Baker County Genealogy Trails
Tracing Your Ancestors Along the Oregon Trail

Biographies

A

Anderson, Gustav
B

Brown, Prentiss
C

Clifford, Morton
Correll, Samuel
Curtis, William
D

Drowley, William
E

F

Fyfer, Julius
H

Haines, Israel (1)
Haines, Israel (2)
Haines, I. D.
Halladay, Wilbur
Hart, Julius
Heilner, Joseph
Heilner, Sigismund
Hindman, Homer
Holcomb, James
Hyde, Charles
I - J

Ison, Luther
Johns, Charles
K

Kinnison, J.P. & H. A.
L

Lachner, William
Levens, William
M

McArthur, Lewis
McColloch, Claude
Messick, John
Moomaw, D. L.
Moore, Charles
Mount, Orville
Murphy, Charles
N

Newbury, William
Nichols, James
O

Olmstead, Martin
P - Q


R

Rand, John
Rea, James
S

Smith, Allan
Stewart, Nelson
T

Trimble, John
U - V

W

White, William
X - Y - Z

Additional biographies can be found here

Hindman, Homer

HOMER HALLOCK HINDMAN

Homer Hallock Hindman, who for many years was a prosperous farmer and stock raiser of Oregon, demonstrated in his life the possibilities for the attainment of success, as his prosperity came to him as the direct reward of persistent and earnest labor. He was born in Iowa, January 3, 1862, his parents being William and Sarah Hindman. The father was a native of Pennsylvania and in early life removed to Iowa, where he was married, his wife being a native of Nova Scotia. He took up the occupation of farming and in the year 1864 came to the Pacific coast, settling first in Baker, Oregon, in which locality he secured a homestead claim. He then turned his attention to the cattle business, in which he was very successful. In fact he was associated with many interests and activities which constituted valuable forces in the early development of the region. He was mining for a time, at Auburn and in 1915 he retired from active business, removing to Los Angeles, California, where his remaining days were passed, his death there occurring in 1917. His wife had died before the removal to Oregon, passing away at the age of about fifty years.

Homer Hallock Hindman acquired a common school education in Baker City, Oregon, and later pursued a course in a business college at Portland. He afterward returned to Baker and in connection with his brother followed farming and stock raising, his business affairs being most profitably and wisely conducted. Year after year their interests increased and at the time of the death of H. H. Hindman in 1904 the brothers owned about eight hundred head of fine stock and a good farm. Subsequent to his demise the stock was sold, but his widow still continues to hold her
interest in the farm.

It was on the 13th of November, 1889, in Baker City, that Mr. Hindman was married to Miss Grace Oakes, a daughter of Omega and Isabella Oakes, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania. The father removed to Iowa after the Civil war and engaged in photography there until 1875, when he came to the west, establishing his home at Roseburg, Oregon. In 1887 he removed to Baker City, where his remaining days were passed. He had rendered active service to the Union army during the Civil war and as he grew old he was accorded a pension and retired from active business. He passed away in January, 1918, but his widow survives and Is now making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Hindman. To Mr. and Mrs. Hindman were born the following, named: Isabelle, whose birth occurred in Baker City, November 17, 1898, and who was married August 16, 1920, to Jack R. Dooley, their home being now In Marshfield, Oregon; Richard C, who was born in Baker, May 16, 1903; Dorothy, who was born June 16, 1904, and is a student in the high school at Baker City; two children who died in infancy; Fay, who was born in Baker in 1891 and on the 11th of October, 1915, became the wife of Bernhard Baer, becoming the mother of a son. Homer, on the 318t of July, 1916, while her death occurred on the 9th of August following, her little son now making his home with his grandmother, Mrs. Hindman.

Mr. Hindman was at one time a member of the state militia. He paid very little attention to politics, however, but on one occasion, in 1892, was a candidate for the office of sheriff. He voted with the democratic party and fraternally he was connected with the Elks and with the Knights of Pythias.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Smith, Allan

ALLAN ADOLPHUS SMITH

Allan Adolphus Smith, who since 1910 has engaged in the practice of law at Baker, was born in Humboldt, Iowa, April 15, 1885, and is a son of Jacob and Louisa Smith, the former a successful farmer and prominent business man of Iowa. The family came originally from Pennsylvania, where representatives of the name had lived through several generations.

