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Portage County, Ohio
Genealogy and History

 

 Portage County Biographies


RILEY G. KING, was born December 24, 1836, in Portage County, Ohio, and is the son of Timothy L. and Mary M. (Wright) King, natives of Massachusetts and New York respectively, who were married in Portage County in 1835, and came to this county in 1839, bringing their family of two children, our subject and Isabel. Riley remained at home with his parents until he was 24 years old, and received a limited education. He has always followed the occupation of farming, and was employed as a farm hand until the opening of the war, when he enlisted in Co. B of the 13th Regiment Indiana Volunteers, and remained in the service about three years and three months, mustered out July 10, 1864. After he returned from the army he resumed his former occupation, farming, and his marriage with Miss Mary A. Burke, a native of Wayne County, Indiana, born September 9, 1837, was solemnized on March 12, 1868, at Paw Paw, this county. To this union three children were born, an infant (deceased) unnamed, Clarence Bruce and William Oscar aged 13 and 10 respectively. Mr. King and family are members of the United Brethren Church. He is a Republican and always votes the straight ticket. He is the possessor of 188 acres of land in Erie and Richland Townships which is all, with an exception of 27 acres of timber, under a high state of cultivation. He has acquired all by hard labor. He is perhaps the oldest citizen of Erie Township now living in its borders. ["History of Miami County, Indiana: From the earliest time to the present ..." By Brant & Fuller, Chicago - Contributed by Barb Zigenmeyer]

E. D. BAITH, member of the firm of Baith & Jackson, merchants, Atwater, is a native of Atwater Township, this county, born in 1854, son of Amos and Mary A . (Kump) Baith, natives of Mahoning County, Ohio, who settled in Atwater Township, this county, in 1850. They reared a family of five children, all of whom are now living: E. D., Hattie (wife of L. C. Porter), Ella (wife of E. R. Spires), Albert and Anna. Our subject was brought up on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits until' 1883, when he purchased the interest of Brush and Alden, of the firm of Brush, Alden & Butler. In 1884 Mr. Jackson succeeded Mr. Butler, and the firm became Baith & Jackson. They carry a general stock of merchandise worth about 110,000, and do an extensive business. Mr. Baith is a member of the Congregational Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

MRS. E. H. BEACH, P. O. Atwater, was born February 6, 1817, in Durham, Greene Co., N. Y.; daughter of Eliakim, Jr., and Frances Stannard, natives of Connecticut, born May 16, 1786, and March 22, 1790, respectively. They were the parents of nine children, viz.: Adaline, Antoinette, Harriet, Lucinda M., Edward, Lucy, Piatt, Mary, Eliakim. Mrs. Beach's grandparents were Eliakim, Sr., and Bethia Stannard, of Puritan stock, both natives of Connecticut, former born August 31, 1753, and latter born July 15, 1759. Lucinda M., our subject, was twice married, on first occasion November 26, 1843, to Ransom Hinman, born in Greene County, N. Y., in 1813, and who, when but a child, came with his parents to this county, where he passed the remainder of his life, dying December 22, 1857. Our subject afterward, May 1, 1861, was united in marriage with E. H. Beach, also a native of New York, born in Victor. Mr. Beach came to this county in 1861 and is highly respected and favorably known in this community. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

NELSON BENJAMIN, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Greene County, N. Y., September 15, 1814, son of Richard and Jerusha (Clark) Benjamin, natives of Connecticut, who were among the early settlers of New York State, where they both died. The subject of this sketch is the only living child born to this couple. He came to this county in 1846 and began the work of his life without means, but possessed of untiring energy and perseverance. He cleared the farm, consisting of 175 acres, where he now resides and which is finely improved. Mr. Benjamin was married, in his native county, to Miss Adeline Stannard, born May 20, 1811. Their generation is as follows: Piatt, married to Nellie Baldwin (have seven children: Addie L., Frances S., Pearl R., Mabel G., Ray L., Chester and Josephine); Frances, wife of Amos Whitten, residing in Boston, Mass. (have the following children: Chester H., EdgarB., Charles N. and William M.); Cyrus, married to Jerusha Blakesley (have three children: Bertie S., Mamie and Freddie L.); Amos, married to Josephine G. Whittelsey, resides at home. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

LUTHER BUTLER, retired farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in North Branford, Conn., in 1801; son of David and Betsey Butler, who were among the pilgrims of 1827 to Atwater Township, this county, where they located on land now occupied by our subject, and there lived to the close of their lives. Of thirteen children born to them, seven survive. The subject of this sketch served seven years as Drum Major in the militia, and took an active part as drummer in the Presidential Campaign of 1884, joining in most if not in all the torch-light processions and parades, and he is ever happiest when in the ranks beating the drum. He was married, in 1830, to Miss Eliza Jones, by whom he has the following children: Lyman W., Lucius F., Susan S., and Henry W., married to Weltha Wintersteen (they have two children: Albert H. and Arthur W.) In 1880 Mr. and Mrs. Butler celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding day, when there were present, besides other guests, thirteen grandchildren. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

W. W. CLEVERLY, farmer, P. O. Atwater, is a descendant of one of the pioneers of Atwater Township, where he was born in 1835; son of William and Eliza Cleverly, natives of New York and Maryland, respectively, who were the parents of six children, five of whom are now living (the oldest being dead): W. W.; Eliza, wife of J. E. Garrison, of Junction City, Kan.: Fannie, wife of E. Ellison; Abbey, wife of William Ripple, of Warsaw, Ind.; and Frank. Mr. and Mrs. William Cleverly located in Atwater Township in 1831, settling on land now owned by Charles Bradley, Jr., and both died in the township. Our subject was married, in 1861, to Miss Lydia, daughter of John Webber, of Deerfield Township, this county. By this union were born five children: Chase, Charles, John, Florence and Bertie. In 1862 Mr. Cleverly settled on his present farm of 107 acres, which was then wholly wooded but he has cleared about sixty acres, has erected a fine commodious brick residence, and is making other improvements. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

THORNTON DOUTHITT, farmer, P. O. Atwater Center, was born in Edinburg Township, this county, October 11, 1831; son of Daniel and Rachel (Pumphrey) Douthitt, the former born in Pennsylvania, the latter a native of Huron County, Ohio, and who joined the early settlement at Edinburg. They were parents of twelve children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the third. Daniel Douthitt, in the latter part of his life, removed to Hardin County, Ohio, where he died in February, 1881, Mrs. Douthitt dying in 1849. The subject of this sketch was brought up on a farm with scarcely any educational advantages outside the severe discipline of labor, which taught him economy. Honesty, perseverance and regular habits, giving him a vigorous constitution, combined with a natural ambition to achieve success, seconded by excellent judgment, have caused him to more than equal his greatest anticipations. Neither early habits nor later indulgences have weakened him in body or mind, using neither strong drink nor tobacco. He married, February 16, 1852, at Atwater, Ohio, Miss Matilda Ann Siddull, second child of Mahlon and Elizabeth (Gould) Siddall, of Atwater, Ohio. Mrs. Douthitt was born April 1, 1831, and in all the laborious undertakings of her husband has borne her equal share, acting nobly and truly a self-sacrificing part . She is a kind friend, affectionate mother and good wife; their home being ample and sufficiently ornamental to dispense to a large circle of friends that free-hearted hospitality for which they are justly noted. She (Mrs. Douthitt) has borne our subject five children: Andrew M., born April 20,1853, admitted to the bar, but engaged in teaching (has two children: Bertha Ann and Dudley M.); George F., born June 12,1856, a teacher in the Union Schools, but preparing for the practice of law; Jennie T., born September 10,1864, married, January 1, 1885, to H. Alva Myers, a teacher; Thomas D., born January 27, 1867, engaged in teaching: Clinton A., born June 1, 1870, attending school and helping his father on the farm. During the late war Mr. Douthitt located on his present farm of 225 acres, clearing it of timber, etc., besides several other large tracts, and with the revenue received from the railroad company (in payment for thousands of cords of wood) he has paid for the farm and liquidated other large obligations. The majority of the family are regular attendants on the service of the Methodist Episcopal Church, but not any are members of any religious denomination. In politics Mr. Douthitt is an unswerving disciple of Jefferson, but although living in a township overwhelmingly Republican, his fellow-townsmen have seen fit to repose in him the responsible position of Real Estate Assessor in 1880, and Township Trustee for three terms. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JAMES B. ELTON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Atwater January 14, 1848, son of Erbin and Caroline (Woodruff) Elton, and grandson of Ebenezer and Emily Elton, of Puritan stock, who came from Connecticut in 1833 via canal to Buffalo, thence by lake to Ohio, and settled on the land now occupied by their son Erbin. Mrs. Caroline Elton came with her parents, Chancy and Perlina Woodruff, from Farmington, Conn., to Atwater Township, this county. They had with them their seven children: Havey, Ezekiel, Henry, Caroline, Cornelius, Cornelia and Alfred, and after coming here had two more—Sarah and William. Ebenezer and Emily Elton had six children: Lucella, married Watrous Fairchild Taylor; Erbin, married Caroline Elton; Elizabeth, married John Norton; Harriett, married Lucius Walker; Edwin, married Harriett Knapp, and Ebenezer, died at the age of two years. Ebenezer Elton lived to enjoy pioneer life but a short time, dying December 22, 1835, aged forty-three. At his death, Erbin, who was but a boy at the time, took charge of the homestead and diligently cleared it of timber, etc., and still makes it his residence. He had four children: Edwin, died April 18, 1870, aged twenty-six; those now living are James B., born in this township in 1848, (married, in 1871, Miss Sarah Hacock, by whom he has two children: Iona A. and Edwin); Henry, a farmer, Windham Township, this county (married Miss Eliza Hacock, June 26, 1883, have two daughters: Carrie and Nina); Emily, married October 8, 1879, to Earnest Youngman, farmer, Windham Township, this county. The family are highly esteemed and respected members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

THOMAS W. GILSON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Oil Creek Township, Crawford County, Penn., in 1823; son of William and Mary (Lafferty) Gilson, natives of Pennsylvania, both now deceased. Of their children, John, Alice, Peter, Margaret and Thomas W. are now living. Our subject spent the greater part of his life in his native county, and has always been a farmer by occupation. He was married, in 1846, to Miss Cynthia Fowler, a native of Crawford County, Penn., who died January 19, 1876, the mother of five children, viz.: M. H., M. W., L. A., A. T. and E. L., who have been spared to care for their father and his home through the declining years of his life. In 1865 Mr. Gilson purchased and settled on his present estate, comprising 120 acres, now one of the best cultivated farms in Atwater Township. He and his family are highly respected in this community. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HOMER HILLYER, retired, was born in Deerfield Township, this county, November 17, 1815; son of Daniel and Charity (Loomis) Hillyer, natives of Southwick, Mass. The family, along with a colony of seventy-five persons, embarked for the West in 1815, and were forty-four days on the road, settling in this county during October, 1815. Daniel Hillyer was a farmer and did considerable surveying in Atwater and Randolph Townships. Of the six children born to him and his wife, three are now living: Homer, Joseph T. and Edwin, the two younger now residents of Dodge County, Wis. Homer Hillyer was brought up on a farm and was married, June 11, 1845, to Miss Hannah Cooney, a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, who died January 17, 1865, without issue. He was married, on second occasion, September 6, 1865, to Miss Celinda C. Crail, born in Beaver County, Penn. Mr. Hillyer was appointed station agent at Atwater on the C. & P. R. R. at the time it was built and acceptably served in that capacity until 1884, when he resigned, being one of the oldest agents on the road, and retired to enjoy the well-earned results of his labors. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for years, and is widely known and esteemed by all. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

IRA JACKSON, firm of Baith & Jackson, merchants, Atwater, was born in Mt. Vernon, Knox Co., Ohio, in 1853, and is an adopted son of Josiah and Lucy A . (Phinney) Jackson, former of whom, now in his seventy-ninth year, is a native of Rutland County, Vt., and the latter of Dover, Ohio. The family settled in Freedom Township, this county, at an early date and cleared a farm where they resided until their removal to this village. The subject of this sketch served an apprenticeship of ten years at Ravenna in merchandising, and in the spring of 1884 formed the present partnership. This firm are successors to Brush, Alden & Butler, the leading business house of Atwater. Mr. Jackson married, August 15,1877, Miss Mary F., daughter of Capt. J. C. Long, of Nantucket, commander of a whaling vessel for years, but now living a retired life in Ravenna. The children born to this union are William and George. Mr. Jackson is a member of the Congregational Church; a member of the Royal Arcanum. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

