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    AYERS, GRANVILLE T.

    Granville T. Ayers. In the year succeeding that in which Oklahoma was admitted to statehood Mr. Ayers became a teacher in the public schools of Beaver County, and during the intervening period he has continued as one of the prominent and influential figures in the educational affairs of this western section of the state, his broad pedagogic experience and his marked executive ability having met with consistent recognition when, in the autumn of 1914, he was elected county superintendent of schools, a position in which his administration is fully justifying the popular choice for the incumbent of this important office and is proving potent in advancing the standard of general school work in Beaver County. Mr. Ayers has been identified with educational work for virtually twenty years and has honored his chosen profession by his character, his scholarly attainments and his worthy achievement. As one of the representative citizens and valued officials of Beaver County he is specially entitled to specific recognition in this history of the state of his adoption.

    In Wayne County, Illinois, Mr. Ayers was born on the 9th of April, 1874, and the place of his nativity was far from being one of sumptuous order, though it was a true home in which comfort and refinement were in evidence,— a log house of the pioneer type being at the time the parental domicile on one of the excellent farms of the county mentioned and the place being owned and operated by the father of the future Oklahoma pedagogue. Superintendent Ayers is a son of Robert S. and Samantha (Newman) Ayers, the former of whom was born in Gibson County, Indiana, in 1831, and the latter of whom was born in Kentucky, in 1841. Robert S. Ayers is a son of Christopher Ayers, who likewise was born in Indiana, where his parents settled in the earlier pioneer era in the history of that state. The entire active career of Robert S. Ayers has been marked by close association with the basic industries of agriculture and stock raising, in connection with which he continued his operations in Indiana until 1870, when he removed with his family to Wayne County, Illinois, where he developed and improved a valuable farm and where he is now living retired, in the city of Fairfield, the county seat, his eighty-fourth birthday anniversary having been celebrated in 1915. He was a personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, whom he accompanied on the latter's canvass during the historic Lincoln and Douglas campaign, in 1860. In 1855 was solemnized his marriage to Miss Samantha Newman, a daughter of Turner Newman, who was a native of Kentucky. Her grandfather, John Henry Newman, was a native of England and came to the United States in 1824 and settled on Duck River, Kentucky, where he purchased 2,000 acres of valley land, the original deed to this property being now in the possession of his great-grandson, Granville T. Ayers, subject of this review. Mrs. Samantha Ayers passed the closing period of her gentle and gracious life at Fairfield, Illinois, where she died in the year 1901. Of the five children the only son is he to whom this sketch is dedicated and who was the fourth in order of birth. Estella, who was born in 1856, is the wife of John McLain, and they have five children,—Homer, Lena, Orrin, Paul and Kathryn. Wilmoth, who was born in 1858, is the wife of Solon Hill and has three children,—Ayers, Earl and Katerine. Jesse May, born in 1860, is the wife of James Monroe and they have four children, Orilla, who was born in 1862, is the wife of Robert Lewis, of Louisville, Clay County, Illinois, and they have one child.

    After duly availing himself of the advantages of the public schools of Wayne County, Illinois, Granville T. Ayers completed an effective course of higher study in Hayward College, at Fairfield, that county, and at the age of twenty-two years he initiated his pedagogic career as a teacher in the public schools of his native state, where he continued his labors as an educator for a period of twelve years, during two of which he was an instructor in the Illinois State Reform School, at Pontiac.

    In 1908 Mr. Ayers came to Oklahoma and engaged in teaching in the schools of Beaver County, his services in this capacity having continued until he was elected to his present office, that of county superintendent of schools, in the autumn of 1914, since which time he has worked with characteristic zeal and efficiency in the broader field of educational activity. He is a stalwart supporter of the cause of the republican party, is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Christian Church.

    On the 22d of October, 1914, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ayers to Miss Mary White, who had been a popular teacher in the schools of Clay County, Illinois for eight years prior to her marriage. Mrs. Ayers was born in Posey County, Indiana, on the 20th of September, 1885, and in the same county were born her parents, Joseph and Mary (Montgomery) White. Mr. and Mrs. Ayers represent a distinct intellectual and moral force in their home community and also are zealous in the furtherance of high civic ideals and all things that make for the educational, moral and material welfare of their home city and county, where their circle of friends is coincident with that of their acquaintances, Mrs. Ayers being a leader in church and social activities at Beaver.

    [Source: “A STANDARD HISTORY OF OKLAHOMA” Volume V; By Joseph B. Thoburn; Copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    BELL, JESSE WILLIAM

    Since he was seventeen years of age Jesse William Bell has found a sphere of usefulness and honorable activity as a citizen in Oklahoma. He prospered as a farmer, and has also been in mercantile activities and is publisher of one of the leading papers of the county, and at the present time is serving as postmaster of LaKemp.

    He was born in a log house on a farm in Franklin County, Missouri, April 8, 1881, a son of William Lafayette and Amy Lee (Farrar) Bell, both of whom were natives of the same county. His grandparents were Russell and Elizabeth (Caldwell) Bell. Russell Bell was a Confederate soldier during the Civil war, and was captain of a company in the army commanded by General Sterling Price. William Lafayette Bell was born August 20, 1854, and died in Cleveland County, Oklahoma, September 29, 1902. His life was spent as a farmer, and in 1898 he came to Oklahoma and his closing years were spent in this state. On June 12, 1873, he married Amy Lee Farrar, who was born in Franklin County, Missouri, July 31, 1854, and is now living at LaKemp. Her parents were Jesse P. and Mary (Bullock) Farrar. He was born in Missouri and she in Ohio. William L. Bell and wife were the parents of eleven children, five sons and six daughters, nine of whom are still living: Edward Russell, who was born April 23, 1874, and is now a farmer in Beaver County, was married in 1896 to Susie E. Hethcock; Birtie E., born February 6, 1876, married in 1908 Samuel McGrath and they now live at Seattle, Washington; Mollie Virginia, born July 12, 1878, in Texas, was married in 1895 to Marion F. Hethcock and they live on a farm in Beaver County; the fourth in age is Jesse William; Thomas Franklin was born September 21, 1884, and lives at May, Washington; Minnie Pearl, born May 18, 1886, and was married in 1912 to Bruce Eslick, and they live in Montana; Drusie was born in 1888 and died in 1891; Arthur Lafayette, born March 5, 1891, died January 9, 1916; Ollie Clinton, born November 3, 1893, is now a farmer in Baca County, Colorado; Sylvia Mabel, born September 24, 1897, was married in 1915 to Howard Gordon, who is a farmer in Baca County, Colorado; Girtie Lee was born February 3, 1901, and is now with her mother.

    Jesse W. Bell is the type of citizen who makes the best of his opportunities wherever he finds them. His early life was spent on his father's farm in Franklin County, Missouri, and he had a public school education. In 1898 he came to Oklahoma with his parents, and in 1907 he located a tract of government land in Beaver County two miles east of the present Town of LaKemp. He still owns that land and has increased it by considerable other valuable holdings in the country district of the county. In 1912 leaving the farm Mr. Bell engaged in the drug business at the new Town of LaKemp, and in the same year he bought the LaKemp Mirror, of which he was editor and publisher until February, 1915, when he removed the plant to Beaver, the county seat, and changed the name of the paper to the Democrat. It is now published under the incorporated title of the Enterprise Publishing Company, of which Mr. Bell is secretary and treasurer. Mr. Bell was appointed postmaster of LaKemp August 23, 1914, and is giving a very efficient administration of that office. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Masons and with the Modern Woodmen of America, and politically his actions have always been in line with the democratic party. On February 14, 1904, at Tecumseh, Oklahoma, he married Miss Dora May Little, who was born on a farm in Hickory County, North Carolina, August 23, 1887, a daughter of F. P. and Elizabeth (Little) Little, both of whom were natives of North Carolina. The Little family came to Oklahoma in 1901, when Mrs. Bell was about fourteen years of age and located in Pottawatomie County. Mr. and Mrs. Bell have four children: Jesse Charles, born September 13, 1908; Edith Lee, born June 30, 1911; Irl Clinton, born August 3, 1913; and Thelma Elizabeth, born October 27, 1915.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    BOYER, ORR J.

    In the years to come when the pioneer activities in Beaver County are thrown into a stronger relief, the name of O. J. Boyer will be recalled for its early associations with the settlement and development of that county, and particularly with the business and civic life of the Town of LaKemp. In 1915 at the first election after the incorporation of that town, he was chosen treasurer.

    He came with his parents to Beaver County in 1906 and located on a claim of Government land one mile west of the present Town of LaKemp. O. J. Boyer was born on a farm in Van Buren County, Iowa, January 11, 1884, a son of Benjamin O. and Martha E. (Fine) Boyer. His father, who was born in Ohio May 22, 1854, has spent his active career as a farmer and on coming to Oklahoma in 1905 also proved up a claim of Government land in Beaver County. In 1883 he married Miss Martha E. Fine, who was born in Missouri April 27, 1862, a daughter of Doctor Fine, also a native of that state. To their union were born four children, two sons and two daughters, as follows: Orr J.; Dorr, who was born September 10, 1886, and is now a farmer in Beaver County, married in 1911 Eva Fogel, a native of Illinois, and their one child is Verlin Elmer; Beulah, born December 5, 1890, was married in 1908 to Oliver B. Hummer, a native of McLouth, Kansas, and their children are Goldie and Emmett; Gladys Elizabeth, who was born April 20, 1905.

    Orr J. Boyer was reared and educated in Iowa, attending the public schools at Farmington. He had a practical training on his father's farm, and was ready to make an independent career when he came to Oklahoma in 1905. After proving up his claim in Beaver County he applied himself to business affairs as manager in 1911 of a lumber yard at LaKemp conducted by the York-Key Lumber Corporation. He had charge of this yard until it was closed on July 1, 1913. He then entered the LaKemp State Bank, as bookkeeper, and was assistant cashier when he severed his active connection with the institution, though he is still a director. Mr. Boyer is now at the head of a prosperous business handling real estate, farm loans and insurance.

    Politically he is a democrat, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In February, 1910, at Farmington, Iowa, he married Miss Ida Spurgeon, a daughter of Samuel and Matilda Spurgeon. Mrs. Boyer was born at Bonaparte, Iowa, March 29, 1881. They are the parents of two children: Charles Arthur, born at LaKemp, Oklahoma, August 19, 1911; and Blanche Elizabeth, born December 6, 1912, at LaKemp.

    [SOURCE: A STANDARD HISTORY OF OKLAHOMA; VOLUME IV; JOSEPH B. THOBURN; 1916; TRANSCRIBED BY ANDALEEN WHITNEY]

    BRAIDWOOD, THOMAS P.

    In 1887, about two years prior to the formal opening of Oklahoma Territory to white settlement, Mr. Braidwood came to the neutral strip of country then known as No Man s Land and became one of the influential figures in defining the government and instituting the development of this region that now includes a number of the most prosperous and progressive counties in the western part of the state. He established his residence in old Beaver City and there opened and conducted the first hardware store, operations having been continued in the original building until the same was destroyed by a cyclone that swept the locality on the 31st of March, 1892. In the year that marked his arrival in this new frontier region Mr. Braidwood became one of the organizers of the Territory of Cimarron, and he served as a member of the Territorial Senate. In 1888 he was chosen territorial secretary, and of this office he continued the incumbent until the territorial organization was dissolved by the opening of Oklahoma Territory to settlement, as duly recorded in the direct historical department of this publication.

