offices of Township Trustee, Treasurer and Assessor, and for three years was County Commissioner. He owns 125 acres of land, in addition to other property. His wool and stock operations are very extensive, but operated with care and sound judgment, and the profits from them have enabled Mr. Boyd to amass a comfortable competency for his declining years.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JAMES BOYD
JAMES BOYD, farmer, P. O. Plain City, was born in Washington County, Penn., June 5, 1826, and moved with his parents to Madison County in 1831, locating in this township in 1852. He was a son of James and Martha (Millikin) Boyd, natives of Pennsylvania. Our subject's education was limited to the common schools of this county. He early began the work of a farmer, and has sine spent his life in that useful occupation. He owns a farm of 356½ acres of land, near Plain City, where he resides. He was married, Nov. 20, 1864, to Ann E. Williams, a native of Franklin County, Ohio, and a daughter of Ebenezer Williams. They have three children - Emma, James Grant and Robert Colfax. Mr. Boyd was a Whig until the formation of the Republican party, since which he has been a Republican. His grandfather, Col. Millikin, an officer in the war of 1812, was a surveyor by profession, and at one time owned 2,200 acres of land here.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

ROBERT BOYD
ROBERT BOYD, farmer and stock-raiser, and President of the London Exchange Bank, residence, West High street, London, was born in Washington County, Penn., October 9, 1824. He is a son of James Boyd, also a native of Pennsylvania, and a farmer by occupation. He came to Madison. County, Ohio, in September, 1830, locating in Canaan Township. Col. James Milliken had located 2,200 acres of land in this county, in 1829, and divided it equally among his nine children. One daughter, Martha, was the wife of James Boyd, and it was upon her portion of the estate (200 acres) that they settled. They were the parents of four children, all living, and residents of this county—two sons at Plain City, Darby Township; a daughter, wife of Squire William Kilgore, of Canaan Township, and our subject. James Boyd was about thirty-three years of age at the time of his death. His widow is still living and in her eightieth year. Robert Boyd was the oldest child and grew to manhood on Darby Plains, Canaan Township. He assisted his mother on the farm till the date of his marriage, October 18, 1849, when he was married to Caroline M., daughter of Valentine and Nancy (Roberts) Wilson. They came to Ohio about 1810, and now reside in Somerford Township. After marriage, Mr. Boyd engaged in farming for himself, on 145 acres of the home farm. He then sold his land and purchased 400 acres in Jefferson Township (now a farm of 420 acres), where he resided live years. He then removed to his present residence in London. When quite young, Mr. Boyd commenced dealing in stock, and has since continued in that business. He is a member of the firm of Boyd & Byers, probably the largest grazers and dealers in stock in Madison County. Mr. Boyd has been very successful in life, now owning 1,380 acres of land, 113 of which is in the corporate limits of London, and 110 acres constituting the home farm. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a Trustee in that body. His political views are Prohibition-Republican. He was one of the first Directors of the Madison County Infirmary; has been Township Trustee, and served six terms in the Village Council. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd have been blessed with five children—Nancy, wife of J. W. Byers, of Boyd & Byers; Martha A., wife of A. G. Carpenter, an attorney at law, of Cleveland, Ohio; Albert W., who married Myrtie L. Fowler, of Wyandot County, Ohio; Caroline M. and Robert W., the two latter graduates of the London High School.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

J. C. BRIDGMAN
J. C. BRIDGMAN, auctioneer, London, can trace back his ancestry to about the time of Oliver Cromwell, in England. He has in his possession a wood-cut, engraved about that time, and bearing the following inscription: "Charlotte Lady Middleton, daughter of the Right Hon. Sir Orlando Bridgman, Knight and Baronet, Lord-Keeper of ye Great Seale of England, and Lady Dowager of Sir Thomas Middleton, Chirkcastle, in Denbighshire, Baronet for ye advancement of this work, contributed this Plate to whose Patronage it is Humbly dedicated by R. Blome." It was in all probability his son, James Bridgman, who came to America in 1640, and is of the " Pilgrim Fathers " stock. He settled at Hartford, Conn., the same year, thence moved to Springfield, Mass., and subsequently to Northampton, N. H. John, his only son, had six sons—John, born in 1674: James, born in 1677; Isaac, born in 1680; Ebenezer, born in 1686; Thomas, born in 1688, and Orlando, born in 1701. John, the eldest son, had a son Jonathan, who was born in Connecticut. He afterward moved to a farm on Moose Mountain, in the Leming neighborhood, and near Hanover, H. H. He had six sons—Isaac, John, Asa, Abel, Gideon and Orlando. These sons were all ministers of the Baptist denomination, and when one of them, Abel, died, another brother, Isaac, preached the funeral sermon, and the four remaining brothers acted as pall-bearers. This son, Abel, previously mentioned, married a Miss Fowler, a cousin of O. S. Fowler, the great phrenologist of New York City. He was a laborious worker, and died at the comparatively early age of forty-four years. His widow subsequently married a Mr. Bass. Abel's son, Erastus, was born at Hanover, N. H., in 1796, and there resided during his life. He was a farmer through life and died in 1874, at the age of seventy-eight years. He married Mary Flagg, a native of Massachusetts, and a daughter of Dr. Bazalele Flagg, a great lover of, and indulger in, practical jokes. They were the parents of seven children, three daughters and four sons, three living—Mary Frances, John C. (our subject) and Nathan C., Adeline, Charles, Augusta and Mendal are deceased. Mrs. Bridgman departed this life in the summer of 1868, and both parents are buried near Hanover. N H., in the old cemetery near the brick church where Abel Bridgman's sermon was preached. Our subject, the fifth child and second son of this family, was born at Hanover, N. H., March 24, 1831, and was there reared. He obtained a fair common-school education, and part of an academic one. He was married, January 19, 1853, to Lucy B. Pelton, and, on April 13. 1854, Mr. Bridgman and wife arrived at London, this county. Mr. Bridgman secured a position as clerk for W. W. Fellows, in the dry goods liner and remained with him six months. He then secured a similar position with Samuel Tenny, and subsequently was with Shaw & Toland one year. He then purchased a half-interest in the grocery trade of William Smith, and the firm put out the following sign over their place of business: "Smith & Bridgman, Genius and Capital Combined" Either the former quality or latter necessity failed, for the firm carried on the business but a few months. After engaging a short time in other enterprises, Mr. Bridgman commenced at London in his present business. This was in 1856, at the beginning of the stock sales in Madison County. Since that time, Mr. Bridgman has devoted nearly all his time to this occupation, and his success as an auctioneer is beyond doubt, and does not need any word from us. "Jack Bridgman," as he is familiarly called, is well known all over this and adjoining counties, and his jovial manners, free and ready wit, and common-sense qualities have won for him the friendship of all. When his father's estate was being settled up, he generously relinquished his claim to any part of it to a younger brother who had stayed at home and taken care of the old folks. Mr. Bridgman commenced life in Madison County without a dollar in money, and has succeeded in life beyond his anticipations. His sales of every description during the year 1882 amounted to $350,000. He is a Royal and Select Master in Masonry, and connected with all the fraternity organizations at London. He is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. and Mrs. Bridgman had seven children given them four living—Marion Frances, wife of William Chrisman, of London; Franklin Ross, with Jennings, Ford & Paxton, live stock commission merchants, Cincinnati; Mary S. and Ollie. Charles M., Flora and Orlando are deceased. Mr. Bridgman is a director in the Madison National Bank. Mrs. Bridgman is a lady of education and refinement, and as jovial in her manners as her husband. She is a daughter of David M. Pelton, who was born in Lyme, N. H., November 26, 1804. He was a son of David M. Pelton, Sr., also a native of Lyme, N. H. He was a cattle drover, and died in 1818. He married Lucy Stone, and his widow subsequently went to New York State, and married the father of Millard Fillmore, thus becoming step-mother to the President of the United States. David M. Pelton, Jr., the father of Mrs. Bridgman, married Sally Boss, who was born in Hanover, N. H. They were the parents of five children—Lucy B., born May 2, 1834; Isabel F., born August 3. 1840: David C., born June 26, 1843; Brewster, born August 23, 1848, and Franklin R., born August 20, 1852. Lucy B. Bridgman and David C. are the two living. Mr. Pelton died April 3, 1872, aged sixty-eight years, and his wife February 8, 1871. Mrs. Bridgman's maternal grandfather was Thomas Ross, who enlisted in the Colonial army during the Revolutionary war, at eighteen years of age, and subsequently died at Hanover, N. H.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

BENJAMIN BROBST
BENJAMIN BROBST, with Houston & Burnham, hardware, London, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, January 21, 1842. He is a son of Peter Brobst, a native of Berks County, Penn., and a farmer by occupation. He accompanied his father, Jacob Brobst, to Ohio in 1806, the latter locating in Fairfield, near Pickaway County. Peter Brobst is yet living and is in his seventy-seventh year. He married Elizabeth Fellers, a native of Fairfield County. They were the parents of ten children, seven now living, our subject the only one in this county. Mrs. Brobst departed this life in 1879.
Our subject was reared on the home farm in Pickaway County, and in early life "farmed it" for three years. In the fall of 1865, he came to Madison County, locating at Jefferson. He there engaged in mercantile pursuits for four years. He then sold his stock and removed to London, engaging in the sewing-machine business. He remained at that for seven years, and then clerked for P. C. Cowling for four years. Since 1880, he has been connected with Houston & Burnham. Mr. Brobst is an influential member of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, and Deacon and Clerk of the official board. Politically, he is Democratic. Mr. Brobst was married, April 7, 1862, to Loraine Culp, a native of Pickaway County, Ohio. They have three children—Ernest E., Sarah E. and Anna F. Mrs. Brobst is also a member of the Lutheran Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JAMES and DWYER BROWN
James and Dwyer Brown, two brothers, were natives of New York, but became residents of Somerford Township about 1818-20. James was born June 21. 1795. He first emigrated to Canada, and thence to Ohio. His wife, Mary Ann, was born in Virginia in 1803. They were married in Madison County. He died March 13,1875. Dwyer Brown married a Miss McMullen, and subsequently moved West. Mr. James Brown was an excellent neighbor and citizen, a useful member of society, and was entrusted with many of the offices of the township. He raised a large family of children, who became useful members of society, and whose characters are above reproach.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