S. W. JOHNSON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in New Haven County, Conn., in 1825; son of Levi and Eliza (Riggs) Johnson, who crossed the country, arriving in this county in 1834, and settling in Rootstown Township, where the father purchased a farm and founded a home. In 1846 Levi Johnson removed to Atwater Township, where he lived till the close of his life, August 25, 1862. His widow is now in the eighty-sixth year of her age. Of the children born to this couple, but two survive: S. W. and Henry. The subject of this sketch was married, in 1849, to Miss Sally, daughter of Stephen Wooley, deceased. His living children are James R. and Eliza, wife of B. F. Hathaway, present Clerk of Atwater Township. In 1850 Mr. Johnson settled on a farm of 100 acres in the northern part of Atwater Township, on which he resided until 1882, when he moved to his present farm, comprising sixty acres, situated near Atwater Station. He has spent a life-time of labor and toil in clearing land and creating from the wilderness scenes of growth and abundance. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN KENNEDY, section foreman Cleveland & Pittsburgh Railroad, P. O. Atwater, was born in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1819; son of John and Ann Kennedy. He crossed the ocean in 1851 and began the struggle of life, possessing a vigorous constitution, strong ambition and an honest heart as his only capital. He made his way to the "West" and worked for two months on the Akron branch of the Cleveland, Mt. Vernon & Delaware Railroad. In 1852 he was appointed to his present position, and has proved, by his careful application to business, one of the best, as he is one of the oldest, men in the company's employ. He was married first to Miss Mary A. Sebrell, who died in 1871, leaving four children: Ellen, Ann, John and Patrick. He was married, on second occasion, to Mrs. Margret Coats, who died in March, 1883. Mr. Kennedy, who has ever been temperate and frugal in habits, in 1864 was enabled to purchase his present farm, consisting of 128 acres of land. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

WILLIAM W. KETTRING, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Atwater Township, this county, in 1842; son of Jacob and Rachel (Petrie) Kettring, natives of Baden, Germany, the former born in November, 1815, the latter in 1822, the respective families immigrating to America in 1831. They were the parents of six sons: William W., George, Joshua, Jacob, Caleb and Eli. Jacob Kettring, St., cleared forty acres of land in Atwater Township, this county, where he engaged in farming till his death. His widow, who survives him, is a resident of Atwater, this county. Our subject was brought up on the farm, and has always followed agricultural pursuits. In 1862 he joined the Union Army, enlisting in Company C, One Hundred and Eleventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving till the close of the war. He participated in the battle of Stone River, siege of Knoxville, the Georgia and Atlanta campaigns, Franklin, Ft. Fisher and Nashville under Thomas, and received an honorable discharge as Corporal in July, 1865. Returning to peaceful pursuits he was married, in 1867, to Miss Lucy A., daughter of Thomas Gilson, of Atwater Township, this county. Six children were born to this union, all now living: Henry, Clara, Charles, Maggie, Edith and Mary. Mr. Kettring is a member of the I. O. O F. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN MANSFIELD, farmer, P. O. Atwater Centre, was born in Wallingford, Conn., November 18, 1806; son of Ira and Susan (Kirtland) Mansfield, who had a family of six children, of whom our subject is the only survivor. His grandfather, John Mansfield, was an officer of some distinction in the Revolutionary struggle. Ira Mansfield, his father, better known as Maj. Mansfield, made his way through the wilderness of Ohio in 1806, and succeeded in making a trade of land with Joshua Atwater, the original proprietor of the township, securing 360 acres. Returning to the East he brought his family back with him in 1808, and here founded a home. This land he subsequently sold, and purchased 150 acres near the present homestead. He raised a company of volunteers for the war of 1812, in which he took an active part. While in camp at Detroit his trusted clerk decamped with $1,500 of his money. For a time this crippled him, but his untiring ambition soon enabled him to retrieve the loss. Ira Mansfield's death occurred in Atwater in 1849. His widow survived him until 1851. Our subject was married, in 1833, to Miss Mary Hall, also a native af Wallingford, Conn., and who has borne him two sons: Ira K, residing at Chicago, I11., is married to Emma J. Cook (their living children are Mary M., Susan M. and Bessie I.); Silliman S., married to Margaret Goss, they reside in Atwater Township, this county, (Their children are Charles K., Alfred H., Pearl W., Henry L., Carrie J., Frankie G. and Ira S.). Mr. Mansfield is among the oldest settlers of Atwater Township. He has served as Assessor several terms, and has ever taken an active part in the development of his township. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

EDGAR H. MANSFIELD, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born May 4, 1843, in Atwater Township, this county; son of Henry E. Mansfield, born in Wallingford, Conn., August 16,1803, and grandson of Maj. Ira Mansfield, a pioneer of 1807 to Atwater Township. Henry E. Mansfield was twice married, first to "Miss Jane Stanly, a native of Newton Falls, Trumbull Co., Ohio, who died April 2, 1837. Jane, the only surviving child of this union, married M. D. Motherspaw, and is the mother of two children—Harry and Frank—and grandmother of Carl and Ruby. His second union was with Ann S. Stanly, a sister of his deceased wife, born August 16, 1815, daughter of Nathaniel and Mary (Moore) Stanly, the former born November 15, 1768, died August 13, 1848, the latter born August 22,1772, died June 11, 1847, and who had thirteen children, of whom two survive: James, born July 23, 1801, and Ann S. There are seventy-nine living descendants of this couple. The subject of this sketch was married, in 1869, to Miss Lora E., daughter of William Campbell, a native of Atwater Township, this county. This family and its connections are among the oldest and most respected in Atwater Township; they are both industrious and successful, walking in the steps of their forefathers.

SIDNEY A. MATTOON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, is a native of Atwater Township, this county, born December 25, 1832, son of Caleb and Betsey (Hall) Mattoon, of Connecticut, and grandson of Caleb Mattoon, one of the earliest pioneers of this township, coming here from Connecticut with an ox team. Here he cleared a farm comprising 100 acres and lived the balance of his life. The subject of this sketch was united in marriage, in Atwater Township, this county, January 9,1856, with Miss Elizabeth, adopted daughter of Aaron Baldwin. This union has been blessed with five children, four now living: Charles A., Jessie, Estella and Edwin. In 1858 Mr. Mattoon settled on his present farm of 240 acres. He is Trustee of the Congregational Church and Superintendent of the Sabbath-school. The family are among the oldest and most respected in Atwater Township. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN MYERS, Atwater, Ohio, was born in Berlin Township, Mahoning Co., Ohio, December 22, 1828, son of Daniel and Polly Myers from Pennsylvania, and early pioneers of Mahoning County, Ohio. The subject of this sketch had not the advantages of acquiring an education that many boys, even of his time, possessed. Arithmetic was his "main fort," and in that branch he got as far as the "double rule of three." His constant practice in compound numbers, interest, percentage and mensuration has made him so proficient in these departments of arithmetic, that better scholars than he frequently acknowlege his superiority in these departments. When about twenty years old he commenced to battle with life for himself, and his first undertaking was a contract to cut 100 cords of four-foot wood at 25 cents per cord for John Boles, of Campbellsport. Taking for a partner his brother Henry, they accomplished the feat in ten days, going to and from their work twice during the time, a distance of fifteen miles. With his share of the proceeds, as part payment, Mr. Myers purchased a " Canfield grain thresher " for which he paid $200. This was his first investment, and he continued to follow threshing for sixteen years. In February, 1851, he was married to Miss Sophia Betts, a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, but who when two years old moved with her parents to Trumbull County, Ohio, where she lived until united in marriage to Mr. Myers. Our subject and wife spent one year of their married life in Berlin Township, and in the fall of 1852 they moved to Atwater Township, this county, on the farm where they now live, consisting of 120 acres, for which Mr. Myers paid $17.50 per acre; about ten acres of this farm were cleared off when Mr. Myers moved on it, but being possessed of a strong constitution and a tireless ambition, with the best elements of character and natural frugality, his life's work has been crowned with merited success. He is owner of over 500 acres of land in Atwater Township, and notwithstanding the vast amount of labor connected with operating such a farm, he has Always taken an active interest in educational matters, giving his children every advantage of acquiring a thorough education. The record of his family, all of whom are now living, is: W. C., born November 3, 1852; Lucy A., born July 11, 1854, married to L. I. Glass; Chester A., born December 16, 1856, married to Clara E. Hawn; H. Alva, born August 20, 1859, married to Jennie T. Douthitt; Vinnie M., born August 27, 1861; Eddie M., born December 11, 1864; Hattie
J., born January 8, 1867; Jesse O., born May 26, 1870, and Worthy Allen, born December 14, 1873. Six of these have taught school, viz.: W. C., Chester A., H. Alva, Vinnie M., Eddie M. and Hattie J. Mr. Myers is a strong supporter of Democracy, casting his first Presidential vote for Franklin Pierce, and voting for every Democratic candidate for President since that time. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HENRY NICHOLS, farmer, P. O. Atwater Centre, was born in Fairfield, Columbiana Co., Ohio, September 20, 1825, son of Nasin and Elizabeth (Gould) Nichols, natives of New York State, where the former died when our subject was but two years of age. The widowed mother, with her son, came West and located in Ellsworth, Mahoning Co., Ohio, and three years later removed to this county, settling in Edinburg Township, where she was married, on second occasion, in Columbiana County, to Mahlon Siddall, by whom she had eleven children, nine of whom are now living: Marilda J., George W., Matilda A., Louisa and Elisha (twins), Lovinia, Keller, Isaac and Melissa. The subject of this sketch has been a resident of Atwater and Edinburg Townships, this county, since 1834 and experienced all the hardships incident to pioneer life. Between his residence and Atwater Center the road covers hidden timber which he helped to fell in order to obtain a pass through the woods. He has been twice married, first in 1850 to Miss Mary K. Lynn, born in Limestone, Fayette Co., Penn., September 29, 1831, and who died in 1874, the mother of two children, both now living: Frances J., wife of Jerome Huxley, of Princeton, Kan. (have two children: Dallas H. and George E), and Samuel E., residing in Atwater, married to Ada Wireman (have two sons: Bernard H. and Walter). Mr. Nichols was married on second occasion, in 1875, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Jesse and Emily Rogers, a pioneer family. Mr. .Nichols in 1866 settled on his present estate, comprising 126 acres, where he has established a permanent home. He and his wife are connected with the Disciples Church of Edinburg. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN NORTON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, one of the oldest native residents of Atwater Township, this county, was born here in 1813; son of Jerry and Rachel (Hubbard) Norton, who journeyed from Connecticut in 1812, with ox teams and one horse. They had two children with them, were six weeks on the road, and located in Atwater Township, this county. They had a family of twelve children, of whom five are now living: Sarah, wife of Daniel Hall, in Richmond, Mich.; Mary, wife of Isaac Elliott; John; James; and Ellen, wife of Henry Beebe. Jerry Norton in the latter years of his life removed to Randolph Township, where he died. Our subject was married in Edinburg, this county, March 11, 1846, to Miss Elizabeth Elton, of Atwater Township. Their only child (adopted), Martha, married Z. Strong and has three children: Willie, Henry and Landa. Mr. Norton lives on the homestead farm consisting of 100 acres. He has served his township as Treasurer. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JAMES SPIERS, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in England, October 16, 1813, son of Thomas and Aon (Parkins) Spiers, with whom he immigrated to this country in 1833, and located in Deerfield Township, where Thomas Spiers died the following week. In 1840 our subject secured fifty acres of his present estate, now comprising eighty-two acres, which at that time was wholly wooded. A road through the forests had to be cut to make a clearing for the erection of a cabin. Their bread was baked in a kettle suspended on poles, over a fire, and they experienced all the other hardships and privations incident to a pioneer's life. He was married in Boardman, then Trumbull, now Mahoning County, Ohio, February 29, 1844, to Miss Betsey, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Webber, by whom he has the following children living: Milo; Lucy, wife of Charles Craig (have one child—Ethel 31.), and Celeste, residing at home, the joy and solace of her parents' declining years. The family are widely known and highly esteemed. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

C. J. STANFORD, member of firm of Stanford & Mendenhall, furniture dealers and undertakers, Atwater, was born in Randolph Township, this county, September 7, 1841. His father, Orrin Stanford, a native of Connecticut, came to this county when a youth, with his father, Oliver, who was one of the pioneers of Randolph Township. Orrin Stanford married Eliza Coe, a daughter of Deacon James Coe, Sr., who was born in Granville, Mass., March 19, 1769, and settled in Randolph Township, this county, in 1811. The Coe family came to this country from the County of Suffolk, England, where their ancestors for many generations back had resided. Robert Coe, of Milford, Suffolk, was burned at the stake by orders from Queen Mary, September, 1555. Robert Coe (of the ninth generation) is the first of this name who came to this county. The subject of this sketch learned the carpenter's trade of his father, and worked at the same until he joined the Union Army, in 1861, enlisting in Company A, Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and serving three years. He participated in the battles of Middle Creek, Ky., under Garfield, Pound Gap, Siege of Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, and in other skirmishes. After his return he worked at his trade until 1877 when he opened a furniture store and undertaking establishment at Edinburg. In 1880 lie removed his business to Atwater, and in 1883 Mr. Mendenhall was admitted a partner in the concern. Mr. Stanford was married, March 15, 1883, to Miss Nina Mendenhall, by whom he has one son—William. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