    In 1890 when old Beaver County, including the present day counties of Beaver, Texas and Cimarron, was organized Mr. Braidwood was appointed county clerk by Hon. George W. Steele, then Governor of Oklahoma Territory. In the ensuing popular election, in 1891, he was duly chosen the incumbent of this office, in which he served two years. He then returned to his former home at Leavenworth, Kansas, where he remained until 1897 when he came again to Oklahoma and resumed his residence in Beaver County. In 1902 he was elected representative of Beaver and Woodward counties in the lower house of the Territorial Legislature, in which he served one term and did much to further the best interests of his constituent district, besides taking loyal and effective part in legislation for the benefit of the territory at large. In 1905 he served as journal clerk of the Legislature. In 1907, the year of the admission of Oklahoma as one of the sovereign states of the Union, Mr. Braidwood was appointed United States Commissioner for western Oklahoma, and of this Federal office he has since continued the efficient incumbent, his residence being maintained in the Village of Beaver, judicial center of the county of the same name. He has been foremost in all activities tending to promote the civic and material advancement of his home town and county, and in 1888 he served as mayor of old Beaver City, no other pioneer of this now opulent section of the state being better known or held in higher popular esteem. Mr. Braidwood has reclaimed and improved one of the large and valuable stock ranches of Beaver County, is still the owner of this property and on the same he maintained his residence for a period of eleven years. He has proved one of the strong, vigilant and resourceful pioneers and upbuilders of western Oklahoma and his name shall ever merit high place on the historical records of this section of the state.

    Mr. Braidwood was born in the city of Albany, New York, on the 24th of March, 1855, and his father, Thomas L. Braidwood was born at Utica, that state, on the 3d of May, 1820, his death having occurred in Beaver County, Oklahoma, on the 1st of May, 1900, only two days prior to his eightieth birthday anniversary. Thomas L. Braidwood was reared and educated in the old Empire State, where he learned the trade of iron moulder and where he continued his residence until 1871, when he removed with his family to Kansas and became one of the pioneer settlers of Cowley County, where he entered claim to and settled upon a tract of government land. He instituted the development of this land and eventually perfected his title to the property. He continued to reside upon his pioneer homestead until 1875, when he removed to Leavenworth, that state, and became superintendent of a stove foundry. With this industrial enterprise he continued to be thus identified until 1889, when he came to Beaver County, Oklahoma, and resumed operations as an agriculturist and stock grower, with which lines of enterprise he here continued to be identified until his death, both he and his wife having been persons of superior intellectual powers and of sterling character, their worthy lives and worthy deeds having gained to them the good will and high esteem of all with whom they came in contact. In the State of New York was solemnized the marriage of Thomas L. Braidwood to Miss Marian Burgess, who was born in the City of Glasgow, Scotland, on the 11th of November, 1818, and who was thus an infant at the time of her parents' immigration to the United States in 1820. She was reared and educated in the State of New York and survived her honored husband by exactly two years, she having been summoned to the life eternal on the 3d of May, 1902, in Beaver County, Oklahoma. The marriage of this loved pioneer couple was solemnized at West Troy, New York, on the 6th day of July, 1844, and after a period of nearly sixty years their devoted companionship was severed by the death of Mr. Braidwood. They became the parents of four sons and two daughters, concerning whom the following brief data are entered: James was born April 6, 1845, and died on the 15th of September of the following year. John Burgess was born September 5, 1846, and now resides in Albany, New York. He married Miss Caroline VanGuysling, on the 25th of December, 1870, and her death occurred in 1885, their surviving children being James A., born October 12, 1871, and John Burgess, Jr., born September 5, 1874. James Liddell was born September 25, 1848, and was drowned in the Arkansas River, at a point near Muskogee, Indian Territory, on the 10th of May, 1871. Marian E., who was born at Albany, New York, on the 10th of June, 1851, was married July 4, 1874, to Charles C. Black, and they became the parents of four children: Charlotte, Marian E., Francis and Charles B., all of whom are living except the first born. Thomas P., whose name introduces this article, was the next in order of birth. Anna J., who was born March 13, 1858, became, on the 31st of March, 1875, the wife of William M. Allison, and of their six children Howard and Robert died in infancy, as did also Nina, the three surviving being William A., born August 1, 1878; Marian, born in February, 1879, died in 1907; and Anna, born May 18, 1883. Mrs. Allison died July 6, 1892, at Chandler, Oklahoma, and her husband, who was a pioneer newspaper man, both in Southern Kansas and in Oklahoma, now resides at Snyder, Oklahoma, where he is serving as postmaster.

    Thomas P. Braidwood acquired his early education in the public schools of his native city, the capital of the State of New York, and was a lad of about sixteen years when he accompanied his parents on their immigration to Kansas, in 1871. After his father assumed the superintendency of the stove foundry at Leavenworth, that state, Mr. Braidwood was employed twelve years as a moulder in the establishment, and he thus continued to be engaged until his removal to what is now the State of Oklahoma, in 1887, as noted in detail in former paragraphs of this article.

    Mr. Braidwood is aligned as a stalwart advocate of the political principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor, has received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite in the time-honored Masonic fraternity, and is affiliated also with the Knights of Pythias.

    At Leavenworth, Kansas, on the 6th of June, 1877, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Braidwood to Miss Josie A. Warner, who was born at Delavan, Tazewell County, Illinois, on the 10th day of July, 1855, a daughter of Alexander and Almira (Dossett) Warner, the former a native of England and the latter of Illinois. Mrs. Braidwood received a collegiate education and for three years prior to her marriage she was a successful teacher in the pioneer schools of Crawford County, Kansas. She died in the City of Leavenworth, that state, on the 12th of June, 1897, and of her two children the elder is living,—Thomas C., who was born at Leavenworth, Kansas, September 3, 1878, and resides at Beaver, Oklahoma. He married Miss Edith Hoover, a native of Kansas, on the 10th of April, 1913. Lottie, the younger of the two children of Thomas P. and Josie A. (Warner) Braidwood, was born November 26, 1880, and died in infancy.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    BURFORD, JOHN H.

    A large and benignant influence has been exerted by Judge Burford in connection with the development and progress of the State of Oklahoma, to which he has given distinguished service, not only as a lawyer and jurist, but also as a legislator and as a citizen of broad views and vigorous public spirit. He served for ten years as chief justice of the Supreme Court of Oklahoma Territory, and as such administered the oath to the members of the constitutional convention, which framed the constitution, the adoption of which gained for Oklahoma admission into the Union as a state. To him is ascribed leadership in the movement that gained to the twin territories admission as a sovereign state. He was the first president of the Oklahoma City Commercial Club and as such issued the call which resulted in the first joint statehood convention held by the two territories. He represented the Twelfth Senatorial District in the Oklahoma Legislature during the Fourth and Fifth General Assemblies. The judge is essentially one of the distinguished members of the Oklahoma bar, is consistently to be designated as a pioneer citizen, and his character and services have given him inviolable place in the confidence and esteem of the people of this vigorous young commonwealth.

    Judge Burford was born in Parke County, Indiana, on the 29th of February, 1852, and is a son of Rev. James Burford, who was a native of Indiana, and a descendant of Elijah Hastings Burford, of English, Scotch and Welsh ancestry, who emigrated from Oxfordshire County, England, and settled in Amherst County, Virginia, in August, 1713. This family gave to the nation a gallant patriot soldier in the War of the Revolution. Rev. James Burford was a prominent member of the clergy of the Baptist Church in Indiana, where he held various pastoral charges and where he continued to reside until his death. Judge Burford's great grandfather, Daniel Burford. was a pioneer settler of Fort Harrod, Mercer County, Kentucky, where he reared a large family, developed a large landed estate and was prominent in the civic and material progress of the community.

    Like many other able representatives of the legal profession, Judge Burford found the days of his childhood and youth compassed by the conditions and influences of the farm, and his early education was acquired in the schools of his native state. In 1874, he was graduated in the University of Indiana, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and thereafter he took effective post graduate law courses, besides having been for a time a student and assistant in the law offices of Judge D. V. Burns, of Indianapolis. From the capitol city of Indiana, he removed to Crawfordsville, the judicial center of Montgomery County that state, where he initiated his independent career as a lawyer and where he became an intimate friend of the distinguished soldier and author, Gen. Lew Wallace, and also of the brilliant Indiana novelist, Maurice Thompson.

    At Crawfordsville, Judge Burford soon gained professional prestige and success, and there he served for two terms as prosecuting attorney of the Twenty-second Judicial Circuit of the state. He early became active in the affairs of the republican party in his native commonwealth, and as a member of its state central committee in 1888, was a vigorous and effective champion of Gen. Benjamin Harrison in the latter's campaign for the presidency of the United States, he having taken" a loyal part in effecting the nomination and election of his distinguished and honored fellow Hoosier.

    In 1890, Judge Burford came to Oklahoma Territory, and soon afterwards he was appointed, by Governor George W. Steele, the first Probate judge of Beaver County, in the region formerly designated as '' No Man's Land.'' His incumbency of this office continued two days, at the expiration of which he resigned and located in Oklahoma City, where shortly afterwards he assumed the office of Register of the United States Land Office, a position to which he was appointed by President Harrison. Of this post he continued the incumbent until March, 1892, when he was appointed by President Harrison associate justice of the Supreme Court, to succeed Hon. Abram J. Seay, who had resigned to accept appointment to the office of governor of the territory, as successor of Governor Steele, who had resigned. As an associate justice of the Supreme Court, Judge Burford was assigned to the Second District, which embraced the western part of the territory, and he accordingly removed to El Reno, in order to reside within the judicial district for which he was appointed. He continued his services on the Supreme bench for a period of four years and four months, three years of which were under President Cleveland. He discharged the duties of this high position with such ability and efficiency, that he gained the friendship and support of Attorney General Judson Harmon, and President Cleveland over the protest of some partisan democrats, permitted Judge Burford to serve for the full term for which he was appointed. He was succeeded by Hon. John C. Tarsney, of Kansas City, and then resumed the active practice of his profession, with residence and office in El Reno.