PETER BUFFENBERGER
PETER BUFFENBERGER a native of Virginia, while a young single man, emigrated to Madison County, Ohio, and in 1810 located on Paint Creek, in this township, and entered at once largely into the stock business on the prairie, and was very successful. About 1816, he fenced in a large tract of these prairies. He accumulated a large estate, and when, at the advanced age of seventy-five years, married a young lady, Miss Angeline Hutson, by whom he had two children—Eugene and May. The former married a Mr. Crawford, of New York. Mr. Buffenberger died a few years after his marriage, leaving his family 4,200 acres of fine land, besides 700 acres which he had previously deeded in fee simple to his wife. His wife subsequently married for her second husband Mr. Colburn, and they now reside in New Jersey, and Mary, her youngest daughter by her first marriage, who is unmarried, resides with them.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

L. W. BURNHAM
L. W. BURNHAM, of Houston & Burnham, hardware merchants, London, was born in Pike Township, Madison County, December 12,1852. He is a son of Henry Burnham, a native of this county and a farmer by occupation. He married Eveline Williams, a native of this county. L. W. Burnham is the elder of five children, and when a young man accepted the position of Teller of the Trader's Bank of Mechanicsburg, Champaign Co., Ohio. He remained in this position three years, and then came to London to accept a similar one in the Central Bank of that city. After three years he resigned that position, and engaged in his present business with T. J. Houston, under the firm name of Houston & Burnham. Mr. Burnham is a member of the M. E. Church, and Republican politically. He was married, October 5, 1875, to Ella M. Houston, a sister of his present partner. She was a member of the M. E. Church and departed this life June 6, 1880.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

MARCELLUS L. BRYAN
MARCELLUS L. BRYAN, editor and publisher of the Madison Democrat, was born at Batavia, Clermont Co., Ohio, March 29, 1823. His grandfather, David C. Bryan, who died July 31, 1829, was born on Long Island in 1771, and, in 1792, married Ruth Bryan. In 1800, he moved to New Jersey, in 1803 to Williamsburg, this county, and, in 1825, to Batavia. He was elected a Representative in the Legislature in 1806, but his seat was contested and given to Thomas Morris, and served as State Senator from 1807 to 1810, when he resigned to become Clerk of the Courts, which place he ably filled until his death, a period of nineteen years. His son, Malancthon A., was then Clerk for some two years. He was born September 26, 1803, and died March 27, 1832. George S., another son, was born September 3. 1792, and died November 28, 1832, and his wife Mary died July 16, 1844, aged forty-seven years. Our subject's father, whose name was also David C., was born on Long Island, and was quite young when brought to Batavia by his parents. In 1828, when only nineteen years of age, he married Miss Mary M. Moore, youngest daughter of Capt. Charles Moore, an ex Captain of the war of 1812, and an early settler of Clermont County, from Philadelphia. To this union eight children were born, viz., Marcellus L.; Francis, wife of T. J. Bolds, of London; Charles M., of California; Beulah C., wife of Joseph Kewley, of Richmond, Ind.; Dr. A. S., of Point Pleasant, Clermont County; Rose, wife of Mr. Patterson, of Point Pleasant; Eva, wife of Allen Armacost, of Wayne County, Ind.; Learner L., a printer in Chicago; and two daughters that died in infancy. The father was a man of prominence in his community, and at the time of his death was serving as Auditor of Clermont County. He was an Old-Line Whig until the organization of the Republican party, when he became a Democrat. He was held in high esteem by the people and for many years occupied the office of Justice of the Peace. He died in 1867 from the effects of sunstroke received about a year previous. His wife still survives, at the age of seventy-three years. Our subject remained at home until nineteen years of age, when he went to Columbus and engaged as a type setter on the Ohio Statesman. Before leaving home, he had learned the printer's trade under Andrew Gest, in the Clermont Courier office. After remaining in Columbus one year, Mr. Bryan went to Circleville, but after a year's residence there returned to Columbus, where he married Miss Martha S. Masterson, a native of Ireland and a daughter of Prof. John O. Masterson. After his marriage, he went to Circleville, where he operated the Circleville Herald one year. He then returned to Columbus and remained there one year, after which he and John A Kissinger came to London and took possession of the National Democrat, of which Mr. Bryan soon became sole proprietor, changing the name of the paper to the Madison Democrat, under which title he has since continued its publication. While in Columbus, he and four other journeymen printers established the Daily Reveille, and in this office the great humorist, Artemus Ward (Charles Brown) was employed for some time. Mr. Bryan withdrew from the Reveille company one year after its organization, and six months before it was discontinued. Of his family of eight children, seven survive, viz., Mary L., Ormand M., Chester E., Charles M., Mattie T., Marcellus and Addison. Annie O., the next to the youngest, is deceased. Mr. Bryan has been a Democrat ever since he cast his first vote. He served as Mayor of the village of London two terms and as County Recorder one term.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JOHN W. BYERS, deceased. The first of this name of whom any definite account can be given was Thomas Byers, who, with his son James, both natives of Scotland, emigrated from their native country to escape the persecutions their people were subjected to in that country, and made their home in Ireland, where they suffered in the siege of Londonderry. James, with his three sons, Thomas, Andrew and Samuel, emigrated to America at an early day, with other Scotch-Irish Covenanters. Andrew settled in Pennsylvania in 1791 or 1792, where he raised a family of children, of whom one son, James, married in Fayette County, Penn., and had four children, one son and three daughters. His wife died, and he was married the second time, to Elizabeth Watson, by whom he had seven children, five girls and two sons, John and Moses. In 1807, he moved to Ross County, Ohio, where he lived nine years. He then purchased land in Fayette County, and, four years later, finding his title defective, he was persuaded to relinquish this land, receiving 300 acres in the wilds of Madison County as an inducement to peaceably give up possession. He located in Madison County in 1820. His son, John W., was born near Uniontown, Fayette Co., Penn., May 9, 1800, and, in 1825, married Matilda Hunter, by whom he had three children, of whom one survives—Matilda, wife of Samuel Truitt. Mrs. Byers died in 1831, and, in the fall of 1833, be married Sarah Painter, by whom he had ten children—Mary R., wife of N. P. Gardner; Louisa J., wife of Thomas Price; Missouri, deceased, wife of George Truitt; Joel M., who married Louisa Fitzgerald; James W., whose sketch appears elsewhere; John C, who married Josephine Rickabaugh; Andrew, who married Ida Bidwell; Mary E., deceased, and Laura and Kate, at home. Mr. Byers retired from active life nine years before his death and, after six weeks' illness, died, February 2, 1881, his remains being interred in Kirkwood Cemetery. Mrs. Byers' grandparents McGrew emigrated from Virginia to Westmoreland County, Penn., at a very early day, but the Indians were so hostile that they were obliged to bury their possessions and return to Virginia several times, until finally they resorted to block-houses for safety. He was a surveyor in Pennsylvania and Kentucky. They had seven children, three sons and four daughters. The youngest, Rossanna, was Mrs. Byers' mother. Thomas Painter, Mrs. Byers' grandfather, had three sons and seven daughters. Of these, Joel, her father, was born in 1787, and moved to Pennsylvania from Harper's Ferry, Va.. when he was quite small. In 1809, he married Rosanna McGrew, and had four sons and two daughters. Of the latter, Sarah was born in 1813, and when eleven years of age her mother died. In 1825, her father married Jemima Allen. On March 21, 1826 or 1827, they started for Cincinnati on a family flat-boat, arriving April 12, 1832. They then went to Dayton on a canal boat. Soon after, they returned to Cincinnati, and from there Mrs. Byers went to Jefferson in a stage. Mrs. Byers was married to Mr. Byers November 28, 1833, by Rev. Allen. They lived on a farm, one mile from Lilly Chapel, thirty-eight years, and moved to London in March, 1872. She joined the Presbyterian Church in 1832. While at Brownsville, she saw the first steamboat launched on the Ohio River. It was called the Reindeer, and was built by Robert Fulton, and was sent to Pittsburgh. Mrs. Byers is descended from an old family of Quakers who lived in Virginia many years. The subject of this sketch united with the Presbyterian Church in 1829, being one of the original members in the organization of that church at London. For over fifty-one years, he continued a faithful, consistent member of the same church, with the exception of a few years, when he removed his membership to Jefferson to aid in organizing a church there. As a citizen and business man, the integrity, loyalty and generosity of his spirit were unquestioned. As a husband and father, he was affectionate and self-sacrificing to the last degree. He loved life and often expressed his gratitude to God that He had spared him to live so long, but with great composure and assurance he awaited the invitation to higher joys. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. G. Paterson at the family residence. ["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

J. W. BYERS
J. W. BYERS, of Boyd & Byers, stock-raisers and dealers, London, was born in Fairfield Township, this county, May 26, 1841. His grandfather, James Byers, was a native of Pennsylvania, and came to Ohio at an early day. He first located in Ross County, and subsequently in Fairfield Township, this county. One son, John W. Byers, was also a native of Pennsylvania, and was twelve years of age when his father came to Ohio. He was a farmer through life, and died February 2, 1881. He married Matilda Hunter, a native of Franklin County, Ohio. Two children were born to this union, one now living. Mr. Byers' second wife was Sarah J. Painter, also a native of the Keystone State. Ten children were given to them, eight living. Mrs. Byers is still living, and resides in London. Our subject was one of a pair of twins, and resided in Fairfield Township until twenty-one years of age. He then engaged in the grocery trade in London, remaining in that business fifteen years. At the expiration of this time he engaged in the cattle business with Robert Boyd (in 1879), and the firm are one of the most extensive in their line of trade in the county. Mr. Byers is a member of the Masonic Lodge and Council and the Presbyterian Church. He is Republican in politics, and one year served as Assessor of Union Township. He was married, January 31, 1871, to Nannie E., daughter of Robert Boyd. They have three living children—R. Boyd, Alice L. and John W. Mrs. Byers is a member of the M. E. Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

