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Oklahoma Biographies 2


 


Warren L. Thayer

The first appearance of Warren L. Thayer in Oklahoma was as a harvest man. About fifteen years ago he took up a Government claim in Harper County, and his prosperity and influence has been steadily growing ever since. He is now one of the leading citizens and business men of Laverne.

His birth occurred February 27, 1880, at Union City, Michigan, a son of Robert M. and Frances M. (Blosser) Thayer. His father, who was of Scotch parentage, was born June 17, 1855, at Jackson, Michigan, and was a lumberman until he came to Oklahoma in 1901. In that year he took up a claim in Woodword County and became active in the organization of Ellis and Harper County. He now owns and operates a large stock farm seven miles from May. Robert M. Thayer was married in 1877 and his wife was born November 30, 1854, at Logan, Hocking County, Ohio, a daughter of Abraham and Miriam (Graffis) Blosser, who were natives of Pennsylvania and of Dutch stock. Mrs. Thayer had a college education and is an active member of the Methodist Church. Their children are: Warren L.; Goldie, who was born March 23, 1888, and is now the wife of Bert B. Waltman, a railway official in Denver, Colorado: Pearl Blanche, who was born August 3, 1891, and is now the wife of Bynum Bouse, a rancher at Des Moines, New Mexico; Ernest Blaine, who was born May 7, 1894, and now lives at Laverne, Oklahoma; and Katie Lorena Thayer, who was born July 16, 1896, and is now the wife of W. T. McNeil of Beaver City, Oklahoma.

At the age of seventeen Warren L. Thayer completed a high school course at Knoxville, Tennessee, and at the age of twenty-one graduated A. B. from the Ewing and Jefferson College in Blount County, Tennessee. It was with this education and preliminary experience that he came to Grant County, Oklahoma, and spent his first season in the harvest fields. He also taught school one term. Then in 1901 he settled on his claim of Government land in Woodward County, and by hard work and good judgment has become one of the extensive farmers of that section, having a large tract under cultivation. For one year he was connected with the Spearmore State Bank of Laverne, but is now engaged in a prosperous life insurance business at Laverne. He is also interested in oil properties in Oklahoma and Texas as a promoter and developer, and having read law in the intervals of his business pursuits was admitted to the Oklahoma bar in 1916 and is now prepared to practice his profession. Mr. Thayer is a member of the Masonic Order, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he is a republican.

On January 12, 1910, at Coleman, Texas, he married Miss Sallie May Smith, who was born at Alvarado, Texas, January 8, 1887, a daughter of Thomas and Emma (Quinn) Smith, natives of Texas. Mrs. Thayer is a granddaughter of Deaf Smith, a pioneer scout and frontiersman in Texas, a historic character in the Texas Revolution, and his name is indelibly impressed upon Texas geography in Deaf Smith County, which is now the largest county in area in the United States. Mrs. Thayer completed her education in a Texas college. They have three daughters: Helen, born January 19, 1911; Dorothy, born August 24, 1918; and Virginia Pauline, born February 16, 1916.

[Source:  A Standard History of Oklahoma, Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]


Delany G. ROGERS

of Buffalo, Oklahoma, has been an early settler in both the States of Kansas and Oklahoma. In fact, he has lived nearly all his life close to the frontier and in intimate touch with the people and the activities of a new country. Mr. Rogers only recently retired from the office of postmaster at Buffalo, a position he had held for a number of years. His chief vocation in life has been farming and stock raising, and it is the testimony of his friends and neighbors that whatever he does he does well.

His birth occurred in a log house on a farm in Jefferson County, Indiana, on April 6, 1862. His birth occurred while his father was away fighting the battles of the Union in the Civil war. His parents were Gamaliel and Lydia (Lewis) Rogers. His father was born November 17, 1840, in Jefferson County, Indiana, and was still a very young man when the war broke out. He served three years as a private in Company C of the Sixth Indiana Infantry, but with the exception of that service has spent all his active life as a farmer. From Indiana he moved out to Kansas in 1886, locating on government land in Clark County. That was his home for six years, after which he spent two years in Mead County, then returned to Clark County for eight years, and finally moved to Texas County, Missouri, where he still has his home. He has now reached the age of three quarters of a century, and has lived so usefully he can enjoy the comforts of retired existence. In 1858 Gamaliel Rogers married Lydia Lewis who was also born in Jefferson County, Indiana, August 17, 1840. To their marriage were born ten children, four sons and six daughters, namely: Florence, born December 5, 1860, was married in 1880 to Merritt M. Cosby and they now reside at Protection, Kansas; Delany G., who was the second in order of birth; Willis born in 1864 and died in 1885; Jessie, born in 1868, was married in 1888 to Charles Pauley, and they now live at Oklahoma City; John Belle, born in 1870, is now an osteopathic physician at Hastings, Oklahoma, and in 1905 she became the wife of Charles Morrison; Celia, born in 1872, married in 1910 Mr. L. Dees, and they now live at Rosston, Oklahoma; Samuel Nicholas, born in 1874, is a farmer in Harper County, Oklahoma; Tena, born in 1876, was married in 1908 to Charles Sworkey and they now live at Norman, Oklahoma; Pearl, born in 1878 was married in 1905 to William and they live in Beaver County, Oklahoma.

It was on a farm in Jefferson County, Indiana, that Delany G. Rogers spent his early youth. He had the advantages of the local public schools. The discipline of farm work gave him a rugged constitution, and an experience which he has utilized in his own active career. In 1884 he moved out to Clark County, Kansas, and secured a tract of Government land in a district which at that time had very few agricultural and permanent settlers. Mr. Rogers lived in Kansas until 1899, and in the meantime had improved an excellent farm there. In the latter year he moved to old Woodward County, Oklahoma, and again acquired a homestead, situated two miles from the Town of Buffalo. While Mr. Rogers' activities have kept him in town for a number of years, he still owns considerable land and has most of it under improvement.