    On the 16th of February, 1898, Judge Burford was appointed by President McKinley, to the distinguished office of chief justice of the Supreme Court of Oklahoma Territory, and was reappointed in 1902, and again in 1906 by President Roosevelt, so that he continued in tenure of this important judicial office until the two territories were combined and admitted to statehood on the 16th day of November, 1907. The judge had much influence in formulating and directing the territorial system of jurisprudence which still prevails in the state, and manifested the true judicial qualities, as well as a broad and comprehensive knowledge of law and precedent. While serving as chief justice he published thirteen volumes of Supreme Court reports, and as chairman of the board of trustees of the Territorial Library, he effected the elimination of an indebtedness of $5,000 against the library, besides increasing its collection to the notable aggregate of 15,000 volumes. One of his last official acts on the bench was in rendering the noted decision in a case in which citizens of Greer County sought to prevent the state constitutional convention from dividing that historical county or from incorporating any of its territory into other counties. The questions involved were presented by a number of the ablest lawyers in the constitutional convention on one side, and by a number of eminent lawyers on the other. In this case, Judge Burford announced the principle afterwards affirmed by the Supreme Court, that the constitutional convention was a body possessed of the highest legislative functions in the exercise of which the courts had no power or jurisdiction to interfere. Judge Burford was a member of the commission designated under the enabling act to divide the two territories into districts for the election of delegates to the constitutional convention, and was a member also of the canvassing board that declared the result of the vote on the adoption of the state constitution.

    Upon the assumption of the office of chief justice of the Territorial Supreme Court, Judge Burford established his residence in the City of Guthrie, the territorial capital, and there he for several years maintained his home. His law business is one of broad scope and importance and he has appeared in connection with many of the most celebrated cases presented in the various courts of Oklahoma during the state regime. He represented the citizens of Guthrie throughout all the legal proceedings in the courts of the state and the Supreme Court of the United States involving the removal and relocation of the state capital. He has continued a leader in the councils of the republican party in the state and in 1914 was made its unanimous nominee for United States senator, but was defeated in the general election at the polls, as was the entire republican ticket. In the meanwhile, in 1912, he was elected representative of the Twelfth District in the State Senate for the term of four years. He thus served during the Fourth and Fifth Legislative Assemblies and was a commanding figure in the work and deliberations of the upper house. In the Fourth Legislature the judge was chairman of the committee on Federal relations, and a member also of judiciary committee No. 1, as well as of the committees on banks and banking, and revenue and taxation. In this session he was the author of a bill abolishing the county high school of Logan County; a bill abolishing the Superior Court of the same county, and a bill providing the system by which vacancies in the Legislature should be filled. He was elected on a platform pledging him to champion vigorously the cause of Guthrie in its efforts to become again the state capital, but his earnest efforts were inadequate to overcome the strong opposition put forth in behalf of Oklahoma City.

    In the Fifth Legislature Judge Burford was chairman of the Senate Committee on Military Affairs and held membership also on the committees of ways and means, legal advisory, revenue and taxation, public service corporations, banks and banking, Federal relations, constitution and constitutional amendments, mines and manufacturing, legislative and judicial apportionment and commerce and labor. He was specially influential in the furtherance of measures to conserve greater economy in the administration of the various departments of .government of the state, in abolishing a number of offices, in promoting more efficient public service, and in his efforts to divorce the judicial system of the state from politics. He introduced a bill requiring that judges should be elected on a separate ballot from that of other officials, and also a bill defining the status of the bank guaranty fund and providing for the administration of this fund. High-minded civic loyalty, great circumspection and thorough familiarity with constitutional law and with governmental policies, made Judge Burford one of the most valuable of legislators, and his record in the Senate, as well as on the bench has become an integral and important part of the history of Oklahoma, a state which he has honored and which has in turn conferred upon him high honors. At the expiration of the regular session of the Fifth Legislative Assembly in March, 1915, Judge Burford resigned his position as state senator for Logan County, and took up his residence in Oklahoma City, where he is actively engaged in the practice of his profession as senior member of the firm of Burford, Robertson &- Hoffman.

    In the City of Indianapolis, Indiana, on St. Valentine's day in the centennial year. February 14, 1876, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Burford to Miss Mary A. Cheek, to whom have been born one son, Frank Braden. who is now referee in bankruptcy for the Western Federal District of Oklahoma, and who is engaged in the practice of law at Guthrie. He was graduated in the Guthrie High School, received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the University of Kansas, and completed thereafter a course in the law department of the historic old University of Virginia at Charlottesville, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws.

    While Judge Burford has always taken an interest in political affairs, and has been looked to by republicans as one or the leaders, he has never been a partisan and abhors the title of politician. He has been honored by the members of his profession as president of the State Bar Association and delegate to the American Bar Association, and is a member of the Commercial Law league. He has been loyal to the profession and has persistently been active in endeavors to raise the standard of professional ethics. He has at all times been the champion of the courts, and has openly denounced any attacks upon the integrity or good faith of the judiciary.

    One of Judge Burford's chief characteristics has been his pronounced interest in the progress and success of young men, and especially young lawyers, many of whom he has assisted and specially befriended.

    [Source: A Standard History of Oklahoma Volume 4 By Joseph Bradfield Thoburn - Submitted by a Friend of Free Genealogy]

    CARSON, WILLIAM FRANK

    William F. Carson. A prominent and successful representative of real estate and loan business in western Oklahoma is Mr. Carson, who maintains his residence at Beaver, judicial center of the county of the same name, where he is in charge of the office and business of the Renfrew Investment Company, the headquarters of which are in the City of Woodward. On other pages of this work is given a review of the career of the president of this important company, Rufus O. Renfrew, and to that article reference may be made for further information concerning the company and its extensive operations.

    William Frank Carson, who has been a resident of Oklahoma since 1900, was born on his father's farm In Champaign County, Illinois, on the 23d of June, 1874, and is a son of William G. and Martha Jane (Bales) Carson. His father was born in Vermilion County, Indiana, in which state he was reared and educated and when, in 1855, he removed to Illinois and became one of the pioneer settlers of Champaign County, where he settled on a preemption claim which he obtained from the Government. His entire active career, marked by consecutive industry and unpretentious worth of character, was one of close identification with the great and fundamental industry of agriculture, and through his well-directed endeavors he achieved independence and definite prosperity. He was a staunch democrat of the old school and though he was ever loyal and public-spirited as a citizen he never desired or held political office. Both he and his wife early became zealous members of the Universalist Church, and he exemplified his faith in his daily life, his death having occurred in the City of Champaign, Illinois, on the 10th of November, 1906, after he had been a resident of Champaign County for a full half century.

    On the 22d of February, 1854, was solemnized the marriage of William G. Carson to Miss Martha Jane Bales, who likewise was born in Vermilion County, Indiana, the date of her nativity having been August 27, 1834, his birth having occurred in that county on the 29th of June, 1829,—dates that clearly denote that the respective families were founded in that section of the Hoosier State in the early pioneer days. Mrs. Carson, who still retains her home at Champaign, Illinois, is a daughter of Caleb and Emily (Spangler) Bales, natives of Virginia, and of her ten children—two sons and eight daughters—four daughters died in infancy,—Maria, Ella, Elizabeth and Laura. Emily Josephine, who was born December 20, 1858, became, in 1881, the wife of Eugene A. Ford, and they have four children,—Amos Carson, William Van Pelt, Martha Belle, and Eugene Bartholomew. Caleb W., who was born December 10, 1860, was reared and educated in Champaign County, Illinois, and in his native state he continued his residence until July 5, 1885, when he removed to Ashland, Kansas, where he accumulated a very large estate and where he was the largest individual taxpayer in Clark County at the time of his death, which occurred August 13, 1915. He served eight years as postmaster at Ashland, during both administrations of President Cleveland, and was a leader in the ranks of the democratic party in that section of the Sunflower State. He attained to the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite.of the Masonic fraternity, besides being affiliated with the. Mystic Shrine. In March, 1886, he wedded Miss Martha Congeleton, who survives him, as do also their four sons and one daughter,—Paul C., William G., Frank Lee, Caleb W., Jr., and Hazel Ellene. Ellen A. Carson was born August 11, 1864, was united in marriage on the 27th of February, 1890, to Hon. John I. Lee. Their only child, Irving Allen, died in infancy. Mr. Lee, who died at Cordell, Washita County, Oklahoma, on the 25th of December, 1914, was editor and publisher of the Clark County Clipper,, at Ashland, Kansas, from 1885 to 1890, and thereafter served until 1892 as clerk of the District Court of that county. From 1894 to 1898 he was register of the United States Land Office at Dodge City, Kansas, and in 1901 he came to Oklahoma Territory and engaged in the lumber and coal business at Cordell, where he passed the residue of his life. He was influential in democratic political activities in Kansas and likewise after his removal to Oklahoma. Mary Marc Carson was born August 9, 1867, and on the 20th of August, 1886, she became the wife of Dr. David P. Sims, their only child being a son, Carson, and the family home being maintained at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Miss Luvilla B. Carson, who was born January 22, 1870, remains with her widowed mother.

    William Frank Carson, the second son and yougest child in the above mentioned family, passed the period of his childhood and early youth upon the homestead farm which was the place of his birth, and after duly availing himself of the advantages of the public schools of Champaign County, Illinois, he pursued a higher course in what is now the great Valparaiso University, at Valparaiso, Indiana. He continued to be associated with the work and the management of his father's farm until 1899, when he removed to Ashland, Kansas, where he served as deputy clerk of Clark County. In that city he was thereafter associated with his only brother in the mercantile business for a period of two years, and upon coming to Oklahoma, in 1900, he established his home at Curtis, Woodward County, where he continued in the same line of enterprise four years. He had entered claim to a tract of Government land in that county and in 1904 he perfected his title to the property. In 1910-11 Mr. Carson held a clerical position in a mercantile establishment in the City of Woodward, and in 1912 he there assumed the position of bookkeeper in the head office of the Renfrew investment Company. In October of the same year he was assigned to the management of the company's office at Beaver, where he has since continued the alert and efficient incumbent of this position, in which he has done much to extend the business controlled from this office.

    Mr. Carson is found aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the democratic party, is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, and both he and his wife are specially zealous and valued members of the Presbyterian Church at Beaver, in the Sunday School of which he has served three years as superintendent. It is worthy of incidental note that this is the oldest exclusively Presbyterian Church in the state, its organization having been effected in 1886, when Beaver County was still a part of the region commonly designated as No Man's Land,—prior to the creation of Oklahoma Territory. Mr. Carson is secretary of the Beaver Gospel Team, and also secretary of the Beaver County Sunday School Association.

    At Reinbeek, Grundy County, Iowa, on the 14th of April, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Carson to Miss Grace B. Klein, daughter of Herman E. and Katherine (Kline) Klein, both natives of Iowa, where their respective parents settled in the early pioneer days. Mrs. Carson was born on her father's homestead farm in Grundy County, Iowa, on the 4th of September, 1876, and in her youth she received excellent educational advantages, through the medium of which she prepared herself for service in the pedagogic profession. For eight years prior to her marriage she was a successful and popular teacher in the schools of her native state and in Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Carson have five children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here noted: Francis Klein, March 26, 1902; Ellen Belva, June 1, 1905; Ernest Lee, September 1, 1906; Willis Spangler, July 26, 1910; and Luvilla Grace, July 22, 1912.

    [Source: “A STANDARD HISTORY OF OKLAHOMA” Volume V; By Joseph B. Thoburn; Copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    DEGRAW, CORREL C.