W. H. STOCKBERGER, carriage manufacturer, P. O. Atwater Center, was born in New Lisbon, Columbiana Co., Ohio, in September, 1841, son of Frederick and Elizabeth Stockberger, who emigrated from Germany in 1835. They were married at New Lisbon and settled at Atwater Center in 1854. Their family consisted of four children: Caroline, W. H., Daniel and Lizzie. Frederick Stockberger was a carriage-maker by trade, and established the present business here, which he carried on to the close of his life, in 1878. His widow is still surviving. The subject of this sketch was married in Pittsburgh, Penn., in 1862, to Miss Louisa Rettman, also a native of Germany. Their living children are Jessie, Carrie, Maty, Frank, Lottie, Frederick, Walter and one net named. Mr. Stockberger has made great improvements in the carriage factory, moving the old building to the rear and erecting a substantial two-story structure. The main floor is used as a carriage repository and the upper floor as a paint shop and drying room. This addition was completed in 1880. Mr. Stockberger and family are members of the Lutheran Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JARED STRATTON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in 1841, in Atwater Township, this county; son of Jared and Damaris (Perkins) Stratton, natives of Connecticut, who settled in Atwater Township in 1821. Of their children, three are now living: Almon, born in this township, in 1831, married to Rebecca Henline (they have two children: Willie J. and Howard S.); Jared; and Samuel, unmarried. Jared Stratton, Sr., was a carpenter by trade, and worked at this occupation until within a few years previous to his death in 1883. His widow is now a resident of the old homestead farm. The subject of this sketch, in 1871, settled on his present farm, consisting of fifty-six acres, which he has greatly improved and cultivated. He was married in 1872, to Miss Lydia B. McLeish, who has borne him four children: Fannie, Frank, John and Walter. Mr. Stratton is present Clerk of this district, School Director and a member of the Board of Education. He was appointed a Deacon in the Congregational Church, of which he is a member, in 1883. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

SAMUEL STRATTON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Atwater Township, this county, June 21, 1843; youngest son of Jared Stratton, Sr., whose history appears above. Samuel Stratton has always remained on the homestead farm, and since his father's death, February 18,1883, has been the support and companion of his respected mother, now in her eightieth year. Our subject has added thirty-seven and one-quarter acres to the original homestead, making a total of seventy-five and one-fourth acres. He is connected with the Congregational Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

WILLIAM THOMPSON, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born in Deerfield Township, this county, in 1822, son of Uriah and Elizabeth (Allen) Thompson, natives of New Jersey, and among the pioneers of 1810 to settle in Deerfield Township. At that time there were but ten families in the township, the country was covered with woods, and wild animals were in abundance. Their nearest market was New Lisbon. Uriah Thompson secured eighty acres of land which he cleared, but subsequently removed to Atwater Township, where he and his wife died at the ages of eighty-four and seventy-nine, respectively. Of their six children, three now survive: Uriah, Jr., William and Elizabeth. Our subject has occupied his present farm, now comprising 225 acres, since he was eighteen years of age. He erected a cheese factory on his place, and has won for himself a wide reputation as a successful manufacturer of this commodity. He began life empty-handed, clearing his farm of woods and slowly improving it until he has now one of the best in the county. Mr. Thompson was married in 1855, to Miss Emily Fowler, of Pennsylvania. Of the children born to this union five are living: Louie, Owen P., Lillie, Leona and Wendell. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

SAMUEL TOWNSEND, ticket and station agent, Atwater, was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, in 1836; son of Jonathan and Ann Townsend, of English and French descent, respectively. They came from Bucks County, Penn., and settled in Mahoning County, Ohio, in 1833, where they both died. Our subject was married in 1865 to Miss Lois Roller, of his native county. He was brought up on a farm and followed various occupations until his removal to Atwater in 1870. He was subsequently employed as assistant station agent until the resignation of H. Hillyer, in January, 1884, when he succeeded him, and has proved himself to be an efficient officer. He is well known and highly respected. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

SILAS P. WALLER, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born November 6, 1841, on the Waller estate, this township, in the old log-cabin which his father first occupied in 1837, since when two generations have been born within its honored walls. His father, David G. Waller, was born in Palmyra Township, this county, August 12, 1812, and was married to Catherine Webber, born in Pennsylvania, October 17, 1804, daughter of Peter Webber, who was born September 4, 1779, in Berkshire County, Penn., a son of Christian Webber, a native of Germany who fled from that country when eighteen years of age to avoid being pressed into the army. To this union were born the following children, viz.: Hiram, Silas P. (our subject), and David Webber. David G. Waller's parents, Silas, Sr., and Betsey (Knappen) Waller, were natives of Connecticut and parents of thirteen children, only two of whom now survive: David G., and Mason, a native of Palmyra Township, where he still resides. Silas Waller, Sr., was a son of Joseph (who died in Connecticut) and Sarah Waller, who accompanied her three sons, Silas, David and Asel, with their families, who settled in Palmyra in 1805; she died February 21, 1815. Our subject was married June 2, 1870, to Miss Angeline V., daughter of Henry and Sophia Dawes, early settlers of Deerfield Township, natives of England and the parents of twelve children. To Mr. and Mrs. Waller have been born six children, four now living: Mary Sophia, Fannie Betsey, Cora Elizabeth and George Edmund. Our subject enlisted in 1861 in the three months' call, but did not go out . He re-enlisted for three years in Company G, Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was wounded in the battle of Cedar Mountain, Va., August 9, 1862, and was honorably discharged on account of same, March 16, 1863. After being discharged from the army he attended school at the Poland Seminary, Mahoning Co., Ohio, for one year, and during the winter of 1864-65 he attended the Iron City Commercial College, from which he graduated in the spring of 1865. In October, 1865, he removed to Lawrence County, Mo., and was engaged in teaching school for live years, during which time he assisted in organizing a teachers' institute, and establishing a teachers' library of over 350 volumes; was one of the prime movers in establishing a normal school at Marionville (the building costing $12,000). He was a member of its first Board of Directors, and Secretary of the Board of Directors for three years, and also one of the Building Committee. In the spring of 1870 he returned to the old homestead on a visit, during which he married Angeline Victoria Dawes, and in September returned with his bride to Missouri. During the winter he taught school. In the spring of 1871 he engaged in farming, in which he continued for five years, and during that time he held the offices of Township Clerk, Township Treasurer and Collector of Taxes; he was First Lieutenant of Company I, Missouri State Militia. During the fall of 1873 they lost their little boy, Edmund Guy, and in the spring of 1874 they buried their little boy, Henry Lester, over which his wife became very despondent. Her health remaining very poor all summer, she returned to Ohio on a visit the first of October, staying all the winter of 1874-75. During that time he was engaged in teaching school. In the spring of 1875 he returned to Ohio, and stayed all summer, during which time his wife's health greatly improved. In the fall of 1875 he proposed to his wife that they return to Missouri again, to which she objected, saying that she would rather live in Ohio in a log-cabin than in Missouri in a mansion. He then decided to return to Missouri, dispose of his property and come back and settle on the old homestead, and is now living in the old log-cabin which has been standing some sixty-five years, and in which the third generation is now living. He has been a member of the Township Board of Education for seven years, and has always taken an active part in public and private enterprises. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

E. WARRINGTON, M. D., Atwater, was born in Butler Township, Columbiana Co., Ohio, in April, 1821, son of Abraham and Keziah (Woolman) Warrington, who were the first couple married in Springfield Settlement, Columbiana Co., Ohio, where they raised their family of ten children and resided the balance of their lives. Our subject was raised on a farm, receiving a primary education in Friends' select schools and at Mt. Pleasant Academy. After teaching twelve years and practicing surveying he began the study of medicine, and graduated at Cleveland in the Medical Department of the Western Reserve College in 1852. For five years he practiced his profession at North Benton, Mahoning Co., Ohio. In 1857 he settled in Atwater Center, where he has since been in constant and successful practice, and with two exceptions is the oldest living physician in the county. He has been a member of the Portage County Medical Society for sixteen years, ever since it was started; is also a member of the Northeastern Ohio Medical Association. During his twenty-eight years' residence in Atwater seven doctors at different times have tried to get a foothold there, but would remain only a short time. Dr. Warrington for many years back has used antiseptic method in the treatment of both wounds and diseases with marked success generally, and in some individual cases with marvellous results. In 1853 the Doctor was married to Miss Jane Sproat, who died in 1863, leaving two children—Richard and Jessie. He was married on second occasion in April, 1865, to Miss Elizabeth Ritchie, of Columbiana County, Ohio. Dr. Warrington has served as Township Treasurer and on Board of Education. He is connected with the Congregational Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JAMES WEBBER, Jr., farmer, P. O. Atwater Centre, was born on the homestead farm where he now resides in Atwater Township, this county, April 8, 1825, the second son of James, Sr., and Phebe (Mix) Webber (whose record appears in this book elsewhere). Our subject was married in 1855 to Margaret, widow of Isaac L. Webber, eldest son of James Webber, Sr. (by whom she had three children: James B., Charles E. and Lida L.), and a native of Harrison County, Ind . To our subject and wife have been born two sons: Robert L. and Howard H. Residing from birth on the old homestead, our subject's life has necessarily been uneventful. He has served as Justice of the Peace some years and in various other township offices of trust. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HIRAM B. WEBBER, merchant, P. O. Atwater Centre, was born in Atwater Township, this county, July 18, 1828, son of James, Sr., and Phebe (Mix) Webber, natives of Wallingford, Conn., whose history appears in this work. The subject of this sketch left home when seventeen years of age, and followed mercantile business at New Albany, Ind., where he was extensively engaged for upwards of thirty years. He was united in marriage in Indianapolis, Ind., in 1856, with Miss Fannie E. Smith, of Bloomington, Ind., and who died in Atwater, this township, March 6, 1881. By this union there are three children, now living: Louis C., Mary J. and John L. Mr. Webber moved to St. Louis in 1872, and engaged in the sale of carpets, but in 1875 returned to his native place, where he erected his present place of business, in which he carries a general stock of goods. Mr. Webber was a stock-holder and Director in the Ohio Falls Iron Works at New Albany, Ind., and has been otherwise identified with prominent operations here and elsewhere. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

FRIEND WHITTELSEY, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born April 10,1830, in Atwater Township, this county, son of Randolph and Clarissa (Mansfield) Whittelsey, of Wallingford, Conn., who were the parents of five children: Patrick, Edgar, Friend, Randall, and Clara, wife of Ambrose Goss. The paternal grandfather of our subject, John H. Whittelsey, also a native of Wallingford, Conn., of Scotch descent, settled in the woods near Atwater about 1807, on the farm now owned and occupied by John B. Whittelsey, Jr., his only living child. Our subject was married in 1856 to Miss Eliza Ballinger, of Atwater, who came from Cheltenham, England, with her parents in 1850, and who died in November, 1859, leaving one son—Elisha. Mr. Whittelsey was married, on second occasion, to Miss Susan B. Smith, of Deerfield, by whom he has two children: Susan B. and Edgar. Mr. Whittelsey occupies a part of the old homestead, having a farm of 260 acres. He is regarded as one of the substantial men of Atwater Township.

RANDALL WHITTELSEY, farmer, P. O. Atwater, was born on the homestead farm, upon which he now lives, in Atwater Township, this county, August 30, 1842, the youngest son of Randolph S. and Clarissa (Mansfield) Whittelsey, natives of Wallingford, Conn., where the former was born September, 1799, and the latter in November, 1800. They reared a family of five children, all of whom are now living: Patrick, Edgar, Friend, Randall, and Clara, wife of Ambrose Goss. Randolph S. Whittelsey came to this county when seven years of age, with his father, John H., who founded a home on the land in Atwater Township, now occupied by John B. Whittelsey. Our subject . was married November 16, 1876, to Miss Lucy L., daughter of Royal Merwin, of Palmyra Township, this county, and whose family were pioneers of that township. The three children born to this union are all living: Lois, born June 11, 1878; Clara Jane, born August 7, 1880, and Royal, born August 1, 1882. The Whittelseys are among the most numerous of the pioneers, and are highly respected. Under our subject's able administration the homestead farm has become one of the finest in Atwater Township. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

