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Portage County, Ohio
Genealogy and History

 

 Portage County Biographies


ENOCH NOYES BARTLETT
ENOCH NOYES BARTLETT, born at Bath, N. H., July 4, 1813. [Class of 1838] Entered Oberlin College as a special student in 1835; graduated from the classical course in 1838, and from the theological seminary 1841; ordained in Oberlin Aug. 24, 1841, and Aug. 31 was married to Emily Smith, of Unionville, O. He taught at Mt. Vernon, O., 1841-2; preached Farmington, O., and Garretsville 1843-47; taught at Olivet, Mich., 1846-58; preached at Newton, Ia. 1858-61; at Hamilton, Ill., 1861-65. He was acting principal of the preparatory department of O. C. 1866-68; preached at Newton, Ia., 1868-69; at Woodburn, Ill., 1869-73; Olathe, Kansas, 1873-74; was a real estate and mining agent at Colorado Springs from 1874 until he lost his sight in 1887. Then he removed to Cal., where he lived a quiet life until his death at Ventura, Aug. 13, 1897. [Source: Necrology Oberlin College For The Year 1897-8. Transcribed by: Helen Coughlin]

M. BOSWORTH,
miller and farmer, P. O. North Benton, Mahoning Co., Ohio, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1846; son of Thompson and Annie (Curtis) Bosworth, a pioneer family of Trumbull County, where the former died in 1849. They were parents of three children, two of whom are now living—Mark and Thompson. The widow and her family subsequently removed to Deerfield Township, this county, where our subject received his primary education and grew to manhood. He was married in 1871 to Miss Mary, daughter of John and Margaret Hartzell, of Deerfield Township, this county. By this union there are the following children now living: John, Delmer and Charles Rosco, the latter born January 8, 1885. Mr. Bosworth became associated with D. Lazarus in the milling business in 1876, which partnership still continues. He is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party. A member of the Presbyterian Church of Benton. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

H . E. DAY, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born on the banks of the Mahoning River, in Deerfield Township, this county, November 23, 1804. His grandfather. Lewis Day, with Mr. Ely and Daniel Diver, came to this county in 1799, subsequently returned to the East, but came back here in 1800, bringing their families, and were the first to settle in Deerfield Township. The Day's settlement was east of the Center, and there two generations have lived and passed away. Munn and Lucy (Ely) Day, the parents of our subject, were natives of Massachusetts and Connecticut respectively, and were parents of eight children, six of whom are now living. Our subject was married, first in 1830, to Miss Minerva Scranton, of Atwater, who died in 1838, leaving three children: Dudley M., born on the homestead in 1831, and who married Miss Mary Smith, of Portage County, Ohio, in 1856 (have three children); Edgar M., and Lucy H., wife of A. M. Crosser. Mr. Day was married on the second occasion to Miss Martha Wakefield, of New York State, who bore him four children: Ewing W., who enlisted in Company D, Sixty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was killed in the battle of Stone River; Louisa, wife of Charles Newton; Laura E., wife of F. Hartzall; and Heman L. Mr. Day was engaged in the tannery erected in Deerfield by Jesse Grant, father of Gen. Grant, with whom he had pleasant business associations. Our subject is Trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he has been a consistent member for many years. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by L. Dietz]

RAYMOND H. DAY
DAY, Raymond H, Minneapolis. Res 131 S 4th st, office 419 Bank of Commerce bldg. Lawyer. Born June 12, 1855 in Mantuwa Township Ohio, son of Ditus and Clarissa (Harris) Day. Married in 1885 to Almeda Wilson. Moved to Minn 1857. Educated in public schools Dakota county Minn; U of M 1872-76; taught school 1875-79; studied law with Judge Seagrave Smith; admitted to bar 1881 and has practiced in Minneapolis to date. Member firm of Day & Enches. Member I O O F.  
[Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ.  1907 Transcribed by K. Mohler]

SAMUEL DIVER, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born on the homestead farm at Deerfield Center, January 16, 1817; son of John and Christena (Hartzall) Diver, whose history appears elsewhere in this volume. Our subject was married in this county in 1840, to Miss Miriam, daughter of Peter Mason, a pioneer of this county, and of which she is a native. The children born to this union, who are all living, are as follows: Mary P., wife of Charles Shaeffer; Rosella, wife of Oliver Mowen; Alvira, wife of A. McGowan; and Almira, wife of I . Hartzell. Mr. Diver has a farm of 110 acres on which he settled in 1840, and which he has brought under a high state of cultivation. He may be said to be a model farmer, and a true type of pioneer stock. The family is noted for its industry, all the members having borne a part in clearing the lands and beautifying their homes. AIr. Diver is a member of the Disciples Church. In politics he is a stanch supporter of Republican principles. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOSEPH DIVER, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, is a descendant of one of the oldest pioneer families in Deerfield Township, this county, where he was born in 1823. His grandfather, Daniel Diver, was a native of Germany, who along with Lewis Day and Mr. Ely traded for a large tract of land, divided it into lots, put the tickets into a hat and made a drawing of same, Daniel Diver securing the center. Here the family made a settlement in the wilderness in 1801, and around their cabin home sprang up a prosperous village. John Diver, of Blandford, Mass., father of our subject, resided with his father and assisted him to clear the land. About 1834 he erected the '' Diver House '" and conducted the hotel nearly to the close of his life. He carried the mail on horseback between Cleveland and Pittsburgh, having to pass through eighteen miles of wilderness. On one occasion he found a man left by a brook to die, took him home, and by careful attention saved his life. He was married on first occasion to Miss Laura Ely, who bore him three children, of whom Osman only survives. His second marriage was with Christena Hartzell, by whom he had nine children, of whom are now living Samuel; Polly, wife of William Spires; Joseph; and Christena, wife of N. Gillis. He lived to attain the age of eighty-four years, and when he died left each of his children a small farm with which to begin life. Our subject was married in 1847, to Miss Lucinda Wilcox, a native of Deerfield Township, this county. Eight children born to this union are all living: Edwin, Ella, Gertrude, John, Wallace, Julia, Minnie and Eugene. He succeeded his father as proprietor of the " Diver House," but subsequently leased it and devoted himself to farming. He has been very successful and his acres have accumulated until now he is one of the prominent farmers and landholders in the township. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

WILLIAM DUSTMAN, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Berlin, Mahoning Co., Ohio, February 6, 1836; son of Daniel and Catherine (Goodman) Dustman, natives of Mahoning County, where they still reside, and parents of the following children now living: Jacob, William, Hannah (wife of Hugh Swartz), John, Abraham, Mary Ann (wife of C. Harman), Isaac, Louisa (wife of E. Harman). The maternal grandfather, John Goodman, and paternal grandfather, Jacob Dustman, were among the early founders of Berlin Township, Mahoning Co., Ohio. Our subject was married at Berlin, in 1860, to Miss Sarah A., daughter of Henry Goodman, by whom he has two children— Milton H. and Minnie V. In 1864 Mr. Dustman settled on his farm of eighty acres in this township, also retaining the ownership of his farm of ninety acres in Mahoning County. He has served in several official positions in Deerfield Township, this county. He advocates the principles of the Republican party; is a citizen highly esteemed. A member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