S. H. CARTZDAFNER
S. H. CARTZDAFNER, London, a prominent grocer, was born in Frederick County, Md., April 14, 1826. He is a son of Michael Cartzdafner, a native of that State, and there reared. He was a miller by trade, and came to Ohio in 1854. He located at Georgesville, in Franklin County, and in this county a year later. He came to London in 1860, and there died in the spring of 1862. Mr. Cartzdafner married Maria Connelly, a native of Montgomery County, Md. They were the parents of ten children, six of whom are living. Mother died in April, 1881, and sleeps beside her husband, in Oak Hill Cemetery, east of London. Our subject was the second child and son of this family, and, when nineteen years of age, went to "Virginia, where he learned milling. He worked at his trade six or seven years, in Jefferson County, that State, principally at Harper's Ferry. In 1852, he came to Columbus, and soon after to Madison County, being first employed by J. C. Smith in the "Old Chrisman Mill," in Oak Run Township. He was in the Georgesville Mill two years; three years in the Robert's Mill, three miles west of London, and soon after located permanently in London. He became associated in the grocery trade with John Jones, the partnership being dissolved two and a half year later. Since that time Mr. Cartzdafner has been in business alone, and has met with fair success in his mercantile transactions. He became connected with Virginia Lodge, No. 1 (Odd Fellows), of Harper's Ferry, in 1849. and since his residence in London has been a member of Madison Lodge, No. 70, and the Encampment of the same fraternity. His political views are decidedly Democratic, and he has been a member of both the Council and Board of Education of London. He was united in marriage, June 25, 1850, to Mary S. Jones, a native of Pennsylvania, then residing it Harper's Ferry, Va. Eleven children have been given them, four living—Anna, wife of Will H. Chandler, Jr., an enterprising business man of London; Maria, William and Fannie. Mrs. Cartzdafner is a member of the M. E. denomination.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

J. W. CHANCE
J. W. CHANCE, a rising and popular young dentist of this city was born in Clark County, Ohio, August 29, 1848. His ancestry can be traced back in the following: Jeremiah Change was an Englishman by birth, and came to America between 1730 and 1740, locating in Maryland, where he lived till his death. One son, John Chance, was born near Baltimore about 1762. He married Martha Watkins. One son of this union, Samuel Chance was born in Maryland, eighteen miles from .Baltimore, m 1781. He was a wagon-maker by trade, and married Mary Smallwood, a native of Virginia, and daughter of Dean Smallwood, and niece of Brig. Gen. Smallwood, of Revolutionary fame. They were the parents of ten children, only three living. The father died near Catawba, Clark Co., Ohio, October 21, 1838 and the mother in Catawba March 1, 1870, aged eighty-one years. One of their three living children is William Chance, the father of our subject. He was born in Pleasant Township, Clark County, Ohio, July 14, 1815, and is now a resident of Champaign County. He married Henrietta Jones, born in Champaign County, Ohio, February 21, 1827, and daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Wooley) Jones. The latter was the daughter of Stephen Wooley, of Revolutionary fame, who was the son of William Wooley. This latter married Margaret Brown, a granddaughter of Walford Weber, grandson of King William IV, of Holland. He came to America in 1649, and purchased a goodly portion of Manhattan Island, now the site of New York City. His sister, Aneke Jans, left an estate embracing 192 acres of land in the heart of New York City, and for which the heirs now lay claim. It will thus be seen that William Chance's wife, the mother of our subject, is of royal blood, sixth in line from King William IV, of Holland. She has been the mother of eight children, five living, and two residing in London, this county, subject and brother, John S., his assistant. The subject of this notice was reared on a farm, obtaining a very fair education. He was engaged in teaching school in Champaign County for two years, and for five years in Jefferson and Deer Creek Townships, of this county. About 1876, he commenced the practical study of dentistry, at Columbus, with Dr. R. G. Warner, of that city, a former resident of London. He remained with him one year and then came to London. He immediately formed a partnership with Dr. Carter, which was dissolved by the latter's death, in 1878. Dr. Chance then took charge of the entire business, and has steadily increased it until at present he has one of the finest offices in Central Ohio, and a practice large and remunerative. He is an indefatigable worker, and well merits the success that has followed his every effort. He is connected by membership with the Ohio State Dental Association, the M E. Church, and is a true believer in the principles of the Republican party. Dr. Chance was married, November 30, 1876, to Allie E. Snyder, a native of Madison County, and daughter of John and Drusilla (Ellsworth) Snyder. They have two children—Paul A. and Ethel, Mrs. Chance is also a consistent member of the M. E. denomination.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JAMES CHAPMAN
James Chapman was born in Frederick County, Va., in 1801. In 1816, he became a settler of Paint Township, and subsequently married Ann Chapman, a native of Virginia, by whom he had nine children; three now survive. Mr. Chapman is now eighty-one years of age, is hale and hearty, with good eyesight, and is now one of the few early pioneers yet surviving.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

GEORGE CHAPPELL
GEORGE CHAPPELL settled near Walnut Run about 1810, and remained a resident of this township till death. He was a native of Virginia; married Margaret Green: had four sons and two daughters, all deceased but two—Thomas and Charles, who are now residents of Illinois. Mr. Chappell served as a Justice of the Peace for many years, and while in that office used his best efforts to get parties to compromise, and thus avoid all litigation, if possible; was a most excellent man and faithful officer. John C. Jones, though not an early settler of Paint Township, having settled here in 1844, yet he was born in East Tennessee in 1817, came to Ohio in 1821, grew to manhood, and has been prominently identified with the growth and progress of the county from a very early day. He has served as Director of the County Infirmary, as a Justice of the Peace, as Township Trustee and other minor offices. He is now quite advanced in years, having spent a long and useful life, devoted to the interests of his county and the community in which he has lived. Rev. William Sutton, a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, was, it is believed, born in Virginia, but became a settler of Paint Township about 1810, locating on the Hume land. He married Hannah Coberly; resided here but a few years, when, as a Methodist minister, he had to adopt the itinerant life they live; but the greater portion of his life was spent in the service of the ministry within Madison County. He died at Mt. Sterling, although his home and residence at the time of his death was in London, and there his body was taken for interment. He was an excellent man and faithful Christian minister Lewis Higgins. a native of Virginia, settled on the Hume tract of land about 1811.
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THOMAS COBERLY
Thomas Coberly, a native of Virginia, emigrated to Ohio and purchased 100 acres of land in Paint Township about 1810, upon which he located, and where he resided till death. He was an industrious, hard-working pioneer, and raised a family of four sons and three daughters. Of these, William served in the war of 1812, and subsequently became an extensive farmer and trader, which occupations he followed through life.
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DAVID COLVER
David Colver, a native of Vermont, settled on land now owned by Reason Louck about 1815-16. In early life he was a sailor, and followed the sea. After settling here he remained till his death. He was an active, industrious man, a good neighbor, and a firm Universalist in religious belief. He raised a large family, who are now all deceased.
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REUBEN GREGG
Reuben Gregg, a native of Virginia, emigrated to Chillicothe in 1810, and to Madison County in 1811, and located in Paint Township, about half a mile below where the village of Newport is now situated. He married Phoebe Harpole, and remained a resident here till his death.
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WILLIAM HARBER
William Harber, a native of Virginia, and the only surviving one of his father's family—who were all killed by the Indians when he was but a child, he having escaped by secreting himself in the tall grass— grew to manhood, married, and settled in the north part of this township about 1825. He raised a large family of children, but who. in after veal's. all moved away, since which nothing is known of them.
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ERASTUS HATHAWAY
Erastus Hathaway, a native of New York, and a ship carpenter by trade, settled with his family on land now owned by Hiram Richmond, about 1818-20, and lived and died here. He purchased his land of John Caperton, a native of Virginia, who settled here about 1814, but who, about 1832, returned to his native State. Mr. Hathaway was a man of character and ability, and served as Trustee and a Justice of the Peace.

PETER P. HELPHENSTINE
Peter P. Helphenstine, a native of Virginia, was a Major in the war of the Revolution, for which services he received land grants for a large amount of land. In October, 18_5, he started for Ohio, and, arriving at Chillicothe, he became acquainted with Col: Elias Langham, who was going up into the "Barrens" to lay some warrants. David Watson had accompanied Mr. Helphenstine from Virginia to Ohio, and now they associated with Col. Langham and came up to Madison County to locate and lay and survey their lands. They finished their work about February 14, and returned to Chillicothe. Mr. Helphenstine and Mr. Watson remained there till in September, 1806. They returned to Virginia and at once made preparations to remove to Ohio. Mr. Helphenstine and family, Jonathan Minshall and family and Walter Watson and family, with their connections, to the number of thirty-nine persons, with six or seven wagons, started for their new home in the wilds of Ohio. They arrived at Chillicothe the last of October, 1806. There they left their families, while Mr. Watson, with his family, located upon a place which his son David had previously rented for him, and Mr. Helphenstine proceeded to his land, and,, with the assistance of David Watson and others, erected a cabin, and, in January, 1807, moved his family from Chillicothe into the cabin, in his new and permanent home, and here Mr. Helphenstine remained through life, being, it is believed, the second settler in Paint Township. He was an excellent neighbor and citizen, a devoted Christian, and lived and died highly esteemed and respected by all who knew him. Some years later, Henry Helphenstine, a brother of the above, became a settler of Paint Township.
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SAMUEL HOUSTON
Samuel Houston was a native of Pennsylvania, and settled here about 1820. He married Elizabeth Arbuckle, by whom he had two children, deceased. He was an intelligent and well-educated man. He taught school, and was Township Clerk, and resided here till his death.
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AMOS HOWARD
Amos Howard was born on Goose Island, in the Connecticut River, Grafton County, N. H., April 9, 1775. He married Miran Mills, born March 18, 1774; were married March 22, 1796. In 1808, removed to Virginia; in 1809, came down the Ohio River in a flat-boat and settled on the site where he died. Amos Howard became a settler of the northwest part of Somerford Township about 1817-18, and lived and died there. He was burned to death about 1843. He came here a poor man, but, by industry and economy, and close application to his business, he accumulated a good competency. He had two daughters and one son. The daughters never married, but died single, and the son, Amos J., and his children, became possessed of all the property. Amos J. settled on the home place, and lived there through life. He died April 16, 1882. The Howard family have ever been known as most worthy and respected citizens. John Cory settled in the north part of the township about 1818, and served as a Justice of the Peace. Eli Williams, a native of Virginia, settled on the D. Ward place about 1818-20.
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SAMUEL and JOHN H. KENNEDY
Samuel and John H. Kennedy, natives of Virginia, settled here quite early, probably about 1815-20. The latter became a prominent and useful citizen; was a Justice of the Peace forty years; also Probate Judge from. 1864 to 1876.
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WILLIAM KIRKLEY
William Kirkley settled in the north portion of the township, on land owned by Thomas Bales, about 1825-30. He died on the farm now owned by D. Ward. He married Mary Cowan, who was an excellent Christian woman. Peter Smith, a native of Clark County, Ohio, settled here about 1825. Subsequently he became quite noted as a school-teacher and as a literary man. He removed to Illinois about 1842, where, in 1880, he was killed by being run over by a train of cars.
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GEORGE LINSON
About 1810, George Linson, a native of Virginia, settled on Paint Creek, just below the Buffenberger tract of land. He was married in Virginia, and came here in very limited circumstances; entered upon the stock business; was very successful and made money rapidly, becoming the owner of over two thousand acres of excellent land. He was the father of five sons and two daughters, of whom two now survive— Margaret, now Mrs. Shough; and Jesse. The former resides in Pleasant Township, this county; the latter in Fayette County.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