On February 23, 1907, he was appointed postmaster of Buffalo, and continued the incumbent of the office through two terms until February 23, 1915. He is an active republican, is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

On October 16, 1884, at Taylorsville, Indiana, Mr. Rogers married Miss Isabelle" Phillips, daughter of Madison and Mary (Wallace) Phillips. Mrs. Rogers was born June 11, 1860, in Jefferson County, Indiana, and her parents were natives of the same state. It will be recalled that Mr. Rogers left Indiana and went out into the new country of Kansas in 1884. He made that trip as his wedding journey, being accompanied by his young bride, and they journeyed across the country by wagon and team, like some of their pioneer ancestors who had come from a point still further east to the region of the Ohio Valley. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers are the parents of seven children, four sons and three daughters, namely: Ora Lawrence, born August 14, 1885, now the wife of Irwin Baker of Ashland, Kansas; Madison Gamaliel, born May 25, 1888, and still living at Buffalo; Estella Iris, born March 10, 1890, was married in 1908 to Pirl Baker, and they now live at Protection, Kansas; Alta Rachel, born February 19, 1892; William McKinley, born May 10, 1894; John, born February 14, 1896; and Edward Taft, born August 20, 1907, died July 20, 1908.

[Source:  A Standard History of Oklahoma, Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]


Stonewall Jackson

That Mr. Jackson received his Christian or personal name in honor of one of the great and revered heroes and officers of the Confederate service in the Civil war and that his family name makes the appellation the more consistent finds further reinforcement through the fact that his father was a gallant soldier of the Confederacy during virtually the entire period of the war between the states of the North and the South, his service of four years having been rendered as a member of a Louisiana regiment and it having been his portion to participate in many spirited engagements, including a number of important battles. He was always found at the post of duty and in one engagement he received a severe wound.

     Stonewall Jackson has been a resident of Cheyenne, judicial center of Roger Mills County, since 1902, and through his own executive ability, his circumspection as a financier and his impregnable integrity of purpose he has become an influential figure in connection with banking activities in the western part of the state. In his home town he is now president of the Cheyenne State Bank, of which office he has been the incumbent since 1912, and he is president also of the First State Bank of Strong City; vice president of the Crawford State Bank, of Crawford, Roger Mills County; and a director of the Guaranty State Bank of Texola, Beckham County. His prominence in financial circles is further indicated by his having served in 1913 as treasurer of the Oklahoma Bankers' Association, of which he continues an active and valued member.

     Stonewall Jackson was born at Alto, Cherokee County, Texas, on the 2d of December, 1877, and is a son of William D. and Mary (Kendall) Jackson, both natives of Louisiana, the former having died at Mars Hill, Arkansas, in 1879, and the latter being now a resident of Magnum, Greer County, Oklahoma.

     William D. Jackson was born in the year 1834, and was reared and educated in Louisiana, from which state he went forth as a valiant soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil war, as previously noted. In his native state his marriage was solemnized, and after the close of the war he removed to Arkansas, whence, about 1877, he went with his family to Texas, but about three years later he returned to Arkansas, where he passed the remainder of his life, his active career having found him successfully engaged as a contractor and also a representative of the live-stock industry. He was a scion of a sterling family that was founded in the state of Georgia in the colonial period of our national history, and it is to be presumed that the first representatives of the name in America settled in Virginia. Of his three children the eldest is Willie, who is the wife of William H. Thomason, a farmer in Beaver County, Oklahoma; Stonewall, of this review, was the next in order of birth: and Ida, whose death occurred at Magnum, Greer County, this state, was the wife of Rev. Charles R. Roberts, who is still a resident of that place and who is a clergyman of the Baptist Church.

To the public schools of Arkansas and Texas Stonewall Jackson is indebted for his early educational discipline, and in 1901 he was graduated in the Sam Houston Normal School of Texas. He thereafter devoted his attention to teaching in the schools of the Lone Star State until June of the following year when he came to Oklahoma Territory and established his home at Cheyenne, where he assumed the position of cashier of the 'Cheyenne State Bank, with which he has since been actively identified and of which he has been president since 1912. The bank was established in 1898, by Thurmond Brothers, and it is one of the oldest and strongest financial institutions in this section of the state. Its operations are now based on a capital stock of $20,000, and its surplus fund is $2,500. The vice president of the institution is J. H. Kendall; G. B. Lovett is cashier, and J. L. Finch holds the position of assistant cashier.

     Insistently progressive and public-spirited as a citizen, Mr. Jackson has taken a specially loyal interest in all that touches the civic and material welfare and advancement of his home town and county, and he is found aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the democratic party. He and his wife are zealous and influential members of the Baptist Church at Cheyenne, and he is giving effective service as teacher of the Bible class in its Sunday school. Mr. Jackson is affiliated with Cheyenne Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of which he is past master; with Cheyenne Chapter. Royal Arch Masons; with Elk City Commandery, Knights Templars, at the county seat of Beckham County; and with Indian Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, in Oklahoma City. In addition to these Masonic affiliations he holds membership in Cheyenne Lodge No. 237, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Cheyenne Camp, Modern Woodmen of America.

At Cheyenne the year 1904 recorded the marriage of Mr. Jackson to Miss Texia H. Hornbeak, daughter of Rev. James A. Hornbeak, who is a clergyman of the Presbyterian Church and who now resides in the City of Dallas, Texas, his brother, Dr. S. L. Hornbeak, being a member of the faculty of Trinity University, at Waxahachie, Texas, in which institution Mrs. Jackson was graduated. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have one child, Marjorie, who was born July 8, 1907.

[Source:  A Standard History of Oklahoma, Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]



Dee Rodman

Dee Rodman is one of the successful newspaper men of Oklahoma, entered the profession through the ranks of a printer, and is now editor and publisher of the Fairview Enterprise at Fairview in Major County.

Mr. Rodman is a young man, and has spent most of his years in Oklahoma. He was born March 6, 1884, on a farm in Erath County, Texas, a son of John B. and Nancy Jane (Kimbro) Rodman, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Arkansas. John B. Rodman was born December 17, 1860, at Paducah, Kentucky, followed farming and stone masonry for his active career, and is still farming in Beaver County, Oklahoma. He was married in 1880 and his wife was born May 22, 1861, in Hope County, Arkansas, daughter of Thomas W. and Clementine Kimbro, both of whom are natives of Tennessee. John B. Rodman and wife have the following children: Arthur, born August 3, 1882; Dee; Ella, who was born December 19, 1886, and was married in 1902 to L. R. Houx, and they live in Colorado; Fred L. born February 14, 1888; John J., born June 21, 1891; Ila Belle born December 28, 1894; Daisy, born December 21, 1896; and Hugh B., born June 30, 1901.