Mrs. Lucretia Rudolph GARFIELD, wife of James A. Garfield, twentieth President of the United States, born in Hiram, Portage county, Ohio, 19th April, 1832. She was the daughter of Zebulon Rudolph, a farmer. She received a classical education in Hiram, in a school in which her future husband was a teacher. She became the wife of James A. Garfield, 11th November, 1858, in Hiram, Ohio, where he was president of the college. Their family consisted of several children, one of whom, a daughter, died in infancy. The living children are four sons and one daughter. Her husband, after their marriage, was both college professor and a Campbellite preacher, often officiating in the churches of the sect of Disciples. His career is a matter of familiarity. When he was elected to the Presidency. Mrs. Garfield's public career began. Her occupancy of the White House was suddenly ended by the murder of her husband. During her reign in Washington she showed a great deal of force of character. She was in the most difficult position that any woman can hold in the United States, and she acquitted herself with tact and dignity. She was averse to publicity, discreet, retiring and reticent. The duties of her position broke her health, and she was taken to Long Branch to recover strength. While she was there, President Garfield, just starting from Washington to join her, was shot. Her devotion to him during the agonizing weeks that ended in his death, is historical. After his death Mrs. Garfield received a large amount of money presented to her by citizens of the country, and she made her home in Cleveland, Ohio. She visited Europe and lived for a time in Bournemouth, England. Returning to the United States, she settled in the Garfield homestead in Mentor, Ohio. Mrs. Garfield is passing her days in quiet retirement, doing good work for those about her in the unostentatious manner that distinguished her when she held the position of mistress of the White House. One of her philanthropic deeds was the donation of $10,000 to a university in Kansas, which took the name of her martyred husband. Her life has throughout been an illustration of American womanhood, wifehood and motherhood of the loftiest character. (Source: American Women by Frances Elizabeth Willard, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Vol. 1, 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)

MASON GIBBS, retired, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Worcester County, Mass., in 1801; son of Dolphin and Asineth (Fay) Gibbs. The family removed to Cheshire County, N. H., where the parents died. Our subject was married, October 31, 1835, to Miss Mary, daughter of Charles Reed, who died June 19, 1880, the mother of two children, and of whom the only survivor is Julia, who is living at home and caring for her aged father. Mr. Gibbs came West in 1828, and located at Strongsville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio; from there he moved to Deerfield, this county, in 1831, and entered into mercantile trade in same year. This he carried on successfully until 1871, and was also largely interested in stock-growing. At the close of his mercantile career his store was converted into a dwelling, one of the neatest and most commodious in the township. Mr. Gibbs retired from all active pursuits in 1883. He is Trustee in the Methodist Episcopal Church, with which he has been long identified. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

IRA GILBERT, farmer, Deerfield, was born in Palmyra Township, this county, in 1831, son of James and Charlotte (Cox) Gilbert, and a direct descendant of Sir John Gilbert, of England, who obtained the first land grant in Connecticut from the Crown. The parents of our subject settled in Palmyra Township, this county, in 1811, where they lived to the close of their lives. Their children are Everett, Ira and Lucinda, wife of David Daniel. Our subject was twice married, on first occasion in 1855, in Paris Township, this county, to Miss Harriet, daughter of John Colwell, of this county, and who died in 1879. She was the mother of six children, four of whom are now living: Frank, John, Frederick and Mary. Mr. Gilbert married, on second occasion, in January, 1882, Mrs. Cynthia Green, daughter of George and Polly (Ward) Carris, of Rootstow, Ohio, and who were among its earliest pioneers. "Mother" "Ward's pond was named after one of Mrs. Gilbert's ancestors. Mr. Gilbert has been a resident of Deerfield Township, this county, for forty five years. His present farm, comprising 155 acres, was first settled by Alva, son of Judge Day, and was among the first cleared in the township. Our subject is a stanch supporter of Democratic principles, and one of the most active and respected citizens of Deerfield Township. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HENRY HARTZELL was born in Northampton County, Penn., October 5, 1801. His father, John Hartzell, with his family, moved from Pennsylvania to Deerfield in 1805, and after living for some time in a log-house he burned brick and built the first brick house in the township. Of the ten children of the family at this date, March 26, 1885, there are only two living, Henry and Polly, now wife of Rev. John Shaffer. Henry Hartzell remained at home until twenty-three years of age. He then married Miss Annie Sheets, who died, leaving three children. They are still living, being named Simon, Mary and John. His second wife was Miss Jane Smart, a native of Pennsylvania. Three sons, Eli, James and George, and two daughters, Annie and Lucy, survive her. His third wife was Catherine B. Sullivan, to whom he was married October 19, 1848. To them no children have been born. Their married life is yet unbroken by death. Mr. Hartzell settled on the farm where he now resides, in the southern part of Deerfield, in 1857, on which years ago he erected a large and commodious brick residence, and when eighty-one years old—1882—planned and superintended the building of a very large and convenient barn. -For twelve years he has suffered severely from varicose ulcers upon his limbs, but in body and mind he is still strong and vigorous. In the days of slavery he was a bold, outspoken anti-slavery man, bearing the brand of an "Abolitionist." Since then he has been a supporter of the Republican party, and on temperance he is a radical Prohibitionist. Without the advantages of education, by untiring industry he has been a successful business man, and in his ripe old age, with bright Christian trust, he is patiently waiting for the end. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

MRS. MARGARET HARTZELL, Deerfield, Ohio, was born in Milton Township, Trumbull Co., Ohio, in 1816; daughter of James Parshall and Margaret Baight, a pioneer family of Trumbull County, Ohio. Our subject was united in marriage, in 1841, with John Hartzell, a native of Lancaster County, Penn., who at fourteen years of age came with his father to this county. Here he grew up, and by industry and perseverance accumulated sufficient means to purchase the land where he established a home which stands as a monument to his memory. He died September 1, 1873, aged eighty years, eleven months and twenty-five days, leaving a widow and two children—Anna and Mary, the latter the wife of Mark Bosworth — to mourn his loss. Mrs. Margaret Hartzell is a member of the Presbyterian Church at North Benton. Mahoning Co., Ohio. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

FRANK HARTZELL, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Deerfield Township, this county, September 14, 1838, a son of George Hartzell, who was born in Deerfield Township, May 12, 1811, and who, with his father, William Hartzell, and his grandfather, George Hartzell, settled in the eastern portion of Deerfield Township in 1807. The family came from Bucks County, Penn. George Hartzell, father of our subject, was married to Miss Emily, daughter of Peter Mason, and who was born in Deerfield Township, in 1813. To this union were born Sebra W., Frank and Lewis D. George Hartzell died April 5, 1881, and his widow now resides near her son. Our subject was married, July 8, 1875, to Miss Laura E., daughter of Heman E. Day, and a native of Deerfield Township, this county. Three children have been born to this union, all now living: M.Cecelia, H. Augustus and G. Nelson. Mr. Hartzell possesses a farm of 133 acres. He is a man of enterprise and highly esteemed by all who know him. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