    CORREL C. DEGRAW. The present court clerk of Beaver County, one of the most popular residents of that section of the state, is an original Oklahoma eighty-niner, though he was only a child at the time. The DeGraw family settled in Kingfisher County, and its members have been closely associated with developments here for more than a quarter of a century. The DeGraw family came to Oklahoma from Kansas. Correl C. DeGraw was born in a stone house on a farm in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, July 26, 1879, a son of Byron and Anna (Bothsell) DcGraw. His father was born in 1847 in Iowa, a son of Joseph and Jane DeGraw, the former a native of Canada and the latter of Pennsylvania. Byron DeGraw has been a farmer all his life, combining that occupation with stock raising. He went from Iowa to Kansas in 1872, lived in Pottawatomie County a number of years, and in 1883 moved to Stafford County, where he was engaged in farming until the notable year of 1889. Though he was not a participant in the grand opening of Oklahoma, he arrived in August, about four months after the opening, and secured a tract of government land in Kingfisher County near the present City of Hennessey. That was his home for eight years, and he is now engaged in farming in Dewey County. Miss Anna Bothsell, whom he married in 1876, was born September 22, 1852, at Quincy, Illinois, a daughter of Joseph Bothsell, also a native of Illinois. Mrs. DeGraw died August 17, 1897, at Hennessey, Oklahoma. There were seven children, four sons and three daughters, mentioned briefly as follows: Correl C.; Joseph Parks, born January 10, 1881, now a farmer in Beaver County; Guy, born August 20, 1884, a farmer in Blaine County, Oklahoma; Flossie, born December 23, 1887, married in 1903, John Dugan, and they now live in Blaine County; Ionia, born December 23, 1889, and died January 2 1890; Bessie, born March 3, 1893, who was married 1914, and lived in Kansas City, Missouri; Rector, born March 15, 1895, and now engaged in farming in Dewie County.

    Correl C. DeGraw was ten years of age when he came to Oklahoma with his parents. His subsequent education was obtained from the public schools of Hennessey, as his early youth was surrounded by the conditions typical of an Oklahoma farm during the decade of the '90s. In 1904 Mr. DeGraw took the Civil service examination the Indian school service, and soon afterward was appointed an industrial teacher at the Pierre Indian Schools in Pierre, South Dakota. He remained in the work in South Dakota for three years. In 1907, having returned to Oklahoma, he located at Beaver, and engaged in merchandising. In 1911 he bought a farm two miles north of Beaver, and that is where he now makes his home.

    For a number of years he has taken an active part in republican politics, and it was on the republican ticket that he was chosen to his present office. In 1912 he was appointed clerk of the County Court of Beaver County an office he held two years. In 1914 he was elected court clerk of the same county. He is a member of the Masonic Order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

    On August 1, 1900, at Watonga, Oklahoma, Mr. DeGraw married Miss Laura Boston, who was born September 21, 1882, in Johnson County, Missouri, a daughter of James W. and Eva (Thistle) Boston, both of them natives of St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. DeGraw are the parents of three children, two sons and one daughter, namely Correl James, born May 14, 1901, at O'Keene, Oklahoma; Alva Byron, born September 11, 1904, at O'Keene and Fern, born July 10, 1910, at Beaver.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    DETWILER, WILLIAM LEWIS

    William Lewis Detwiler is a veteran westerner, having lived in several of the states beyond the Mississippi for forty years. His early career was that of a railroad man, and he was in the railroad service during the Civil war. He was one of the early settlers and homesteaders in the Oklahoma Panhandle country and is now engaged in the real estate and loan business at Knowles in Beaver County.

     His birth occurred at Pottstown, Pennsylvania, October 1, 1844. His parents, William H. and Mary (Longabaugh) Detwiler, were born in Pennsylvania of German stock. William L. was the first of their five children. John Barton is now deceased; Mary Jane is the wife of Joseph Perkins; Laura is the wife of Rev. John Gallagher; Josephine is the wife of Fred Clinton.

    The early life of W. L. Detwiler was spent in Wheeling, West Virginia, where he attended the local schools. That was before West Virginia was a state. At the age of seventeen he took up railroading, entering the service of that pioneer railroad, the Baltimore & Ohio, and during the Civil war was advanced to the position of a conductor. He followed railroading actively both in the East and West for twenty years. His home has been in the West since 1876, and in that year he conducted the first passenger train running west of Lincoln, Nebraska, over the Burlington Railroad. For a number of years he also followed prospecting for gold in the Rocky Mountains.

    Mr. Detwiler came to Oklahoma in 1900, locating on a tract of Government land in Beaver County. That land is still in his possession and has been greatly improved from the condition in which he first found it. He has employed his energies and capital in cattle raising, farming and also in selling real estate, and his operations as a real estate man included participation in the founding of the Town of Knowles, where he now has his office. A democrat in politics, he has never been a candidate for office, though he has done much in the way of local betterment in his home town. Mr. Detwiler is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a Mystic Shriner, and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias.

    In 1886, at Linneus, Missouri, he married Miss Martin A. Dail, a native of Linn County, Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Detwiler have no children of their own, but adopted a son, Chester, who was born in 1898.

    Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    DICKSON, ALBERT S.

    Coming in 1886 to that section of neutral strip in Indian Territory that was at the time commonly known as No Man's Land, Mr. Dickson established his residence at Neutral City, a true frontier town of period, where he remained until Oklahoma Territory was thrown open to settlement and formally organized, its prescribed confines including the former No Man's Land, when he removed to Beaver, which was made the judicial center of the county of the same name and which originally included also the present counties of Texas and Cimarron. In this now thriving and important town of western Oklahoma he has since continued in the active and successful practice of law, and he is junior member of the representative law firm of Dickson & Dickson, in which his coadjutor is his brother, Robert E. The firm controls a specially substantial and important practice in this section of the state and its high standing at the bar of Oklahoma determines the distinctive professional ability of its members and their secure place in popular confidence and good will.

    On the paternal homestead farm in Andrew County, Missouri, a log house of the pioneer type figured as the stately domicile in which Albert S. Dickson was born, and the date of his nativity was February 1, 1867. He is a son of Benjamin Franklin Dickson and Anna (Van Deventer) Dickson, whose marriage was solemnized in that state in the year 1860.

    Benjamin F. Dickson was born in Boone County, Missouri, in 1826, his parents having been pioneers of that county, where they established their home on their emigration from their native State of Kentucky. He was reared to adult age in his home county and as a young man he removed to the northwestern part of Missouri, where he passed the remainder of his life as an energetic, progressive and duly successful farmer. He died in Andrew County in 1892, when about sixty-six years of age, and his wife survived him by a number of years. She was born in Missouri and was a daughter of Granville and Ursula (Clark) Van Deventer, her father having been a scion of the historic old Van Deventer family of Lee County, Virginia. Benjamin P. and Anna (Van Deventer) Dickson became the parents of three sons and two daughters, concerning whom the following brief record is given: Alexander Jackson, born in 1861, is now a prosperous agriculturist and stock-grower of Beaver County, Oklahoma. In 1886 he wedded Miss Belle Baker and they have one child, Anna. Robert, who was born in 1864, was afforded the advantage of Avalon College, at Avalon, Missouri, and is now senior member of the law firm of Dickson & Dickson, as previously noted. He was the first regularly elected county attorney of Beaver County and since his retirement from that office he has been associated with his brother Albert S. in the practice of law at Beaver. He whose name initiates this article, was the third in order of birth of the five children. Lucy D., who was born in 1869, was educated in the Missouri State Normal School at Strasburg and in 1896 became the wife of Godfrey Stegman, their home being in the City of St. Joseph, Missouri, and their only child being a daughter, Elsie. Bell, who was born in 1872, is the youngest of the children. In 1899 she became the wife of Hugh A. Ellingsworth and they now maintain their home at Helena, Missouri. They have one child, Everetta.

    Albert S. Dickson passed the period of his childhood and early youth on the old homestead farm and is indebted to the public schools of Andrew County, Missouri, for his preliminary education, which was effectively supplemented by a course of higher study in Avalon College, at Avalon, that state. In the meanwhile he had given much attention to the reading of law, with the intention of eventually entering the legal profession.

    In August, 1886, Mr. Dickson came to the Indian Territory and, as previously stated, established his residence at Neutral City, in "No Man's Land," where he remained until 1890, when he removed to Beaver. In the following year he was admitted to the bar of Oklahoma Territory and since that time he has continued in the practice of his profession at Beaver, as one of the representative pioneer lawyers and a valued citizen of Beaver County. Though he takes a deep and loyal interest in public affairs and is a staunch advocate of the principles of the republican party, he has never sought or held political office, as he considers his profession worthy of his undivided allegiance. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and both he and his wife hold membership in the Christian Church at Beaver.

    At Liberal, Kansas, on the 29th of January, 1910, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Dickson to Miss Edna Humphrey, who was born near Trenton, Missouri, on the 27th of September, 1884, and who is a daughter of Clark and Emma Humphrey, likewise natives of Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Dickson have one child, Albert DeWitt, born September 24, 1913.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    GAY, EXTUS LEROY

    EXTUS LEROY GAY was born in Ohio the year 1862, during the troublous days of the Civil War. His death occurred October 28, 1928, at his home in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. In 1891 Mr. Gay was married to Miss Alice Crawmer in Wichita, Kansas, moving shortly afterwards to El Reno, Oklahoma, where he established the El Reno Democrat. He first came to Oklahoma in 1889, locating in No Man’s Land, the Oklahoma Pan Handle, now Beaver County. He served during the first and second Territorial Legislature as chief clerk. During his residence in the state of Oklahoma he had control of several Democratic papers at different times, all of which were strong advocates of democracy. Mr. Gay was a useful citizen of the state and community, always actively engaged in the interest of affairs looking to the betterment of conditions generally. Mr. Gay is survived by his wife and one daughter, Miss Leah, two sons, Thurman of Wichita, Kansas; and Elgin, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Funeral services were conducted from the Johnson Chapel Sunday afternoon at three o’clock, Rev. Robert Lehew, former pastor of the local Methodist Church, assisted by Rev. W. A. Erwin.

    E. L. GAY. The pioneer newspaper enterprise at Pawhuska was the establishment of the Osage Journal of which E. L. Gay became editor in 1904, when Pawhuska had very little claim to the business activities and improvements of a town or city. Not only in the newspaper field but in other affairs Mr. Gay's life has been one of varied and interesting experience. He is one of the original Oklahomans, and in fact can claim membership in that goodly company of enterprising men who were denominated as "sooners." He and his family had many interesting associations with frontier life in the Southwest, and there are few who possess in their memory a greater fund of information concerning Oklahoma history than this Pawhuska editor.