The first sixteen years of his life Dee Rodman spent on his father's farms in Erath and Ellis counties, Texas. His parents then moved to Oklahoma, locating in Cheyenne, and there he continued his education in the public schools. Mr. Rodman also had the benefit of a two years' business course in the University of Oklahoma at Norman. In 1903 at the age of nineteen he entered the office of the Beacon at Cordell, Oklahoma, and learned by practical experience the printer's trade. In 1905 he came to Fairview and followed his trade as a journeyman printer until 1914. In that year he bought the plant of the Enterprise at Ames, Oklahoma, removed it to Fairview and has since published the Fairview Enterprise, one of the leading papers of Major County. Politically Mr. Rodman is a republican, and he and his wife are members of the Christian Church.

On March 12, 1910, at Fairview he married Miss Vie Morse. Mrs. Rodman was born at Girard, Kansas, November 20, 1891, a daughter of J. E. and Sadie (Nunally) Morse. To their marriage was born one child, Roberta Marian, born May 28, 1914.



Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]



E. L. Gay

E. L. Gay. The pioneer newspaper enterprise at Pawhuska was the establishment of the Osage Journal of which E. L. Gay became editor in 1904, when Pawhuska had very little claim to the business activities and improvements of a town or city. Not only in the newspaper field but in other affairs Mr. Gay's life has been one of varied and interesting experience. He is one of the original Oklahomans, and in fact can claim membership in that goodly company of enterprising men who were denominated as "sooners." He and his family had many interesting associations with frontier life in the Southwest, and there are few who possess in their memory a greater fund of information concerning Oklahoma history than this Pawhuska editor.

Born in Hillsdale County, Michigan, October 12, 1862, E. L. Gay is one of a family of six sons and two daughters, all of whom grew up and are all living except one. He was the fifth in order of age. His parents were Charles H. and Catherine (Fulton) Gay. His grandfather was William H. Gay, who was born in Scotland and was brought to America when a child. About 1830 he settled in Michigan, and in 1852 was appointed United States Indian agent for the Wyandotte tribe at the Wyandotte Agency located near where Kansas City, Kansas, now stands. He held that post until 1856. In that year he and his son James were making a trip from the Indian agency to Fort Leavenworth. While going up the river they were halted by a band of horsemen, and were questioned as to their attitude toward the then critical question of whether Kansas should be admitted as a slave or free state. William H. Gay, it should be remembered, was a Scotchman, and possessed all the courage of his convictions. He expressed himself decisively in favor of making a free state of Kansas, and the words were hardly out of his mouth when he was shot down and killed, while his son was severely wounded. William H. Gay was a real frontier character, and in the early days had made a couple of trips to Texas in the interests of the government, and while there formed a great friendship with Governor Houston. Charles H. Gay, who was born in New York State in 1825, was one of three children, two sons and a daughter, his brother being James H. Gay, already mentioned as the companion of their father at the time of the latter's death, Charles H. Gay spent most of his active career in Southern Michigan and Northern Ohio. He was a millwright by trade in early life but in later years took up the profession of law and became one of the noted young jurists of that section. He married Catherine Fulton, who was of the same family as the noted inventor, Robert Fulton. She died at Pioneer, Ohio, in 1884. At their home in the same place and in the same house Charles H. Gay passed away in 1903.

The early life of E. L. Gay brought him into close touch with the actualities of existence, and he had a hard struggle to gain the education which his ambition craved. He lost his mother in the spring of 1884, when he was twenty-two years of age, and up to that time he had kept quite close to the old homestead. He attended high school at Pioneer, Ohio, and for one year was a student in the Valparaiso Normal School in Indiana. In order to pay his way through school he taught, beginning when he was seventeen years of age, and continued alternately as a teacher and student for five years. His practice was to teach the short winter terms and attend school himself the rest of the year. In 1884, after the death of his mother Mr. Gay went to Kansas City, Kansas, and taught in the Wyandotte County public schools one year, but from there went to Western Kansas and identified himself with the exciting incidents of the frontier. He was also in Texas and for a time was in that region described in the old geographies as "No Man's Land" of Indian Territory. In the spring of 1887 he was in the Panhandle of Texas, looking after a herd of cattle. From there he returned to No Man's Land and in 1889 began the publication of the Tribune at Beaver City. Mr. Gay was closely identified with that movement which is an important chapter in any history of Oklahoma for the erection of a local government in the Panhandle of Oklahoma, and was a member of the first provisional council that adopted a plan of government for '' provisional territory of Cimarron." He was also elected to one of the proposed territorial officers as district attorney. Mr. Gay published the Tribune at Beaver City for about a year. In the meantime he had received an appointment as chief clerk in the first Territorial Legislature of Oklahoma, and spent five months at Guthrie, the capital, during that session. After leaving Beaver City he moved to El Reno and bought the Oklahoma Democrat in that city, which had just been started. He conducted this journal as a partnership for two or three years, and in the meantime had participated in the opening of the Cheyenne and Arapaho lands. Subsequently for one year Mr. Gay conducted the Evening News at Shawnee, and during the boom times that followed railroad construction identified himself with Holdenville. He also lived at Tulsa for a time, and in 1904 came to Pawhuska for the definite purpose of establishing a paper. He was one of the organizers of the Osage Journal Company, and has edited this prominent and influential weekly democratic paper ever since. When Mr. Gay first came to Pawhuska there was not a foot of sidewalk in the town, and not a single brick building. He has used the influence of his paper and has worked as an individual citizen for everything tending to the betterment of his town and has been one of the real factors in its advancement.

In politics he has been a lifelong democrat. He was not only clerk in the first but also in the second Territorial Legislature of Oklahoma, In the early days and while a resident of No Man's Land he held a commission as Deputy United States Marshal under J. J. Dickerson when the federal court of the second Texas District was supposed to have jurisdiction over that country. As such officer he was instrumental in bringing to trial the participants in the Wild Horse Lake massacre which occurred in the central part of that country.

Fraternally he is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Homesteaders and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

While engaged in the newspaper business at El Reno he was married to Alice Crawmer at Wichita, Kansas, on November 26, 1891. Four children have been born to their union, one of them, Eugene Fenton, dying in infancy. Those living are: Leah Frances, Elgin Crawmer and Allen G. Thurman.


Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume V; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]

Walter Ferguson


Walter Ferguson. In the domain of newspaper enterprise in Oklahoma the name of no one family can claim to have more distinctive precedence than that of which Walter Ferguson is a representative, and as a vital force in the field of journalism in this commonwealth his influence has been specially noteworthy, the while he has shown the utmost loyalty to and abiding interest in the vigorous young commonwealth within whose borders he has been a resident since his early childhood, his father having been a distinguished figure in Oklahoma history and he himself having well upheld the prestige of the family name. Mr. Ferguson is editor and publisher of the Cherokee Republican, at Cherokee, the judicial center of Alfalfa County, and of this thriving little city he served as postmaster from August 1, 1911, until August 1, 1915.