In his student days Allan Adolphus Smith attended the Highland Park University at Des Moines, Iowa, and also became a student in Humboldt College at Humboldt, Iowa, from which institution he was graduated in 1908. He then took up the profession of teaching, becoming head of the commercial department of the high school at Baker, a position which he occupied from 1908 until 1910. In the latter year he became associated with the Hon. John L. Rand in the practice of law. for he had previously devoted his leisure hours to the study of law and had qualified for admission to the bar. In 1916 he opened offices of his own, since which time he has practiced independently at Baker. He has wide and accurate knowledge of legal principles and prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care, while his presentation of his cause is always clear, strong and logical. Aside from his chosen calling he has become identified with other interests and is now a director of the Eastern Oregon Light & Power Company.

On the 19th of June, 1912, at The Dalles, Oregon, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Mabel A. Garrett, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Garrett, of Millston, Wisconsin, and representatives of the well known pioneer Mills family of the latter state. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born two children, Lois and Hugh.

In his political views Mr. Smith has always been a democrat and from 1919 until 1921 he represented his district in the state legislature. Unable to fight as a soldier he did his bit in the war activities and took a prominent part in all the various drives. He is now vice president of the Baker Chamber of Commerce, to which position he was chosen in 1918, and he has been a director thereof since 1913. He is also a director of Baker Chapter of the American Red Cross and in other ways has been closely identified with the substantial development and progress of the community and with all that makes for good citizenship and the upholding of high ideals.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Brown, Prentiss

PRENTISS BROWN

Prentiss Brown, elected superintendent of schools at Baker, Oregon, in April, 1920, bringing to bear in his present position the qualities well developed by thorough training in the State University, was born in Lebanon, Linn county, Oregon, October 30, 1893, his parents being William Marsden and Flora Luphanna (Crandall) Brown. The father was born in Iowa, August 7. 1869, and when eleven years of age became a resident of Kansas, where he remained until 1891 and then took up his abode in Lebanon, Oregon. He taught school for five years and afterward founded the Lebanon Criterion, of which he was editor and publisher for the period of a decade. Subsequently he turned his attention to the practice of law and also engaged in the banking business, becoming one of the representative and prominent men of Lebanon, contributing in large measure to its growth and upbuilding.

Prentiss Brown, after mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools of his native city and following his graduation from the Lebanon high school with the class of 1912, attended the University of Oregon, winning his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1916. While in the university he took active part in athletics and forensics and was president of his class during the junior year. Following his graduation he taught history and was athletic coach in the high school of Centralia, Washington.

On the 7th of April, 1917, Mr. Brown enlisted for service in the World war, joining the Field Artillery at Seattle, Washington. He was later transferred to the Presidio at San Francisco, California, and was ordered to report to the Officers' Training Camp. In August, 1917, however, he was discharged for defective vision, after which he was employed as head of the history department in the Walla Walla high school and later was elected principal of the high school at Baker. After two month's work in the latter position he resigned in order to enter the army, the standard for visual requirement having been lowered. He re-enlisted in October, 1918, and was again with the khaki clad boys, serving with the heavy artillery until he received his second discharge. Returning to Baker he was elected to the superintendency of the schools of this city in April, 1920, and is giving excellent satisfaction as the head of the school system, tor his standards are high and he has introduced various improved methods.

At Corvallis, Oregon, on the 318t of August, 1916, Mr. Brown was married to Miss Ida May Humphrey, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Humphrey. Her mother, a native of Iowa, crossed the plains by wagon in 1880 with her father, David Perin who settled near Monroe. Walter S. Humphrey was the son of an Oregon pioneer, Albert Humphrey, and was born near Eugene in 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Brown have become parents of two children: Flora May, born May 1, 1918; and Barbara Ellen, born September 12, 1919.