A. V. WILLSEY, Postmaster and merchant, Atwater, was born in Schoharie County, N. Y., in 1823, son of Henry T. and Orpha (Snow) Willsey, natives of that State. The family located north of Atwater Center in 1840, and subsequently moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, where Mr. Willsey died. His widow lived to attain her eighty-fifth year, and died in Atwater Township, this county, March 28, 1884. They raised a family of five children, all of whom are living, and of these, Moses, who served three years in the Union Army during the late war of the Rebellion, is now a resident of Ashtabula County, Ohio. The subject of this sketch learned the carpenter's trade in his native place, and followed this occupation in connection with farming until his appointment as Postmaster of Atwater by President Grant in 1871, which position he has filled continuously since that time. Mr. Willsey was married in 1843, to Miss Mary J. Clover, a native of Pennsylvania, by whom he has three children: Louisa, wife of Z. Crubaugh; Henry, and Delilah, wife of G. Gelhart. Mr. Willsey owns a farm in Atwater Township, this county, which he operates in connection with his other business. He has served six years as Justice of the Peace, and two terms as Notary. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HOMER H. WOOLF, hardware merchant, Atwater, was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, October 24, 1851, son of George and Eliza A. (Baum) Woolf, natives of Columbiana County and Mahoning County, Ohio, respectively, and who had a family of six children, of whom five are now living: Preston G., Homer H., Maurice O., Clark E. and Wilson W. George Woolf came to this county in 1848, and followed farming until he retired from business. He is now a resident of Atwater township. His wife died December 2, 1880. Our subject was brought up on a farm, and after attending Mt. Union College three years, taught school nine terms and then embarked in business. He was married in Ravenna, June 17, 1875, to Miss Carry V. Crumrine, a native of Mahoning County, Ohio, by whom he has three children: Edith A., A. Leslie and Elsie L. Mr. Woolf, with his brother Preston, established their present business in Atwater in 1874, and in March, 1882, Preston disposed of his interest to our subject, who has since carried it on alone and is doing a good trade, having a stock of about $3,000. He is now serving bis third term as Justice of the Peace, and has filled other township offices. His father's family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

REUBEN N. AVERY; farmer, P. O. Aurora, was born on his present farm in Aurora Township, this county, December 10, 1829, son of Reuben and Corrinna (Lewis) Avery. Reuben Avery, Sr., was born at Horseneck, Conn., March 7,1772, and removed to this township in 1816 with his first wife, Rachel Baldwin, by whom he had ten children. After her death he was married to Mrs. Corrinna (Lewis) Faxon, widow of Isaac D. Faxon, by whom she had four children. She was born in Farmington, Hartford Co., Conn., December 23, 1789, came to Mantua Township, this county, in 1813, and in early life taught school. Her union with Mr. Avery resulted in the birth of six children: Amelia M., Minerva C., Augustus, Henry, Reuben N. and Betsey E. The father died May 22, 1873. Our subject was educated in the common school of his native township. He was married January 1, 1854, to Frances Hatch, born in Aurora Township, this county, December 14, 1835, daughter of Dr. John and Harriet (Gordon) Hatch, natives of Otsego County, N. Y., who removed to Aurora Township in 1826 and 1829 respectively, and where the former died in 1842. His widow is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Avery are the parents of six children, four of whom are living: Lawrence G., Willis L., John H. and Lillian F. Our subject is a farmer by occupation, and owns eighty acres of land. He has filled a number of the township offices. In politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HARVEY BALDWIN, farmer, P. O. Aurora, was born in Geauga County, Ohio, April 14, 1823; son of Harvey and Laura (Kent) Baldwin, who were the parents of four children: Laura Ann (deceased), Harvey, Philander (deceased) and Oscar O., residing in Minnesota. Harvey Baldwin, Sr., was born in Danbury, Conn., in 1796, and came to Cleveland, Ohio, with his father and family in 1806, and the following year to Aurora Township, this county. At eighteen years of age he left his home and embarked upon his career in life, first taking a trip South, thence to New York. In 1819 he purchased a quantity of cheese and cranberries, which he conveyed overland to the Ohio River, thence by skiffboat to Louisville, where he disposed of them. The following year he shipped a cargo to New Orleans, and continued in the cheese business for a period of twenty-five years, making frequent trips down the Ohio River, and as often as once a year to New Orleans. In 1830 he purchased land in Streetsboro, this county, and in connection with farming, engaged extensively in the manufacture and sale of cheese. He died in February, 1882. His wife, the mother of the subject of this sketch, was born in Suffield, Conn., March, 1797, came to Aurora Township, this county, in 1807, and is now residing with our subject. Mr. Baldwin, the subject of this sketch, was reared on the farm, and educated in the common schools. Leaving home when eighteen years of age, he engaged as farm-hand for Charles Harmon, and in 1847 commenced farming for himself in connection with dairying, which he has since continued, excepting three years spent in California. In December, 1847, he married Emily Carver, who has borne him the following children: Ella F., wife of E. R. Merrill; Alice W., wife of F. A. Gould; Carrie E. deceased; Hattie E.; Anna Laura and Minnie C. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

GEN. NELSON EGGLESTON, farmer, was born October 3,1811, in Aurora Township, Portage Co., Ohio ; son of Moses and Sally (Taylor) Eggleston. His father was born in Middlefield, Mass.. in 1784. He came to this township with his brother Joseph in the spring of 1806; after arriving, and looking up the land for which their father's farm in Massachusetts was exchanged, they commenced clearing away the trees, and making preparations for the arrival of the rest of the family the coming year. Among other labors, the ensuing spring, they made maple sugar, fashioning the spouts and buckets, for gathering sap, from basswood, with only their axes, knives and a sap-gouge for tools. During the succeeding summer Joseph revisited Massachusetts, and returned with the Eggleston, Taylor, and Root families, in all, thirty-two in number. They came through Pennsylvania and by way of Pittsburgh. In 1810 Moses had made quite an opening on his land and erected a cabin; having provided it according to the fashion of those times, he proposed to Miss Sally Taylor to come and join with him in the labors and struggles of a border life. This place was one mile and a quarter northwest of the center of Aurora, on the old Cleveland and Newburg road. Tn the war of 1812 Moses enlisted in the service, and was sent to Huron with his company immediately after the surrender of Hull. His wife stayed at the cabin, not knowing what hour the British and Indians might defeat her defenders, and repeat again the scenes of the River Raisin. In 1824 he moved to the Center, where he remained until his death, August 6, 1866. He was formerly of the Federal, then of the Whig and Republican party, by which he was honored with repeated elections to the offices of Justice at the Peace and County Commissioner. He was an influential member of the Presbyterian Church, and his career that of a man of industry, economy and integrity. The mother of our subject was born in Massachusetts, in 1792, and died in April, 1838. She had three children, two of whom survive her—Nelson and Wealtha. The latter is now living in Tuscola, Ill., the widow of Simeon D. Kelley, by whom she had seven children, three boys and four girls; the sons, Moses, Hiram, and Randolph, served through the late war of the Rebellion. Moses, settled at El Presidio, Texas, where he in a short time accumulated a handsome property, and became a prominent citizen, but was murdered about 1880. His two brothers still reside there. Our subject passed his early life on his father's farm, received a common school education, and spent some time at Hudson College, whence he graduated in 1831. He taught school in Calloway County, Ky., nearly a year, returned, and commenced to read law with Mathews & Hitchcock, of Painsville, Ohio; subsequently he studied with Humphrey & Hale, of Hudson, and September 9, 1834, was admitted to the bar upon motion before the Supreme Court sitting at Ravenna. He was married, January 29, 1835, to Miss Caroline Lacy, daughter of Isaac J. Lacy. By this union there are two children, Emmett and Addis. Mr. Eggleston engaged earnestly in the practice of his profession for a time, but submitting to the demands made upon him by his father for help in the working of land, and receiving no pecuniary aid from him in the purchase of books, or in the erection of an office, for which things he was unwilling to run in debt, he flung up the law, and has devoted himself since to farming. In 1834-35 he was Adjutant of the cavalry regiment in the Twentieth Brigade, Ohio Militia, under Col. O. L. Drake, of Freedom; afterward was promoted to the Colonelcy, which office he held two or three years until his resignation. Still later he was elected to the command of the brigade with the rank of General. Mr. Eggleston has a wide acquaintance with the early settlers of northeastern Ohio, and has been connected in various ways with its progress. He called the first meeting at his own house that was ever held to consider the subject of a railroad from Pittsburgh to Cleveland. The report of this meeting made by him and published, resulted immediately in a large convention at the center of Aurora, from all the towns on the route. He has earned a handsome competence, owning 500 acres of improved land in Ohio, and 1,200 in Missouri. He takes a lively interest in literature and polititcs, but does not permit them to interfere with his daily labor and the management of his farms. He is a disciple of Thomas Jefferson, and acknowledges no other master. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN GOULD, of Aurora Township, Portage County the gentleman here introduced, a well known citizen of Aurora, is now in his forty-second year, having been born in Twinsburg, Ohio, in 1844, of New England parentage. His father, John W. Gould, came from Vermont to Ohio in 1837, and his mother, whose maiden name was Eliza Post, from Saybrook, Conn., removed to Ohio with her parents in 1821. Mr. Gould and Miss Post were married in 1839, which relation was broken in 1882, when the beloved mother died, leaving besides her husband, three children: John, Aaron, and Ettie. In 1848 the family removed to Aurora, where they resided an unbroken family until 1879. John, the subject of this sketch, led much the life of any farmer's son, going to township schools, and for several winters was under the tutorship of the Rev. Joseph S. Graves; being of a very studious turn of mind, he added to his limited school advantages a general fund of information gleaned from an extended reading of books, magazines and the best papers. In 1870 Mr. Gould became locally connected with the Cleveland Herald, and in 1873 was advanced to the position of traveling agent of the paper. The year following he became a staff correspondent, and in that capacity made extended tours, his travels in one year alone taking him into nearly a score of States. When the temperance movement known as the "Woman's Crusade" began, Mr. Gould was delegated by his paper to report it, and for over three months this was his exclusive duty, his observations taking him to nearly every corner of the State. In 1879 Mr. Gould was married to Miss Helen Ferris, only daughter of Dr. Osman Ferris, of Mantua, Ohio. Giving up journalism, they located at Aurora Station, Ohio, and farming became his occupation, but in 1880, upon the reorganization of the editorial staff of the Herald, he again became connected with the editorial force of that paper, with special assignment to its agricultural department, though his pen furnished many columns to other departments, and many long journeys were taken as a " special correspondent." The same year, by urgent solicitation, Mr. Gould also became dairy editor of the Ohio Farmer, and for years his writings for that journal over the pseudonym of " Sam," have been widely read. When Secretary Chamberlain, of Columbus, organized the lecture course known as "Farmers' Institutes," Mr. Gould was early assigned to a prominent place as a special lecturer upon dairy and kindred subjects, and during the winters of 1882-83 and 1884, he has visited nearly every part of the State in that capacity. While rarely ever speaking of the extent of his literary work, it is known that he is a frequent contributor to the better class of farm journals, and his writings are sought for, from East to West, by such papers as the New York Tribune, Rural New Yorker, Country Gentleman, Coleman _? Rural, Prairie Farmer, etc. With the disappearance of the Herald in 1885, Mr. Gould was promptly offered a position upon the editorial staff of the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Mr. and Mrs. Gould have always resided at Aurora Station, where they assert they shall always continue to reside, and in the future, as in the past, welcome their many friends to the hospitalities of their home. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

SAMUEL F. HICKOX, retired farmer, Aurora, was born in Hartford County, Conn.', September 9, 1810; son of Josiah and Betsey (Forward) Hickox, who we're the parents of four children: Josiah V.; Betsey,wife of Marcus Taylor; Samuel F., and Chauncey, deceased in 1836. Josiah Hickox, a native of Watertown, Conn., was born August 22, 1777, a son of Ebenezer Hickox, a soldier in the Revolutionary war, who was descended from one of three brothers, natives of England, who immigrated to America in the early part of 1700. The father of our subject came with his family to Aurora Township, this county, in 1818, and here engaged in farming until his death, which occurred August 2,1840. His widow, who survived him until January 15, 1884, was born in Granby, Conn., June 18, 1787, daughter of Samuel and Susanna (Holcomb) Forward, also natives of Granby, Conn., who came to Aurora Township, this county, in 1803, and here died, the father in 1821, and the mother in 1830. Samuel F. Hickox was reared on a farm, and received a common school education. In 1840 he was married to Miss Emily Blair, born in Aurora, November 21,1816, and died January 26, 1884, leaving four children: Oliver, Walter G.. Henry M. B. and Olivia, wife of Albert. Sheldon. Mr. Hickox is a Democrat in politics; an active member of the order of A. F. & A. M. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

CHESTER R. HOWARD, farmer and mechanic, P. O. Aurora Station, was born February 3,1812, in Hartford, Conn.; son of Freeman and Eunice A. (Risley) Howard, natives of Hartford, Conn., and a descendant of Thomas and Susanna Howard, who emigrated from England to America, and settled in Ipswich, Mass., in the year 1634. Freeman Howard, subject's father, was born in 1789; was a carriage-maker by trade, and in 1828 came to Aurora and erected and controlled a saw-mill and grist-mill. He died in Chardon, Ohio, February 3, 1867. His wife was born June 15, 1788, died June 26, 1866, at Chardon, also. They were the parents of the following children: Freeman, Jr., Chester Risley, Eliza, Celestia and Julius Field. Our subject remained at home during his minority, assisting his father in farming and in the saw-mill. In 1846 he bought the property his father had first owned in Ohio, and has since continued to occupy it. He has been twice married, on first occasion to Harriet Benjamin, who died July 10,1864, leaving the following children Emerett, Emerson, Elmira and Eliza. He subsequently, September 7, 1865, married Harriet, daughter of Robert and Rhoda (Henry) Root. Mr. Howard has always quietly and assiduously devoted himself to his private affairs, except when he has been called by the citizens of his township from time to time to discharge the duties of District Assessor, and other local offices. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ELISHA HURD (deceased) was born March 10, 1822, in Aurora Township, Portage Co., Ohio, son of Hopson and Betsey (Lacy) Hard, who had a family of seven children: Maria, wife of P. H. Babcock, of Cleveland, Ohio; Elisha; Hopson; Eliza, wife of S. C. Greene; Frank; Cornelia, wife of J. E. Williams, and a daughter deceased. About 1815 Hopson Hurd, accompanied by Roman Humphrey, came over the mountains with a stock of goods and embarked in business in Aurora. Mr. Humphrey in a short time withdrew from the firm, and the business was then carried on for many years by Mr. Hurd alone. He accumulated a large fortune and died in Aurora in 1869. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in Aurora Township, and here married, October 13, 1852, Louisa Williams, born in Newark Valley, N. Y., May 13, 1830, daughter of Stephen Williams, of Tioga County, N. Y. Four children were born to this union: Eliza, wife of Frank Aldrich, in Cleveland, Ohio; C. Williams; Fred S.; and McClellan, also in Cleveland. Mr. Hurd remained at home assisting his father on the farm until he was twentynine years of age, when he engaged in cattle dealing on his own account, and about 1857, in company with his brother Frank, embarked in mercantile trade, and at the same time attended to' his dairy, live stock and farming interests, This firm continued until the death of Elisha, when Frank carried on the business until 1879, and then sold out to Fred and William S., sons of Elisha Hurd. Mr. Hurd was a Republican in politics. By industry, tact and perseverance he accumulated considerable property, and owned over 700 acres of land at the time of his death, June 17, 1868.