Walter Ferguson was born in Chautauqua County, Kansas, on the 20th of October, 1886, and is a son of Thompson B. and Elva U. (Shartel) Ferguson, his father having been the last of the Territorial governors of Oklahoma and having been a specially prominent and influential figure in this history of this state. In a preliminary way quotation may consistently be made from an interesting article which recently appeared in one of the leading daily papers of Oklahoma:

"The first number of the Shattuck (Oklahoma) Republican appeared recently with Tom Ferguson, Jr., as the editor. The accession of young Tom Ferguson to the ranks of Oklahoma publishers is a very welcome one and puts the third paper in the hands of this interesting newspaper family. That it will be a success is fully expected, as the only kind of papers the Ferguson family ever run are successful ones.

'' Thompson B. Ferguson, Sr, originally an Iowa man, was territorial governor of Oklahoma from 1901 to 1906, and established the Watonga Republican in 1892. He has seen his state grow from an Indian wilderness to one of the most advanced and up-to-date of our commonwealths, and he has seen the Republican grow from nothing to one of the most profitable papers in the state. He was married in 1885 to Miss Elva U. Shartel, a connection of several of the prominent families of Kansas and Oklahoma and a distant relative of Senator Robert M. LaFolIette, of Wisconsin. Mrs. Ferguson has been her husband's partner in the publication of the Republican for some years and is a very able writer and business woman. She says, however, that her best claim to newspaper recognition is the fact that she is the mother of Walter Ferguson, who is the publisher of the Cherokee Republican, and generally considered the best young newspaper man of the new state, and of Tom, Jr., who she fully expects to duplicate Walter's success.

'' Walter Ferguson established the Cherokee Republican several years back and has made it the most often quoted paper in Oklahoma. He has a remarkable fine sense of humor, and every week runs a full-page department of satirical criticism of public events. He has recently achieved local fame by running a department of his paper devoted to events in Bugscuffle, Bolivia. The last Indian uprising, five years ago, was led by Chito Harjo (Crazy Snake), who, after days of 'warfare,' disappeared entirely, and only recently was reported to have turned up in Bolivia. Mr. Ferguson seized upon the report to begin getting long letters each week from Crazy Snake, who recounted the doings of the politicians in Bugscuffle. By thus adopting Dean Swift's method to his own use, Mr. Ferguson has been running a department of political satire each week that has seldom been equaled in state newspaper work,—by starting the 'Bugscuffle News' as one page of his paper. Being a republican in a hidebound democratic state, he naturally finds plenty of material upon which to exercise his wit. Mrs. Ferguson conducts the women's department of the Cherokee Republican and is herself a very able writer and quite prominent in the Oklahoma Federation of Women's Clubs. She was elected second vice president of the Oklahoma Editorial Association at the recent meeting of that organization.

"Tom, Jr., who has only voted one time, has learned his trade thoroughly in his father's office and now starts out for himself in a new field, at Shattuck."

The foregoing extracts show that the Ferguson family is one of much prominence in the field of newspaper work in Oklahoma and further pertinent data will be found on other pages, in the sketch of the career of Hon. Thompson B. Ferguson, who came with his family to Oklahoma in 1889, the year that marked the opening of the territory to settlement.

Walter Ferguson was about four years of age at the time when he came with his parents to the virtually untrammeled wilds of the newly organized Territory of Oklahoma and here he has found ample opportunity for "trammeling" to his heart's content, for the making of name and fame for himself, for being a factor in the march of development and progress and for agitating with the sharp darts of satire the minds of those who have followed the red men on to the stage where the latter long held dominion. Mr. Ferguson has snipped all the dignified prongs off the head of Benjamin Franklin's '' art preservative of all arts,'' and can tell you all about the practical details of a "print shop" and the newspaper business as exemplified in Oklahoma. He learned the printing and newspaper business in the office of his father and, finally shaking off the shackles of paternal supervision, he has shown to his sire and the general public that he is able to sit up and do a few things in the newspaper work in an independent way, all of which has been demonstrated in his upbuilding of the substantial business and wide circulation of the Cherokee Republican,—a paper that is individual, that is an admirable exponent of local interests, and that speaks freely and unreservedly concerning political affairs, from the standpoint of the republican party principles. Mr. Ferguson edited and published the first Blue Book of Oklahoma, and he is alert, vigorous and progressive in his civic attitude, a young man of thought and action and one who has secure vantage-ground in popular confidence and good will. His service as postmaster of Cherokee was marked by a careful and effective administration and his retirement came because he did not wish further to harrass by his preferment in office the governmental administration that is at variance with the political princples and policies of which he is an advocate. Mr. Ferguson is affiliated with the Masonic Fraternity, is one of the most active in the support of measures and enterprises tending to advance the welfare of his home city, county and state, and shares with the other members of the Ferguson family in generous popular esteem.

In the year 1908 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ferguson to Miss Lucia Loomis, daughter of Dr. Edward O. Loomis, a prominent physician and influential citizen of Wapanucka, Johnson County, this state, and the one child of this union is Loomis Benton, was was born in 1909.Walter Ferguson

Walter Ferguson. In the domain of newspaper enterprise in Oklahoma the name of no one family can claim to have more distinctive precedence than that of which Walter Ferguson is a representative, and as a vital force in the field of journalism in this commonwealth his influence has been specially noteworthy, the while he has shown the utmost loyalty to and abiding interest in the vigorous young commonwealth within whose borders he has been a resident since his early childhood, his father having been a distinguished figure in Oklahoma history and he himself having well upheld the prestige of the family name. Mr. Ferguson is editor and publisher of the Cherokee Republican, at Cherokee, the judicial center of Alfalfa County, and of this thriving little city he served as postmaster from August 1, 1911, until August 1, 1915.

Walter Ferguson was born in Chautauqua County, Kansas, on the 20th of October, 1886, and is a son of Thompson B. and Elva U. (Shartel) Ferguson, his father having been the last of the Territorial governors of Oklahoma and having been a specially prominent and influential figure in this history of this state. In a preliminary way quotation may consistently be made from an interesting article which recently appeared in one of the leading daily papers of Oklahoma:

"The first number of the Shattuck (Oklahoma) Republican appeared recently with Tom Ferguson, Jr., as the editor. The accession of young Tom Ferguson to the ranks of Oklahoma publishers is a very welcome one and puts the third paper in the hands of this interesting newspaper family. That it will be a success is fully expected, as the only kind of papers the Ferguson family ever run are successful ones.