In his political views Mr. Brown is a republican and at all times keeps well informed concerning the vital questions and issues of the day. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is serving on the board of directors of the Baker Y. M. C. A. and also of the Red Cross for Baker and Grant counties. He has. Membership in the Baker County Chamber of Commerce, the Baker Country Club and the National Educational Association. He is also a Mason, identified with Lebanon Lodge, No. 44, A. F. & A. M.; and he belongs to Baker Lodge, No. 33S, B. P. O. E.; the Delta Tau Delta, a college fraternity; and to Baker Post, No. 41, of the American Legion, of which he is adjutant. Progressiveness in the educational field, patriotism in citizenship and high standards in every relation of life have made Prentiss Brown a man whom to know is to esteem and honor and he has a host of warm friends in Baker and throughout this section of the state.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Halliday, Wilbur

W. A. HALLIDAY

Wilbur A. Halliday is engaged in the insurance business at Baker, Oregon, where he is also conducting an extensive automobile business. He is actuated in all that he does by a most progressive spirit and step by step has advanced to a place of prominence in connection with the business activity and consequent development of this section of the state. He was born at Grants Pass, Oregon, in 1882, his foster parents being Thomas W. and Emma H. (Ferguson) Halliday, both of whom were natives of Ohio. They came to Oregon in pioneer times, settling at Vale and there the father followed farming for a number of years. He has been called to the home beyond, but the mother is still living.

Wilbur A. Halliday acquired a common school education at Vale, and Ontario, this state, and also pursued a partial course in the Agricultural College at Corvallis, Oregon. This was followed with a commercial course in Portland and thus liberal training well qualified him for life's practical and responsible duties. He came to Baker in 1905 and was here employed in an insurance office for a time, while later he entered a law office and subsequently was connected with one of the banking institutions of the city. He established business on his own account in 1907 by opening a real estate and insurance office and after eleven years, or in 1918, he withdrew from the real estate business, but continued his insurance agency. About this time he turned his attention to the automobile business by securing the agency of the Overland, Oakland and Willys Knight cars and further broadened the scope of his business to include the sale of tires and accessories. He established the largest and most complete automobile repair shop in the city and today his automobile business is one of extensive and gratifying proportions. He annually sells a large number of cars, while his trade in accessories and tires is gratifying and the size of his repair shop is at once indicative of the large amount of business which he does in that connection. He also owns a farm and some real estate and has become one of the leading and prosperous citizens of Baker.

It was here in 1907 that Mr. Halliday was united In marriage to Miss Ethel Parker, a native of Baker and a daughter of Thomas and Verdie (Lewis) Parker, who were pioneer settlers, their names being recorded on the list of the early residents of the state. In pioneer times the father was manager of a hotel and afterward filled the position of county clerk. He lived for some years at La Grande, but afterward returned to Baker and both he and his wife have departed this life. Mr. and Mrs. Halliday have two children: an adopted daughter, Elizabeth, who was born in Baker, October 2, 1916; and Wilbur, who was born in Baker, December 1, 1917.

During the World war Mr. Halliday took active part in all the various drives and had charge of the Red Cross drive, collecting in one drive over thirty-one thousand dollars, giving practically three-fourths of his time to the work. Politically he is a republican and while never ambitious to hold office has always been most loyal to those interests tending to advance the welfare of community, commonwealth and country. Fraternally he is both a Mason and an Elk. He belongs to the Commercial Club and his religious faith is that of the Baptist church. He has served as secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association and in 1919 was made vice president thereof in recognition of the great interest and splendid work that he has done for the society. He assisted in raising the earliest fund of five thousand dollars for the association, whereby a lot was purchased preparatory to the building of the Y. M. C. A. home and with the two drives that followed the association became the owner of a fifty thousand dollar property free of debt. This was accomplished largely by the personal solicitation of Mr. Halliday and his work in the various drives in behalf of the project. He stands for all those forces which make for honorable manhood and for the uplift of the individual, as well as for all interests which contribute to community betterment. His life has been a busy and useful one and his records prove that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Stewart, Nelson

NELSON H. STEWART. D. D. S.