J.W. MACKINNON
J. W. Mackinnon, Superintendent of the London Public Schools, London, was born in Logan County, Ohio, Feb. 13, 1850. His grandfather, William MacKinnon, located in Logan County in an early day, and there became an Associate Judge of the Courts. One son, Daniel W., the father of our subject, was born in Clark County, and was a farmer and stockraiser through life. He died at a son's house in Auglaize County, Ohio, March 16, 1864. He was united in marriage to Phebe Hogge, a native of Clark County, and daughter of John Hogge, a native of Ireland. Mrs. MacKinnon still resides in Logan County, is fifty-three years of age, and in the enjoyment of good health. Our subject is the elder of five children, four living. He grew to manhood on the home farm, and when nineteen years of age entered Wittenberg College, Springfield, Ohio, where he remained five years, and graduated in June, 1874. Soon after he was made Principal of the Bellefontaine High School, holding that position three years. He then came to London to accept his present position, tendered him by the School Board of the latter place. Prof. MacKinnon has had charge of the London schools for 6 years, and their high standing among the graded schools of the State is due in a great measure to his energetic and tireless energy in their behalf. Mr. MacKinnon is a member of and Secretary of each of the Ohio State Teacher's Associations and the Central Ohio Teacher's Association. He is also a member of the Madison County Teachers' Association, the Knights of Honor, American Legion of Honor, and the Presbyterian Church. Previous to coming to London, Prof. MacKinnon was a member of the Logan County Board of School Examiners, and since his residence here has held a like position in Madison County for the past five years. He was married, July 23, 1874, to Clara E. Wallace, a native of Logan County, Ohio, and daughter off Dr. John P. and Emeline (Hover) Wallace, of that county, both now deceased. They are the parents of one son - Lee. Mrs. MacKinnon is also a member of the Presbyterian Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JACOB MARCH
Jacob March, dealer in foreign and domestic marbles, and proprietor of the London Marble and Granite Works, London, was born in Pennsylvania Feb. 25, 1839. He is a son of Daniel March, also a native of Pennsylvania, a farmer in early life, and subsequently a merchant. He lived in Pennsylvania until his death, about seven years ago. He was united in marriage to Rebecca Sparh, also a native of Pennsylvania, who became the mother of ten children. Four of these are now living and two residents of Madison County. Mrs. March died over thirty years ago. Mr. March was reared in his native State, and after his mother's death went to live with a drover, remaining with him over two years, and assisting in driving stock to Baltimore. He then learned the drug trade at East Berlin, Penn., where he was employed for four years. In 1858, he came to London, and learned the marble cutter's trade with Samuel Menter, remaining with him until his death, in September, 1861. He then carried on the business for his employer's widow until 1862, when he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Col. Wilcox commanding. He was in the service three years, serving as a private the greater part of the time, and was honorably discharged July 11, 1865. Upon coming back to Ohio, he engaged in business at Springfield until June, 1866, when he returned to London, and bought a half interest in the marble trade of M. M. Hutchinson. He became sole proprietor a year later, and has remained such, with the exception of six months, when his brother Levi was a partner. Mr. March is an enterprising business man, and has succeeded in building up a good trade. He is a member of all the organizations in London pertaining to the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities, the American Legion of Honor, and is a member of and Treasurer of the Board of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. March is also Treasurer of the Homestead Aid Association, of London. Politically, he is Democratic. He was married, November 27, 1867, to Katy Crawford, a native of this county. Of their five children, four are living—Arabell, Ida May, Kittie Z. and Algeraus C. Mrs. March and daughter Arabell are also members of the Presbyterian denomination.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JACOB MARTIN
Jacob Martin, superannuated minister of the Methodist Episcopal denomination, was born near Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, April 3, 1806. His father was Charles H. Martin, a native of England, who came to America previous to the Revolutionary war. He served in the Colonial army, and subsequently drew a pension for services rendered. He was a single man, and in 1789 removed to Marietta, Ohio, one year after its first settlement, and where he met and afterward married Mary M. Gayler, a native of Pennsylvania. The date of their marriage was 1797. Soon after their union, they located on the Muskingum River, about six miles above Marietta, and in 1815, to Licking County, Ohio, where both passed the remainder of life. The father was a member of the Seceder Church in early life, but subsequently let his thoughts turn to things of a more worldly nature. He was again converted through the ministration of his own son, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in August, 1833, and died in the full faith of a blissful immortality, in November, 1838, aged eighty years. His wife became a member of the Baptist Church in 1821 or 1822, but for convenience, joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1848, living in that faith till her death, December 8, 1860. She was born March 31, 1777. Jacob Martin, born 1806, was in his tenth year when his parents in 1815. removed to Licking County. His educational facilities, like those or all "pioneer boys," were limited, he receiving only fifteen months' schooling in all his life (outside of his theological studies), and that at scattered intervals, between the ages of five and twenty years. He remained with his father until he entered the university. He first thought of taking the step when twenty-one years, of age, and in 1831 joined the Ohio Conference when twenty-five years of age. He was first assigned to the Wilmington (Clinton County) Circuit, and his subsequent locations are as follows: In 1832 , to the Tiffin Circuit; in 1833, to Fort Defiance, and thence to Logan County, W. Va., one year, his circuit covering 600 miles; thence to Gallipolis; in 1836, to London Circuit; next to Franklinton Circuit, one year; Granville Circuit, a like period. At close of that year, superannuated on account of failing health, and removed to Range Township, in this county, and was there engaged in farming for fourteen years. He then returned to the regular ministry again, and, in 1853,was assigned to the Dublin Circuit; thence to Groveport two years, and two years later to Worthington, where he had formerly bought property; two years later, was assigned to the Darbyville Circuit, in Westport, Franklin County, while family remained at Worthington; was there one year; thence to Mount Sterling, this county, and then to Johnston, Licking Co., two years: Baltimore, Fairfield Co., one year; thence, again to Mount Sterling, one year; Bloomingburg, Fayette Co., one year; Frankfort, Ross County, two years, and finally, in 1867, again superannuated, and purchased his present property in London, where he has since resided. Rev. Mr. Martin has been an able and efficient worker in the Lord's vineyard, having traveled a great deal in the State of Michigan, doing missionary work, and prior to his entering the regular ministry. In the latter, he has labored over a period of twenty-two years, averaging over 3,000 miles traversed each year, and probably a grand total of 75,000 miles, or three times the circuit of the globe. He is now resting from his labors, amid pleasant surroundings and hosts of admiring friends. Before long his bark will pass over the river to the great beyond, and where a crown of righteousness awaits him at the last day. Mr. Martin was married in March, 1836, to Johanna C. Leonard, a native of the District of Columbia, now a portion of Fairfax County, Va. Three sons were sent to bless this union, two living. The elder, James D., has been in Washington, D. C, in a dry goods house, part of the time as partner. Near the end of the rebellion, he was sent to Savannah, Ga., as Post Office Agent; thence to Charleston, S. C., where he remained in charge some six months, after which he returned to Washington. He was then appointed one of the "Tax Commissioners" of the South, with headquarters at Beaufort, S. C. At the end of eighteen months, he returned to Washington, D. C, where he still is, in single blessedness. The younger son, Joseph S., is a farmer and stock-raiser of Range Township, where he was born and reared. He married Isabel, daughter of Benjamin Harrison (deceased). They have three children—James F., Benjamin H. and Joseph S. The youngest son of Jacob Martin, John Wayland, died September 23, 1845, aged fourteen months. Mrs. Martin is still living, aged seventy-three years. Like her husband, she has also been a faithful worker, and with her husband, will enjoy the Gospel sweets of the great eternity.
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WILLIAM MCCABE MCCLOUD
William McCabe McCloud, London, the oldest son and oldest living child of J. C. McCloud, is the junior member of the firm of J. C. & Mac MCCLOUD, druggists. He was born at Milford Center, Union Co., Ohio. June 25, 1855. He was but a year old when his parents removed to Madison County, and was reared and educated here. In early life, he was employed as clerk in the grocer trade, and, in 1875, entered the employ of Abram Smith, a prominent druggist of London. He remained in this position for five years, and then, in company with his father, established his present business, August 7, 1880. His trade has slowly increased, and his business proven profitable. He is a member of the Republican party. Mr. McCloud was married, September 22, 1877, to Josie B., daughter of William G. Jones (deceased).
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L.G. MCCOLLUM
L. G. McCollum (deceased), formerly of Squires & McCollum, grocers, was born at Marysville, Union Co., Ohio, March 17, 1840. His father, John McCollum, was born near Glasgow, Scotland, and came to America in 1812. He was a pioneer of Clark County, and there resided a number of years. He subsequently lived in both Union and Madison Counties, but now resides at South Charleston, Clark County, in his seventy-fourth year. He was a cabinet-maker, and later a carpenter, through active life. He married Margaret Irven, a native of London. They are the parents of thirteen children,, all living but two. Mrs. McCollum is still living, and is seventy-two years of age. The subject of this notice was the fourth child, and was reared mostly in Clark County. He learned telegraphy when quite young, and worked at it eight years. On August 22, 1865, he came to London in the employ of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and took charge of their office, remaining in that position four years. He was then engaged in agricultural pursuits for two years, and when the C. S. & C. (now the L, B. & W.) Railway was opened to Georgesville, Franklin County, he was put in charge of the office. He was subsequently employed for Fitch & McCorry, coal dealers, two years, and then accepted a position as passenger conductor on the G, S. & C. Railroad, which he held for nine years. On May 9, 1882, in company with W. S. Squires, he purchased stock and trade of Isaac G. Peetrey, grocer, of London, and was a member of the firm of Squires & McCollum until it was dissolved, August 26, 1882. He died September 9, 1882, and is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, near London, He was a member of the Odd Fellow fraternity, a Thirty-second degree Mason, a member of Mount Vernon Commandery, No. 1, Knights' Templar, of Columbus, also connected with the Railroad Conductors' Union and the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was Republican in politics. Mr. McCollum was married, June 13,1867, to Laura B. Squires, daughter of W. H. and Catherine (Phifer) Squires. There were three children given them—Louise G., Reed S. and Harry K. Mrs. McCollum and the two oldest children are also members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