CHARLES C. HINMAN

CHARLES CAMPBELL HINMAN, born Atwater, O., Jan. 23, 1849. Entered the preparatory department in 1864 and graduated from the classical course in 1871, since which time he has been engaged in the stone business, in Goshen, Ind. until Jan., 1885; in Cleveland till Dec., 1886; and in Philadelphia since 1887, as local manager. He died at his mother’s home in Oberlin, Aug. 20, 1897. [Class of 1871][Source: Necrology Oberlin College For The Year 1897-8. Transcribed by: Helen Coughlin]

JOHN H. HOFFMAN, Deerfield, was born in Northampton County, Penn., April 4, 1823, son of John and Maria (Siegfried) Hoffman, natives of Pennsylvania. Their living children are John H., James J., Henry E., Michael S. and Amanda. The father died in 1879, aged eighty-three years; the mother is now in her eightieth year. Our subject learned the tinsmith's trade and settled at Reading, Penn., where he was married in 1847, to Miss Rosannah Baker, a native of Reading, Berks Co., Penn., and to this union were born three children, now living: Mary A., wife of J. N. Gibbons, Winfield S., who is engaged in the tin and stove trade at Alliance, and Josephine, wife of Edwin J. Day. Mr. Hoffman settled in Deerfield, this county, in 1858, and in 1862 as a substitute entered the ranks of the Union Army, in Company F, Forty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He participated in the battles of Chickasaw Bluffs, Arkansas Post, Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, Black River Bridge and the siege of Vicksburg, from which point he was honorably discharged and returned to his home in Deerfield, Portage Co., Ohio. Mr. Hoffman has served as Constable in Pennsylvania, and in Deerfield Township, this county, and for eighteen years has been Justice of the Peace. He frequently attends the German Reformed Church in his native State. In politics he is a stanch Republican. He cast his first ballot in the old Whig party, for Henry Clay. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

H. D. HUTSON, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Paris Township, this county, August 4, 1827, son of Lazarus and Minerva (Laughlin) Hutsoti, the former born on the banks of the Juniata River, Pennsylvania, the latter a native of Deerfield Township, this county, and a daughter of James Laughlin, who erected the first grist-mill on the Mahoning River, and died in Deerfield Township in 1852, aged eighty years. The children born to this union now living are Hiram, Homer, Henry and H. D. In 1852 our subject began his career in life as a pilot on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers between Pittsburgh and New Orleans. At the breaking out of the Rebellion he entered the service as pilot of the Mississippi squadron, assigned to the brig "Restless," subsequently was put in charge of the repair boat "Swallow," and was so engaged at No. 10, Fort Pillow, Memphis and Vicksburg, where he was taken sick and confined in hospital for three months, during which time his vessel was destroyed by the Rebels. On his recovery he took his position on the " W. H. Brown" dispatch boat, and had charge as pilot of the "Benton" on her memorable trip on the Yazoo River, and participated in the battle at Fort Donelson. His service terminated with the close of the war. Ue subsequently purchased a share in a steamer which he commanded seven years successfully, and disposed of it in 1875, then came to this county, settling on his present farm of 150 acres. He is the founder of and interested in the Hutson Coal Company. Mr. Hutson was married, in 1862, to Miss Charlotte C. Vaughn, a native of Trumbull County, Ohio, by whom he has had one child—Charles W. H.—who died in 1876. Our subject has served the township as Trustee. He is a member of the Disciples Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN W. JONES, P. O. Deerfield, a successful and progressive farmer, was born in North Wales, in 1818. His parents, William and Ann Jones, immigrated to the United States in 1831 and settled in Pittsburgh, where the father died; they had a large family, eight of whom came to this country. Our subject had no educational advantages and early learned to labor. He worked at the big hammer in the mills at Pittsburgh, and by close economy end perseverance was enabled to save something from his hard earned wages. He was married in that city, May 2, 1839, to Miss Mary Griffith, a native of Maryland and of Welsh descent. Mr. Jones came to Deerfield Township, this county, in 1853, and located on his present farm (of which he is now the owner) comprising fifty acres of good productive land. He has erected a fine commodious residence, and made all the improvements necessary to a first-class farm. Our subject gave his services to the Union Army in 1862, enlisting in the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. After a service of over ten months he was honorably discharged on account of sickness occasioned by exposure. Politically he supports the Republican ticket. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN J. KLINE
A pioneer farmer of Hamilton County was John J. Kline and his death which occurred March 14, 1914, came as a severe shock to his many friends. A native of Ohio he was born in Portage County in 1848, a son of John and Margaret (May) Kline. John J. Kline was but eight years of age at the time of his father's death and at that early age began to assume responsibilities. He obtained such education as was afforded in the country schools of Ohio, and when seventeen years of age learned the carpenter's trade which line of work he followed until the removal of the family to Illinois, when he was a young man. He farmed rented land in that state where his marriage occurred in 1875 and in 1880 Mr. Kline and his family came west. The trip was made by train and they settled in Hamilton County in 1883, buying one hundred and sixty acres of land whereon he built a small frame house, shed and stable and made additional improvements. He planted an orchard but this largely died out as the result of the droughts of '93 and '94. He was a very successful farmer and increased his holdings from time to time until he had a fine ranch of two hundred and forty acres in section 32, Scoville Township. He was a man of great energy and determination and allowed no obstacle, however great, long to remain in his path.
In 1875, while residing in Illinois, Mr. Kline was married to Miss Bertha Horschler, a native of Mount Pulaski, Logan county, that state. Her parents were Melchior and Mary (Young) Horschler. Twelve children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Kline: Anthony H., whose death occurred at the age of twenty-three years; George, engaged in farming in Hamilton County; Lena, who is the wife of William Wonderlich, a farmer of Hamilton County; Katherine L., at home; Ralph, who passed away at the age of two years; Cecelia, at home; Daniel E., farming in Hamilton County; Elmer, who died in infancy; Mary L., who is the wife of Cyril Wonderlich, a farmer of Hamilton County; Clara M., who is Sister Leonarda at St. Anthony's School, Cedar Rapids, Nebraska; Francisca, who is Sister Francis Dominick in the St. Agnes Academy at Memphis, Tennessee; and Irene, who is also a nun, being known as Sister Theodore and is at St. Patrick's School, Fremont, Nebraska.
Throughout his life Mr. Kline was a stanch democrat, having firm faith in the principles of that party as factors in good government. Fraternally he was well known as a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Royal Highlanders and the Knights of Columbus. His religious faith was that of the Catholic Church and he was a member of the St. Joseph church at Giltner. Having had but few educational advantages himself, Mr. Kline was a fervent worker in furthering any movement along that line and he served as school treasurer for a period of twenty- seven years. He was also for many years road overseer of the precinct. The greater part of Mr. Kline's life was devoted to farming and he became well known and an influential leader in the community. His death, March 14, 1914, was an occasion of deep sorrow throughout the vicinity, for in his passing Hamilton county lost a representative citizen. [Source: History of Hamilton and Clay Counties, Nebraska; Supervising Editors George L. Burr, O.O. Buck ;Compiled by Dale P. Stough By George L. Burr, O. O. Buck, Dale P. Stough (Published 1921) pages 245-246; MZ - Sub by FoFG]