'' Thompson B. Ferguson, Sr, originally an Iowa man, was territorial governor of Oklahoma from 1901 to 1906, and established the Watonga Republican in 1892. He has seen his state grow from an Indian wilderness to one of the most advanced and up-to-date of our commonwealths, and he has seen the Republican grow from nothing to one of the most profitable papers in the state. He was married in 1885 to Miss Elva U. Shartel, a connection of several of the prominent families of Kansas and Oklahoma and a distant relative of Senator Robert M. LaFolIette, of Wisconsin. Mrs. Ferguson has been her husband's partner in the publication of the Republican for some years and is a very able writer and business woman. She says, however, that her best claim to newspaper recognition is the fact that she is the mother of Walter Ferguson, who is the publisher of the Cherokee Republican, and generally considered the best young newspaper man of the new state, and of Tom, Jr., who she fully expects to duplicate Walter's success.

'' Walter Ferguson established the Cherokee Republican several years back and has made it the most often quoted paper in Oklahoma. He has a remarkable fine sense of humor, and every week runs a full-page department of satirical criticism of public events. He has recently achieved local fame by running a department of his paper devoted to events in Bugscuffle, Bolivia. The last Indian uprising, five years ago, was led by Chito Harjo (Crazy Snake), who, after days of 'warfare,' disappeared entirely, and only recently was reported to have turned up in Bolivia. Mr. Ferguson seized upon the report to begin getting long letters each week from Crazy Snake, who recounted the doings of the politicians in Bugscuffle. By thus adopting Dean Swift's method to his own use, Mr. Ferguson has been running a department of political satire each week that has seldom been equaled in state newspaper work,—by starting the 'Bugscuffle News' as one page of his paper. Being a republican in a hidebound democratic state, he naturally finds plenty of material upon which to exercise his wit. Mrs. Ferguson conducts the women's department of the Cherokee Republican and is herself a very able writer and quite prominent in the Oklahoma Federation of Women's Clubs. She was elected second vice president of the Oklahoma Editorial Association at the recent meeting of that organization.

"Tom, Jr., who has only voted one time, has learned his trade thoroughly in his father's office and now starts out for himself in a new field, at Shattuck."

The foregoing extracts show that the Ferguson family is one of much prominence in the field of newspaper work in Oklahoma and further pertinent data will be found on other pages, in the sketch of the career of Hon. Thompson B. Ferguson, who came with his family to Oklahoma in 1889, the year that marked the opening of the territory to settlement.

Walter Ferguson was about four years of age at the time when he came with his parents to the virtually untrammeled wilds of the newly organized Territory of Oklahoma and here he has found ample opportunity for "trammeling" to his heart's content, for the making of name and fame for himself, for being a factor in the march of development and progress and for agitating with the sharp darts of satire the minds of those who have followed the red men on to the stage where the latter long held dominion. Mr. Ferguson has snipped all the dignified prongs off the head of Benjamin Franklin's '' art preservative of all arts,'' and can tell you all about the practical details of a "print shop" and the newspaper business as exemplified in Oklahoma. He learned the printing and newspaper business in the office of his father and, finally shaking off the shackles of paternal supervision, he has shown to his sire and the general public that he is able to sit up and do a few things in the newspaper work in an independent way, all of which has been demonstrated in his upbuilding of the substantial business and wide circulation of the Cherokee Republican,—a paper that is individual, that is an admirable exponent of local interests, and that speaks freely and unreservedly concerning political affairs, from the standpoint of the republican party principles. Mr. Ferguson edited and published the first Blue Book of Oklahoma, and he is alert, vigorous and progressive in his civic attitude, a young man of thought and action and one who has secure vantage-ground in popular confidence and good will. His service as postmaster of Cherokee was marked by a careful and effective administration and his retirement came because he did not wish further to harrass by his preferment in office the governmental administration that is at variance with the political princples and policies of which he is an advocate. Mr. Ferguson is affiliated with the Masonic Fraternity, is one of the most active in the support of measures and enterprises tending to advance the welfare of his home city, county and state, and shares with the other members of the Ferguson family in generous popular esteem.

In the year 1908 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ferguson to Miss Lucia Loomis, daughter of Dr. Edward O. Loomis, a prominent physician and influential citizen of Wapanucka, Johnson County, this state, and the one child of this union is Loomis Benton, was was born in 1909.

[Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma”; Volume IV; Joseph B. Thoburn; 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]