    Born in Hillsdale County, Michigan, October 12, 1862, E. L. Gay is one of a family of six sons and two daughters, all of whom grew up and are all living except one. He was the fifth in order of age. His parents were Charles H. and Catherine (Fulton) Gay. His grandfather was William H. Gay, who was born in Scotland and was brought to America when a child. About 1830 he settled in Michigan, and in 1852 was appointed United States Indian agent for the Wyandotte tribe at the Wyandotte Agency located near where Kansas City, Kansas, now stands. He held that post until 1856. In that year he and his son James were making a trip from the Indian agency to Fort Leavenworth. While going up the river they were halted by a band of horsemen, and were questioned as to their attitude toward the then critical question of whether Kansas should be admitted as a slave or free state. William H. Gay, it should be remembered, was a Scotchman, and possessed all the courage of his convictions. He expressed himself decisively in favor of making a free state of Kansas, and the words were hardly out of his mouth when he was shot down and killed, while his son was severely wounded. William H. Gay was a real frontier character, and in the early days had made a couple of trips to Texas in the interests of the government, and while there formed a great friendship with Governor Houston. Charles H. Gay, who was born in New York State in 1825, was one of three children, two sons and a daughter, his brother being James H. Gay, already mentioned as the companion of their father at the time of the latter's death, Charles H. Gay spent most of his active career in Southern Michigan and Northern Ohio. He was a millwright by trade in early life but in later years took up the profession of law and became one of the noted young jurists of that section. He married Catherine Fulton, who was of the same family as the noted inventor, Robert Fulton. She died at Pioneer, Ohio, in 1884. At their home in the same place and in the same house Charles H. Gay passed away in 1903.

    The early life of E. L. Gay brought him into close touch with the actualities of existence, and he had a hard struggle to gain the education which his ambition craved. He lost his mother in the spring of 1884, when he was twenty-two years of age, and up to that time he had kept quite close to the old homestead. He attended high school at Pioneer, Ohio, and for one year was a student in the Valparaiso Normal School in Indiana. In order to pay his way through school he taught, beginning when he was seventeen years of age, and continued alternately as a teacher and student for five years. His practice was to teach the short winter terms and attend school himself the rest of the year. In 1884, after the death of his mother Mr. Gay went to Kansas City, Kansas, and taught in the Wyandotte County public schools one year, but from there went to Western Kansas and identified himself with the exciting incidents of the frontier. He was also in Texas and for a time was in that region described in the old geographies as "No Man's Land" of Indian Territory. In the spring of 1887 he was in the Panhandle of Texas, looking after a herd of cattle. From there he returned to No Man's Land and in 1889 began the publication of the Tribune at Beaver City. Mr. Gay was closely identified with that movement which is an important chapter in any history of Oklahoma for the erection of a local government in the Panhandle of Oklahoma, and was a member of the first provisional council that adopted a plan of government for '' provisional territory of Cimarron." He was also elected to one of the proposed territorial officers as district attorney. Mr. Gay published the Tribune at Beaver City for about a year. In the meantime he had received an appointment as chief clerk in the first Territorial Legislature of Oklahoma, and spent five months at Guthrie, the capital, during that session. After leaving Beaver City he moved to El Reno and bought the Oklahoma Democrat in that city, which had just been started. He conducted this journal as a partnership for two or three years, and in the meantime had participated in the opening of the Cheyenne and Arapaho lands. Subsequently for one year Mr. Gay conducted the Evening News at Shawnee, and during the boom times that followed railroad construction identified himself with Holdenville. He also lived at Tulsa for a time, and in 1904 came to Pawhuska for the definite purpose of establishing a paper. He was one of the organizers of the Osage Journal Company, and has edited this prominent and influential weekly democratic paper ever since. When Mr. Gay first came to Pawhuska there was not a foot of sidewalk in the town, and not a single brick building. He has used the influence of his paper and has worked as an individual citizen for everything tending to the betterment of his town and has been one of the real factors in its advancement.

    In politics he has been a lifelong democrat. He was not only clerk in the first but also in the second Territorial Legislature of Oklahoma, In the early days and while a resident of No Man's Land he held a commission as Deputy United States Marshal under J. J. Dickerson when the federal court of the second Texas District was supposed to have jurisdiction over that country. As such officer he was instrumental in bringing to trial the participants in the Wild Horse Lake massacre which occurred in the central part of that country.

    Fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Homesteaders and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

    While engaged in the newspaper business at El Reno he was married to Alice Crawmer at Wichita, Kansas, on November 26, 1891. Four children have been born to their union, one of them, Eugene Fenton, dying in infancy. Those living are: Leah Frances, Elgin Crawmer and Allen G. Thurman.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    HEALY, GEORGE H.

    In point of continuous residence this honored member of the Beaver County Bar is to be consistently designated as the oldest citizen of the county, and in addition to this interesting feature of pioneer prestige he holds secure place as one of the representative members of the legal profession in this section of the state, and as a citizen whose influence and co-operation have been potent in connection with civic and material progress in western Oklahoma. He is engaged in the practice of his profession in the Town of Beaver, the county seat, has held various offices of distinctive public trust, including that of county judge, and became a resident of what is now the State of Oklahoma more than thirty years ago, so that he gained varied experience in connection with frontier life in old Indian Territory.

    Judge Healy is a scion of a New England colonial family of English lineage and personally takes due pride in adverting to the old Pine Tree State as the place of his nativity. He was born in the Village of China, Kennebec County, Maine, on the 30th of May, 1857, and is a son of William H. and Ellen (Breck) Healy, both likewise natives of that state. Reared and educated in Maine, William H. Healy achieved success and prominence in New England as a tanner and an exporter and importer of leather and hides. He developed an extensive business, in connection with which he maintained tanneries and warehouses both in Boston and New York. His operations in this field of enterprise continued until 1875, when he removed with his family to Texas, where he engaged in the cattle business on a large scale, besides which, in line with his former business activities, he developed a proseprous business in the buying of furs from Indians and white trappers in Dakota Territory, his activities in this direction continuing from 1875 to 1879 and both of his business ventures in the West having proved very successful.

    In 1878 William H. Healy established a cattle ranch in the western part of Indian Territory,—in the neutral strip commonly designated as No Man's Land and later included in Beaver County. He continued the handling of cattle upon an extensive scale on the great open ranges of Texas and Indian Territory until his death, which occurred in 1883, and he became widely known throughout the Southwest, both as a business man of great energy and ability and as a citizen of sterling character. His marriage to Miss Ellen Breck was solemnized in his young manhood, and his wife was summoned to eternal rest in 1867, while the family home was still maintained in the East. Of their six children the first born, a daughter, died in infancy. Caroline E., who was born in 1843, has never married and maintains her home in the City of Springfield, Massachusetts. William H., Jr., who was born in 1845, attained to distinction as one of the representative lawyers in the city of Boston and there his death occurred in 1897. Frank D., who was born in 1847, served as sheriff of Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory four years, his term having been initiated in 1894, and in 1897 he was appointed Register of the United States Land Office at Woodward, Oklahoma, a position which he retained until his death, in 1902. He established his residence in Indian Territory in 1878 and here was associated with his brother George H., of this review, in the cattle business in the early days. In 1866 he married Miss Frank B. Dow, likewise a native of China, Maine, and they are survived by three children, William, Charles and Dole. He became prominent in public affairs and political matters in Oklahoma Territory, and was a stalwart advocate of the cause of the republican party. Nathaniel G., who was born in 1849 and who remains a bachelor, is now a resident of the City of Los Angeles, California.

    George H. Healy, the youngest of the children, was graduated in an excellent private school in the city of Boston when he was seventeen years of age, and he accompanied his father on the removal to Texas, in 1875, so that virtually his entire mature life has been passed in the Southwest, where his memory links the pioneer past with the present-day era of opulent progress and prosperity, it having been his privilege to contribute a due quota to the march of advancement along both civic and industrial lines. Mr. Healy came to Indian Territory in 1880, and during the long intervening years he has maintained his home within the borders of what is now the vigorous young State of Oklahoma. He was early associated with his brother Frank in establishing a cattle ranch in the old Neutral strip in which the present Beaver County is included, and this ranch was situated on Beaver Creek, its operation having been continued by the brothers until the opening of Oklahoma Territory to settlement.

    In 1890 Judge Healy was elected the first treasurer of old Beaver County, which then included also the present counties of Texas and Cimarron, and for eight years prior to the admission of Oklahoma to statehood he served as a member of the Republican Central Committee of the Territory, his vigorous and effective cooperation having been fruitful in the advancing of the party cause during the territorial days as well as under the later regime of state government. A man of broad intellectual keen and mature judgment, Judge Healy finally gave careful attention to the study of law until he had fortified himself well in accurate knowledge of the science of jurisprudence, and in 1900 he was admitted to the Oklahoma Bar. He soon afterward engaged in the practice of his profession at Beaver, his attention being given to his substantial law business until his election to the bench of the County Court of Beaver County, on which he served four consecutive years, 1910-14. Since his retirement from the bench Judge Healy has continued in the active work of his profession at Beaver, where he controls a large and representative law business and is known as one of the leading members of the bar of Beaver County.

    In the City of Emporia, Kansas, on the 5th of November, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Healy to Miss Lydia Savage, who was born at Virginia, Cass County, Illinois, on the 23d of August, 1870, and who is a daughter of John W. and Caroline M. (Springer) Savage, the former of whom was born in Illinois, in 1838, and the latter in Pennsylvania, in the same year, she being now a resident of Beaver, Oklahoma, her husband having died at Emporia, Kansas, on the 20th of May, 1891. Judge and Mrs. Healy have but one child, Ledru Rollin, who was born in Beaver County, Oklahoma, on the 9th of August, 1891, and who was afforded the advantages of the Kansas State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, and of the Wesleyan Business College, at Saline, that state. He is now "one of the representative young members of the bar of the City of El Paso, Texas.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    INNIS, JOSEPH A.

    The present efficient incumbent of the office of county surveyor of Woodward County has served consecutively in this position since 1900, and is one of the sterling pioneers and honored and influential citizens of the county, where he established his residence at the time when this section was thrown open to white settlement, as a part of the historic Cherokee Strip, or Outlet. Mr. Innis is the owner of valuable farm property in the county and has been one of the valiant and resouceful men who have been foremost in the development of Woodward County along both civic and industrial lines.

    On the homestead farm of his parents, in Ripley County, Indiana, Joseph A. Innis was born on the 8th of May, 1861, and he thus came into the world about the time when his native land was plunged into the vortex of fratercidal war. He is a son of James and Sarah (Runner) Innis, both natives of the Hoosier state, and representatives of sterling pioneer families of that commonwealth. James Innis was born in Ripley County, Indiana, in 1832, and at the time of his death, in 1901, he was a resident of the Village of May, Woodward County, Oklahoma, his entire active career having been one of close and successful identification with the basic industries of agriculture and stock growing, though in his youth he served for a time as a teacher and a civil engineer. He first came to what is now the State of Oklahoma in 1887, but after remaining for a time in the section long designated as No Man's Land, which included the present County of Beaver. He thus became a resident of Oklahoma even before the territory of this name had been created from the original Indian Territory. His son, Joseph A., subject of this review, had preceded him to this frontier region by about a year. The marriage of James Innis to Miss Sarah Runner was solemnized in 1853, and Mrs. Innis died in what is now Beaver County, Oklahoma, in 1889, the year that the new territory was thrown open to settlement. She was born in 1833 and was a daughter of David Runner, who immigrated from Germany and became a pioneer settler in Indiana. Of the children of James and Sarah (Runner) Innis the eldest is Milford Taylor, who was born in 1859; Joseph A., of this sketch, was the second in order of birth; John Newton was born in 1863; Eward was born in 1867 and died in 1869; James D. was born in 1870; William Isaac in 1873; Robert E. in 1878; and Archibald D. in 1882. All save one of the children are living.