JOHN LAZARUS, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Northampton County, Penn., June 22,1804; son of Frederick and Christena Hartzell, natives of thatcounty. This family pioneered its way west, in 1807, traveling through the wilderness to Ellsworth, from whence a road had to be cut, and they passed the remainder of their lives in Deerfield Township. Their living children are Joseph, John, George, Annie, Mary and Betsey. Our subject was married in Trumbull County,[ Ohio, in 1829, to Miss Isabella Moore, who died in 1855, the mother of three children, two of whom are living: Sarah, wife of F. Kirkbright, and Mary, wife of Joshua Hartzell. Mr. Lazarus owns a farm of 160 acres on which he settled after marriage. He is connected with the Presbyterian Church of Benton. In politics he supports the Republican party. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

DANIEL LAZARUS, a member of the firm of Lazarus & Bosworth, millers, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Deerfield Township, this county, in 1839, son of George, a native of Pennsylvania, and Jane (Craig) Lazarus, a native of Mahoning County, Ohio, of which place the latter's parents were among the earliest pioneers. Our subject was married, in 1865, to Miss Drusilla, daughter of Thompson Bosworth. They are the parents of the following children now living: Effie and Mary. Mr. Lazarus is the senior partner of the above firm, which operates a mill erected by him in 1872, on the site of a structure built in 1822, by Peter Lazarus, and adjoins a saw-mill erected in 1816, the first built in Deerfield Township. The present mill is provided with two ran of buhrs, and has a capacity of sixty bushels of wheat and 200 of feed per diem. Our subject is an officer in the Presbyterian Church of Benton, and is highly esteemed as a citizen and neighbor. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

H. S. LOOMIS, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Randolph Township, this county, December 12, 1834; son of Harlow and Maria (Ward) Loomis, the former born in Wallingford, Conn., in 1798, the latter in Randolph Township, in 1808, a daughter of Josiah Ward. These families were among the earliest pioneers to settle in Randolph, Josiah Ward coming in 1803. The parents lived to a ripe old age, combating the privations and hardships of pioneer life to see as the results of their labor the fields to bloom and ripen with abundance. Of their children five are living: Alfred, a resident of Washington Territory; Celinda, wife of William Brocket; H. S.; Sardis and Albert H. Stephen J., the fifth child in the family, enlisted during the late war of the Rebellion, in the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was killed at Atlanta, Ga. The subject of this sketch was brought up on a farm, and was married, in Suffield Township, this county, in 1860, to Miss Malinda Wise, a native of Greentown, Ohio. Four children were born to this union all now living: Alva A., Stephen W., Rose B. and Humbert H. Mr. Loomis has always been industrious, and very successful, and as the results of his many years of labor has a fine farm of 242 acres in Deerfield Township, which he is continually improving. The family are highly respected members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

A. MARSH, proprietor of flax-mill, P. O. Deerfield, was born in England, in 1827; son of Emanuel and Anna Marsh. He immigrated to the United States in 1849 and located at Waterford, N. Y., where he worked at his trade. Four years later he removed to Springfield, Ohio, and was employed at various places until his coming to Deerfield, this county, in 1864. He operated a mill in Deerfield Township (since destroyed), and in 1876 came into possession of his present mill, originally built by Peter Lazarus in about 1840. It has now a capacity of turning out 3,000 pounds of flax per day, which is marketed in Pennsylvania and Indiana. Mr. Marsh has made his investment successful. He was married, in Waterford, N. Y., in 1850, to Miss Mary A. Wright, a native of England, by whom he has the following children: Alice; Giles H., married to Rhoda Mahuran; Flora L., wife of P. Case; Emma; Rose; Mattie; Minnie and Frank. Politically Mr. Marsh supports the principles of the Republican party. His family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

BENJAMIN D. MISNER, carpenter, P. O. Deerfield, is a native of Indiana County, Penn., where he was born in 1819: son of Benjamin and Eve (Ditch) Misner, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Ohio in 1822 and were among the early pioneers of Mahoning County, where the father died in 1854 They reared a family of ten children, as follows: John, Samuel, David, Jacob, George, Benjamin D., Joseph, Elizabeth, Catherine and Eve. Our subject was married, in Mahoning County, Ohio, in 1861, to Miss Caroline A. Hartzell, a native of Pennsylvania, who has borne him one daughter—Mary H., wife of William Wilson. Mr. Misner came to Deerfield Township, this county, in 1862. He is a carpenter by trade, an occupation be followed through life with considerable success, and as the fruits of his industry has secured the needed comforts for his old age. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ISAAC MOTT, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, one of the oldest native residents, was born in Deerfield Township, this county, May 10, 1812. His grandfather, Ezekiel Mott, a soldier in the Revolutionary war, was among the pilgrims of 1807 to Deerfield Township, where he cleared a farm and lived to the close of his life. Elijah Mott (father of our subject) was born during the Revolutionary war, and was married to Miss Annie Rose, who bore him ten children, of whom only Sylvester and Isaac survive. The subject of this sketch was married, in Deerfield Township, this county, April 17, 1834, to Miss Elizabeth Jobes, born June 25, 1810. Their living children are Cornelius, married to Miss Carson (have one child—Ada); Cornelia, married to Samuel Mell (their children are Isaac, Frank and Minnie). In 1844 Mr. Mott settled on his present farm consisting of 150 acres, where he has since made his home. He is a member of the United Brethren Church. Politically he is a stanch Republican. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

T. R. MOWEN, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, May 14, 1824; son of Daniel and Elizabeth Mowen (whose record appears elsewhere in this volume). Our subject was married, in 1844, to Miss Elizabeth B., daughter of Ephraim B. Hubbard (deceased), a pioneer of Deerfield Township, this county. To this union there was born one son—Walter E.. married to Miss Alice, daughter of Stephen Randall, by whom he has one son—Don T. Mr. Mowen came to this county in 1844, settling in Deerfield Township. In 1858 he purchased his present estate, comprising seventy acres, and his farm is well improved and ably managed by himself and son. Mr. Mowen is a Deacon in the Disciples Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

OLIVER P. MOWEN, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born at Fredericksburg, Ohio, April 25, 1843; son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Rudicill) Mowen, the former born September 11, 1792, at Hagerstown, Md., on the field where the battle of Antietam was subsequently fought, and died at Fredericksburg April 8, 1845. The latter is a native of Springfield, Mahoning Co., Ohio, where she was born April 21, 1797, of German descent. She is now in the eighty-eighth year of her age. She is the mother of ten children. Our subject enlisted during the late war of the Rebellion in Company D, One Hundred and Fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, participated in the efforts made to repulse John Morgan when he ventured on his raid through Ohio, and was discharged on account of sickness December 9, 1862. He was married, in 1869, to Miss Rosella, daughter of Samuel Diver and a native of Deerfield Township, and by this union there is one child living—Mabel. Their eldest child, Sammy, born October 15, 1872, died after a brief illness July 8, 1874. In 1870 Mr. Mowen settled on his present farm of sixty acres, which he has greatly improved and converted into one of the neatest homes in Deerfield Township. It may be observed that it is the same farm settled on by Mrs. Mowen's grandfather, Peter Mason, an early pioneer of Deerfield Township. Our subject is a member of the congregation of the Disciples Church; he] has served as Township Assessor for two years. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