Joseph A. Innis

JOSEPH A. INNIS. The present efficient incumbent of the office of county surveyor of Woodward County has served consecutively in this position since 1900, and is one of the sterling pioneers and honored and influential citizens of the county, where he established his residence at the time when this section was thrown open to white settlement, as a part of the historic Cherokee Strip, or Outlet. Mr. Innis is the owner of valuable farm property in the county and has been one of the valiant and resouceful men who have been foremost in the development of Woodward County along both civic and industrial lines.
On the homestead farm of his parents, in Ripley County, Indiana, Joseph A. Innis was born on the 8th of May, 1861, and he thus came into the world about the time when his native land was plunged into the vortex of fratercidal war. He is a son of James and Sarah (Runner) Innis, both natives of the Hoosier state, and representatives of sterling pioneer families of that commonwealth. James Innis was born in Ripley County, Indiana, in 1832, and at the time of his death, in 1901, he was a resident of the Village of May, Woodward County, Oklahoma, his entire active career having been one of close and successful identification with the basic industries of agriculture and stock growing, though in his youth he served for a time as a teacher and a civil engineer. He first came to what is now the State of Oklahoma in 1887, but after remaining for a time in the section long designated as No Man's Land, which included the present County of Beaver. He thus became a resident of Oklahoma even before the territory of this name had been created from the original Indian Territory. His son, Joseph A., subject of this review, had preceded him to this frontier region by about a year. The marriage of James Innis to Miss Sarah Runner was solemnized in 1853, and Mrs. Innis died in what is now Beaver County, Oklahoma, in 1889, the year that the new territory was thrown open to settlement. She was born in 1833 and was a daughter of David Runner, who immigrated from Germany and became a pioneer settler in Indiana. Of the children of James and Sarah (Runner) Innis the eldest is Milford Taylor, who was born in 1859; Joseph A., of this sketch, was the second in order of birth; John Newton was born in 1863; Eward was born in 1867 and died in 1869; James D. was born in 1870; William Isaac in 1873; Robert E. in 1878; and Archibald D. in 1882. All save one of the children are living.
Joseph A. Innis was reared and educated in his native state, where he was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home farm and made good use of the advantages afforded in the public schools of the locality and period. In 1884, as a young man of twenty-three years, he came to the West and established his residence in Barber County, Kansas, as a pioneer of that section of the Sunflower state. In 1886 he came to the No Man's Land of the present State of Oklahoma, and in that section of the Indian Territory he became a pioneer agriculturist and stock grower. He there continued operations until the Cherokee Strip was thrown open to settlement in 1893, when he participated in the rush into the new country, and entered claim to a homestead in what is now Woodward County. He vigorously instituted the reclamation and improvement of this property and on his land was eventually established the now thriving Village of May, of which he was virtually the founder, and which was named in honor of the only daughter of his first marriage.
Mr. Innis developed his land into one of the well improved and valuable farms of Woodward County and there he continued to maintain his home until 1900, when he was elected county surveyor and removed to the City of Woodward, judicial center and metropolis of the county. He had gained broad and practical experience as a civil engineer in the days of his youth, and his technical facility has been reinforced by careful study, so that he is eminently qualified for the important office which he has held consecutively since the year noted, the popular estimate placed upon his official services being indicated by his re-election at successive intervals of two years. He has done a large volume of important surveying work in the county and has had supervision also of much other civil engineering, of even more technical order. He still retains ownership of his farm, is significantly vital and progressive in his civic attitude, is always ready to give his co-operation in the furtherance of measures and enterprises advanced for the general good of the community, and is a citizen who is not only one of the well known pioneers of this section of the state, but also one whose circle of friends is limited only by that of his acquaintances. He is a stalwart advocate of the cause of the republican party, is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
At Butler, Missouri, on the 2nd of August, 1881, Mr. Innis wedded Miss Mary Maple, who was born in Bates County, that state, in 1864, a daughter of Jehu and Harriet (Fuller) Maple, and she died on the 23rd of April, 1888, soon after the family home had been established in what is now Beaver County, Oklahoma, and about one month after the birth of her only daughter, the three children who survive her being: Harry B., born in 1883; Asa J., born in 1885; and Mary Prudence, born March 11, 1888.
On the 23rd of June, 1904, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Innis to Miss Etta C. Strong, who was born in Parke County, Indiana, on the 21st day of August, 1877, and who is a daughter of John and Mary (Jones) Strong, likewise natives of that county. Mr. and Mrs. Innis have five children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here noted: Joseph T., March 9, 1905; Eva May, December 13, 1907; Charles T. Bruce, November 29, 1909; Lester Gail, February 6, 1913; and Crystal Elnora, February 14, 1915.

[Source: “A Standard History of Oklahoma” Volume IV; by Joseph B. Thoburn; copyright 1916; Transcribed by Andaleen Whitney]



CUNNINGHAM, JAMES D.

Owner of St. James Hotel Leaves a $100,000 Estate

James D. Cunningham, 55 years old, died at the St. Mary's Hospital at 12:55 o'clock yesterday. Mr. Cunningham has been in poor health for several weeks. He was born in Madison, Wis., February 11, 1856. He lived at Sargent, Neb., where he engaged in the hardware and implement business with his brother-in-law, and at Brokenbow, Neb., where he was in the live stock business. In 1898 he moved to Enid, Ok., and started a hardware store, also serving a term as county treasurer for Garfield County, Oklahoma. In 1902 he moved to Keytoeville, Mo., where he made his home. He left an estate valued at $100,000 in Kansas City. He owned the St. James Hotel at Tenth and Locust streets and land in Southern Missouri and Oklahoma. His wife and seven children, Mrs. T. W. Smith, Mrs. George D. Key, both of Lawton, Ok., John W. Cunningham, a student of the University of Missouri; Orval J. Cunningham, a physician of this city and Grace Gladys, Leota Ellen and James D. Jr., all living at home. (Kansas City Star, May 15, 1911, page 3)
[Submitted by Peggy Thompson]


James Benjamin Rawls

RAWLS, JAMES BENJAMIN, lawyer and probate judge, was born at Suggsville, Clarke County; son of John Franklin and Lucretia Jaqueline (Davis) Rawls, the former a native of Harris County, Ga., later a resident of Mobile; grandson of William and Frances (Dancy) Rawls of Harris County, Ga., and of Shugan Ransom and Mary (Sorsby) Davis of near Ransom's Bridge, Halifax County, N. C, the former served in the War of 1812, from North Carolina, stationed at Norfolk, Va.; great-grandson of William and Amy (Ransom) Davis, of North Carolina, and of Benjamin and Susan (Davis) Sorsby, the former was of English descent, and served in the Revolutionary Army, enlisted in Nash County, N. C, under Capt. Jacob Turner's company, 3rd North Carolina infantry regiment, commanded by Col. Jethro Sumner. He received his early education in private schools in Mobile and at Summerville institute, Noxubee County, Miss. He read law by a correspondence course and entered upon the practice, having successfully passed an examination before the presiding judge of the circuit court of Washington County, 1905. He has served as notary public and justice of the peace several years; was county commissioner two terms; probate judge one term, and elected tax commissioner of Washington County, 1907, an office he still holds. He was a member of the home guard of Mobile at the close of the War of Secession, having been taken prisoner at the capture of Mobile and held until Lee's surrender at Appomattox. He is a Democrat, Methodist, and Mason. Married: February 4, 1873, near Columbus, Ky., to Ruth Morrison, daughter of Edwin Ruthven and Harriet Magruda (Brown) Ray, of that place; granddaughter of Col. Peter W. and Susan (Ray) Brown of Lebanon, Ky., and Dennis and Nancy (Hayes) Ray of Clinton, Ky. Children: 1. Carrie L., m. John C Maclay, Moss Point, Miss.; 2. Harriet M., m. William R. Leon, Deer Park; 3. James B., Jr., unmarried, Lucedale, Miss.; 4. Mary D., m. Dr. Warren D. Ratliff, Lucedale, Miss.; 5. Ellen H., unmarried, St. Stephens; 6. Ruth R., md. Samuel E. McGlathery, Chatom; 7. Dennis B., Mobile; 8. Robert M., Francis, Okla.; 9. Fletcher H., St. Stephens; 10. Antoinette, St. Stephens; 11. Louise D., Mobile; 12. Edgar D., St. Stephens; 13. Ebenezer T., St. Stephens. Residence: St. Stephens.