ERNEST MCCORMACK
Ernest McCormack, London, Clerk of the Courts of Madison County, was born in London, December 31, 1853. His father, Edwin McCormack, was born in this county in 1819, and resided here during life. He was Deputy Assessor of Internal Revenue of this district for many years, and once served as Sheriff of Madison County. He died in 1875, aged fifty-six years. He married Adelia Webb, a native of Connecticut, who bore him six children. Two of these yet survive—our subject and brother Edward, a clerk in Jordan's coal office, London. Mrs. McCormack is still living and resides in London. Ernest McCormack attended the public schools of his native place, and subsequently the Commercial College of Dayton, Ohio. Upon leaving the latter institution, he secured a position as book-keeper for I. G. Peetrey in the mercantile trade. He remained there live years, and was then appointed Recorder of Madison County, to fill an unexpired term of six months. Upon the expiration of this time, he entered the Auditor's office as a clerk, remaining there one year. In the fall of 1881, he was the Republican candidate for Clerk of the Courts of this county, and was elected for a term of three years, commencing February 9, 1882. Mr. McCormack is connected by membership with Mystic Lodge, No. 36, Knights of Pythias, of London.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

W.H.C. MCCOY
W. H. C. McCoy, London, a life resident of Madison County, and a resident of London, was born in Deer Creek Township August 10, 1828. A sketch of his father is well worth a place in our work. William McCoy (deceased), was born in Washington County, Penn., January 30, 1785; his father, Daniel McCoy, emigrated to Kentucky in 1787, and there resided till 1806. He then removed to Clark County, Ohio; he departed this life in Highland County. He married a Miss Sutherland; on March 10, 1815, William McCoy came to Madison County, locating in Deer Creek Township, one and a half miles east of the present site of La Fayette; he was a farmer and stock-raiser through life, and took great interest in the breeding and raising of horses. He owned 300 acres of land at the time of his death. He was a soldier in the war of 1812; a Whig in early life, subsequently a stanch Republican, and for many, years was a Justice of the Peace in Deer Creek Township; he was one of the founders of the Presbyterian Church of London, and among its first Elders. He died September 3, 1869, aged eighty-four years eight months and three days. His wife was Ann Tweed Fielding, who was born in Washington County, Penn., January 17, 1793; they were the parents of nine children, six daughters and three sons, two now living—Mrs. M. M. Davidson, of London, and our subject. Mrs. McCoy departed this life March 28, 1854. Both parents were buried in the cemetery, two and a half miles east of La Fayette. Our subject was the eighth child, and grew to mature years on the old home farm. In early life he walked two and a half miles to district school, and subsequently attended an academy at Jefferson; he has been engaged in farming the most of his life, having inherited 100 acres of the home farm, and afterward buying the other 200 acres, and then adding 140 more to it; he came to London February 23, 1873, and sold his farm in December, 1879; since his removal to London, he has been working at the carpenter's trade, which he learned about 1855. Mr. McCoy is a member of Chandler Lodge, No. 138 (Masonic), Madison Lodge, No. 70 (I. O. O. F.), and has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal denomination for twenty-eight years; he was class leader of the church at La Fayette, and has held the same position in the church of London; he is Republican in politics, and has served as Justice of the Peace of Deer Creek Township. He was united in marriage, March 6, 1853, to Elizabeth Simpson, a native of Nottingham, Eng., who came to America when but ten years of age. Four children were born to this union, three living—William, in A., T. & S. Fe Land Office, Topeka, Kan., who married Jennie McCoy; Henry C. and Celestia B.; Lydia T., the oldest child is deceased. Mrs. McCoy departed this life February 7, 1880; she was also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The full name of our subject is William Henry Clay, and the manner in which it was given him will be of. interest. When his parents lived in Kentucky, they were well acquainted with Henry Clay, and when our subject was born, he was named for the Kentucky statesman. When he had attained the age of two and a half years, Henry Clay stopped at the Gwynne farm, and sent word to the parents to bring his namesake over. He then presented the child with a five dollar gold piece. This money was taken charge of by an elder brother, and used in the purchase of calves. At the time of the latter's death, the sum amounted to $200. This money was put on interest for two or three years, and then the father saw a chance to buy forty-one acres of land adjoining the homestead, which he purchased. When our subject grew of age, he was presented this piece of land, and kept it till he finally disposed of the whole farm.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

GEORGE G. MCDONALD
George G. McDonald, London, is a retired farmer, and has been a resident of Madison County for three-quarters of a century. He was born in Washington County, Tenn., on Christmas Day of 1803. He is a son of James McDonald, a native of Botetourt County, Va. He left his native State when quite young, and emigrated to Tennessee, where he married Nancy Cook, a native of New Jersey. They came to Ross County, Ohio, in the winter of 1806-07, and the following spring came to Madison County. He located on a farm in Union Township, six miles from the present site of London, and on the Georgesville pike. He was a farmer by occupation, and a pioneer of that part of Madison county. There was only one house in what is now the village of London when he came to this county, and Indians and wild beasts were entirely too plentiful for comfort. Twelve children were born to Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, six living, and their daughter, seventy-six; daughter, seventy-four; daughter, seventy-two; and son, fifty-nine, an average of over seventy-three years each. This is probably the highest average of any family in Madison County. Our subject was the third child and second son, and in early life assisted his father in the general duties of the farm. He was accustomed to clearing land, and burning up the walnut timber to get it out of the way. His mother was a good scholar, and taught him what early education he possessed. He married Melinda Ferguson, a native of Lexington, Ky., and a resident of Franklin County, Ohio. He remained with his father three years after marriage, and then purchased 335 acres of land in Deer Creek Township where he resided until 1878. In the meantime, he had increased his farm to 623 acres. His original farm he gave to his daughter, and now owns and farms the remainder, 288 acres. In 1878, he removed to London, where he now resides. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal denomination fifty-five years, probably as long as any present resident of Madison County. He was formerly a Whig, but became a charter member of the Republican party on the date of its organization. He has always enjoyed perfect health, and to use his own language - "When I am a little indisposed, I don't take any medicine, but just starve the sickness away. I find that the best plan." Thirteen children have been give to him, only one living - Mary A., wife of "Judge" Robert C. Fulton, of Columbus. "Uncle George," as he is familiarly known to the greater part of our readers, possesses a most remarkable memory. He can relate many stories of "days gone by," when the little band of pioneers in this county had all they could do to keep body and soul together, and wait for the day when the white settlers would predominate. He has been a "tiller of the soil" for three-quarters of a century, honest in every action, and enjoys the true esteem and respect of every citizen in the county.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

W.H. MCKINNON
W. H. McKinnon, London, is a member of the firm of McKinnon & Watts, the well-known saddlers and harness-makers. He is a native of Lisbon, Clark County, Ohio, and a son of Theophilus McKinnon, who came to Ohio in 1802. He was born in Harrison County, Ky., in November, 1774. His father came to Ohio with his family in 1802, and settled on Buck Creek, a few miles north of Springfield, Ohio, he being the first settler on that stream above the site of Lagonda. He also planted the first apple-orchard in that part of the country. At the time the family settled in Ohio, this entire region of the State was inhabited by many Indians. Mr. McKinnon, in his younger days, witnessed a number of councils of Indians, at which the "pipe of peace" figured prominently. He once heard the famous Indian chief and warrior, Tecumseh, make a speech at a council in Springfield. He was married to Pricilla Houston, sister of Dr. J. T. Houston, of London, January 2, 1823. Mrs. McKinnon departed this life July 24, 1872. Nine children were born to them, all of whom lived to the years of maturity, and six of them are now living—Mrs. Reed Marquart and Mr. J. Q. McKinnon, of Atlanta, Ill.; Mr. J. T. McKinnon, of Washington Territory; Hon. J. H. McKinnon, of Ashland, Neb.; Mrs. E. E. Watts and W. H. McKinnon, of London. For almost thirty years Mr. McK. was a resident of Madison County, with the exception of a short time of residence at Xenia, spending the last fourteen years of his life in London. Mr. McK. possessed a remarkable memory, and, with his mind stored with the numerable facts gained from many years of diligent reading, he was a veritable living history of Madison County. Always interested in the affairs of the nation, he kept himself posted upon all subjects of importance, so that it was a pleasure to hear from him through his knowledge of affairs seventy and seventy-five years ago. During the last thirteen years of his life, he was blind, and it seemed to be true in his case, that the loss of one of the powers strengthens the remaining, for up to within a short time of his death his mind remained perfectly clear and ready, and his memory surprisingly accurate. During the years of his blindness, he was kept informed upon all matters of interest by friends reading to him, and he continued to manifest a great interest in matters of daily concern. For nearly sixty years, he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal denomination, having been converted while a resident of Lisbon, Clark County, Ohio. He was active in his church relations, and made his house a home for ministers, delighting to entertain and keep them with him. His days of life reached from the days of George Washington to the present. He lived under every administration since the organization of our present government. His first Presidential vote was cast for James Monroe, in 1820, after whom he voted for President at every election for that office, making in all, for him, sixteen such votes. He said that he had crossed the Alleghany Mountains twelve times on horseback, a feat that few would care about performing at the present day. He was a grandson of Maj. Harrison and a great-grandson of Col. Crawford, both of whom were tortured to death by the Indians, the former having been "squibbed " to death with powder, at a place near the present site of Zanesfield, Logan County, Ohio, and the latter having been burned to death at a stake, near Upper Sandusky, Wyandot County, Ohio. Mr. McKinnon passed away from earth the evening of Friday before Easter Sunday, in 1882, aged eighty-eight years, being, with possibly two exceptions, the oldest man in the community. He sleeps the sleep that knows no awakening in Oak Hill Cemetery, east of London. W. H. McKinnon was reared in Clark and Madison Counties, and served a four years' apprenticeship at his present trade with an uncle, Thomas Houston, of South Charleston, Ohio He worked at his trade in Logan County, Ill., for two years, and then returned to South Charleston. After a short time, he went to Catawba, Clark County, and subsequently to Jefferson, in this county. In 1865, he came to London with his uncle, and three or four months later the present partnership of McKinnon & Watts was formed. They are among the oldest merchants in the village, have met with very good success, and both members of the firm are highly esteemed. Mr. McKinnon is Republican in politics, and once served two years as a member of the County Central Committee.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