HENRY W. MUERMAN, tanner and currier, P. O. Deerfield, is a native of Westphalia, Prussia, where he was born in 1838; a son of Charles H. and Sophia S. (Thierman) Muerman, both deceased. Of their children four came to America, of whom three are now living: Christian A., in 1851, President of the Board of Equalization, also engaged in the insurance business at Cleveland; Harman, in 1855, proprietor of the Burnet Hotel, Lima, Stark Co., Ohio; and Henry W. In 1853 our subject came to America and direct to Deerfield, this county, where his brothers, Christian and Morris, were operating a tannery, formerly the property of Dr. Curtis. It was built about 1815, by Jesse Grant, father of Gen. U. S. Grant. Our subject subsequently leased the tannery of his brothers, succeeding them in the business in which he has since been very successful. He was married in this township in 1862, to Miss Jennie R. Schaeffer, a native of Smithtown, Mahoning Co., Ohio, and has three children living and one deceased. Those now living are John C., Paul M. and Helen E. Charles is deceased. Mr. Muerman has a farm of forty-six acres, which he conducts in addition to his other business. Hh is a consistent member of the Christian Church, of which he is Deacon, chorister and organist. He is well and favorably known. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

CHARLES PARHAM, farmer, P. O. Yale, was born in Dorsetshire, England, in 1817; son of Thomas and Mary (Babcock) Parham, both now deceased. Our subject immigrated to this country in 1835, and located in Buffalo, N. Y., where he learned the painter's trade. After remaining there two years, he removed to Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, working at his trade there until his settlement in Deerfield Township, this county, in 1842. At this time he had, by careful management, saved enough to purchase twenty-five acres of land; a second purchase of nine acres followed, and at this-time he is the possessor of a farm of 155 acres, secured by his own industry and frugality. He was married in Warren, Ohio, June 2, 1840, to Miss Rebecca Davis, who has borne him six children—Henry, who served three months in the Union Array during the late Rebellion; Albion, who enlisted in the One Hundred and Fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was killed before Atlanta, Ga., during the war of the Rebellion; Martha, wife of N. Dodge; Sabina, Hiram and Frederick C. Mrs. Parham died June 17, 1859, and on August 4, 1861, our subject married Miss Mary A. Meads, a native of Brighton, England, by whom be has one son., John M., married to Miss Eliza Kibler, and residing on the homestead. Mr. Parham is a Trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is highly esteemed by all who know him. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ANTHONY REED, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, in October, 1811, son of William and Mary (Middlesworth) Reed; for mer born in the State of Delaware, the latter in West Virginia. (Their history appears in another portion of this volume.) The family settled in the southern portion of Deerfield Township, this county, in 1812, where the parents lived to the close of their lives. Our subject's advantages for receiving an education were very limited, and his father realizing this fact, erected a log-schoolhouse, in which he taught his own and the neighbors' children in his spare moments. Anthony resided on the old homestead until thirty years of age. He was married in 1842 to Miss Elizabeth Lazarus, a native of Deerfield Township, this county. This union has been blessed with two children —Amelia, wife of William R. Shilliday (have four children, Maggie, Arad, Mattie and Mary), and Mary, widow of George Ganze (by whom she had two children, Joel and Mabel), and who is residing on the old homestead with her children, a comfort to her father in his declining years. Mr. Reed, when twenty-one years of age, purchased sixty-six acres of land, to which he subsequently added until he is now owner of 429 acres. He inherited but a small amount of money, and his accumulations are the result of his own energy and industry. He is a member of the Congregational Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

GEORGE W. REED, farmer and stock raiser, section 6, township 65, range 39, is a prominent pioneer of this township. He was born March 7, 1832, in Portage County, Ohio. His father, John Reed, was a native of Virginia, and his mother, formerly Rebecca Moran, was born in Maryland. George was reared to manhood at his birthplace on the farm, and received a common school education. He also learned the blacksmith’s trade. In October, 1854, he immigrated to Iowa and settled in Hardin County, at the then new town of Eldora, there being only three houses in the place. He started a shop and did the first blacksmithing in the county. After remaining there some twelve years, he moved on a farm where he lived six years. In March, 1870, he came to Atchison County, Missouri, with Mr. Shoecraft and settled where he now resides. They built a small shanty and broke prairie. He helped to locate the roads and put in the first bridge. At that time there were but four farms opened between his place and Rock Port. He was instrumental in establishing a mail route from Rock Port to Maryville. His first building lumber he hauled from Phelps and Craig. Mr. R. now has 160 acres of fine land, well improved, comfortable buildings, etc. He has been a hard working man and deserves his success. During the war he enlisted in September, 1861, in Company A, Twelfth Iowa Infantry. He took part in the battles of Fort Donelson, Fort Henry, Smithland, Kentucky and Shiloh. He was taken prisoner at the battle on April 6. They were taken to Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and were three days without anything to eat. They were confined at different points: Macon, Georgia, and finally to Libby Prison. He suffered fearfully and lost about 100 pounds in weight, and was little more than a skeleton when he was released in December, 1862. He held the position of sergeant; returning home he recruited forty men, with whom he went to Davenport. He was offered a lieutenant’s commission, but ill health would not permit his going to the field again. Mr. Reed has been twice married: First, in September, 1854, to Miss Mariah Ewell, a native of Maine; she died June 16, 1870. By this union he has two children: John I., born September 3, 1858, and George R., born April 9, 1860. He was married again January 12, 1874, to Helen Mar Ewell, a sister of the former wife. She was born in Kennebec County, Maine, November 17, 1833. They had one child: Stella, born October 15, 1874. Mrs. Reed is a member of the Presbyterian Church. [The History of Holt and Atchison Counties, Missouri; St. Joseph, Mo.: National Historical Company, 1882. Transcribed by K. Mohler]

JAMES REED
, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Brooke County, W. Va., in 1809, a grandson of Anthony Middlesworth, a Hollander by birth, and son of William and Mary (Middlesworth) Reed, the former born in the State of Delaware August 23,1778; the latter a native of West Virginia. They had a family of twelve children, of whom eight are still living. The family were among the pioneers of this county of 1812, and settled two and a half miles south of the center of Deerfield Township. William Reed here cleared eighty or ninety acres of land and passed the remainder of his life, attaining the ripe age'of eighty-five years. Our subject was brought up on the farm, receiving the limited education obtainable in that early day. Being reared in the wilderness he early learned to swing the ax and to toil with his hands. At the age of twenty-one he began the struggle of life for himself, and by perseverance, industry and frugality he accumulated a fine estate, comprising over 290 acres of land. He was married September 14, 1852, to Miss Rebecca A. McMillen. The family are connected with the Presbyterian Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