    Joseph A. Innis was reared and educated in his native state, where he was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home farm and made good use of the advantages afforded in the public schools of the locality and period. In 1884, as a young man of twenty-three years, he came to the West and established his residence in Barber County, Kansas, as a pioneer of that section of the Sunflower state. In 1886 he came to the No Man's Land of the present State of Oklahoma, and in that section of the Indian Territory he became a pioneer agriculturist and stock grower. He there continued operations until the Cherokee Strip was thrown open to settlement in 1893, when he participated in the rush into the new country, and entered claim to a homestead in what is now Woodward County. He vigorously instituted the reclamation and improvement of this property and on his land was eventually established the now thriving Village of May, of which he was virtually the founder, and which was named in honor of the only daughter of his first marriage.

    Mr. Innis developed his land into one of the well improved and valuable farms of Woodward County and there he continued to maintain his home until 1900, when he was elected county surveyor and removed to the City of Woodward, judicial center and metropolis of the county. He had gained broad and practical experience as a civil engineer in the days of his youth, and his technical facility has been reinforced by careful study, so that he is eminently qualified for the important office which he has held consecutively since the year noted, the popular estimate placed upon his official services being indicated by his re-election at successive intervals of two years. He has done a large volume of important surveying work in the county and has had supervision also of much other civil engineering, of even more technical order. He still retains ownership of his farm, is significantly vital and progressive in his civic attitude, is always ready to give his co-operation in the furtherance of measures and enterprises advanced for the general good of the community, and is a citizen who is not only one of the well known pioneers of this section of the state, but also one whose circle of friends is limited only by that of his acquaintances. He is a stalwart advocate of the cause of the republican party, is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

    At Butler, Missouri, on the 2nd of August, 1881, Mr. Innis wedded Miss Mary Maple, who was born in Bates County, that state, in 1864, a daughter of Jehu and Harriet (Fuller) Maple, and she died on the 23rd of April, 1888, soon after the family home had been established in what is now Beaver County, Oklahoma, and about one month after the birth of her only daughter, the three children who survive her being: Harry B., born in 1883; Asa J., born in 1885; and Mary Prudence, born March 11, 1888.

    On the 23rd of June, 1904, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Innis to Miss Etta C. Strong, who was born in Parke County, Indiana, on the 21st day of August, 1877, and who is a daughter of John and Mary (Jones) Strong, likewise natives of that county. Mr. and Mrs. Innis have five children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here noted: Joseph T., March 9, 1905; Eva May, December 13, 1907; Charles T. Bruce, November 29, 1909; Lester Gail, February 6, 1913; and Crystal Elnora, February 14, 1915.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume IV; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    LONG, LINDSEY L.

    That historic section of Western Oklahoma that was designated as No Man's Land and organized into Cimarron Territory in a local way prior to the opening of Oklahoma Territory to settlement, has become one of the vital and prosperous sections of the state, and one of the important counties is Beaver, in which Doctor Long controls a large and important practice as a physician and surgeon and has gained precedence as one of the representative members of his profession in Western Oklahoma. He maintains his residence and professional headquarters at Beaver, the county seat, and is one of the progressive and loyal citizens of the town and county.

    Dr. Lindsey Lowder Long was born on a farm in Neosho County, Kansas, on the 22d of September, 1875, a date that clearly demonstrates that his parents were numbered among the pioneers of that section of the Sunflower State. He is a son of David and Jeanette (Lowder) Long, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter of Indiana, in which latter state their marriage was solemnized in 1850.

    David Long was born in North Carolina on the 15th of October, 1824, and his parents claimed the Old Dominion State of Virginia as the place of their nativity, the respective families having there been founded in the colonial era of our national history. In 1828, when he was a child of about four years, the parents of David Long removed from North Carolina and became pioneer settlers in the wilds of Greene County, Indiana, where they passed the remainder of their lives and where the father reclaimed a farm from the wilderness. In Greene County David was reared under the conditions and influences of the early pioneer days, in the meanwhile availing himself of the advantages of the schools of the locality and period, and in 1850, when about twenty-five years of age, he there wedded Miss Jeanette Lowder, who was born in Lawrence County, that state, on the 2d of July, 1832, a daughter of John R. and Aesah (Hodson) Lowder, pioneers of that county, to which they removed from their native State of North Carolina. After his marriage Mr. Long continued his activities as a farmer in Greene County, Indiana, until 1871, when he removed with his family to Kansas and became one of the pioneer settlers in Neosho County. He purchased a tract of land two miles south of old Osage Mission, and there reclaimed a productive farm. He became one of the substantial and representative citizens of Neosho County and there continued to reside on his fine homestead farm until his death, which occurred on the 7th of March, 1896. His widow survived him by nearly fifteen years and was a resident of Erie, the judicial center of Neosho County, when she, too, was called to the life eternal on the 25th of November, 1910. Concerning their children the following brief data are entered: Rev. Matthew T., who was born October 16, 1851, is a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church and maintains his home in Oklahoma. In 1875 he wedded Miss Etta Noble, and they have four children—Stella, Frederick, Ethel and Ruth—the eldest daughter, Stella, being now the wife of Rufus O. Renfrew, a prominent capitalist and influential citizen of Woodward, Oklahoma, one individually mentioned on other pages of this work. Linda A., who was born November 9, 1853, is the wife of John J. Fields, editor and publisher of the Sentinel Leader at Sentinel, Washita County, Oklahoma. Their marriage was celebrated in 1875, and they have four children—Robert, Cornelius, David and May. Cornelius, the next in order of birth of the children of David and Jeanette (Lowder) Long, was born March 6, 1855, and died on the 13th of the same month. Finley, who was born March 30, 1857, died December 20, 1908. Henry, who was born January 22, 1861, is a leading lawyer in the City of Ottawa, Kansas. John R., born February 23, 1864, is a prosperous farmer of Neosho County, Kansas. Rolla E., who was born April 27, 1869, is superintendent of the city schools of Galena, Kansas. May M., who was born March 28, 1871, is a successful and popular teacher in the public schools of the City of Sherman, Texas, and Doctor Long of this review is the youngest of the nine children.

    Passing the days of his childhood and early youth on the homestead farm in Neosho County, Kansas, Doctor Long acquired his preliminary education in the district schools and thereafter attended the public schools of Erie, the county seat, where he was graduated in the high school as a member of the class of 1895. In the meanwhile he had formulated definite plans for his future career, and in the year that marked his completion of his high school course he entered the University Medical College at Kansas City, Missouri, in which institution he was graduated March 19, 1898, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

    Immediately after his graduation in the medical college Doctor Long came to Oklahoma Territory, and, on the 20th of April of the same year, he opened an office at Alva, judicial center of Woods County, where he continued in the successful practice of his profession during the ensuing eight years. He then took an effective post-graduate course in one of the leading medical institutions of the City of Chicago, and in May, 1906, he established his home at Beaver, Oklahoma, where he has since been engaged in active general practice and where he has secure prestige as the leading representative of his profession in Beaver County. He has served as mayor of Beaver, besides holding other local offices of minor order, and has shown a lively interest in all that touches the welfare and progress of his home town and county. While a resident of Alva he served as a member of the city council and also of the board of education, besides which he did effective service as county health officer of Woods County. He holds membership in the Oklahoma State Medical Society and the American Medical Association has completed the circles of both York and Scottish Rite Masonry, in the latter of which he has received the thirty-second degree, besides being affiliated with the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine and the Knights of Pythias.

    On the 10th of September, 1899, was solemnized the marriage of Doctor Long to Miss Maude Beegle of Alva. She was born in Kingman County, Kansas, on the 13th of March, 1875, and is a daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Jang (Crottzer) Beegle, both natives of Pennsylvania and both honored pioneers of Kansas. Mr. Beegle was born in 1836 and his death occurred June 10, 1908. The mother of Mrs. Long was born in 1832 and was summoned to eternal rest on the 25th of December, 1911. Prior to her marriage Mrs. Long had been a successful and popular teacher, her work in the pedagogic profession having continued for three years after she had completed a course of study in the Colorado State Normal School at Greeley. Doctor and Mrs. Long have one child, Lenore Madge, who was born at Alva, this state, on the 12th of November, 1902.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    MUNSELL, LEVI S.

    The exacting and all important profession of medicine has found many able, loyal and zealous representatives in the various counties and communities of the vigorous young State of Oklahoma, and Beaver, the judicial center of Beaver County, is signally favored in having gained as a citizen a physician and surgeon of such distinctive technical attainments and such broad experience as are defined in the character and achievement of Doctor Munsell, who has here built up a large and representative practice and who holds high place as one of the leading members of his profession in Western Oklahoma.

    In ascribing to Doctor Munsell special distinction of nativity the object is best attained by recalling the humorous paraphrase of a familiar quotation that was indulged in one of the famous post-graduate speeches of Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, when he said: '' Some men are born great, some achieve greatness, and some are born in Ohio.'' Under the last clause Doctor Munsell is able to make classification, for he was born at Coldwater, Mercer County, Ohio, on the 21st of September, 1841. He is a son of William A. O. and Deborah (Gray), Munsell..

    William A. O. Munsell was born near Fletcher, Miami County, Ohio, in the year 1812, and, as the date indicates was a representative of one of the very early pioneer families of the old Buckeye State, where his father, Levi Munsell, initated the reclamation of a farm from the wilderness prior to the War of 1812, the original American progenitors having come from England and settled in this country in the early colonial days. William A. O. Munsell was reared to manhood in Ohio, andd though school facilities were very meager in the locality, and period, he provided advantages for himself, and his alert and receptive mentality enabled him to become a man of large intellectual force and broad mental ken. He became a representative farmer in his section of Ohio and also labored with consecrated devotion and zeal as a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he was what was commonly designated as a "local preacher." During the climacteric period of the Civil war he served as a United States marshal for the Northwestern district of Ohio. In 1888 he removed to Missouri, and he died at Cameron, that state, in 1902, at the patriarchal age of ninety years. Early in his career he had been prominently identified with the promotion of railroad building in Ohio, and he was a man of marked business ability as well as one of exalted personal character.

    In the year 1825 was solemnized the marriage of Rev. William A. O. Munsell to Miss Deborah Gray, who was born in 1818, a daughter of David and Sarah Gray, and who was summoned to the life eternal in 1849. Of this union were born two sons and two daughters, of whom Elmore Y. and Mary Elizabeth are deceased, Doctor Munsell, of this review, having been the third in order of birth, and the eldest of the children being Sarah L., who is the wife of Stephen Frank, a representative farmer near Cameron, Missouri..