Dr. Nelson H. Stewart, enjoying an extensive dental practice in Baker, his present professional position arguing well for further success and advancement in the future, was born in Indiana in 1880, a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Harris) Stewart. The father followed farming as a life work and remained in the east until called to the home beyond.

Dr. Stewart of this review acquired a common school education in Indiana and then began preparation for the practice of dentistry as a student In the North Pacific Dental College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1903. He at once entered upon the active work of his profession in Portland, but later removed to Astoria and in 1911 came to Baker, where he has since enjoyed a splendid practice, save for a brief period spent in British Columbia. It was after the birth of his first child that he went with his family to Vancouver, returning to the United States following the close of the World war in December, 1918.

At Canyon City in 1916 Dr. Stewart was married to Miss Mayme A. Baisley, a daughter of Ollie and Drusa (Payton) Baisley. Mrs. Stewart and her mother are natives of Oregon, having been born in Baker county. Her father, who was born in Missouri, followed farming for a long period and later turned his attention to merchandising at Baker, but is now again a ranchman, living at Durkee, Baker county. The mother is deceased. Dr. and Mrs. Stewart have two children: Marion, born in Baker, in 1917: and Robert, born in 1919.

Dr. Stewart gives his political endorsement to the republican party, but has never sought nor desired office. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and also with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks at Baker and is highly esteemed in these organizations. He has also won a creditable place in professional circles, his ability growing with the passing years, owing to his wide study and experience.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Haines, Israel

HON. ISRAEL D. HAINES

Who represents Baker County on the floor of the Senate, has so often been a member of the Legislative Assembly that his name has become almost a household word in the history of our State. Mr. Haines is a gentleman of rather commanding appearance, tall and well-proportioned, neatly attired, pleasant features, with brown beard and hair, in which the silver threads are shining. He is a ready speaker, and takes an active part in the debates. He was born in Xenia, Ohio, in 1827; moved with his parents to Missouri in 1841, where he resided until coming to Oregon in 1849. He was then connected with the quartermaster's department of the Rifle Regiment, U. S. troops, commanded by Col. Loring. The regiment took possession of Fort Vancouver a few days after their arrival, under the U. S. treaty with Great Britain. Securing his discharge from the U. S. service shortly afterwards, he went overland to California in the following spring and spent the summer mining on Nelson's Creek. He returned to Oregon the following fall and remained in Portland until 1853, when he went to Jackson County. He remained there but a short time, when the Randolph gold excitement broke out. Mr. Haines went to Coos Bay and erected the first house there, using it as a hotel and general merchandise store. His goods arrived on the sailing vessel "Cynosure," commanded by Capt. Whippy; Mr. Haines acting as her pilot and guiding her across the bar, she being the first sailing vessel that, laden with merchandise, ever entered that harbor. He returned to Jacksonville in the fall of 1854 and carried on a general merchandising business until 1862. He that year represented Jackson county in the House of Representatives. He read law under Hon. P. P. Prim, and was admitted to the bar in 1864. He soon afterwards moved to Idaho Territory and practiced his profession there and in California. In 1867 he opened an office in Baker county, where he has resided ever since, interspersing his practice with successful ventures in farming and stock-raising. He was a member of the House from that county in 1876, and in 1878 was elected State Senator and was re-elected in 1882. He is a staunch Democrat and a strict partisan. He was married in 1871 to Miss Sarah M. Dorsett, their family consisting of five children. He is an active, influential citizen, and is highly esteemed by the people of the county he represents.
 
Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Curtis, William

HON. WM. P. CURTIS

One of the Representatives from Baker County is an exceedingly good-natured and pleasant little gentleman of sixty summers. He is hale and hearty, with a well-proportioned figure, an elastic step, and a peculiarly bright eye, and so far as general appearance is concerned, looks much younger than his years. His has been a varied experience, and in the course of his eventful life he has had his share of its joys and sorrows. Born in Owen county, old Kentucky, in the year 1822, in the days when the village master taught his little school in a log cabin, young William had an opportunity of daily interviewing the grim instructor of the youthful mind until the advanced age of ten years. He was then apprenticed to a hatter, and with that dignitary remained until he was master of the business. He worked for some time at his trade, and went into the general merchandise business in Monterey, in the same county. Hearing of the great gold discoveries in California, he settled up his business affairs and set out for the land of promise. The trip across the plains was a long and tedious one, and, after a five months' journey, Mr. Curtis had the pleasure of entering the historic place called 'Hangtown" or Placerville, in El Dorado county. From there he went to Placer County and remained two years, and in 1854 went north to Yreka. He remained but one year in his new abode and then returned to Placer county, where he engaged in mining and stock- raising, in the meantime being elected to the office of Justice of the Peace. In those days the Justice was the oracle in the mining camp, and a man was never selected to fill that office unless he was possessed of character, sense and nerve; he was the arbiter of all differences and the advisor in all important matters. Mr. Curtis came to Oregon in 1864, locating in Canyon City, where he remained but one year; we next find him in a small mining camp called Clarkesville, in Baker county, where at last have his wanderings ceased and his spirit, as it were, found rest, and we find him representing that county in the Legislature of 1878, as well as in the present body. In 1872 he was elected Justice of the Peace there, and has been since re-elected twice. As an instance of his popularity, let it be said that the session of the Legislature of 1878 had no sooner closed, than he was once more made a Justice, which office he held until elected a member of the House in 1882. He is a frank, plain, open-hearted little man, and has hosts of personal friends. He was married in California in 1858 to Mrs. Margaret House, who died in 1863, and he has since been a widower.
 
Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Ison, Luther

HON. LUTHER B. ISON

Is one of the Representatives from Baker County in the House. He is a medium-sized, well-proportioned and fine-looking gentleman, with a clear eye and a full face. At times you would think this man had genius, but you are immediately confronted with the stern reality that he has not. On entering the House, he goes straight to his desk, takes out his book containing legislation which is up for consideration, and buries himself in the work of investigating the merits and provisions of the various measures. When he proceeds to address the House, the listener is struck with the forcible manner in which he speaks and the great earnestness of his language. His style of oratory is one peculiar to himself and withal pleasing. Although Mr. Ison is not eloquent, he is, by far, the most acceptable speaker in the present House. He begins to talk in a moderated tone of voice, which gradually changes to one of decision, sometimes appealing, again persuasive, and again endeavoring to convince. His sentences are short, and seldom does he utter a clear-cut, round Edmund Burke construction. He is an able man and a diplomate, and would make a popular candidate for any office that required addressing the people in large bodies assembled. He was born in Garrad County, Kentucky, in the year 1843 in 1849 his parents immigrated to Grundy county, Missouri, where young Ison attended the public schools until he was prepared to enter Grand River College, where he remained some time, and afterwards finished at Fayette College in Howard County. In 1866 he came to Oregon and located in Baker County, where he mined and taught school from 1866 to 1870. He was then elected county clerk, and subsequently re-elected twice to the same office. During the time which he served as county clerk, he studied law, and was admitted as a professional lawyer in October, 1876. In June, 1876, he was elected district attorney of the fifth judicial district, and was re-elected in 1878. At the expiration of his term of office, he became associated with A. J. Lawrence in the law business, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a staunch Democrat, and his long life of usefulness as a member of that party, together with the many offices that have been thrust upon him, are sufficient indications of the esteem in which he is held. Mr. Ison was married to Miss Josie Gates, of Union, August 12, 1870.

Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Moomaw, D. L.

D. L. MOOMAW

At present a prominent citizen of Baker City, was born in Eastern Virginia, in 1837 and came to Oregon in 1858. He settled in Oregon City, where he was engaged in teaching school until the spring of 1861. The gold excitement caused by the discovery of that coveted commodity in Northern Idaho induces him to emigrate hence and he remained in the mines for several years. His success was not brilliant in amassing a fortune of any considerable magnitude, and he returned to Oregon in the spring of 1870, locating at Baker City, where he has resided ever since. He has become closely identified with t he interests of that section of the country and is enthusiastic in its praise. He has always been an active politician, but is not a candidate for political honors. He is a gentleman of pleasing address, a little below medium height, heavy set, full beard and hair of dark brown. He is unmarried; in fact, he is considered by many a confirmed old bachelor, but he is still in market and is very popular among the ladies. He is an uncompromising Republican and represented his county in the last Republican State Convention.

Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Rea, James

JAMES REA resides one mile southeast of Wenatchee, Chelan county, where he is engaged successfully in fruit growing. He is a native Oregonian, having been born at Auburn, Baker county, June 15, 1865. His father, James M. Rea, crossed the plains in 1849 to California, and in 1862 went to Baker City, Oregon, where he engaged in mining on Griffin’s Gulch. He remained in this vicinity until his death, April 4, 1901. The mother, Mary M. (Ridgeway) Rea, is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and at present resides at Baker City.

With the exception of four years passed in Idaho, our subject lived in the place of his nativity, where he teamed, attended public school and high school, conducted a stage line from Baker City to Baizley, the Elkhorn mines and other points, until the fall of 1892, when he came to Wenatchee. Here he engaged in farming and teaming and in 1900 purchased his present home. He had taken up eighty acres of land, which, in 1894, he sold, owing to a mineral contest, gold having been found in this locality.

Our subject has three brothers and two sisters living, Frank, George and Edward, at Baker City, or its immediate vicinity, Jennie, wife of William Crouter, a Baker county mining man, and Josephine, single a student and teacher of music, Kansas City, Missouri.

At Baker City, Oregon, December 18, 1898, Mr. Rea was married to Dora Wheeler, daughter of Peter and Alethia Wheeler, mentioned in another portion of this work. They have two children, Evelyn and Willie.

Politically independent is Mr. Rea, and at present he holds the office of road supervisor.

An Illustrated History of Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties in the state of Washington
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1904
Transcribed by Tammie Rudder

Anderson, Gustav

GUSTAV ANDERSON. Residence 1778 Valley avenue; office Shoemaker building, Baker City.  Born December 17, 1863, near the City of Geffe, Sweden.  Son of Anders and Martha (Larsen) Anderson.  Removed to Olympia, Wash., in 1882, and to Oregon in 1887.  Education, prior to leaving Sweden, was in the public schools, from which he graduated, and under private instructor.  Graduated from Olympia Collegiate Institute in June, 1887, and from the law department of the University of Oregon in 1895, with degree of LL. B.  Admitted to the bar June 1, 1895, and later to the Federal Courts, including the Court of Appeals.  Practiced law in Portland until September, 1905, when, owing to ill-health, and believing the climate would benefit, he accepted an offer into partnership, with the then District Attorney at Baker City, and has practiced there since.  City Attorney of Baker City.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Glenda Stevens
Moore, Charles

Charles Allan Moore:
Residence 1723 Valley avenue; office, 2104 Court street, Baker City.  Born March 9, 1864, near Edina, Knox County, Missouri.  Son of John William and Edna Frances (Payton) Moore.  Married December 30 1897, to Hattie A. Newbury.  Educated in the public schools of Knox County, Missouri, Adair County, Missouri, and Millville, California, until 1878, in which year he came to Oregon and attended public schools at Lakeview.  Entered the State University at Eugene in 1884, and attended till 1887.  Studied law in the office of C. A. Cogswell, at Lakeview, Oregon, from 1887 to 1891, when he was admitted to the bar at Salem.  Began the practice of his profession alone, at Portland, in 1891, and continued until 1893, when he went into partnership with A. W. Johnston, under the firm name of Moore & Johnston, which existed until 1897.  Continued practicing alone until 1901, when he removed to Baker City, and continued to date. Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