LINUS REED, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born March 30, 1815, in Deerfield Township, this county, son of William and Mary (Middlesworth) Reed, whose history appears elsewhere in this work. Our subject attended the school taught by his father, and held in the log-schoolbouse erected by the latter, and resided on the old home farm until his marriage in 1838, in Stark County, Ohio, with Sarah B., daughter of David Swaine, and a native of New Jersey. To this union were born two children, Mary A. (deceased) and Ardelia. Our subject is a self-made man; commencing with but $50, he has accumulated a comfortable competency. He taught school for fifteen terms at $12 per month, and from his savings made his first purchase of land at $9 per acre; for his next purchase he paid $30, and the residence which he is now building to replace one destroyed by fire will cost $1,800. When he first setled on bis present farm it was covered with woods, which had to be cut away to make room for his log-cabin. His first purchase was twenty-six acres, to which he added seventy-two, and he has also bought lands elsewhere which he disposed of advantageously. Mr. Reed is one of the oldest residents of Deerfield Township. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

MARK B. REGAL, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born November 5, 1840, in Deerfield Township, this county, son of John and Lucinda (Laughlin) Regal, who are among the oldest living pioneers of Deerfield Township. They were parents of ten children and have sixteen grand-children. The subject of this sketch was brought up on the home farm and, after securing an education, for several years worked during summer and taught in the winter seasons. He was married in 1877, to Anna, daughter of John and Margaret Hartzell, and widow of Miller McGowan (by whom she had five children, all now living: Lelia, wife of James Watson, Margaret, Alsora, John and Gertrude). The home farm consists of 166 acres, and is one of the best cultivated and improved in the township. Mr. and Mrs. Regal are members of the Disciples Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

WILLIAM M. SHEFELTON, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1831, son of John and Jane (French) Shefelton, natives of Washington County, Penn. His grandfather, John Shefelton, one of the earliest pioneers of that county, along with his son crossed the mountains on horseback in August, 1804, securing 160 acres of land in Newton Township, where they erected a shanty, after which the former returned East and brought back his family, the son remaining in the cabin through the winter and living oq the results of his hunting expeditions. John and Jane Shefelton, our subject's parents, reared a family of eight children, seven of whom are now living: George J., Eliza, Melissa, Joseph R., Alexander F., Cynthia and William M. Our subject enlisted at Newton Falls during the late war of the Rebellion, December 7, 1861, in Company D, Sixth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and participated in the following engagements: Woodstock, Va.; Mount Jackson, Va.; Harrisonburg; Cross Keys, Va. (these four engagements were in June, 1862); Luray, Va. (July 28, 1862); Cedar Mountain; second Bull Run, Va.; Fredericksburg; Kelly's Ford, Va.; Chancellorsville; Brandy Station; Middleburg, Va.; South Mountain, Md.; Hagerstown, Md.; Boonsboro; Jones' Cross Roads, Md.; Culpeper Court House, Va., and was injured by his horse falling on him while charging a Rebel battery at Auburn Mills, Va., October 14, 1863. He re-enlisted in the veteran service December 24, 1863, and was in the following engagements: Malvern Hill, Va., July 28, 1864; Weldon Railroad, Va., August 21, 1864; Boydstown Plank Road, Va., October 27, 1864; Hatcher's Run, Va., December 20, 1864; Hatcher's Run, Va., February 6, 1865; Dinwiddie Court House, Va, April 6. 1865; Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865, and served till the close of the struggle, losing his health from injuries and exposures'. Mr. Shefelton purchased his present farm of 159 acres in 1866, and was married in 1867 to Miss Deborah Hartzell, by whom he has had four children, two now living —Hartzell J. and Charles R., now (1885) respectively fifteen and seven years of age. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

J. L. SLACK, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Paris Township, Stark Co., Ohio, in 1830; son of Henry and Catherine (Gardner) Slack, natives of Bradford County and Columbiana Co., Ohio, respectively. They were the parents of the following children: John G., Jesse L., Andrew J. and Louis B. The Slacks were among the earliest pioneers of Stark County, the father of our subject being but two years of age when he left Virginia with his father. Our subject remained on the homestead until he was eighteen years of age, when he went to New Franklin, Ohio, and served a three years' apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade. In 1860 he purchased a small farm in Deerfield Township, and completed a partially built grist and saw-mill on the Mahoning River near his placa These industries he has successfully conducted in connection with his farm, which now comprises 112 acres. He was married in Deerfield Township, this county, in 1854, to Miss Mary M., daughter of Ephraim B. Hubbard, of Deerfield Township, and has two children living: Laura, wife of S. F. Henseman, and Helen B. Mr. Slack for many years has been a member of the Disciples Church. In politics he is a Republican, though originally identified with the Whig party. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ISAAC W. SMITH, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Deerfield Township, this county, July 11, 1832; a son of Joseph and Margaret (Wilson) Smith, the latter a native of Wilmington, Del.; the former a native of Beaver County, Penn., was a grandson of Isaac Wilson, a native of Ireland, who started Joseph, subject's father, in mercantile trade in Deerfield, which he followed to the close of his life. He also engaged in milling, and was one of the enterprising spirits of the early times. He reared a family of four children, three of whom are now living: Sarah A., wife of John Day; Isaac W., and Susan, wife of Friend Whittlesey. The subject of this sketch was married, December 25, 1855, to Miss Cornelia A. Betts, a native of Connecticut. To this union three children were born, all of whom are now living: Charles, married to Miss Lizzie Card (have one son—Eddie); Joseph M., a resident of Huron, Dak.; and Jessie M. Mr. Smith has spent the most of his life in Deerfield Township. In April, 1880, he obtained a contract with the Government for carrying the mails from the C., Y. & P. R. R. to Deerfield, which duties he has faithfully performed and has never missed a mail. He has been mostly engaged in stock dealing, and has crossed the Allegheny Mountains fourteen times with stock. He was a traveling salesman for the Champion Machine Company, of Springfield, Ohio, for five years. At present he carries on the only livery in Deerfield, and also attends to his mail contract . His services on the road in the latter capacity have made for him many friends, and by the children he is well and favorably known as "Uncle Ike." Mr. Smith has served as Constable of Deerfield Township. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

CHARLES M. SMITH, Deerfield, was born in Deerfield Township, this county, September 22, 1855; son of Isaac W. and Cornelia A. (Betts) Smith. He was reared on a farm, and lived on the homestead until his marriage, July 10, 1879, with Miss Lizzie, daughter of Silas and Margaret Card. To this union has been born one child—Edward C. In 1881 our subject became associated, as a salesman, in the house of John G. Preston, with whom he is connected at the present time. He has won hosts of friends from his boyhood up, being possessed of those qualities which endear him to all who know him. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ISAAC W. SMITH, proprietor of the Bartlett House, P. O. Deerfield, wai born in Smith Township, Mahoning Co., Ohio, May 1, 1850, son of William and Jane (Trotter) Smith. He Whs reared on a farm and early learned to labor. After securing an education he accepted a position as salesman at Ravenna, Ohio, with his brothers, with whom he remained some years. Subsequently be came to Deerfield, and filled a similar position in the mercantile house of Wilson & Diver, where he remained until his purchase of the Bartlett House in 1882. Under the able management of Mr. and Mrs. Smith this hotel has gained an extended reputation throughout the State, and is highly commended by the traveling public for its clean and well-ventilated rooms, the abundance of the table, and the care bestowed upon the guests by the host and hostess, who strive to make all feel at home. Our subject was married, Jane 24, 1877, to Miss Ella L., daughter of Joseph Diver, and a native of Deerfield. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