ABRAM MILLER
Abram Miller, of Lohr & Miller, undertakers, London, was born in Virginia January 24, 1817. He is a son of John Miller, a native of that State, and a farmer by occupation. He came to Ohio about 1822, locating near New Lancaster. He resided there a year or two, and then, becoming dissatisfied, went back to Virginia, where he died about 1831. He married Mary Groves, also a native of Virginia, and daughter of John Groves. They were blessed with eight children, three living. Mrs. Miller subsequently married Thomas Lang, but there were no children born to this union. She died about 1862. Our subject was the third child of the first union, and the only one residing in this county. He lived in Virginia until twenty-one years of age, and in April following came to Urbana, Champaign County. where he learned the wagon-maker's trade. He worked at it there for ten years, and in 1848 came to Madison County, locating at Midway, Range Township. He still worked at his trade, but about 1862, commenced keeping hotel, which latter business he followed for ten years. During a portion of this time, he worked at his trade. In 1869, he came to London, and was landlord of the old Miller House for nine years. In September, 1879, he became associated in business with George W. and James Lohr, in his present business. Mr. Miller is a good undertaker, and thoroughly understands the embalming process. The firm has met with good success in business. Mr. Miller is a Prohibition-Democrat in politics. He was married, in October, 1841, to Harriet Minshall, a native of Madison County. Of their three children, two are living—Ella, wife of Robert Morris, and Theodore W. Mrs. Miller departed this life in January, 1848. He was again married, November 2, 1848, to Sophronia Chappell, daughter of William P. Chappell, who was born in Virginia January 28, 1804. He accompanied his father, George Chappell, to this county, when quite a small boy. Five children were born to this second marriage, four living—Leora A., wife of Isaac N. Fisher, of Midway, Range Township; Fannie, wife of W. H. H. Williamson, of Danville, Madison County; Amanda B. and Vincent C. Cordelia J. is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

CHARLES MINSHALL
Charles Minshall, with W. S. Squires & Co., grocers, was born in Range Township, Madison County, Ohio, July 30. 1859. His grandfather, Jonathan Minshall, was a native of Maryland, and came to Madison County about 1805 or 1806. He was an early and honored pioneer of this county, and a very successful man in business. He died at the age of eighty-eight years. One son, W. W. Minshall (deceased), the father of our subject, was born in Paint Township, on the farm now owned by David Watson, December 25, 1810. He was a stock-dealer through life, and late in life removed to London, where he died, October 18, 1873, aged sixty-three years. He was probably the first white child born in Madison County. He was twice married, his first wife bearing him six children, all of whom are living. His second wife was Mrs. Hannah (Littleton) Beers, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Littleton, natives of Virginia and Maryland. They had three children, our subject the oldest and only one living. Mrs. Minshall is still living, resides in London, at the age of sixty-two years, and in the enjoyment of splendid health. Charles Minshall lived in this county till fourteen years of age, and then spent three or four years in the States of Missouri, Texas and Iowa, being engaged during this period in the stock business. He then came back to Madison County, and since March 17, 1882, has been engaged in his present business. He was united in marriage, February 7,1882, to Florence, daughter of Seth McCollum, grocer, of South Charleston.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JAMES Q. MINSHALL
James Q. Minshall (deceased) was born in Paint Township, this county, March 7,1815, and died in London August 28, 1878. His parents, Jonathan and Eleanor Minshall, came from Virginia to Ross County, Ohio, in 1806, and moved from there to Paint Township, Madison County, one year later. James Quinn Minshall began life for himself at twenty-one years of age, by accepting a position with a Mr. Anderson, who kept a stage station near, and subsequently a hotel at LaFayette, in this county. After remaining three years with Mr. Anderson, during which time he accumulated about $300, he engaged in farming and stock-dealing, renting the John Creamer farm in Range Township, in connection with Jesse Watson. In this business he continued until his death, accumulating property which, clear of all indebtedness, was worth not less than $200,000. During his lifetime. he paid, interest included, not less than $70,000 as security for others. He was the owner of between thirty-four and thirty-five hundred acres of land in Range, Paint and Union Townships, and was a large stock owner in the Madison National Bank, of which he was President for a long time prior to and until his death. He was married to Hannah Watson, daughter of Samuel Watson, and by her had five children, viz., Wyatt, Clarestine (deceased), Leon, Sarah and Ada. Mrs. Minshall died in June, 1866, after twenty-seven years of happily married life, and in April, 1867, Mr. Minshall married Lydia Powell, by whom he had no children. Mr. Minshall was one of the best known, most influential and wealthy citizens of Madison County. From a penniless boy, he gained his high position in the world by his own personal efforts, and though he lost a great deal of money, during his life, his business ability and untiring energy enabled him to overcome all reverses, and to reach a position of the highest honor in the community. Some time before the beginning of his residence in London, in 1865, he joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was ever afterward a steadfast, working Christian. Tireless in doing good, and unbounded in his charity, with a warm heart and sympathetic nature, he never turned a deaf ear to the cry of want, but always stood ready to help the deserving poor. In his death the community mourned the loss of one of its most noble members.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

LEON MINSHALL
Leon Minshall, of Armstrong & Minshall, dealers in furniture and queensware, London. He was born near Midway, Range Township, April 7, 1847, and is a son of James Q. Minshall and Hannah Watson. Our subject was reared and educated in Madison County, and in 1866 located in London. He was first engaged in the grocery business with Watson, Cowling & Co., and in 1870, went to Bloomington, Ill., where he was engaged in the transfer business with William Armstrong, the firm being known as Armstrong & Minshall. He continued there in business for two years, and then returned to Ohio. His next step was taking a course of study at Dickison College, Carlisle, Penn. In 1878, he engaged in the boot and shoe trade, and three years later, November L, 1881, sold out to William Ronemus. In June, 1882, he formed a partnership with Edward Armstrong, in his present business, and the firm have so far secured a very substantial and encouraging trade. Mr. Minshall is Republican in politics. He was married March 15, 1877, to Mary Ganlin, a native of England. They have two children—Imo and Elsie. Mr. and Mrs. Minshall are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

ELISHA MOORE
Elisha Moore (deceased) was a native of Virginia, born near Winchester in 1797. His father, John Moore, was also a native of the "Old Dominion," and* came to Ohio about 1811. He located in Ross County, and a year later came to Madison County, settling on 300 acres of land belonging to the Littler family, in Union Township. He was a farmer by occupation, a quiet and unobtrusive citizen, and a great lover of fun. He was a " Jackson Democrat " until 1840, then joined the Whig party and remained that way till his death. He was twice married. His first wife was a Miss Smith, who bore him two children, both now deceased. His second wife was Sarah Littler. They were the parents of nine children, probably two now living. Our subject was about fifteen years of age when he accompanied his parents to this county. He farmed two or three years in early life, in Ross County, raising wheat and floating it down to New Orleans to market, on a flatboat. He then located on his father's land, in Union Township, and resided there till 1840. He then removed his family to Noble County, Indiana, and there departed this life in 1861. He was also twice married. His first wife was Annie Cooms, a native of Virginia or Maryland, and daughter of Jacob Cooms. They had four children, three living. Mrs. Moore died in the fall of 1836, and Mr. Moore married for his second wife Nancy Scott, a native of Madison or Clark County, and daughter of Robert Scott. No children were born to this union. Mrs. Moore is still living, and resides at Pearson, Kosciusko Co., Ind. Politically, Mr. Moore was a Whig, a "Know Nothing," and subsequently a Republican. Robert Moore, a carpenter of London, and the only member of the family now residing in this county, was born on the old home farm, in Union Township, April 17, 1828. When twelve years of age, he went to Noble County, Ind., with his parents, and assisted in " clearing up " a large "patch of timber" which then covered the farm. Wild beasts and Indians were very plentiful then, and Mr. Moore remembers a day when his father killed three deer and brought them home. Wolves and wild turkeys were numerous, and the former were so bold as to steal close to the log cabin, attack and kill the dog which stood on guard. Mr. Moore's father was in rather poor health after going to Indiana, and his two sons were engaged in doing all the work of the farm. At twenty-two years of age, Robert Moore left the old fireside, and that summer assisted on another farm in the same county. The following winter he came to this county, and the next summer worked in a saw-mill. He was then employed to drive 100 head of cattle from London over the mountains to Philadelphia. He returned to London, and then to his father's. He rented the home farm, remained there two years, and then returned to London again. He was then engaged in different occupations, visiting both the East and the West, for some time, but was principally employed in working at his trade in London and Madison Count}'. Failing health has caused a cessation of active labor for the past seven or eight years. Mr. Moore united with the Masonic fraternity in 1855 or 1856, and is a member or Chandler Lodge, No. 138, of London. He is a stanch Republican, but has never been an office-holder. He was married in the last week of 1863 to Thoressa Lohr. a native of London, and daughter of John Lohr. Of their five children, three are living—Annie, Mary and Clara. Mrs. Moore is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of London, and Mr. Moore is a regular attendant on its services.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