    The common schools of Ohio afforded to Dr. Levi S. Munsell his early educational advantages, and at the age of twenty-three years he was matriculated in the Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, in which he completed his higher academic studies. In preparation for the profession of his choice he entered the medical department of the University of Ohio, at Columbus, and in this institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1870, and with the well earned degree of Doctorrof Medicine. Establishing his residence at Geneva, Adams County, Indiana, he there continued in the active practice of his profession nine years, and during the ensuing nine years he was engaged in practice at Rockport, judicial center of Atchison County, Missouri, where he was associated in practice with his brother, the late Dr. Elmore Y. Munsell. In 1886 he removed to Wichita, Kansas, where he built up a substantial practice and where he remained until the latter part of the year 1889, when he came to Indiann Territory, and became one of the pioneer physicians in the Old Chickasaw Nation. When, in 1891, the present Town of Chickasha was founded, he became one of its first settlers, and there he maintained his professional headquarters two years. In 1897 he located at the old Town of Hardesty, Beaver County, where he remained until 1900, when he established his home at Beaver, the county seat, where he has since continued in active practice and where, in point of years, he holds prestige as the dean of his profession in this county. He has been an active practitioner for forty years, has kept in touch with the advances made in medical and surgical science, has honored his profession by his character and efficient services and is worthy of special consideration in this history as being one of the pioneer physicians and surgeons of Oklahoma. The Doctor has served as coroner and also as health officer of Beaver County and has in all things closely identified himself with community interests, as a broad-minded and progressive citizen. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, he has attained to the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite of the Masonic fraternity, as an affiliate of the consistory in the City of Guthrie, and is identified also with the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which his wife was a lifelong and devoted adherent. He is a member of the Oklahoma State Medical Society and the American Medical Association.

    At Coldwater, his native town in Ohio, the 1st of March, 1866, recorded the marriage of Doctor Munsell to Miss Elizabeth J. Young, daughter of Philip and Mary (Plummer) Young, who passed their entire lives in Ohio. Mrs. Munsell was born July 7, 1841, and the supreme loss and bereavement in the life of Doctor Munsell came when his cherished and devoted wife was summoned to eternal rest, at Fred, Oklahoma Territory, on the 2d of July, 1891, just five days prior to her fiftieth birthdayyanniversary. Of their seven children Paul and Fusia died young; Dayton is engaged in the banking business at El Reno, this state; Pearl E. is the wife of Thomas B. Carey, of Dallas, Texas; William O. is a resident of the City of Portland, Oregon; R. Netta is the wife of E. V. Roe, who maintains his residence at Caldwell, Kansas, and is in the railway postal service of the United States; and Grace A. is the wife of Robert Osborne, their home being now in the City of Detroit, Michigan..

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    RIZLEY, ROSCOE

    Born in a prairie dugout near Beaver, Oklahoma, on July 5, 1892, and known as Ross, Rizley was the son of Robert M. and Arabella Narcissus McCown Rizley. Educated in the Beaver public schools, the future U.S. Representative then took courses at the summer normal school also at Beaver. After he received his teacher's certificate, Rizley taught in the rural schools of Beaver County in 1909 and 1910. In 1911 he attended Hill's Business College in Oklahoma City. After a brief stint as deputy registrar of deeds of Beaver County in 1912, he moved to Kansas City, Missouri, to attend the Kansas City School of Law from which he received an LL.B. on June 1915. Admitted to the Oklahoma bar in 1915, he began his practice of law in Beaver in a partnership with R. H. Loofbourrow. The following year he married Ruby Seal, also of Beaver. The couple had seven children. In 1918, he became county attorney of Beaver County, a position he held until 1920 when he moved to Guymon in Texas County. Over the next several years he practiced law and was very active in Guymon civic affairs. Not only did he serve as Guymon city attorney, he was a member of the school board and chamber of commerce, helped organize the Lions Club, and participated in various fraternal organizations. A lifelong Republican, Rizley was elected to the Oklahoma Senate in 1930. Although serving but one term, he had achieved some distinction in public service in the state. By the late 1930s the Republican Party in Oklahoma was on the verge of collapse. Indeed, he supported abandonment of the party in favor of a "grass roots" coalition of all anti-New Dealers. The Republicans, nevertheless, rallied and nominated him as their gubernatorial candidate in 1938. Although defeated, he rebounded two years later and won election to the U.S. House of Representatives from Oklahoma's Eighth District. He held this congressional seat for four terms. During his eight years in Congress he served on various committees, including Agriculture, Rules, and Expenditures in the Executive Department. As a member of this last committee, he chaired the Subcommittee on Surplus Property and was instrumental in exposing the waste and disorder in the disposal of government property following World War II. His pioneer work with this subcommittee ultimately led to the establishment of the General Services Administration. In his last term he also chaired the Special Committee to Investigate Campaign Expenditures. In 1948 he made an unsuccessful bid for the U.S. Senate seat being vacated by Edward H. Moore. Robert S. Kerr, the former Oklahoma governor who was the Democratic candidate, launched a partisan attack on the congressman and charged that he was both a military and economic isolationist. Following his defeat, Rizley resumed private law practice. With the Republican victory in the presidential election of 1952, he again entered public service. From March to December 1953 the former congressman served as a solicitor for the Post Office Department, from December 1953 to December 1954 as assistant secretary of agriculture, from December 1954 to February 1955 as special assistant to the postmaster general, and from February 1955 to April 1956 as a member of the Civil Aeronautics Board. While with the CAB, he was named to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. In 1956 he resigned his CAB post to become judge of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma, thus becoming one of the few people to serve in all three branches of the federal government. Interestingly, Kerr made the motion for Rizley's confirmation in the Senate. Rizley served as a federal judge until his death in Oklahoma City on March 4, 1969. He was interred at Elmhurst Cemetery in Guymon.

    RODMAN, DEE

    DEE RODMAN is one of the successful newspaper men of Oklahoma, entered the profession through the ranks of a printer, and is now editor and publisher of the Fairview Enterprise at Fairview in Major County.

    Mr. Rodman is a young man, and has spent most of his years in Oklahoma. He was born March 6, 1884, on a farm in Erath County, Texas, a son of John B. and Nancy Jane (Kimbro) Rodman, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Arkansas. John B. Rodman was born December 17, 1860, at Paducah, Kentucky, followed farming and stone masonry for his active career, and is still farming in Beaver County, Oklahoma. He was married in 1880 and his wife was born May 22, 1861, in Hope County, Arkansas, daughter of Thomas W. and Clementine Kimbro, both of whom are natives of Tennessee. John B. Rodman and wife have the following children: Arthur, born August 3, 1882; Dee; Ella, who was born December 19, 1886, and was married in 1902 to L. R. Houx, and they live in Colorado; Fred L. born February 14, 1888; John J., born June 21, 1891; Ila Belle born December 28, 1894; Daisy, born December 21, 1896; and Hugh B., born June 30, 1901.

    The first sixteen years of his life Dee Rodman spent on his father's farms in Erath and Ellis counties, Texas. His parents then moved to Oklahoma, locating in Cheyenne, and there he continued his education in the public schools. Mr. Rodman also had the benefit of a two years' business course in the University of Oklahoma at Norman. In 1903 at the age of nineteen he entered the office of the Beacon at Cordell, Oklahoma, and learned by practical experience the printer's trade. In 1905 he came to Fairview and followed his trade as a journeyman printer until 1914. In that year he bought the plant of the Enterprise at Ames, Oklahoma, removed it to Fairview and has since published the Fairview Enterprise, one of the leading papers of Major County. Politically Mr. Rodman is a republican, and he and his wife are members of the Christian Church.

    On March 12, 1910, at Fairview he married Miss Vie Morse. Mrs. Rodman was born at Girard, Kansas, November 20, 1891, a daughter of J. E. and Sadie (Nunally) Morse. To their marriage was born one child, Roberta Marian, born May 28, 1914.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    SMITH, CLAUDE TILDEN

    Claude Tilden Smith. A lawyer who now enjoys a lucrative private practice in Beaver County, Claude Tilden Smith also distinguished himself by a vigorous administration as county attorney for two years, and is the recognized leader of the democratic party in Beaver County.

    He is of an old Southern family, long represented in the State of Maryland. He was born at Wakefield, Maryland, March 26, 1877, a son of James E. and Martha A. (Beach) Smith. His father was born July 17, 1850, at Warfieldsburg, Maryland, a son of James and Mary (Harmon) Smith, who were natives of Maryland. James E. Smith during his younger years was a very active democratic leader in Maryland, and held several state offices.

    He is now living at Westminster, Maryland. He married, April 16, 1876, Miss Beach, who was born August 3, 1849, at Leesburg, Virginia, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Higdon) Beach, both natives of Loudon County, Virginia, and of prominent Virginia stock. Claude Tilden Smith was the oldest of five sons. The others were: Rozier Gorman, born in 1879 and died in 1880; Grover Roberts, born in 1884 and died in 1885; John Ray, born in 1886, died in 1903; and James E., Jr., who was bornnin 1891, was married in 1915 to Beulah Ogle, and now lives with his father. That the family has been strongly democratic in politics will be observed from the fact that several of the sons were named for some of the great leaders in that party during the last three or four decades..

    Claude Tilden Smith was given a liberal classical education at Western Maryland College in Westminster, where he graduated A. B. with the class of 1896. He took up the study of law at first under Judge James A. C. Bond and later under Reifsnider & Reifsnider at Westminster for three years. His preceptors subsequently filled places on the bench. He was admitted to practice before the Court of Appeals of Maryland on October 14, 1899. He soon had a promising law practice in hiss native state, and in 1903 was appointed examiner in equity causes for Carroll County, and in 1908 held office as city solicitor for Westminster. He resigned these positions June 26, 1909, on his removal to Beaver, Oklahoma.

    At the present time Mr. Smith is state committeeman in the democratic organization from Beaver County. In 1910 he was the nominee of his party for county attorney, and in 1912 was again nominated and this time elected, leading his ticket. He remained in the office two years, but in his third campaign was defeated, largely on account of the fact that he had shown an unusual ability and fearlessness in the vigorous enforcement of all laws and the additional fact that Beaver Countyy has a republican majority. Since leaving office he has looked after the interests of an extensive private practice. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias.

    On June 12, 1907, at Sparrow Point, Maryland, he married Miss Amelia E. Owings, who was born June 16, 1884, at Cockeysville, Maryland, a daughter of Perry Thomas and Margaret Stuart (Watson) Owings, the former a native of Baltimore County, Maryland, and the latter of England. Mrs. Smith is a descendant in the maternal line from the royal family of Stuarts of England and Scotland, and another branch of her ancestry was the fighting McKays of Scotland. Daniel Henry Stuart McKay, herr grand-uncle, was the grand master of the Orange Society in the counties of Antrim and Londonderry, Ireland, for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have four children, two sons and two daughters, namely: James Owings, born June 5, 1908; Claude Tilden, Jr., born September 22, 1909; Martha Amelia, born December 26, 1911; and Elizabeth Stuart, born December 1, 1913. The three youngest children were born in Beaver, Oklahoma.

    While a resident of Maryland Mr. Smith took a very active part in military affairs. He was the organizer of Company H, First Maryland Infantry, Maryland National Guard, and he resigned from the office of captain when he came to Oklahoma.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    SMITH, IRA T.