ZENO KENT, farmer, P. O. Aurora, was born on his present farm in Aurora Township, this county, February 20, 1821, son of Zeno and Emily (Granger) Kent, natives of Connecticut, who made a permanent settlement in Aurora Township, this county, in 1810. They were the parents of eight children, three of whom are now living: Julius, a farmer in Chagrin Falls, Ohio; Zeno, and Delight, wife of Mr. Gillman, of Iowa. Mr. Kent died March 27, 1837, and his widow, February, 1865. Our subject was reared on the farm, and received such an education as could be obtained at the schools of Aurora and Ravenna in those early days. In 1848 he was married to Miss Almira, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Gould, who were natives of Vermont. Mrs. Kent died November 27, 1867, leaving six children: Helen H.; Leroy Zeno; Charles E.; Emily D., wife of Arthur Stanton; Dora and Nora. Keno Kent is one of the oldest living residents and natives of this township. He has followed the occupation of a farmer during his life, and is now owner of 340 acres of good land, besides having given each of his sons a farm to start them in life ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

SOLOMON LITTLE, farmer, P. O. Aurora, was born on the farm where he now resides in Aurora Township, Portage Co., Ohio, December 27, 1825, son of Warren and Susanna (Spencer) Little. Warren Little was born April 16, 1780, in Middlefield, Mass. He was thrice married, on the second occasion to the mother of our subject, also a native of Middlefield, where she was born September 12, 1781, and who bore him seven children, three of whom are now living: Harmony, wife of Seth Sawyer; Nancy, widow of Oliver Smith, and Solomon. Our subject's father and mother both died in Aurora Township, this county, the former November 8, 1868, the latter July 30, 1838. Our subject was reared on the farm upon which he now resides, and in 1864 he married Myra Ward, born at Middlefield, Mass., January 13, 1840, daughter of John and Phoebe (Church) Ward, also natives and residents of Middlefield, Mass. To this union have been born three children, two of whom are now living: Elma and Harry. Mr. Little, who is a farmer by occupation, owns one of the best farms in the township, comprising 330 acres of fine land. He and his wife are members of the Congregational Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HERBERT T. SHELDON, Sheriff and farmer, P.O. Aurora, was born April 17, 1842, in Aurora Township, Portage Co., Ohio; son of Ebenezer and Sarah K. (Sizer) Sheldon, who were the parents of six children: Horace S.; Herbert T.; Arthur E.; Sarah A. (Mrs. C. W. Hammond), in Hubbard, Ohio; Ruby E. (Mrs. Seymour Higley), in Windham, Ohio; Charles S., in Yellow Springs, Greene County, Ohio. The father of our subject was a native of Aurora Township, this county, born April 30, 1811, and was reared, educated and married here; he engaged in farming and merchandising, was a Republican in politics, Clerk of the township for a number of years; he died February 7,1876. His widow, who was born in Massachusetts, March 13, 1818, came to Mantua with her parents in 1831, and died in Aurora in August, 1881. Our subject passed his early life at home, and was educated in the common schools of the township. When twenty years of age he engaged in farming for a year on his own account; February 20, 1862, he was married to Ella G, daughter of Roswell and Dorothy L. (Ellsworth) Bissell, who has borne him two children: Maud, wife of William Reed, of Bainbridge, and Claude E. In 1853 Mr. Sheldon entered the store of G. L. Hoor & Co., remaining with them four years, after which he canvassed for the sale of fruit trees in West Virginia. In 1868 he purchased a farm one mile east of Aurora Center, where he remained nine years, but in the spring of 1877 removed to a farm of C. R. Harmon's and engaged in farming. He is a Republican in politics, has served as Trustee of the township several times, and for years has been Township Clerk. In August, 1884, he was nominated Sheriff by his party, and in October, 1884, was elected Sheriff, and took his seat, January 5, 1885. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

OLIVER SPENCER, retired farmer, P. O. Aurora, was born in Middlefield, Mass., August 25, 1801; son of Samuel W. and Lucy (Fisk) Spencer,who settled in Aurora Township, this county, in 1812, but after living here one year went back to Massachusetts. After the death of his wife, Samuel W. Spencer returned to Aurora Township, where he remained the balance of his life. He was the father of twelve children, four of whom are now living: Oliver, Selden, Thompson and Nelson. The paternal grandfather of our subject, John Spencer, of Middlefield, Mass., settled here in 1812, and lived with his son Braiuerd until his death. In 1829 Oliver Spencer settled in Aurora Township on the farm where he now resides, all of which he cleared and improved. He has been twice married, first, in 1823, to Sally Little; on the second occasion, September 3, 1829, he was united in marriage with Anna, daughter of Sylvanus Eldridge, of Aurora Township, this county. They have had three children: Melinda (deceased), Matilda (Mrs. O. J. Payne) and Russell. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer are members of the Congregational Church, with which he has been connected for upward of forty years, and for thirty-five years has been a Deacon in same. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

WORTHY TAYLOR, retired farmer, Aurora, was born in Hampshire County, Mass., January 10, 1797; son of Samuel and Sarah (Jaggers) Taylor. The father of our subject was a native of Springfield, Mass., a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and came to Aurora Township, this county, with his family, in 1807, and died in 1813. His mother was a native of Hebron, Mass., and died in 1853, leaving eleven children, of whom are now living, Worthy, Col. Royl and Marcus. The subject of this sketch received a common school education in Aurora Township, this county, and upon attaining his majority engaged in farming, which occupation he has since continued. On February 17, 1817, he was married to Miss Harriet Kent. In 1872 Mr. Taylor removed to Aurora Center, where he is now residing. He is a member of the Disciples Church; has served the people of his township as Justice of the Peace for twentyseven years. In politics he is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

MARCUS TAYLOR, farmer, P. O. Aurora, was born in Middlefield, Mass., September 22, 1805; son of Samuel and Sarah (Jaggers) Taylor (see biography of Worthy Taylor). In 1807 he accompanied his parents to Aurora Township, this county, locating on the farm which he now occupies, and which has since been in the name of the Taylor family. In 1828 he purchased the homestead of his elder brother, Samuel, who had become its owner after the death of their father. Our subject was married, September 22, 1833, to Betsey M., daughter of Josiah and Betsey (Forward) Hickox (see biography of Samuel F. Hickox), by whom he has had two children: Sally M. (deceased) and Chauncy M., who married Emma Stanton, of Streetsboro. and resides on the home farm, having three children. Mr. Taylor is one of the oldest settlers and citizens of Aurora Township, and has served in several positions of trust. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

EDWIN BARBER, retired farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born in Litchfield, Conn., June 28, 1797; son of Joseph and Abigail (Coe) Barber. On May 8, 1819, he arrived in Brimfield Township, this county, but in January, 1820, revisited Connecticut, returning to Brimfield Township in 1822, and settling on the farm where he now resides and which he cleared and improved. He was married, August 5, 1823, to Elvira, daughter of Nathan and Sarah Benedict, of Cornwall, Conn., by whom he had three children: Frederick (deceased), Ozias, and Elvira (deceased). Ozias is a resident of Akron, Ohio, and married to Harriet Campbell, of Tallmadge. Mr. Barber is one of the few pioneers now left in Brimfield Township. After a wedded life of nearly sixty-one years, he lost his wife, who died, May 9, 1884, in her eighty-second year. Mr. Barber has been a member of the Baptist Church over fifty years. He has been Justice of the Peace of Brimfield Township one term. In politics he is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ELI E. BENEDICT, farmer, P. O. Kent, was born in Litchfield, Conn., March 8,1828, son of Eli and Marcella (Stoddard) Benedict. His maternal grandfather, Levi Stoddard, was an early settler of Perry, Lake County, and in 1830 removed to Brimfield Township, this county. The parents of our subject settled in what is now Northampton, Summit Co., Ohio, in 1830, where his father cleared and improved a farm on which he lived until his death in 1876; he died at the age of seventy-seven. His widow then removed to Brimfield Township, this county, and resided with the subject of this sketch until her death, March 8, 1884; she died at the age of eighty-five. They had a family of fourteen children, ten of whom grew to manhood and womanhood: Levi (deceased), Matilda (Mrs. George Allen), Melissa (Mrs. A. Cummings), William, Eli E., Henry, Edwin, Lewis (deceased), Martha (deceased), and Charlotte. Our subject lived in Northampton until 1842, since when he has been a resident of Brimfield Township, this county, living on the old homestead of his grandfather, Levi Stoddard. He was married in 1851 to Harriet, daughter of Horace and Harriet Barton, of Shalersville, by whom he has four children: Julia (Mrs. A. Wilder), Charles, Albert and Lucy. Mr. Benedict is one of the representative farmers , of this county. In politics a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN BOOSINGER, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born in Brimfield Township, this county, May 8, 1818, son of John and Barbara (Williard) Boosinger, who settled here in 1816. Mr. Boosinger was raised on his father's farm, one mile west of Brimfield Center, where he resided until he was twentythree years of age. He has been twice married, first, November 4, 1845, to Caroline, daughter of Conrad and Mary C. (Kline) Neff, by whom he had two children: Vernon L., born July 16, 1847, and Lucy C., born March 5, 1853, married to George H. Meachem July 31, 1879. Mrs. Caroline Boosinger died April 10, 1853, aged twenty-nine years, and August 1, 1853, Mr. Boosinger was married to Juliett Neff, sister of his deceased wife, who has borne him three children: Edward C., born April 7, 1854, married Miss Mary E. Spencer December 24, 1884; Omer C., born January 5, 1858, married Emma J. Brown March 9, 1882, and Zaidee B., born January 29, 1863, married Will M. Moulton November 21, 1882. Mr. Boosinger is a Democrat in politics; has held several offices in the township. He and his wife have been members of the Universalist Church for about twenty years. Mr. Boosinger still reside on the farm which he cleared and improved when first married. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

GEORGE W. BOOSINGER, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born in Rootstown, this county, September 16, 1827, son of John and Barbara (Williard) Boosinger, who settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1816, the first family who settled here. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Conrad Boosinger, a native of Germany, who settled in Ravenna Township in 1800 and who in 1809 removed to Tallmadge, Summit Co., Ohio, where he resided until his death. John Boosinger, the father of our subject, was born in eastern Virginia March 17, 1785. In December, 1813, he married Barbara "Williard, a daughter of Philip Williard, an early settler of Rootstown, and reared a family of eight children (see sketch of Philip Boosinger in Franklin Township). Mrs. Boosinger died March 28, 1867, at the age of seventy-seven years, and Mr. Boosinger died March 16, 1875, in his ninetieth year. Our subject was reared in Brimfield Township, this county, where he received a common school education. When twenty-two years of age he worked his father's farm, continuing with him until his death. He was married December 25, 1851, to Amanda M., daughter of Moses and Elizabeth Burdge,of Brimfield Township. By this union there were nine children: Elsie M. (Mrs. Joseph Meloy), Charles N. (deceased), Banks W., Charlie Q., Hoyt F., Frank L., Ida M., Henry S. and Hattie L. Mr. Boosinger came on the farm where he now resides in 1875, though he had owned it several years previous to that time. Both he and his wife are members or the First Universalist Church of Brimfield. He has held various offices in the township; in politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