WILLIAM ALLEN NEIL
Maj. William Allen Neil, stock-dealer and farmer, residence London, was born at Columbus, Ohio, January 28, 1836. His father, Robert Neil, is a native of Clark County, Ky., and in early life was proprietor and manager of a line of stage running between Washington, D. C., and Lexington, Ky. In 1811, he removed to Ohio, locating at Urbana, Champaign County, and there resided during the war of 1812. He subsequently went back to his native State, and afterward came to Ohio again, this time locating at Franklinton, now Columbus, the capital of the Buckeye State. He now resides there, and is probably the oldest living pioneer resident. He was one of the early Presidents of the Little Miami Railroad, and its principal executive officer for many years. He married Mary M. Hoge, daughter of Rev. James Hoge, one of the first settlers in Franklinton, Ohio, and by profession a minister of the Presbyterian denomination. He preached one of the first sermons of that body in the new village, and was pastor of the Presbyterian Church there for over fifty years. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Neil, seven of whom yet survive, and two are residents of Madison County. William A. Neil was reared on the old homestead farm (now within the limits of the city of Columbus, and cut in parts by three railroads), and educated in the high school of the town. In early life, he was employed as clerk in a dry goods house, and also learned the jewelry trade. Indoor life proving disastrous to his health, he resolved to try farming, and to further that purpose, on April 14, 1856, he came to Madison County, locating a farm of 1,030 acres on the Midway pike in Union Township. At this time, there were but two pikes in Madison County, and the Major, seeing the necessity for good roads for travel during the rainy seasons, was largely instrumental in bettering the condition of the roads, and in building the "Midway pike," considered one of the best in the county. He greatly improved his farm by drainage, etc., and subsequently sold 230 acres, until at present it embraces 800 acres of the best farming land in the county. Maj. Neil also took an active interest in the breeding, rearing and handling of fine stock, and deserves great credit for his efforts in behalf of the farmers and stockmen in the county. In 1870, he removed to the city of London, taking up his residence in the fine mansion on South Main street, erected by Jesse Watson, late President of the Madison National Bank. Maj. Neil is a member of the Lodge, Chapter and Council (Masonic) of London, and of Mount Vernon Commandery No. 1, Knights Templar, of Columbus, Ohio. He is also a member of Lyons Post, G. A. R., of London. He is Republican in politics, a Councilman, and Chairman of the Committee on Streets. On May 4, 1864, Mr. Neil enlisted in Company B, One Hundred Fifty-fourth Regiment Ohio National Guards, and accompanied them to Camp Dennison, and was mustered into duty on the 9th of the month as First Lieutenant.*
[*He was subsequently elected Captain and Major while at Camp Dennison.] Through the kindness of the Governor, he obtained a furlough, came home, and on the 12th was married to Sarah E. Chrisman, daughter of Jacob Chrisman, a native of Virginia, and a large land-owner in Madison County. Leaving his bride at home, he rejoined his company in West Virginia. While here, he was brevetted a Lieutenant Colonel, and soon after returned to his home, having served about four months. Maj. Neil and wife have three children—Louise, Robert Allan and Grace. His wife is a member of the M. E. Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

LUTHER NEWCOM
Luther Newcom, a Yankee, settled here about 1850, and was among the first teachers.
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S.B. NORRIS
S. B. Norris, Principal of the Colored Schools of London, was born at Elizabeth, Allegheny County, Penn.. November 17, 1838. His father was Zaccheus Norris, a native of Pennsylvania, and a farmer by occupation. He resided in his native State till his death, in 1838. He married Nancy Batch, also a native of the Keystone State. Our subject was the only child of their union. Mrs. Norris subsequently married George Myles, a widower, with two children. There were three children born to this latter union, all living, but none residents of Madison County. Mrs. Myles departed this life in Pennsylvania, in 1879. S. B. Norris grew to manhood in the old "Keystone State," obtaining a good common school education. At twenty-two years of age, he came to Ohio, and entered Iberia College, located at Morrow, then under the management of the Free Presbyterian Church (now Jefferson College, of the United Presbyterian faith). Mr. Norris remained there the greater part of three years, taking a scientific course, and graduating in 1867. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Company A, One hundred and Twenty-seventh United States Colored Troops, of Ohio, at Pittsburgh, Penn., and was re-organized at Camp William, near Philadelphia. It became a part of the Twenty-fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment went out late in the war, participating in the battles of Big Bottoms, on the James River, Fort Harrison, Hatcher's Bun, witnessed the evacuation of Petersburg, and the pursuit and surrender of Gen. Lee and the Confederate forces at Appomattox Court House. The regiment was then transferred to Brazos Santiago, Texas, arriving there June 1, and being mustered out of service September 12, 1865. Mr. Norris was Quartermaster Sergeant of regiment, and was subsequently detained there as Forage Master under the Post Quartermaster Sergeant. He remained in that position until January 28, 1866, when he was honorably discharged. He then returned to Ohio, and was placed in charge of the colored schools of Delaware for two years. He came to London in the fall of 1871, and in September of that year accepted his present position. The fact of his having been kept in this position ever since shows the high esteem in which his professional services are held, by both races of people. Mr. Norris has been an indefatigable worker in the cause of education, and to him is due the praise for the high standing of the London colored schools, and the fine school building in which they are located. Mr. Norris is a member of the Colored M E. Church of London, and Trustee in that body. He is connected with the Widows' Sons Lodge. No. 4 (colored Masons), of Philadelphia, and a thorough Republican. He was married, March 21,1866, to Elmora Osborn, a native of Delaware, Ohio. Of their five children, the following are living: Mary E.. Jesse and William H., Birny O. and James B. are deceased.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

DANIEL ORCUTT
Daniel Orcutt, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. London, was born in Greene County, Ohio; January 2, 1831. He is the son of B. and Mary Ann (Miller) Orcutt, natives of Pennsylvania. Our subject received a common school education in Greene County, and remained on the farm until twenty-two years of age, when he engaged in milling. He operated a saw mill in this township in connection with his brother, for twenty years. He was married, in 1859, to Mary E. Cryder, a native of this county, and a daughter of William Cryder, whose biography appears in this work. By his marriage, Mr. Orcutt has had two children—Louella F. and J. H Mr. Orcutt is a Republican in politics; he owns 120 acres of land, having turned his attention entirely to farming.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

HENRY ORCUTT

Henry Orcutt, farmer, P. O. London, son of B. and Mary A. (Miller) Orcutt, who came to Ohio in 1820, was born in Greene County, Ohio, February 9, 1821. He was reared on the farm, and in 1852 came to this county, where he engaged with his brothers in operating a saw mill; he was married, in 1848, to Maria F. Little, a native of Virginia, of German descent, and a daughter of John Little, of Greene County. They have had three children—Rufinia Almira, Victoria P., wife of William Evans, and Mary Elizabeth, wife of James W. B. Evans; Mrs. Orcutt died March 21, 1882. Mr. Orcutt has retired from active life and only works when he thinks it would be beneficial to his health. He started in life as a poor man, but now has a comfortable home and a nice farm; he is a moral, conscientious man, who carries his principles into politics, voting for the man and not for the party.
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JACKSON ORCUTT
Jackson Orcutt, farmer, P. O. London, was born in Ross Township, Greene Co., Ohio. He is a son of B. and Mary A. (Miller) Orcutt, who came to Ohio in 1820, and settled in Greene County, where they remained until their death, he May 27, 1871, in his seventy-fourth year, and she January 2, 1846, in her forty-eighth year. The father was a very religious man, and took great delight in his Bible, which was his constant companion, and a source of much pleasure and comfort to him. His opinions were always founded on the truth as found in the Gospel, and they were so sound in theory as to be seldom questioned. His walk through his long and eventful life may well serve as an example to his posterity, and the true Christian spirit manifested by him will ever shine as a beacon light to guide them in the path of rectitude and morality. He died in the full hope of a complete salvation, without aught to regret in his well-spent life. Our subject received an ordinary education in Greene County, and has passed one-third of his life in a saw mill with his brother, the rest of his life having been devoted to farming. He was married to Ruth Watson, a daughter of Samuel Watson, by whom he has had a family of live children—Leroy, Clinton, Olive, Edgar and Viola. Mr. Orcutt started in life with $1 in money: he now owns 100 acres of good land, well improved and under a high state of cultivation. He is a Republican in politics, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

THOMAS ORPET
Thomas Orpet, a native of Maryland, married a sister of George Prugh, and settled on Deer Creek, on land now owned by William Arbuckle, about 1818-19. Subsequently he bought seven acres near Mr. Gabriel Potee, where he died about 1861. He was of German descent, uneducated, and would never educate his children, believing it dangerous and injurious to become educated.

JOHN PHIFER
John Phifer, a native of Virginia, emigrated to Madison County about 1810, and located on Paint Creek, on what is now known as the Buffenberger land. He was a blacksmith by trade, which business he followed, in connection with farming, through life. He had a family of three sons and four daughters, all now deceased. Mr. Phifer was an exceptional man for honesty, integrity and uprightness of life. Industrious and faithful in business, kind-hearted and liberal, ever ready with his means and influence to aid in every moral progress and improvement, and died at a good old age, loved and respected by all who knew him.
George Phifer, son of the above, married Tabitha Dean; was also a blacksmith by trade, which business he followed several years. After his marriage, he located at London and became one of the active business men of that place. He erected the Phifer House; also the block on the opposite side of High street now occupied by Wolf's clothing store and others. During this time, he was carrying on an active business as a farmer and stock-dealer, and was also for several years engaged in the tanning business—in all which enterprises he was remarkably successful, and died possessed of a large amount of property. Abraham, son of John and brother of George Phifer, married Ann Withrow and settled near his father; devoted his life to farming; was very prosperous, and at his death owned 600 acres of land and several thousand dollars in money. John, the third son, died when young. The daughters were named Dolly, Clara, Betsey and Nancy. All married and had families, and became prosperous and good citizens.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

SUTTON POTEE
Sutton Potee, a native of Baltimore, Md., emigrated, with his wife and three children, in the fall of 1817, to Ohio, and settled on the farm now owned by his son Gabriel, near the National road, on Deer Creek, Somerford Township, and here opened out right in the woods. He rented three or four years, then bought the place, and remained here till his death. He married Hannah Markle, by whom he had six children. All grew to maturity, four now living. Mr. Potee was a very active, stirring man, and devoted his whole business life to farming. He was cautious in all business transactions, of firm and undoubted character, and a lifelong member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, with which he united when a young man.
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SHEDRICK PRESTON
Shedrick Preston, from Greenbrier County, Va., settled on the tract of land purchased by John Arbuckle about 1812 or 1813, as in 1814 he served as Township Trustee. Subsequently he removed to the Big Sandy, since which nothing has been known of him.
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GEORGE PRUGH
George Prugh was born in Maryland, but of German descent, and married Margaret Markle, a native of Maryland, and in 1812 emigrated to Ohio and settled in what was then Deer Creek Township (now Somerford), about one mile north of the village of Somerford, where they remained till their death. He died in 1841, and she in 1864. He was a very excellent citizen, and held the offices of Trustee, Treasurer and Justice of the Peace. Two of his sons, Samuel and G. W. Prugh, now quite advanced in years, are still residents of the township, and are most honored an respected citizens. The former was born in Maryland in 1811, and the latter in this township in 1816. William Pepper a native of Maryland, settled here on land now owned by Charles Mitchell about 1810-12, as we find by the township records. He was a Supervisor in 1812. John Summers, from Virginia, settled here about 1813; was a blacksmith by trade, and perhaps the first settled in this township.
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JOSEPH REA
Joseph Rea was born in Pennsylvania in 1754; he married Elizabeth Conn, who was born January 27, 1762; they were married January 16. 1783. They emigrated to Virginia; thence, in 1810, to Ross County, Ohio: and thence to Madison County, about 1818, and settled on Oak Run, where they died about 1829. They had a family of nine children; all grew to maturity, but are now deceased. Of their children, Mathew was born in Rockbridge County, Va., in 1793; he became a resident of London in 1818, and married Ann Amos, who was born in Maryland November 15, 1802; they were married in London by Patrick McLene, Esq., and, in 1835, settled in Oak Run Township, where he became a very successful farmer and stock-raiser, and accumulated a good property. She died in 1857, and he in 1873. They had seven children; three now survive; Robert and Jerry, two of the surviving children, are large land-owners in Oak Run Township, and are among the most respected citizens of the county.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