WILLIAM P. SPIERS, retired farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Steeple Clayton, Buckinghamshire, England, in 1820, son of John and Rebecca Spiers, whose history appears in this volume. He has been a resident of Deerfield Township since the family made their settlement in 1833. Mr. Spiers served an apprenticeship at carriage-making, and worked over forty years at the business, but subsequently abandoned his trade and is now living a retired life, occupying a pleasant residence with seventeen acres of land. He was married in 1846, to Miss Mary, daughter of John Diver, a native of Deerfield. To this union two children were born, both now living: Ethelbert B., and Emma, married to Edward Lazarus (they have three children: Nellie A., Bertha and Lottie). Mr. Spiers is one of our oldest and most respected pioneers, and is well and favorably known. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN SPIRES, farmer and manufacturer, Deerfield, was born in Buckinghamshire, England, December 13, 1800, son of Thomas and Ann (Perkins) Spires, who reared three sons and two daughters, John and James being the only survivors. The parents came to this county in 1833, and settled in Deerfield Township, but the father only lived about thirty days after his arrival. The mother died in August, 1852. Our subject came to America in 1832, stayed one year in New York, and then followed his parents to Deerfield Township, this county, where he began the struggle of life empty-handed But he was sagacious, frugal, ambitious, full of energy, and blessed with a rugged constitution. He was married, in 1820, to Miss Rebecca Parker, a native of Buckinghamshire, England, by whom he had nine children, of whom are now living: William P., James, Ann P. Eddy (in Racine, Wis.), Hannah, Richard, Thomas J. and John A. Mrs. Spires died in 1881. Our subject in 1837 was enabled to purchase thirty-five acres of land. He now owns about 100 acree in Deerfield Township and 900 in Atwater Township, this county. The pottery at Atwater, Ohio, carried on under the firm name of John Spires & Sons, was purchased of the administrators of the late W. F. Burns in 1880. Hig first enterprise was to supply a pottery at Limaville, Stark County, with clay, in the year 1849. In the same year he built a saw-mill on Yellow Creek in Deerfield, which was used twenty-one years. It was then moved to its present site in Atwater, where it is now run by the firm. Mr. Spires, though well advanced in age, enjoys the best of health. During his residence here he has cleared 500 acres of land, most of which is under cultivation. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

FREDERICK D. TIBBALS, farmer, was born on the homestead farm in Deerfield Township, this county, November 24, 1825, son of Alfred M., born in Granville, Mass.. August 14, 1797, and Martha (Swim) Tibbals, born in Burlington, N. J., November 26, 1800. They were married January 20, 1820, and were the parents of four sons, all now living: John L., Frederick D., Curtis and Newell D. Alfred M. Tibbals was killed by a falling tree February 26, 1858. His widow, though now advanced in years, is strong and vigorous in mind and body. The grandparents of our subject were Moses and Ruth (Spelman) Tibbals, the former born August 6, 1767, the latter March 24, 1773. They were married April 18, 1790, and in 1804 they came to Deerfield Township, this county, from Granville, Mass., bringing with them a team of oxen and a favorite cow. They settled on land still occupied by their posterity, cleared a space in the wilderness, and erected a rude hut, in which they lived until the brick house was built in 1816, and which is in use at this time Moses Tibbals secured several hundred acres of land from Granger & Phelps, but subsequently disposed of all but 160 acres. The parents on both sides are deceased and buried in Deerfield . The Tibbals are of English descent, the first of this name settling in Massachusetts. Our subject was married, November 15, 1858, to Miss Celia A., daughter of Peter Mason, a native of Deerfield, who died June 4, 1881, aged fifty-one years. Mr. Tibbals is mostly engaged in stock dealing. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