[History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 4 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen, 1921 - Transcribed by AFOFG]



James K. Beauchamp

Beauchamp, James K., lawyer and jurist of Kansas City, Mo.,was born April 22, 1859, in Viola, Del. For three years he was probate judge of Garfield county. Since 1902 he has been associate justice of the supreme court of Oklahoma.
[Herringshaw's American Blue-Book of Biography by Thomas William Herringshaw, 1914 – Transcribed by AFOFG]




Stewart Bates Eakin

Eakin, Stewart Bates, banker of Eugene, Okla., was born Aug. 28, 1846, in Elgin, 11l. He is vice-president of the First National bank.
Herringshaw's American Blue-Book of Biography by Thomas William Herringshaw, 1914 – Transcribed by AFOFG]

RET H. ERWIN

A well-known and highly esteemed citizen of Ada, Pontotoc County, where he is now one of the interested principals of the Pontotoc County Abstract Company, Mr. Erwin is one of the progressive and loyal young men who was virtually reared under the primitive conditions that obtained [? sic] in the former Indian Territory, and he has kept pace with the march of progress, has proved a resourceful, steadfast and reliable citizen and has done his part in the furtherance of civic and material advancement. His high standing in his home community is indicated by the fact that he served two consecutive terms as county treasurer of Pontotoc County, a position from which he retired on the 1st of July, 1915, the provisions of Oklahoma law being such that no candidate for such county office is eligible for re-election for a third term.
Mr. Erwin was born in the southeastern part of the State of Missouri, in the year 1883, and is a son of Joe and Fannie (Davis) Erwin. His father, a native of the State of Tennessee, was one of the early white settlers of the Chickasaw Nation country of Indian Territory, and became a prominent and influential factor in the social, industrial and commercial development of this now favored section of Oklahoma. He served as a valiant soldier of the Confederacy during the Civil war and was a resident of Missouri thereafter until his removal to Indian Territory, where he became a pioneer settler in the Chickasaw Nation, as previously intimated.
The early education of Ret H. Erwin was obtained in subscription schools maintained in the Chickasaw Nation, and in one of these undeniably primitive schools, in the Sulphur Springs district of Pontotoc County, he had a number of Indian children as his fellow-pupils. He made good use of these meager scholastic advantages and in the broad schools of experience he has effectively rounded out his education in later years. After Oklahoma was admitted to statehood Mr. Erwin was appointed deputy clerk of Pontotoc County, and of this position he continued the incumbent until he was elected county treasurer, in 1910. His careful and able administration of the fiscal affairs of the county resulted in his re-election in 1912, and his record in this important office stands unequivocally to his credit and to that of the county which he thus served. His brother-in-law, Lee Daggs, who has been his assistant in the office of county treasurer, succeeded him in office and is now in tenure of the position.
Mr. Erwin accords allegiance to the democratic party, is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias and the independent Order of the Odd Fellows, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Baptist Church in their home city. Mr. Erwin has two brothers and three sisters, concerning whom the following brief data may consistently be given: G. A. and P. F. are prosperous farmers near Ada; Mrs. Lee Daggs is the wife of the present county treasurer of Pontotoc County; and Jeanette and Mary are with their brothers.
On the 5th of April, 1913, Mr. Erwin wedded Mrs. Effie Bryant, of Ada, and their two children are Lucile and Ret H., Jr. Mrs. Erwin also had two children by a former marriage, Ambrose Bryant and Marie Bryant.
(A Standard History of Oklahoma, transcribed by Sandra Stutzman)

ALEX RENNIE

Among the enterprising and successful business men of the growing young commonwealth of Oklahoma are some who mingle in their veins the blood of the white settlers with that of the original possessors of the soil. Of this type is Alex Rennie, now engaged in the insurance, real estate and loan business in Tishomingo, Johnston County. Mr. Rennie was born in Tishomingo in 1872, the son of Alex and Mary (Humphrey) Rennie. The father, a native of Toronto, Canada, came to Fort Washita, Indian Territory, in 1859, and during the Civil war was a soldier in the Confederate army. He was one of the first merchants in Tishomingo and served a term as treasurer of the Chickasaw Nation. Mr. Rennie's paternal grandfather was a native of Scotland. His maternal greatgrandmother was a full blood Chickasaw. His maternal grandfather was a pioneer farmer of the Chickasaw country and for a number of years operated a mill near Tishomingo. Holmes Colbert, a half brother of his mother, was one of the foremost men of the Chickasaw country and represented the nation for several years in Washington.
Mr. Rennie was educated in the public schools of Denison, Texas, including the high school, and at the Denison Business College, being graduated from both the last name institutions. When eighteen years old he entered the employ of an uncle at Lehigh, Oklahoma, and remained there for three years. Subsequently returning to Tishomingo, he engaged in the insurance, real estate and loan business and has since been thus occupied. It was partly under his supervision that the Tishomingo town site, as now platted, was laid out, when the Rock Island road built here [? Sic]. The original town site had been platted under tribal government and lacked uniformity in lots and streets, and in making the new plat much confusion ensued. As an instance of this, Mr. Rennie found that after the new plat was made practically all of seven acres he owned on the original plat had been consumed in streets. Many of the streets of the town, which covers 545 acres, are named after prominent Indian families and other pioneers of the Chickasaw Nation. In addition to his regular business already mentioned, Mr. Rennie owns some valuable farms in Jackson County, and is an advocate of scientific, progressive farming. At one time he held a position under the tribal government, being collector of the one per cent revenue tax on merchants. His brother William, now deceased, was treasurer of the Chickasaw Nation during the first per capita payment to the tribe, at which time Charles Carter, now a member of Congress from Oklahoma, was secretary of the nation.
Mr. Rennie was married in 1900, at Stonewall, to Miss Lulu Burris, daughter of one of the leading men of the Chickasaw Nation for many years, who held nearly every office in the Indian government save that of governor. Mr. and Mrs. Rennie are the parents of four children: Louise, Helen, Dorothy and Alexia. Mr. Rennie is a member of the Presbyterian Church, of the Tishomingo Commercial Club, and of the Royal Arch and Scottish Rite divisions of the Masonic order. He has a brother, John F., who is a railroad man at Denison, Texas, and a sister, Mrs. U. S. Allender, wife of a druggist at Pauls Valley. Giving evidence more of the Caucasian blood in him than of the Indian blood, and possessing the progressive characteristics of the leading white men who have made this old nation a land of happy homes, thriving farms and commendable public institutions, Mr. Rennie is typical of the generation that is accomplishing most for a higher civilization here.
(A Standard History of Oklahoma, transcribed by Sandra Stutzman)