THE BOSZOR FAMILY were among the early settlers of Portage County and were of German origin Boszor came from his native country to America about 1772, and settled at Baltimore, Md., where he married Barbara Stoyer. He died at Baltimore in 1798, and the widow subsequently came to this county and died in Brimfield Township. Their son, Henry Boszor, settled at Ravenna in 1804; he was a shoe-maker by trade, but after coming to this county his principal occupation was farming. He at once bought fifty acres of land a short distance east of Ravenna, and in 1805 was married to Polly Boosinger, a daughter of Conrad Boosinger, a pioneer of this county. The following year he sold this farm and bought a farm by the Stark County line, but a year or so afterward he sold out and bought a place in the northeast part of Springfield Township, this county, where he lived for several years, and in 1816 bought a farm one mile west of Brimfield Center, and for the remainder of his life was a resident of Brimfield Township. The last-mentioned farm was afterward known as the " Israel Thorndyke " farm, and a year or so after his purchase he traded his place with Mr. Thorndyke for a farm of 100 acres one-half mile north of Brimfield Center, which became his homestead up to the time of his death. Some five or six years after his last trade he discovered that this farm had been heavily mortgaged previous to his purchase of it, which involved him in a heavy additional expense, and he was obliged to pay for it a second time. This to a man with a young and growing family was quite a hardship, but he may be said to have surmounted all obstacles—raised a family of nine children, and at his death in 1862 left a comfortable property to his widow and children. He was a representative pioneer and a highly esteemed and trusted citizen. From the records it would appear that he served the township in various local offices, such as Trustee, etc., etc. He was formerly an old-line "Whig, but in the later years of his life he adhered to the Democratic party. During the war of 1812 he was drafted and hired a substitute; only a short time afterward, however, he volunteered, and was on his way with others to re-enforce, and was only a short distance from Gen. Hull's army at the time of its surrender, but the company of which he was a member escaped. He died in August, 1862. His widow, Polly, died February 11, 1874. They were both members of the Lutheran Church. They were the parents of the following named children: Elizabeth, born in 1805, died in 1881; John, born December 28, 1807, died in August, 1884; Jacob, born December 26, 1809; Polly, born in 1811, died in 1835; Barbara, born in 1813, died November 20, 1875; Susan, born in September, 1815; Henry, born August 1, 1818; David, born February 2, 1821, died May 6, 1861; Martin, born June 2, 1824; Simon Peter, born in 1830, died in 1881. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

Henry Boszor, son of Henry and Polly (Boosinger) Boszor, P. O. Kent, was born August 1, 1818, one mile west of Brimfield Center. He lived with his parents until twenty-six years of age, in the meantime having received a fair common school education. November 20, 1844, he was married to Miss Sarah Neff, daughter of Conrad and Catharine (Kline) Neff, natives of Pennsylvania, and on April 16 following they commenced housekeeping in a little log-house on a farm of ninety-seven acres which they purchased that spring, located on Lot 17, Brimfield Township. On this farm they have ever since resided. Except the log house mentioned and some twenty€five acres upon which the trees had been girdled and the land in part cultivated sufficient to raise enough to afford a bare subsistence to the former owners, this farm was in a wild state, and as the purchase was made nearly all on credit, the young couple not only saw before them the prospect of many years of patient industry in order to improve the land and build up a home, but also to create the wherewithal to pay for the same; but they set themselves to the task with a right good" will. The log-house has long since disappeared, and in its place, a short distance west of the spot, stands a neat and commodious frame residence and out-buildings, surrounded by well-kept fences and attractive grounds, while the twenty-five acres of girdled trees and land covered with bush and briers have given place to over seventy acres of cultivated and highly productive land, and the homestead has grown to 110 acres, while a short distance away Mr. Boszor owns another farm of 100 acres, nearly as valuable as the homestead, which at a reasonable valuation would be worth $100 per acre. A very attractive feature of Mr. Henry Boszor's home is a green-house, built on the east end of his residence, to which Mrs. Boszor devotes much care. A curiosity in this climate is a lemon tree that Mrs, Boszor set out thirty years ago, which for the past twenty years has borne excellent fruit, much better than can ordinarily be bought, as the lemons thoroughly ripen and drop from the branch. No two people in the county are held in greater respect for their many excellent qualities. They have ever been ready, in a quiet way, to do their full part toward promoting all those enterprises which are calculated to benefit society. Mr. Boszor has served his township three terms as Trustee, and Assessor one term. He was for some time a Director of the bank at Kent, and for the past ten years has been a Trustee of Bouthtel College, an institution to which he has donated nearly $2,000. Mr. Boszor ascribes his success in life to the fact that he made punctuality in all business transactions his motto. Mr. and Mrs. Boszor are members of the Universalist Church. Politically he is a Democrat. The grandfather of Mrs. Sarah (Neff) Boszor was Conrad Neff, a native of Sweden, who came from Pennsylvania to Ohio with his wife and seven children in 1805, and settled in Canfield Township, Mahoning Co., Ohio, in 1830. He died in Canfield, that county, and his wife followed a few years later. They lie buried side by side. Conrad and Mary Catharine Neff had a family of eleven children: Rebecca, born April 15,1815; Henry and John (twins), born November 20, 1816, and died respectively February 15, 1832, and April 20, 1817; Mary A., born November 21, 1818; Sarah, born May 24, 1820; Samuel, born June 25, 1821, and died December 18, 1825; Caroline, born December 27, 1823, and died April 11, 1853; La Fayette, born in November, 1826, died August 2, 1828; Juliette, born February 3, 1829; John, born January 22, 1831, and died February 13, 1885, in Osceola, Iowa; and Lucy Ann, born October 20, 1834. The father of this family was reared in the Presbyterian faith, though in later years of his life he became more of a Universalist in thought. He died December 5, 1866, aged seventy-two years, ten months and nineteen days; his wife died July 15, 1865, aged seventy-two years, seven months and five days. She was reared in the Lutheran faith. Both are-buried in Brimfield.

HIRAM G. BRIGGS, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born in Palmyra Township, this county, May 25, 1835, son of Asa and Abigail (Tuttle) Briggs, the former of whom was a native of Vermont and an early settler of Ravenna, where he cleared a farm, afterward settling in Palmyra, where he also cleared and improved a farm, and in 1845 removed to Iowa, where he died the following year at the age of sixty-nine. Asa Briggs was twice married; by his first wife, nee Miss Williams, he had four children: Lestina, Sarah, Emily and Ira. His second wife was Abigail Tuttle, of Palmyra, by whom he had three children, Hiram G. being the only one now living. Our subject returned to this county immediately after his father's death, and served an apprenticeship at the shoe-maker's trade, which he followed up to 1859. He was married, March 4, 1859, to Lucy A., daughter of Conrad and Mary C. (Kline) Neff, of Brimfield Township, this county, by whom he has three children: Norris, C. Clark, and Mary G. Mr. Briggs located his farm in Brimfield Township in 1859, where he has since resided. He has held various minor township offices, and served as Trustee two terms. He is a F. & A . M. In politics a Democrat.

REUBEN BROBST, wool buyer, Brimfield, was born in Lehigh County, Penn., January 22, 1824, son of Daniel and Mary (Brobst) Brobst. His paternal grandfather was Michael Brobst, of Lehigh County, and a farmer by occupation, and his maternal grandfather was John Brobst, of same county, a prominent farmer and merchant. Our subject was reared in Lehigh County until sixteen years of age. He then went to Washington, Penn., where he served an apprenticeship of five years at the tinner's trade. In 1847 he settled in Brimfield, this county, and worked at his trade in connection with putting up eaves troughs, for fifteen years. He then embarked in his present business, in which he has since been profitably engaged. Mr. Brobst was married, in 1848, to Orra, daughter of Nathaniel Packard, an early settler of Brimfield Township, and by this union there are four children: Electa, wife of Henry Ewell; Orpha, wife of Peter Snyder; Alice and Edward D. Mr. Brobst is a F. & A. M. In politics a prominent Democrat . ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JACOB BROWN, retired farmer, Brimfield, was born in Marlboro, Stark Co., Ohio, March 28, 1818, and is a son of John and Catherine (Niswanger) Brown, who settled in Stark County when it was a wilderness, and cleared and improved the farm on which they lived and died. Our subject was reared on his father's farm and received a limited education. He was married in 1841, to Lavinia, daughter of John and Sarah Baumbarger, of Stark County, by whom he had six children, three now living: Frank, a physician in Petoskey, Mich.; Amanda, wife of Jacob Kline, in Franklin Township, and Emma J., wife of Homer Boosinger, in Brimfield. Mr. Brown settled in Rootstown in 1842, where he cleared and improved a farm of 225 acres, on which he resided up to 1881, when he removed to Brimfield Center, and here he has erected an elegant residence. He is independent in politics; a worthy citizen. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

SAMUEL BUELL, farmer, P. O. Kent, was born in Berks County, Penn., June 11, 1809; son of Samuel and Barbara (Godfrey) Buell, who settled in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1826, and lived and died there. They had eleven children, of whom but two are now living—Elijah and Samuel. Our subject was married, November 14, 1833, to Catherine, daughter of George and Catherine (Ecker) Freebye, of Coventry, Ohio, and the issue of this union has been six children: Henry A., killed in the late war of the Rebellion; Maria (deceased); George; Annetta (Mrs. Eli Leonard); Marvin (deceased); and Samuel, Jr. The latter settled in the southeastern part of Brimfield Township, this county, in 1834, where he cleared and improved a farm. In 1838 he removed to Shalersville, where he lived until 1847, and then returned and located on the farm where he now resides. Mr. Buell and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Kent. In politics he is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOSEPH L. CARRIER, farmer and Justice of the Peace, P. O. Brimfield, was born on the farm where he now resides, November 24, 1839; son of Lucius and Orilla (Emerson) Carrier. His paternal grandfather was Elisha Carrier, a native of Connecticut, who settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1835, on the farm now owned by our subject, a part of which he cleared and improved. He lost his mind in the latter part of his life, and died in August, 1845, at the age of seventy seven years. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Joseph Emerson, a native of Vermont, and a soldier of the Revolution. Lucius Carrier died in 1842, at the age of twenty-two and his widow in 1862, at the age of fifty-two. Our subject, who is their only child, was married, June 13, 1861, to Mary M., daughter 6f Benjamin O. and Catherine (Caris) Edson, of Rootstown, this county, by which union there are five children: Arthur W., Elmer E., Joseph M., Frederick L. and Ethel I. Mr. Carrier has given his children the best educational advantages. His three eldest sons are now teachers, Arthur W. being Principal of the select school in Brimfield and considered one of the best educators in the county. Mr. Carrier has held the office of Town Clerk and other minor offices, and is now serving his sixth consecutive term as Justice of the Peace. He is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity; in politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JACOB CARSON, farmer, P. O. Kent, was born in Dauphin County, Penn., November 26, 1817; son of John and Catherine (Vance) Carson, who settled in what is now Berlin, Mahoning Co., Ohio, in 1831, where they cleared and improved a farm. They were owners of several other large farms in that county, where they lived and died. The father of our subject, who served in the war of 1812, was of Scotch descent, a son of George Carson and a cousin of the celebrated scout, Kit Carson. Our subject went to Mahoning County when fourteen years of age, and when twenty-five years old moved to the farm in Berlin OH which his father had first settled, where he remained for seven years. In 1849 he settled in Deerfield Township and improved the farm there on which he resided for sixteen years. In 1865 he removed to Brimfield Township, to the farm he now owns and where he has since resided. He was married, November 27, 1843, to Elizabeth, daughter of Jonathan and Ellen Kinsey, of Columbiana County, Ohio, by whom he had eight children: Annetta, wife of Samuel Risk; Mary, wife of Frederick Edson; Catherine, wife of W. D. Roth; Oliver P.; Helen A., wife of Albert Shuman; Cecelia, wife of Marcy Russ; Charles; and Josephine, wife of Warren Meloy. Mr. Carson is one of the representative farmers of Brimfield Township. He has served the township as Trustee two terms. In politics he has always been a Democrat ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

CONSTANT CHAPMAN (deceased) was born in Westbrook, Conn., December 27, 1761; a son of Deacon Jedediah Chapman, Jr., and a descendant of Robert Chapman (of the seventh generation) who was a son of Robert Chapman, Sr., born in 1616 and who came from Hull, England, to Boston, Mass., in 1635, settling in Saybrook, Conn., in November of the same year, and died October 10, 1687. Our subject, when sixteen years of age, chose the occupation of a sailor, and followed the seas up to the time he settled in Brimfield, in 1821, and for many years was a ship Captain; during the war of the Revolution and while in the marine service, he was taken prisoner by the French Government and his ship and cargo confiscated. He was taken to the Island of Guadaloupe and kept a prisoner over a year, when he was exchanged. The American Government afterward made the French pay for the loss of his vessel and cargo. He was married, January 27, 1785, to Jemima, daughter of Silas Kelsey, of Killingworth, Conn., by whom he had nine children: Lydia K. (deceased); Thurot F. (deceased); John K. (deceased); Anna F. (deceased); Chloe P., wife of Henry Smith; Mary C. (deceased); Joseph G. (deceased); Jemima T., wife of Gardner Wing, and Henry C. (deceased). Mr. Chapman was the first Postmaster of Brimfield, and died here in 1847, aged eighty-six years. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