CHARLES RIGDON
Charles Rigdon came here from Champaign County and settled about the same time—1820-21.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JOHN J. ROBERTS
John J. Roberts settled here about 1817. He was the successor of Gabriel Markle to the gristmill on Deer Creek. He remained in this township till his death.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

WILLIAM SCOTT
William Scott settled near the Charles Rigdon place about 1820. He married Betsey Rigdon. Subsequently, he moved to Pekin, Ill., where he died. They were a good family and esteemed citizens.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JOHN SIMPKINS
John Simpkins, a native of Maryland, came to this county about the same time as the Gwynnes, it is believed as early as 1808; he purchased land in this township on Walnut and Oak Run, which new is owned by Mrs. Eliza Chrisman, and here settled and made some improvement and became a leading active man in the secular affairs of the county; served as Treasurer of the county in 1816; Collector in 1817; was an Associate Judge and also a Justice of the Peace; the latter office he filled for many years. He finally moved to Missouri, remaining but a short time, when he returned to this county, entered upon the mercantile trade, which he followed through the greater part of the remainder of his life. He had two brothers, James and Thomas; the latter was stabbed and killed on the streets of London; the former subsequently returned to his native State, Maryland.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

WILLIAM and CHARLES SOWARD
William and Charles Soward, two brothers, settled on the James D. Statler land about 1817. The latter subsequently removed to Logan County. The former remained in this township through life. They were men of character and good business ability. William started in life poor, but became quite wealthy.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

MICHAEL STATLER
Michael Statler, a native of Virginia, settled where his son now lives, on the Urbana road, about 1824, where he died about 1842. His wife survived him about thirty years. Mr. Statler was killed while cutting down a tree upon which another had lodged, which fell on him.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

DAVID WATSON
David Watson was born in Maryland October 17, 1783, and, with his father, Walter Watson, and his family, became settlers of Ohio in 1806, and in 1807, with Mr. Helphenstine and family, David came to Paint Township, and here was married to Mary Helphenstine, for whom he formed a special attachment when she was but ten years of age. while residing in Virginia. They commenced in life with nothing, as poor as any person ever started out in life. But we will not here devote space to portray a history of this valuable citizen's life, as it is fully given in another part of this work. Suffice it here to say that Paint Township may well be proud of having been the place of residence of one whose life was so full of activity, success and usefulness. George Blougher. of German descent, came with or about the same time as Robert Hume, in 1804. He worked one year for him, clearing his land, for which services Mr. Hume deeded him 100 acres of land, upon which he settled and remained through life. He was a very honorable man, a good neighbor and a worthy citizen. About 1810-12, a Mr. Harpole settled on the Hume land, and became owner of quite a large amount of land, but of him and his we know but little.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

W.E. WEST
WEST, W. E., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 3; Marengo P. O.; born in Madison Co., Ohio, August 4, 1823, came to Elgin, Ill., 1836, and to McHenry Co. February 25, 1876; owns 200 acres of land, value $50 per acre; was member of Co. B, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Regt. Ill. Vol. Inf. Married Arvilla Lewis, of Stockholm, March 8, 1855 ; she was born February 8, 1831; has two children, both members of M. E. Church.
[Source: 1877 McHenry County, IL Directory - submitted by K. T.]

ABNER S. WILLIARD
Abner S. Williard was a native of Vermont, born in 1791. He emigrated first to Canada, thence to New York, and in 1812 came to Champaign County, Ohio, and in 1815 removed to Madison County, where he lived till his death. He married Hulda Colver, who was born on the banks of Lake Champaign, in New York, in 1796. They were married in Madison County in 1817. He died December 16, 1872. She died June 3, 1861. He was a man of undoubted character, and esteemed and respected by all who knew him.

MONTGOMERY WILSON
Montgomery Wilson was one of the early settlers of this township (Oak Run), of whom but little is known, except that he was a blacksmith by trade, and located temporarily wherever his business or inclination led him.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

SAMUEL WILSON
Samuel Wilson came here from Paint Township, and settled in the west part of this township, in Survey 6,078, about 1825. but remained here only five years, when he removed to Illinois, where he died about 1872. He was a very moral and worthy citizen, and, while residing in Illinois, he became a devoted member and worker in the Methodist Church.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

VALENTINE WILSON
Valentine Wilson, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1786, with his father's family emigrated, in 1790, to Clark County, Ky., where he remained a citizen twelve years, and, in the year 1802, emigrated to Ohio and settled on the head-waters of Beaver Creek, in Bath Township, county of Greene. In 1816, Mr. Wilson removed to Madison County and settled on the headwaters of Deer Creek, on land still owned by Mrs. Wilson, his widow. He was married three times, and was the father of nineteen children. He was first married in 1806, to Eleanor Judy, by whom he had six children. She died on the 5th of September, 1818. In 1819, he married Mrs. Susanna Umble, who became the mother of four children. She died August 18, 1825. On June 18, 1827, he married for his third wife Miss Nancy Roberts, who became the mother of nine children. Of these nineteen children, all but one grew to maturity; and of the eighteen who arrived at maturity, all but one became heads of families. Mr. Wilson died July 2, 1855, on the farm where he first located in 1816. From a small beginning on 160 acres, bought of the man who had but recently entered it, with Congress scrip, in the thirty-nine years of his after life he had accumulated nearly ten thousand acres of land, and died the wealthiest man in Madison County. It is believed he erected the first brickyard ever in Madison County.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]

JAMES WITHROW

James Withrow, a native of Pennsylvania, came to Madison County and located in Paint Township, on Walnut Run, in 1807, and, one year later, brought his family to his new home. Here he took up 250 acres of land. All the country around was a vast wilderness, in which he had but three neighbors—David Watson. Jonathan Minshall and Peter P. Helphenstine. Indians were still here, and were frequent visitors at their house. They were generally friendly and peaceable, but frequently too free or officious, and would borrow or take things out of the house, such as cooking utensils, sometimes keeping them a long time, but would generally return them. They would frequently borrow corn-meal and provisions of various kinds. Corn-meal in that day was an item of some value, when they had to go forty-five miles to Chillicothe to get grinding done. Sometimes they would have their supply of meal nearly exhausted, and they would hide it in the straw tick in the bed. On one occasion, Indians searched the house ail over, and even the bed. but did not happen to find it. Mr. "Withrow never allowed them to bring their guns in the house, but had them leave them outside. At one time, Mr. Withrow having gone to Chillicothe to mill, the Indians came and wanted to bring their guns inside the house, but Mrs. Withrow required them to leave them outside. They came in and sat by the fire. Mrs. Withrow was spinning, and she observed them talking with each other, and apparently displeased about something. By their motions she could understand that they were talking about scalping her. With all the courage she could command, she instantly ordered them out of the house, and by continued firmness finally succeeded in getting them away. Such trials of their courage and fortitude were quite frequent, in that early day, and it seems those noble pioneer women were peculiarly fitted for the occasions they had to meet. Mr. Withrow was quite a military man, and was a Major in the militia for many years. He, in later years, after his farm began to produce wheat, hauled it. to Urbana over the then terrible mud roads, and sold it at 37 cents per bushel. The last hat he purchased for himself he bought at "Urbana, for which he gave fourteen bushels of wheat. He erected a sawmill on Walnut Run about 1815, which was the first mill in this vicinity, and one of the first in the county. This mill was run by water, and remained in use about ten or twelve years. Mr. Withrow was no office-seeker, and desired no notoriety in that way, but was an active, industrious man, and devoted his life to his farm interests. His character and integrity were beyond reproach, and was a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church, having brought with him, when he came here, a letter of his membership in the church where he lived in Pennsylvania, bearing date 1803, and connected himself with the church at London, in which church he was an Elder many years.
Of their family of seven children, Ann, the eldest, married Abraham Phifer. She died about 1873. Margaret died unmarried. David married Mary Harvey, and settled in Paint Township, where he died without issue. Isabel married John Stroup, by whom she had five children; is now a widow and resides in London. One of her daughters is the wife of Mr. McLaughlin, proprietor of the Phifer House. Another of her daughters, Rebecca, married Joseph Foos, emigrated to California, and was said to be the first woman who ever went through on the overland route. She is now a resident of Australia. Robert married Ann Carr; resides in London; was formerly Sheriff of the county, but is now retired from all active business. Washington married Catharine Truman and settled on the home place. Then he purchased a farm, which, a few years after, he sold, and in 1842 purchased the Robert Hume land, upon which he resided till, in 1878, he removed to his present place of residence, in Newport, where he has since resided, retired from all active business. His life has been devoted to farming and dealing in stock. From 1836 to 1853, he gave his special attention to buying stock through the "Western States, and driving them over the mountains to the Eastern markets, and during this business of seventeen years' duration, there was but. one year in which he did a losing business; the sixteen years were successful, and yielded him good profits. His business life has been one of activity, crowned with success, having accumulated a large amount of property. His principal fault in life has been in being too kind-hearted and accommodating for his own financial good, as he has paid over $40,000 security money. But, notwithstanding these misfortunes, he has an ample competency left, and a clear conscience that he has faithfully discharged all obligations, no matter how unjust some of them may have been. Mr. Withrow has been employed to settle up a great many estates in his community, and has filled many of the important offices of his county and township, and is one of the pillars of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Newport, of which he has been a member since the winter of 1854, and has filled most of the important offices of the church. Samuel, the youngest child of Mr. James Withrow, married Charlotte Rankin and resides in London; is engaged in farming, which has been his principal business through life.
["The History of Madison County, Ohio: A History of the County ...", Volume 2; By R.C. Brown : W.H. Beers & Co; 1883 - Tr. by G.T. Transcription Team]




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