WILLIAM W. JONES

From the time of his early childhood has this well known citizen, who served for three years as one of the efficient commissioners of the City of Bartlesville, the progressive judicial center of Washington County, been a resident of what is now the State of Oklahoma, and he is a representative of one of its honored pioneer families. Mr. Jones is now devoting his time to looking after the real estate holdings of himself and father and is the representative of the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company of Newark, New Jersey, in the City of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. He claims the Lone Star State as the place of his nativity and was about two years old when he accompanied his parents on the overland journey from Texas to Indian Territory, his medium of transportation having been one of the old-time "prairie schooners," and his mother having driven the team attached to the same, the [?sic] while his father drove another team and gave careful supervision to the primitive caravan and the care of the live stock which was driven through by men hired for the purpose. He whose name initiates this article has imbibed deeply of the progressive spirit of the state in which he was reared and has witnessed its development and upbuilding with satisfaction, his loyalty to Oklahoma being of the most insistent type and being marked by distinctive public spirit.
Mr. Jones was born in Fannin County, Texas, in the year 1883, and is a son of John W. S. and Martha T. (Stowe) Jones, the former of whom was born and reared in Illinois and the latter of whom was born in Indiana but reared to maturity in Illinois, where her marriage was solemnized. In 1878 the parents removed to Texas, and there the father was identified with the cattle and farming industries until 1885, when he came with his family to Indian Territory, under conditions that have already been described. They arrived in what is now Washington County in July of that year and location was made on a pioneer farm two miles east of Bartlesville. John W. S. Jones here developed a valuable landed estate and achieved marked success as a farmer and stock-grower. He continued his residence on this place until about the year 1900, since which time he has lived virtually retired in the City of Bartlesville. He still owns a valuable landed estate of 300 acres in Washington County and the same is devoted to diversified agriculture and the raising of live stock. Mr. Jones is one of the sterling pioneer citizens of Washington County, has done well his part in the development of this section of the state, and is held in high esteem by all who know him, his wife, who had been his devoted helpmeet, having been called to the life eternal in January, 1901, at the age of forty-four years, and she is survived by four children?Francis A., who is one of the prosperous agriculturists of Washington County, his farm being situated a few miles south of Bartlesville; William W., who is the immediate subject of this review; and Ora Dessie and Ola Bessie, twins, the former being the wife of Charles B. Skinner, who resides on a farm two miles south of Bartlesville, and the latter being the wife of Roy E. Spear, assistant city engineer of Bartlesville.
William W. Jones has been a resident of Washington County from his virtual infancy and his childhood was passed under the conditions and influences of the pioneer period in the history of this section. He acquired his early education in the somewhat primitive local schools of the period, and the first which he attended was in the old Missionary Baptist Church building, four miles southeast of Bartlesville. Thereafter his studies were continued in a schoolhouse that was built by his father and a few other men for the purpose and that was supported by him and other settlers in the vicinity, the teacher receiving $1 a month for each child to whom he imparted instruction. Mr. Jones continued to attend school about four months each year until he had attained to the age of sixteen years, and in the meanwhile he learned the lessons of practical industry under the careful direction of his father, the latter having earnestly encouraged the children in the developing of self-reliance, ambition and a determination to achieve worthy success. After leaving the rural school Mr. Jones attended the public schools of Bartlesville for two terms?one of seven and the other of nine months' duration. At the age of eighteen years he felt his ambition to acquire a more liberal education so definitely quickened that he made the desire one of action. Through his own resources largely, he defrayed the expenses of a three years' course in school at Independence, Kansas, where he pursued high school studies and also completed a regular business course, so that he won and received diplomas in each department, in 1904, at which time he was about twenty years of age. The ambition of the young student and worker was not yet satisfied, as shown by the fact that in the same year he realized his heart's desire and took unto himself a wife. The year 1904 recorded, at Independence, Kansas, his marriage to Miss Grace McCreery, who was born and reared in the Sunflower State and who is a daughter of John L. McCreery, now a resident of Bartlesville, Mr. and Mrs. Jones have five children, namely: Ray Winfield, Elsie Genevieve, Charles Francis, Helen Laurie, and Robert Lincoln.
After the completion of his education work at Independence Mr. Jones returned to Oklahoma and engaged in the insurance business at Bartlesville. On the 1st of January, 1905, he removed to Shawnee, Pottawatomie County, where he continued in the same line of enterprise until the spring of the following year, when he returned to Bartlesville and assumed the position of bookkeeper in the Bartlesville National Bank, a position of which he continued the incumbent two years. For the ensuing two years he was retained as an auditor and bookkeeper in the service of the Sachem & Mid-West Oil Company and in 1910, when Bartlesville adopted the commission system of municipal government, he was appointed secretary of the board of city commissioners, in which capacity he served, besides holding simultaneously the office of city treasurer, until the spring of 1912, when further municipal honors were conferred upon him in his election to the responsible office of commissioner of finance and supplies. His administration has been characterized by efficiency and a loyal effort to do all in his power to further the civic and industrial welfare of his home city, and he was one of the popular and valued municipal executives of Bartlesville. Mr. Jones is aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the republican party, and is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World, and the Fraternal Aid Association. He is a stockholder and director of the Fish Creek Oil & Gas Company, of which he is serving as secretary, and he is the owner of his residence property in Bartlesville. For the first three months after their marriage he and his wife lived in the home of his parents, and since that time they have maintained an independent home, their first child having been born at Shawnee and the other in the City of Bartlesville.
Mr. and Mrs. Jones are popular in the representative social activities of their home city and are zealous members of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he served six years as superintendent of the Sunday school and of whose board of trustees he is a member at the present time. He was treasurer of the building committee at the time when the present beautiful church edifice was erected, and he has stated in a facetious way that he has held practically every lay office in the church save that of president of the Ladies' Aid Society.
(A Standard History of Oklahoma, transcribed by Sandra Stutzman)




 

 

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