CONSTANT H. CHAPMAN, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born February 24, 1825, in Brimfield Township, this county; son of Joseph G. and Elizabeth (Boszor) Chapman, who had a family of five children: Constant H., Mary (wife of Stephen Webster), Leory M., Thurot K., Electa E. (wife of George W. Bow). Joseph G. Chapman was a native of Connecticut and settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1820, clearing and improving the farm now owned by his daughter, Mrs. Stephen Webster, where he lived and died. Our subject's paternal grandfather was Constant Chapman, a native of Westbrook, Conn., who settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1821; his maternal grandfather, Henry Boszor, a native of Maryland, settled in Brimfield Township in 1816. Our subject has always lived in Brimfield, with the exception of two years that he resided in Illinois. He has been twice married. By his first wife, Permelia, daughter of Lybia and Julia (Minard) Underwood, of this township, he had one child—Morris S. On June 28, 1863, he married his present wife, Elizabeth, daughter of John and Jane (McCloughan) Warner, of Suffield, this county, by whom he has two children—Nellie and Edd. Mr. Chapman has owned several farms in Brimfield Township, and has made many improvements on them. He served the township as Justice of the Peace for fifteen years; in politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

MORRIS S. CHAPMAN, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born April 14, 1850, in Brimfield, this county; son of Constant H. and Permelia (Underwood) Chapman. His paternal grandfather, Joseph G. Chapman, settled in Brimfield in 1820, and was a son of Constant Chapman, a native of Westbrook, Conn., who settled in Brimfield in 1821. His maternal grandfather, Lydia Underwood, a son of Alpheus Underwood, settled in Brimfield in 1817. Our subject was reared in Brimfield Township and educated in its common and select schools, and took a course in the Commercial Department of Mt. Union College. He was married October 4, 1871, to Viola A., daughter of Russell R., a native of Providence, R. I., and Mary A. (Wolcott) Ross, of Kent, this county, by whom he has two children: J. P. Ionia., born December 1, 1875, and Aimee R., born November 16, 1883. Mr. Chapman has always been engaged in farming, and prior to 1875 also taught school seven consecutive winters. He is a member of the K. of P.; was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace in April, 1883; in politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JAMES F. DAVIDSON, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born in Buffalo Valley, Union Co., Penn., February 19, 1809; son of William and Mary (Forester) Davidson, who settled in Springfield, Summit Co., Ohio, in 1816, where they remained four years, settling in the spring of 1820 in Brimfield Township, this county, on Lot 52, now owned by J. W. Sherman, where they built a log-house and barn and cleared about thirty acres. They lived there eleven years, when they moved to the farm now owned by Joseph Fitch, and there lived and died. They had nine children: Jane H., Dorcas F., Betsey C., James F., Hetty M., John F., Mary M., William F. and Harriet T., all now deceased but James F. Our subject located on the farm where he now resides in 1859, and that portion of Lot 58 now included in his farm he cleared and improved himself. He is one of the representative farmers and citizens of Brimfield Township. In politics he is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN EVITTS, farmer, P. O. Kent, was born in Lancaster County, Penn., January 24, 1827; son of Daniel and Sarah (Stone) Evitts, who were the parents of six children: Margaret, wife of Perry Merton; Mary, wife of Samuel Cotton (deceased); Magdalena, wife of Martin Brazor (deceased); John, Joseph (deceased) and David. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Evitts located in Springfield Township (now in Summit County), in 1832, clearing and improving a farm on which they lived until 1842, when they settled in Brimfield Township, this county, on the farm now owned by William Gettes, which they cleared and improved, and where they lived and died. Our subject remained with his parents until nineteen years of age, and for the succeeding four years worked by the month as a farm hand. He was married February 21, 1850, to Catherine, daughter of Joseph Williard, who settled on the farm now occupied by our subject in 1826. To this union were born three children: Electa C., wife of Thomas Lighton; Ida C., wife of Frank W. Koon (deceased); and Flora A. (deceased). There are three grandchildren: Clyde E. Lighton, Evitts G. P. Koon and Frank W. Koon, Jr. Mr. Evitts has served his township one term as Trustee. In politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

AARON FERREY, farmer, P. O. Kent, was born in Belchertown, Mass., July 6, 1808, a son of Aaron and Elizabeth (Gilbert) Ferrey, who settled in Franklin Township, this county, in 1831. His father located on the farm now owned by Harley Judson, most of which he improved, and here he resided up to 1850, when he removed to what is now Kent and there lived until his death. By his first wife, Elizabeth Gilbert, of Belchertown, Mass., Aaron Ferrey, Sr., had eleven children: Eliza (deceased), Aaron, Moses (deceased), Mary (deceased), George (deceased), John (deceased), Ann (wife of George Williams, in Wisconsin), William, Charles (in Indiana), Emeline (deceased) and Frank. His second wife was Mrs. Mary McPherson, nee Dickinson, by whom he had two children: Eliza, wife of Henry Swan, and Byron. Aaron Ferrey. Sr., died in 1860, at the age of seventy-eight years. Our subject was reared in Amherst, Mass., until ten years of age, when his parents removed to Virginia, there they remained five years and then returned to Amherst, and here his father engaged in the manufacture of brick, our subject assisting him until twenty-one years of age, when he embarked in the same business for himself, which he continued for several years in different sections of New England. On May 9, 1837, he was married to Judith, daughter of George and Judith (Hastings) Nutting, of Amherst, Mass., by whom he has had eight children: George W., Charles E. (deceased), Mary E. (deceased), Frank H, Julia A., Fred A., Will D. and John H. In 1842 Mr. Ferrey came to Portage County and engaged in the manufacture of brick in Franklin, furnishing the material for the large building now known as Kent Worsted Mills. In 1846 he removed to Franklin Mills (now Kent), where he resided for twenty years, doing an extensive business, and in 1866 he located in Brimfield, on the farm where he now resides, and in connection with farming, carried on a brick-yard up to 1880, when his sons took charge of that department. Mr. and Mrs. Ferrey and daughters are members of the Congregational Church. In politics he is a Republican.

REUBEN HART, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born in Goshen, Litchfield Co., Conn., May 2, 1803, son of Reuben and Ruth (Ives) Hart and grandson of Nathaniel Hart, of Wallingford, Conn., a carpenter and cabinet-maker by trade. Our subject was reared on his father's farm in Goshen, Conn., and learned the carpenter's trade of his father, which occupation he followed many years after he came to Brimfield Township. He settled here in 1826 on the farm now occupied by his son Charles, where he resided up to 1864, when he purchased the farm adjoining, and here he has lived ever since. Mr. Hart was married July 2, 1829, to Nancy A., daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Hotchkiss) Law, formerly of Woodbridge, Conn., who settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1818, and to this union have been born four children, two of whom are now living: Charles and Lois (Mrs. Edwin J. Glass). Charles married Eleanor Stillwell, of Brimfield Township, this county, October 27, 1863, and had four children, three of whom are now living: M. Gertrude, Harry S. and Jennie L. Mr. and Mrs. Hart are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has filled several offices in the gift of his township, and served as Justice of the Peace one term. In politics he is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HENRY KING, farmer and iron manufacturer, P. O. Kent, was born in Franklin Township, this county, in June, 1833, son of Robert and Rhoda (Bishop) King, who had a family of three children: Henry, Charles and Helen A., wife of Henry Heyd. His paternal grandfather, William King, a native of Hampden County, Mass., settled in Ravenna, Portage Co., Ohio, in 1811. He was the owner of a large tract of land in Charlestown Township, which he had purchased of the Western Reserve Land Company, and lived there a year or more, disposing of the same in parcels. He returned to Ravenna in 1814, and engaged in hotel business up to 1839, and was one of the best known landlords in this part of the State at that time. He died in 1843, aged about sixty-five years. He had four children: Robert, deceased; John B., deceased; Eli P., deceased, and Mary, wife of Dr. A. Woodworth, now of St. Louis. Robert, his eldest son, resided in Ravenna nearly all his life. He was a prominent farmer and business man, and was at one time engaged in banking, dealing also in live stock on an extensive scale. His wife was a daughter of Deacon Bishop, of Blandford, Mass. Our subject was reared in Ravenna from five years of 8ge, and there received a liberal education for his day, being principally educated by Mr. Calhoun, a Yale graduate and relative of John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina. In 1850 he was engaged in the Civil Engineer Corps of the C. & P. R. R., with whom he remained one year, and then was employed in the locomotive works at Cleveland for four years. He was married February 11, 1856, to Rebecca, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Antrim) Sharp, of Salem, Ohio. In 1855 Mr. King went to Salem, Ohio, and embarked in the foundry and machine business there for fifteen years, and during that time, in connection with Pittsburgh parties, was also engaged in the manufacture of pig iron in Columbiana County, Ohio, and in Armstrong County, Penn., in which he is still interested. He was a resident of Pittsburgh for ten years, and in the fall of 1883 located in Brimfield Township, this county, on the farm where he now resides. In politics Mr. King is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ALMON LANPHARE, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born September 25, 1821, in Brimfield Township, this county, son of Abner H. and Sophia (Moulton) Lanphare, who had eight children: an infant son (deceased), Almon, Eunice (deceased), Eliza A., Nathan (deceased), infant twins (deceased) and Martha C. Abner H. Lanphare was a native of Woodstock, Vt., came to Brimfield Township, this county, in October, 1816, and the following winter taught the first public school in Franklin Township, this county. He afterward bought 200 acres of land in Brimfield Township (a part of which is now owned and occupied by our subject), clearing and improving a farm on which he lived, and died October 4, 1879, in his eighty-fourth year. The maternal grandfather of our subject, Jeremiah Moulton, settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1817. Almon Lanphare was reared in Brimfield Township, where he has always resided. He has been twice married, his first wife being Caroline, a daughter of Peletiah and Hannah Bard, of Brimfield, and by her he had two children: Charles, who served through the late war of the Rebellion and died of consumption six months after his discharge, and Henry A., deceased. His present wife is Flora A., daughter of Col. Bisaell and Artemesia Austin, of Randolph Township, this county. By this union there are two children. Jennie and Stella. Mr. Lanphare and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has held various offices in the gift of the township; in politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

AARON P. MALLORY, farmer and carpenter, P. O. Kent, was born in Brimfield Township, this county, March 14, 1821, son of Benjamin and Johanna (Harris) Mallory, natives of Litchfield County, Conn., who settled here in 1817 on the farm now owned by our subject, and which they cleared and improved. They were the parents of four children: Margarett Ann, deceased; Aaron P.; Benjamin, deceased, and B. O. Plymton, deceased. Benjamin Mallory died October 18, 1859, aged seventy-one years, and his wife October 18, 1848. Our subject was reared on the old homestead, where he has always resided, and was married December 24, 1848, to Fidelia E., daughter of James and Betsey (Avery) Blake, formerly of Cornwall, Litchfield Co., Conn., and who settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1826, locating half a mile east of Brimfield Center, where they cleared and improved a farm, on which they resided until Mr. Blake's death; he died March 7, 1872, at the age of seventy-three years. His widow died in 1881, aged eighty years. They reared a family of six children: Orville, a clergyman of the Free-Will Baptist Church, who was a Representative in the Ohio Legislature for four years (now deceased), Fidelia E , Buel A., Sherman M. (deceased), Judson A. and Charlotte (wife of John I. Hastings). Mr. and Mrs. Mallory are the parents of four children: Frank N., deceased; Emma J., wife of A. T. Nighman; Nettie, wife of Cyrus Osborn, and Benjamin. Our subject has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since he was fourteen years of age. In politics he is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JAMES MOULTON, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born May 30, 1825, in Brimfield Township, this county, son of Augustus and Sarah (Osborn) Moulton, who were the parents of three children: Louisa A. wife of Silas Shannon (have four children living: Maria, Warren, Charlie and Josie, latter wife of Richard Bunker), Warren (now deceased) and James. Augustus Moulton settled on a quarter section of land (a part of which is now owned by our subject and his sister, Mrs. Silas Shannon,) in 1822, where he cleared a farm from what was an unbroken wilderness and lived there antil his death. He died in 1863,at the age of sixty-five years. Our subject's paternal grandfather was Jeremiah Moulton, a native of Munson, Mass., who settled in Brimfield in 1817, clearing and improving a farm where he lived the balance of his life. He was a prominent man in his day, and served the county as Associate Judge for seven years. He reared a family of ten children: George (deceased), Augustus (deceased), Anson (deceased), William J., Sullivan, Lucy (wife of John Abels), Nancy (deceased), Sophia (deceased), Betsey (wife of Chauncey Tupper) and Emily (deceased). The maternal grandfather of our subject was Peter Osborn. of Connecticut, and whose sons, Peter and Joseph, settled in Brimfield in 1821, where they lived for many years. James Moulton, the subject of this sketch was reared on the home farm where he has always resided, with the exception of seven years, during which he lived in Suffield, this county. He married, March 11, 1843, Betsey, daughter of Russell and Betsey (Jones) Meacham, of Suffield Township, this county, by whom he has had the following children: Martha E., wife of John Sylvester; Sarah A., wife of George Maloy (have one child—Clarence A.); Minnie A., wife of E. Ladenslayer (have one daughter— Nellie); Cora, wife of Calvin Milter (have two children: James I. and Clara A.); William M.; Emma W.; Bertha A., and Hannah R. (deceased). Mr. Moulton has served his township as Justice of the Peace one term. In politics he has always been a stanch Democrat .