WILCOX FAMILY.
It is impossible to trace the genealogy of the Wilcox family to a very remote period, not farther than 1745, at which time Abel Wilcox, a resident of Connecticut, moved from Hebron, that State, to Sandersfield, Mass. His wife's maiden name was Susannah Hall. To them were born six children: Abel, Abijah, Jerusha, Hetty, Susannah and William. Abel, Jr., was united in marriage with Lois Chamberlain, of East Windsor, Conn. This union was blessed with three children: Amos, Abel and Jerusha. When quite advanced in life he with his family removed to Erie County, Penn., where he remained until his death. Abijah, the second son, was drowned. William, the youngest son of Abel and Susannah Wilcox, was born in Sandersfield, Mass., August 7, 1777. February 23, 1803, he married Lucinda Gibbs, of East Windsor, by whom he was the father of seven girls and five boys. Austatia, born July 27, 1805, died April 27, 1806. George, a bright and promising youth, born March 22,1811, died July 29, 1821, aged ten years. The remaining children lived to manhood and womanhood, all settled in Ohio and became heads of families. In 1816 William Wilcox sold his farm to a man named Granger, who had previously been to Ohio and "taken up" several hundred acres of land lying in the northeastern part of the State, near where the city of Akron now stands. William Wilcox, highly pleased with Granger's description of this land and of the surroundings, bought it before seeing the property. They packed their goods, not for passage by railroad, but for passage by wagon behind ox teams, and started for their Western home. The teams consisted of three yoke of oxen, besides one horse; these drew two heavily laden wagons. Among the things in them were 200 pounds of wool, which Mrs. Wilcox carded, spun, and in two summers had woven into cloth. After due preparation, she made it into garments for family use. The journey through the wilderness—for it was forest—was long and tedious. Atone time they were delayed a week by the illness of one of the children, and an accident to Mr. Wilcox, whereby he hurt his knee, also detained them. Forty-one days from the time they left Massachusetts they arrived at their destination. They were sadly disappointed when they saw the land, for it was not what it had been represented. Granger at that time had a brother living in Deerfield, Portage Co., Ohio, and there was an exchange made between him and Mr. Wilcox, but not without sacrifice on the part of Wilcox, and early in the spring of 1818 they left for Deerfield, their future home. This property, situated in the eastern part of the township on the Mahoning River, they were well satisfied with, and Mr. Wilcox said, "I have blundered on a good farm."
Mr. Wilcox's health failed, and June 22, 1828, at the age of fifty-one, his spirit returned to God who gave it. His remains rest in the cemetery in Deerfield. Mrs. Wilcox lived to the advanced age of seventy-eight years, dying September 16, 1862. A noble Christian woman. She sleeps by the side of her companion. Seneca, son of Lucinda and William Wilcox, born February 25, 1804, was married to Samantha Wilson, of Palmyra, June 22, 1830 (to them were born seven children: Desire, Emeline, Caroline, Lucinda, John, Cornelia and Melissa). He died November 23, 1863. Julia, born February 17, 1807, widow of Riley Halleck (she was married November 15, 1827, and became the mother of eleven children: Gibbs, Louisa, William, Lucy Ann, Marion, Joel, Betsey, Erwin, Harriet, Elijah and Benjamin). Emily was born April 18, 1809, widow of Jesse Rogers, married March 25, 1832 (seven children were the result of this union: Eliza, Edwin, Linus, Maria, Henry, Harriet and Alice.) Harriet, born December 17,1814, widow of Caleb Steele, married June 26, 1836 (at present she resides in Alliance); William L, born April 16, 1817, died August 5, 1851, was married to Clarissa Sheets, of Berlin (they had two children, daughters); Newell D., born May 15, 1819, married December 16, 1841, to Amelia Hall, of Palmyra (two sons, Wallace and Curtis, were the fruits of this marriage), died March 1, 1881; Mary M., born August 22, 1821 (married, November 12, 1845, to Linus Sheets, of Berlin, Ohio (the result of this union was seven children: Maria, Newell, Clara, Emma, Warren, Eddie and Ellen), she died January 20. 1878; Lucinda, born February 8, 1824, married Joseph Diver, of Deerfield, November 26, 1846 (of their children, eight are living: Edwin, Ella, Gertie, John, Wallace, Julia, Minnie and Eugene), died March 4, 1877; Clarissa, born December 27, 1825, was married March 8, 1849, to Elias Mowen, of Deerfield (their children are: Alma, Marsha, Ursula, Judson and Wealthy). Alexander H. Wilcox, born in Sandersfield, Mass., November 27, 1812, acquired what education he could in the log-schoolhouse. Bereft of a father's care at the age of fifteen, he turned his energies to the trades of carpenter and joiner. Now, at the age of seventy-two years, he displays his genius by inventing a patent fence, which is proving a success. Mr. Wilcox has built bridges over the Mahoning River, and has erected many dwellings (the first house he built was one done without recompense for his widowed mother). Of the incidents of note that have transpired during his life was the capture of two horse thieves; one he captured at Georgetown, the other at Deerfield. He returned both horses in the possession of the thieves to their owners, and received a reward of $50 for the last one taken. He was married in 1837 to Betsey, daughter of John Diver, who died August 6, 1850, leaving six children: Julia A., born February 17, 1838 (she was married November 24, 1858, to William B. Wilson, of Palmyra; died April 5, 1872); Harriet L., born September 6, 1839, widow of Henry Carver, married August 4, 1867; George A., born October 2,1841, married, October 3, 1866, to Calista E. Kibler, of Palmyra; Joseph, born July 20, 1843, a young man with bright prospects, died at his home May 16, 1865, in his twenty-second year; William B., born May 20, 1845, married Adelia Haines, of Deerfield, March 4. 1879; Susan C., born January 11, 1847, died September 5, 1850; Charles E., born August 5, 1849, married to Ida Packer September 28, 1872. Mr. Wilcox was married, on second occasion, in 1851, to Adaline Barrack, of Maryland, by whom he has had three children: Sarah, born November 20, 1851, died November 3, 1861; Cornelius, born June 7, 1853; James B., born March 20, 1856, married July 2, 1882, to Susanna Shively, of Deerfield. Mr. Wilcox is among the few living pioneers of this township. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. He attended Cleveland's inauguration and visited Mt . Vernon. Casting his first ballot for Jackson, he has never lost but one Presidential vote, and that was for Horace Greely. Although the hand of time has touched his hair with silver threads, Mr. Wilcox has lost none of the fire of ambition, or the vigor of his earlier manhood; his health is good, his frame elastic, and his capacity for eudurance seemingly as great as ever. He is a highly esteemed and much respected citizen of Deerfield. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN S. WILSON, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1817, son of Isaac and Sarah (Givens) Wilson, natives of. Delaware and parents of the following children: John S., Isaac, Elizabeth, George and Joseph. Isaac Wilson, a paper-maker by trade, was appointed Superintendent of a mill on Little Beaver Creek, Columbiana Co., Ohio, by Cramer & Spear, of Pittsburgh, Penn Accepting this position he located there in 1814. He subsequently established a small stock of goods in a room, and bis wife attended to the sale of same while he ran the mill. He was afterward admitted a partner in the concern and carried on the milling business until 1824, when he bought a farm of 175 acres near Franklin, Stark County. Misfortunes came upon him soon after; his barn was struck by lightning and burned, and his son was caught beneath a falling tree and lost his limb. Returning to commercial pursuits he opened a tavern, which he conducted some years. Subsequently he removed to Salem, established himself in business there, and remained the balance of his life. He died August 1, 1846, aged sixty-one years. At the time of his death he had twelve stores under his control in different portions of the State. His widow lived to be eighty-three years of age. Our subject was married in Mahoning County in 1841, to Miss Sarah Everett, of New York, by whom he has had twelve children, seven of whom are now living: Mary, wife of S. Caldwell; Martha, wife of I. Diver; Frank, married to Bertha Benedict; Hartzell S., married to Sarah Hahn; Anna M.; Morgan C. and Joseph. Mr. W:ilson came to Deerfield Township in 1846, and for some years engaged in mercantile business. Prior to coming here he carried on a grist and saw-mill in Berlin Township, Mahoning County. He settled on a farm in the eastern part of this township, comprising over 300 acres, and still owns 159 acres of same. In the spring of 1881 he occupied his present estate, comprising twenty-two acres of well-improved land. Although advanced in years our subject is strong mentally and physically. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

ISAAC WILSON, merchant, Deerfield, was born in Liverpool, Columbiana Co., Ohio, in 1821, son of Isaac Bnd Sarah (Givens) Wilson. He came to Deerfield in 1840, and took charge of the business which he has since continuously and successfully carried on. He has a stock worth about $10,000, and enjoys a large and lucrative trade. He was married in 1844 to Miss Juliette, daughter of J. W. Farnham, of Deerfield. Though they have no children of their own the death of Mr. Wilson's younger sister gave them an adopted son —William H. Wilson, who married Miss Nellie Misner, of Deerfield Township, this county. Our subject is a man of pronounced business ability, unassuming in his every-day life, and possessing those genial qualities of mind and heart that have won for him hosts of friends during his long career in business. Mr. Wilson has filled various offices of trust, and served as Postmaster of Deerfield for upward of twenty-five years. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]

JOHN D. WOODWARD, farmer, P. O. Deerfield, was born in Fayette Connty, Penn., in 1830, son of Amos and Mary (Mallaby) Woodward, natives of Pennsylvania, who settled in Milton Township, Trumbull County, in 1848, thence removed to Palmyra, Portage Co., Ohio, where Mr. Woodward died in 1856. His widow resides on the homestead, the mother of eight children: Mary, wife of M. Sutton; John, married to Lucinda Wilcox (have two children: Alice A. and Blanche); William, married to Cornelia Wilcox (have six children: Rowland, Cora, Mary E., MaudE., Joseph and Gertie); Elizabeth, widow of William Earnest (have three children: Reuben, Oliver and William); Albert, married to Julia Westover (their children are Ransom and Jane); Eliza J., wife of Evan Jones; Amos, married to Martha Jenkins (have two children: Wallace and Lemuel); Richard, married to Sarah Wilson (have two children: Jonas E. and Archibald). Of these John and William settled on the present estate of 300 acres in Deerfield Township in 1864. Politically they are Republicans. They rank among the enterprising farmers of the county. ["History of Portage County", by Warner, Beers & Co., 1885 - Contributed by Linda Dietz]




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