Murphy, Charles

Charles Patrick Murphy:
Residence, 2675 Church street; office, Courthouse, Baker City.  Born September 2, 1868, at Liverpool, England.  Son of Charles N. and Annie (Keating) Murphy.  Married June 14, 1899, to Margaret D. Klein.  Attended St. Anthony’s Public Elementary School, followed by course in St. Francis Xavier’s College, Liverpool.  Taught in public schools of Liverpool three years, and came to Minnesota in 1888.  Admitted to the Supreme Court of Minnesota in 190; practiced law in Duluth, Minnesota, until 1903, when he removed to Oregon and was admitted to the bar of this state in December, 1904.  Served term in Minnesota National Guard.  Democrat.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

Newbury, William

William Spencer Newbury:
Residence 2222 B street; office, 1909 Court avenue, Baker City, Oregon.  Born in Ripley, New York, September 19, 1834.  Son of John A. and Louis (Spencer) Newbury.  Married to Miss Alzina Taylor, October 12, 1860, at Madison, Wisconsin.  Attended the common schools at Ripley, N. Y., until 1850; later studied law in the office of Senator John W. Davis, Fox Lake, Wisconsin, and later took a course at the Commercial College at Madison.  Admitted to the bar at Humboldt, Kansas, in 1865.  Came to Oregon in 1870, and admitted to Oregon State bar in 1874.  First Lieutenant Eighth Kansas Volunteer Infantry, 1861; Postmaster from 1861 to 1864 of Iola, Kansas, and Mayor of Iola, Kansas, in 1870; member of G. A. R. and Loyal Legion of America; was Mayor of the City of Portland from 1877 to 1879.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

Nichols, James

James Howe Nichols:
Residence and office, Baker City.  Born July 12, 1883, at Lima, La Grange County, Indiana.  Son of Drusus Burnell and Jennie Louise (Shipman) Nichols.  Attended Lima school until 12 years of age, then entered Howe Academy, where he remained until 15 years of age, then re-entered Lima High School, and graduated therefrom in 1901.  Entered the University of Michigan in the fall of that year, and spent one year in the Literary Department, following it by a course in the Law Department of the same University, from which he graduated in June, 1905, with degree of Bachelor of Laws.  Admitted to the bar of Indiana in April 1905, to the bar of Michigan in June, 1905, to the bar of Oregon, temporarily, in November, 1905, and permanently in May, 1907.  Located at Baker City in 1905, and formed partnership with C. A. Robertson, under the firm name of Robertson & Nichols, which lasted until June, 1906, at which time he entered the offices of Hart & Smith, Baker City.  On the election of Mr. Smith to the bench, he formed partnership with J. N. Hart, under the firm name of Hart & Nichols, which continues to date.  Elected Police Judge and Auditor of Baker City in November, 1908. President of the University of Michigan Democratic Club in 1904.  Democrat.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

Olmstead, Martin

Martin L. Olmstead:
Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon.  Born September 29, 1842, in the State of New York.  Married in 1866 to Celia E. East.  Educated at Wildman Collegiate Institute, Batavia, New York, at Rochester University, Rochester, New York, and at the Albany Law School, Albany, New York, from which institute he received LL. B. degree. Admitted to the Supreme Court of New York State in 1867, and to the Courts of Iowa and Nebraska in 1868.  Was admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon in 1876.  Was Lieutenant-Colonel U. S. Volunteers and is Past Commandant of G. A. R.  Was Circuit Judge Sixth Judicial District of Oregon.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

Mount, Orville

Orville Buyland Mount:
Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon.  Born in Silverton, Oregon, August 4, 1871.  Son of Henry Duckwall and Rebecca (Stevens) Mount.  Married to Elsie L. Johnson December 10, 1902.  Attended public schools until 1898; Monmouth Normal School, 1898-1891, graduating in business course; University of Oregon, 1891-1893.  From 1894 to 1897, studied law in the office of brother Wallace Mount, at Sprague, Wash., who is now Justice of Supreme Court of Washington.  Admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, November 27, 1897.  Member of A. F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. fraternities.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