JOHN Q. MOULTON, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born on the farm where he now resides, November 14, 1846; son of Elbridge G. and Almira J. (Dunning) Moulton. His paternal grandfather, Harrison Moulton, settled in 1817 on the farm now owned by our subject, which he cleared and improved. He had six children: Wyles, William (deceased), Elbridge G. (deceased), Susan (deceased), Maria (Mrs. Albert Underwood). Sophia (Mrs. Albert Dawley). Elbridge G. had three children—A. Jeannette (Mrs. J. W. Sherman), Lucy M. (deceased), and John Q. Our subject has always resided on the old homestead. He was married, January 4, 1871, to Eliza A., daughter of Elias and Mary A. Heckman, of Brimfield Township, this county, by whom he has one child, Nina E. Mr. Moulton is a representative farmer and citizen of Brimfield Township. In politics he is a Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOSEPH P. PARKER, butter and cheese manufacturer, Brimfield, was born in Windsor, Ashtabula Co., Ohio, June 30, 1818; son of Daniel and Sarah (Bartlett) Parker, natives of East Windsor, Conn., who settled in Ashtabula County, in 1813, where Mr. Parker cleared and improved a farm on which he resided up to 1832. He afterward lived in different parts of the State, and died in Ashtabula County, in 1852, at the age of seventy-eight years. Our subject came to Shalersville, this county, in 1837, and here for three years worked by the month; the three years following this he rented a farm in the same township, and then purchased a small farm in Shalersville Township, where he lived until 1849, and then removed to Michigan. In 1851 he engaged in farming in Streetsboro Township, this county, where he remained up to 1876, then located in Brimfield Township, and embarked in his present business of manufacturing butter and cheese. He has been twice married; on first occasion, September 9, 1842, to Harriet, daughter of Newton and Molly (Hotchkiss) Morris, early settlers of Shalersville Township, this county. By this union there were two children: Alice, wife of William Beasley, and Ellen, wife of Joseph Quinn. On January 1, 1859, Mr. Parker married Annis, daughter of James and Lucy (Barber) Rose, of Kent, who bore him six children: Frank, Hattie, Addie (deceased), Willie, Lettie and Eleanor (deceased). Mr. Parker is a A.F. & A.M. In politics he is a Democrat. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

EDWARD PARSONS (deceased), who was a pioneer of Brimfield Township, this county, was born in Northampton, Mass., March 14, 1797, son of Moses and Esther (Kingsley) Parsons, also natives of Massachusetts. The Parsons family is a very old one and the name appears often in the early history of the old Bay State. They were originally of English extraction. The subject of this sketch lived in his native village until a man grown, in the meantime learning the trade of his father, that of a carpenter and joiner. At this place, when about twenty-nine years of age, he made the acquaintance of Miss Clementina Janes, then teaching school at Northampton, a daughter of Peleg Cheney and Martha (Coy) Janes, of Brimfield, Hampden Co., Mass., where Mr. Janes was a large mill owner. The Janeses were of English extraction, and the Coys of Irish origin, though both families for generations previous were natives of Massachusetts or Connecticut. This acquaintance resulted in the marriage of Mr. Parsons with Miss Janes on January 1, 1828, and two years and a half afterward Mr. Parsons with his wife and son, Edward A., born in Northampton, Hampshire County, Mass., January 25,1829, moved to Ohio, and first settled at Brecksville, Cuyahoga County, for one year-, thence went to Cleveland, remaining six months, and finally, in the fall of 1831, took up their residence in the township of Brimfield, Portage County. Here Mr. Parsons worked at his trade at odd intervals, but never to any extent, making farming his main occupation, at which he was very successful, for although buying only fifty acres at the start, he afterward became the owner of 200 or more acres near the village of Brimfield. He was one of the most substantial and highly respected citizens of the township. In 1868 he retired from active farming, and moved to Kent, where he resided until his death, April 6, 1874. He was from early manhood a devoted member of the Episcopal Church (as was his wife), himself and a Mr. Cogswell being the founders of the first church organization of this denomination in his native village of Northampton, Hampshire Co., Mass.. where he was Junior Warden. At Kent he took the same interest, and was one of the organizers of the Episcopal Church in the village, and for the erection of this house of worship he contributed liberally of his means and served as Church Warden for many years. In politics he was originally a Whig, and in sentiment a believer in liberty and the equal rights of man, and on the formation of the Republican party, he always acted and voted with that party. On the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion, two of his sons volunteered and served in the Union Army: Timothy G., for four years, most of the time in the Quartermaster's Department; and William C, for ten months as an artilleryman. Mr. and Mrs. Parsons reared a family of six children: Edward A., born January 25, 1829, Timothy G., born September 17, 1832; Harriet J., born June 24, 1835, died October 2, 1876; Martha Kingsly, born April 1, 1838; William Cheney, born February 19, 1841; Clementina, born September 30, 1843. All the children were born in Brimfield, Ohio, except Edward A., who was born at Northampton, Mass. Mrs. Parsons is now eighty-two years of age, and is an exceedingly amiable and worthy lady, well preserved for her years, retaining all her faculties. She resides with her daughter, now Mrs. Clementina Barber, wife of Charles H. Barber, the present Postmaster of Kent. 1854, to Mary E., daughter of Gideon and Elizabeth Marlett, of Elkhart, Ind., by whom he has had five children: Marcy H., Delos P. (deceased), Marion (deceased), Ernest L., and Herbert L. Mr. Russ has held several township offices in Brimfield. In politics he is a Democrat . ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOSEPH RUSS, farmer, P. O. Brimfield,was born in Brimfield Township, this county, February, 5, 1832; son of Beverly Y. and Bertia (Emerson) Russ, natives of Vermont. His father came to Ohio in 1829, and purchased a tract of land in Brimfield Township, this county, on which he settled in 1831,cleared and improved and where he resided until his death. The farm is still the property of his descendants. He had five children: Joseph, Seraph (deceased), Van (deceased), Viola (deceased) and Emma (Mrs. S. Samuel Buell, Jr.). Our subject has been a resident of Brimfield Township, this county, most of his life and has lived on his present farm upward of twenty-seven years; he was married February 2 [cut off] ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

EDWARD A. RUSSELL, farmer, P. O. Brimfield, was born, in Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., July 21, 1818; son of Edward and Love (Spencer) Russell, the former of whom, a native of Washington County, N. Y., died at our subject's residence in December, 1883, aged ninety-two years; the latter, a native of Rupert, Bennington Co., Vt., died on the old homestead in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1845. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Capt. William Russell, a son of Ebenezer Russell, a native of Branford, Conn., whose ancestors settled there in 1660. He was the first Treasurer of Washington County, N. Y., and held the office for fifty consecutive years. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Phineas Spencer, a native of Vermont, and a farmer by occupation. The parents of our subject settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1829, on the farm now owned by William Kruger, which they cleared and improved . They had eleven children: Phineas S., Martha L. (deceased), Edward A., Mary L. (deceased), William, John (deceased), Frank F., Delia M. (deceased), Eliza J. (Mrs. E. Osgood), Nancy S. and an infant (deceased). Our subject was married, June 2, 1846, to Ann, daughter of John and Julia A . (Harris) Furry, formerly of Dutchess County, N. Y., who settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1817, and to this union were born five children: Homer B., Albert E, Warren A., Merritt E. and Myra J. (twins). Mrs. Russell died November 24, 1884. Our subject has always resided in Brimfield Township, this county, where he followed his trade, that of a wagonmaker, for eight years engaged in farming, and has resided on his present farm since 1855. He is a Republican in politics, he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

OLIVER SAWYER, farmer, P. O. Kent, was born in Jaffrey, Cheshire Co., N. H., April 21, 1804; son of Uriah and Sally (Spafford) Sawyer, natives of Massachusetts, who settled in Brimfield Township, this county, in 1817, locating on Lot 20, part of the farm now owned and occupied by our subject, where they lived and died. The paternal grandfather of our subject was William Sawyer of Berlin, Mass., who had seven children: Amos, Oliver, Asa, Uriah, Nabby, Polly and Hannah, all now deceased. He (Grandfather Sawyer) and two brothers settled about 1740, on an elevated piece of land in Berlin, Mass., which has always gone by the name of "Sawyer's Hill." These three brothers lived and died there, and raised large families. Oliver Sawyer visited the spot in 1857, and found the local school was attended by about sixty scholars, over forty of whom were named Sawyer. Our subject's maternal grandfather was Job Spafford, also of Berlin, Mass. Uriah Sawyer had ten children, of whom eight grew to maturity: Oliver, Henry (deceased), Lockhart (deceased), Uriah (deceased), William B. (deceased), Benjamin F. (deceased), Sally (Mrs. John Walker) and Hannah. Our subject has always lived within half a mile of the old homestead, having when twenty-three years of age purchased the farm three-fourths of a mile south of his present residence, where he lived for over forty years. He has been twice married, on first occasion November 29, 1827, to Sophia, daughter of Asa and Eunice Sawyer, by whom he had four children: Luke (deceased), George L. (deceased), George L. (second) and Jane A. (deceased). August 16, 1862, he married his second wife, Martha L. (Russell) Furry. Mr. Sawyer came back to the old homestead in 1862, where he has since resided with his only surviving child, George L, who is married to Mary J., daughter of Henry C. Chapman and grand-daughter of Constance. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

LEWIS LOOMIS, son of Asa Loomis, was born in Litchfield County, Conn., in 1809, came with his parents to Charlestown Township in 1822, and was married to Miss Charity Hough, of Atwater, April 3, 1833. In 1834 he purchased his present farm on Lot 35, from Sheldon Farnham. His children are Martin, married to Amorett, daughter of Chester Howard, of Aurora; Cornelia, married to Henry Gilmore; Amna, married to John Whitney, of Freedom Township. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

Mrs. Armilla Amanda CHENEY, treasurer National Relief Corps, born in Windham, Ohio, 27th August, 1845, of Massachusetts and Vermont parentage. Her maiden name was Perkins. She is a lineal descendant of John Perkins, who, over two-hundred-fifty years ago, by strategy, saved the little Puritan colony of Ipswich, Mass., from the Indians. Left fatherless at an early age, without brothers or sisters, and with a mother in feeble health, more than ordinary cares and responsibilities came to her in her younger days. Her whole life has been characterized by the ability to do whatsoever her hands found to do. She received a liberal education and was thereby qualified for the useful and responsible positions she has held. She was in school when the war-cry rang out at the firing on Fort Sumter, and became an earnest worker in the home labors that formed so large a part of the daily task of Northern women for alleviating the sufferings of the Boys in Blue. She became the wife of Capt. James W. Cheney, a native of Massachusetts, in May, 1868. Moving to Detroit, Mich., in the fall of 1870, where she still resides, she identified herself with one of the prominent churches, and engaged in its work and that of its Sabbath-school, having in charge the infant department for several years. She became a member of Fairbanks Woman's Relief Corps, of Detroit, early in its organization, was appointed department secretary of that order soon after, and in 1887 accepted the office of secretary of the national organization. So faithfully and conscientiously were her duties performed that she won the love and esteem of the order throughout the country, and in Milwaukee, Wis., in 1889, was elected national treasurer and was unanimously reelected at the succeeding national conventions, held in Boston, Mass., in 189o. and in Detroit, Mich., in 1891. ("American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies" Vol. 1, by Frances Elizabeth Willard & Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Publ. 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)

Henry Wilber HORTON, Jr., secretary Buhl Sons Company; born Garrettsville, O., Aug. 4, 1855; son of Henry W. and Mary (Allen) Horton; educated in public schools of Garrettsville; married at Jefferson, O., 1879, Cora E. Bailey. Began active career as clerk in retail hardware store of Henry Talcott, Jefferson 1872; went to Painesville, O., and later to Sharon, Pa., where he filled position of paymaster for the Sharon Iron Co.; removed to Detroit, 1887, and became connected with Buhl Sons Company, wholesale hardward, and has been secretary and director of the company since 1902. Member Protected Home Circle. Republican. Episcopalian. Club: Commercial. Recreations: Music, baseball and other outdoor diversions. Office: 103- 119 Woodbridge Av. Residence: 316 Hudson Av. ["The Book of Detroiters". Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis Copyright, 1908. Transcribed by Christine Walters]


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