    IRA T. SMITH, M. D., a prominent physician and surgeon at LaKemp, was one of the pioneers of Oklahoma, having come to the state at the time of the opening of the Cherokee Strip, more than twenty years ago. For many years he has enjoyed a high standing in his profession and also in business affairs, and success has come to him as a reward for much earnest and hard labor during his younger years. .

    He was born November 3, 1868, in a log house on a farm in Sullivan County, Missouri. His parents were John E. and Nancy F. (Sipes) Smith. His father was born in Ireland, emigrated to America with his parents in 1829, the family locating in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and there as a young man he became a structural iron worker. He was born in 1827 and he died in Portland, Oregon, in 1904. He was one of the loyal natives of Ireland who fought for the integrity of the Union during the Civil war. He served as a private in Company E of an Iowa cavalry and went through the entire struggle with credit. His wife was born in 1830 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and died at Vici, Oklahoma, in 1914. She was a lifelong member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. These worthy people became the parents of fourteen children, Robert, John S., Ephraim S., Margaret, Joseph G., Harriet Jane, James F. N., Daniel M., Nancy E., William T., Henry B., Ira T., Lena Belle, and Martha, the last two being now deceased. .

    The first temple of learning Doctor Smith attended was a log school house in Sullivan County, Missouri. This instruction was interspersed with such work as his strength permitted him to perform on his father's farm. Being one of a large family of children, he had the serious responsibilities of life early thrust upon him. In 1881 he left home and went out to Nebraska, which was then a frontier state, and from there in 1884 moved to Kiowa, Kansas. There he entered the drug business, studied pharmacy and also carried on his readings in medicine. .

    In 1893 Doctor Smith took part in the opening of the Cherokee Strip, and though failing to secure a claim in the strip he secured one in Dewey County in the old Cheyenne and Arapahoe country. For a number of years he devoted himself to his arduous duties as a country practitioner in Dewey and Ellis counties, but in 1913 removed to Beaver County and bought a drug store in the new town of LaKemp. He has a good business as a druggist, and also has a widely extended and profitable practice as a physician. Doctor Smith is a member of the Oklahoma Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, being a member of the Consistory No. 1 at Guthrie. He is a charter member and was the first noble grand of Fay Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Fay, Oklahoma. His church is the Presbyterian. .

    On December 24, 1889, in Sedgwick County, Kansas, Doctor Smith married Miss Minnie Adella Halsey, who was born in Kansas City, Missouri, September 16, 1869. To their marriage have been born five children, three daughters and two sons: Verga M., born November 18, 1892, now the wife of G. F. Partridge, a farmer at LaKemp; John Henry, born April 29, 1901; Lura Rose, born May 29, 1904; Georgia Lillian, born November 29, 1906; and Ira, born October 25, 1909.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    TOOKER, LEROY B

    A popular and able young representative of the newspaper business in Western Oklahoma, Mr. Tooker is editor and manager of the Beaver Democrat, a well ordered weekly paper published at the county seat of Beaver County.

    Mr. Tooker was born at Lawrence, McHenry County, Illinois, on the 12th of July, 1888, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Mary L. (Palmer) Tooker. His father was born in 1840, in the State of Wisconsin, where his parents were pioneer settlers, and for many years he was a successful building contractor, a vocation which he continued to follow until 1907, when he came to the newly-organized State of Oklahoma and obtained a tract of Government land in Beaver County. This homestead, which he has developed into one of the well-improved and valuable farms of the county, is situated twenty-four miles southwest of Beaver, the county seat, and there he and his wife still maintain their residence, their marriage having been solemnized in 1879 and Mrs. Tooker having been born in Pennsylvania, on the 8th day of July, 1842, her parents likewise having been natives of the old Keystone State. They have three children, of whom the subject of this review is the youngest, as is he also the only son: Lynnia Belle, who was born February 20, 1880, at Lawrence, Illinois, was united in marriage in 1911, to Hugh N. Robertson, and they reside in Beaver County, Oklahoma, their two children being Linden and Lillian; Georgia May, who was born in 1882, became, in 1899, the wife of Charles L. Munger, their home being in Beaver County, and they have five children,—Vernon, Harlan, Adrian, Kenneth and Lila.

    The public schools of his native place afforded to Leroy E. Tooker his early educational advantages and after completing the curriculum of the high school he pursued a higher course of study in the University of Illinois at Champaign. He left the university in 1909 and immediately came to Oklahoma, where his parents had established their home in the preceding year. Here he put his scholastic attainments to practical test and utilization by becoming a representative of the pedagogic profession. As such he devoted two years to teaching in the public schools of Beaver County, his successful work including a year of service as principal of the village schools of Beaver, in 1910-11.

    On the 19th of June, 1911, Mr. Tooker purchased the plant and business of the Beaver County Democrat, and in the following year he founded the Forgan Enterprise, of both of which weekly papers he has since continued editor and publisher and both of which he has brought up to a high standard,—especially as purveyors of local news and as exponents of the general interests of Beaver County. Since assuming control of the Beaver County Democrat, which is the pioneer newspaper of the county, he has effected its absorption of the La Kemp Mirror, the Ivanhoe News and the Forgan Enterprise in the Beaver County villages of the names designated, and thus he had made the Beaver County Democrat a paper of specially wide circulation and dominating influence in the county, its political proclivities being indicated by its title. Both through his paper and in a personal way Mr. Tooker stands exemplar of civic progressiveness and spares neither time nor effort in his efforts to promote the social and material advancement and well being of Beaver County and its people. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity he has received the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, and he is affiliated also with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He holds membership in the Presbyterian Church, of which his parents have been zealous members for many years. This energetic, wide-awake and progressive young journalist is still numbered among the eligible bachelors of western Oklahoma, and it is needless to say that this fact does not in the least militate against his popularity in social circles.

    [Source: A Standard History of Oklahoma, Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

    TWYFORD, CHARLES FRENCH

    Now serving as county attorney of Beaver County, Mr. Twyford has been known in different sections of Oklahoma both as a newspaper man and as a lawyer. He has made a splendid record both in his private practice and in the administration of his official duties since locating at Beaver. It is a matter of interest that Mrs. Twyford, his wife, is a graduate physician. The Twyford family has had many interesting associations with Oklahoma affairs ever since the year of the original opening. His father was one of Oklahoma's Eighty-Niners, while his mother has long been distinguished as having taught the first regular public school in Oklahoma Territory, and for her varied achievements and influence in both educational and missionary fields.

    It was on a cotton plantation in Pontotoc County, Mississippi, that Charles French Twyford was born, December 1, 1875, a son of Samuel B. and Lucy E. (French) Twyford. His father was born April 1, 1843, at Terre Haute, Indiana, a son of Charles C. and Lucy (Belt) Twyford, who were natives of the State of Delaware and of Scotch ancestry. Flag - link to Civil War Veteran Page Samuel B. Twyford had a varied and active career. In early years he was a railroad man. At the outbreak of the Civil war he was living at Champaign, Illinois, and there enlisted with the Eleventh Illinois Volunteer Cavalry. After serving three months with that regiment he was transferred to Company M of the Fifth Missouri Cavalry, and was given scout duty with the rank and pay of a captain. He remained in active service until the close of the war. He then lived in Illinois for a few years, but in 1872 with an ox team wagon he drove from Illinois to Marion County, Kansas. There he was a grade contractor during the construction of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad through that part of Kansas.

    In 1873, two years before the birth of his son, Charles F., he removed to Pontotoc County, Mississippi, and engaged in cotton planting there until 1879. Returning to Kansas he resumed farming in Marion County, and lived in that state until 1889. In that year, which marked the opening of Oklahoma Territory, he joined in the rush, and was fortunate in locating a good tract of Government land near the present Town of Edmond. He was one of the best types of early Oklahoma settlers and was a progressive farmer and respected citizen of that locality until his death on March 28, 1898. He was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church all his life.

    His wife, Lucy E. French, whom he married at Greenfield, Illinois, December 1, 1874, was born at Hamilton, Ohio, March 17, 1844, a daughter of John and Jane (French) French, who were natives of Hastings, England. Mrs. Twyford is a graduate of the Illinois State Normal School at Bloomington and took special work in the Illinois State University at Champaign. For five years she was a teacher in St. Louis and later did missionary work for ten years in Mississippi, organizing a number of churches and also conducting schools. In 1879, in addition to the burdens of her household and the care of her children, she began teaching in Kansas, and for nine years conducted schools at different points in that state. Soon after coming to Oklahoma with her family, in 1889, she organized and directed as teacher the first public school opened in the territory. The session began in September following the opening in April, and that was Edmond 's first public school. It was conducted for a term of nine months, and this school graduated the first eighth grade class graduated in Oklahoma Territory or Oklahoma State. This class, all of whom were girls, and eleven in number, made up the first enrollment at the Central State Normal of Edmond. During the First Territorial Legislature Mrs. Twyford was one of the committee of five named by the governor to draft school laws and apportion school districts. In 1891 she took up church work under the auspices of the Congregational Church, and was engaged in organizing and building churches up to 1901. In the year that she retired from active responsibilities she had completed more than thirty years of active service in behalf of schools and religion. While in Oklahoma she was the prime factor in the erection of five rural churches in the vicinity of Edmond. She was regularly ordained to the ministry in 1891, and filled the pulpit in each of the churches which she organized. Since she retired in 1901 she has been regarded as one of the most useful women Oklahoma ever had. She now lives at 1015 North Kelly Street in Oklahoma City. To her marriage with Mr. Twyford were born five children: Charles French; Mary A., born August 5, 1877; Ethel, born June 20, 1879, and died in infancy; Theresa, born June 17, 1881; and James S., born June 5, 1882.

    The atmosphere of culture and good ideals, every incentive to a life of integrity and honorable activity, were afforded Charles F. Twyford from childhood up. He obtained his education at the Central State Normal in Edmond and at Kingfisher' College. He paid his way while in college by work as a printer, a trade which afforded him his livelihood for a number of years. Subsequently he became one of the editors and publishers of the Oklahoma Labor Signal and the Oklahoma Farmer. In 1903 he established the News at Bridgeport, conducted it twelve months, and then went to Topeka, Kansas, where he was employed at his trade as printer three years.

    In 1909 Mr. Twyford entered the Epworth University School of Law at Oklahoma City, remained in attendance three years, and was admitted to practice June 12, 1911. In 1913 he located at Beaver, and has already secured a satisfying share of practice and his thorough qualifications were the basis for his successful candidacy as republican nominee for the office of county attorney of Beaver County in 1914. Fraternally he is a member of the Alva Lodge of Elks.

    On September 17, 1913, at El Dorado, Oklahoma, Mr. Twyford married Miss May Drew, daughter of William H. and Ethelda (Wilson) Drew, who were natives of the State of Michigan. Mrs. Doctor Twyford was born in Greer County, Oklahoma, September 15, 1892, was educated at Fort Worth, Texas, in the university there, and with the class of 1913 graduated from the medical department of the University of Oklahoma and was awarded the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

    [Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]



 


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