McArthur, Lewis

LEWIS LINN MC ARTHUR
Lewis Linn McArthur, son of William P. and Mary S. (Young) McArthur, was born in Portsmouth, Va., March 18, 1843. He was educated at Brown University, Providence, R.I., and at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., and read law at York, Pa., where he was admitted to the bar on March 18, 1864. He then went to Council Bluffs, Iowa, joined an immigration party and started across the plains for Oregon. He began the practice of law at Umatilla, landing in the Fall of 1864, and in 1865 was elected City Recorder. He also edited a newspaper known as the “Index.” In 1867 he moved to Auburn, Baker County, where he practiced his profession and engaged in mining. He was elected County Judge of Baker County in 1868, and in 1870 founded the “Bed Rock Democrat,” a weekly newspaper, still published at Baker City. His connection with this paper was brief, however, for in the summer of 1870 he was elected as Supreme Judge from the old Fifth Judicial District, a position which he held until 1878, when the separate Supreme Court was established. Upon being legislated out of the office of Supreme Judge, he was immediately appointed as Circuit Judge of the Fifth District by Governor Thayer and was elected to the same position in 1882. He resigned from the bench in 1883 and formed a law partnership with Judge J.B. Condon, of The Dalles. This partnership continued until 1886, when President Cleveland appointed Judge McArthur as United States District Attorney for Oregon. Upon the expiration of his term of office in 1890, he became a member of the Portland law firm of Bronaugh, Northrup & McArthur, which was afterward changed to Bronaugh, McArthur, Fenton & Bronaugh. Judge McArthur maintained his connection with his firm until his death of May 10, 1897.

The subject of this sketch was married to Miss Harriet K. Nesmith, daughter of the late Senator James Willis Nesmith, on July 10, 1878. He is survived by two sons, C.N. and Lewis A. McArthur, besides his widow, whose present home is at Salem. Judge McArthur was identified with the educational interests of the state, being a regent of the University of Oregon for more than 24 years. In politics he was a Democrat of the old school, although he repudiated Bryan and free silver in 1896. He served as president of the Oregon Bar Association during the year 1890-91, and was prominently identified with several fraternal orders and charitable associations.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Kim Mohler
Messick, John

JOHN BRUCE MESSICK. – Residence, 2196 Court street; office, County Courthouse, Baker City.  Son of Richard M. and Mary Bell (Tomlinson) Messick.  Married April 3, 1895, to Stella M. Haines.  Educated at the public schools of Missouri; at William Jewel College, Liberty, Missouri, from which institution he graduated in 1881.  Came to Oregon in 1886.  Taught school, 1886 to 1892, studying law at same time.  Was admitted to the bar of Oregon at Pendleton in May, 1892.  Served four years in O. N. G.; served four years as Justice of the Peace at Baker City; County Judge, Baker County, Oregon, since 1906.  Member and Past Master of Masonic fraternity.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Sharon Witt
Correll, Samuel

Samuel Oscar Correll.  Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon.  Born in Frankford, West Virginia, September 30, 1872.  Son of William Neil and Martha Nancy (Butcher) Correll.  Came to Oregon August 1, 1896.  Married Edna Haskell, November 28, 1905.  Graduated from Chillicothe Normal, Chillicothe, Missouri, 1894; Nevada Business College, Nevada, Missouri, June, 1895; West Virginia University, Law Department, June, 1900.  Admitted to bar in West Virginia June 6, 1900; in Oregon, 1901.  Practiced law in Lewisburg, West Virginia, short time, coming to Baker City, Oregon; formed partnership with W. F. Butcher, which continued until November 1, 1904, when M. D. Clifford entered said partnership under firm name of Butcher, Clifford & Correll.  Democrat.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Angela Skelton

Clifford, Morton

Morton D. Clifford.  Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon.  Born May 24, 1859, at Ottumwa, Wapello County, Iowa.  Son of Harmon H. and Jane (Mahon) Clifford.  Married August 5, 1885, to Edith Hazeltine.  Came to Oregon in 1870.  Educated in the common schools of Grant County, Oregon.  Read law in the office of W. Lair Hill and F. P. Mays at The Dalles, Oregon.  Admitted to the bar of Oregon and to the United States Circuit and District Courts in 1882.  Elected District Attorney 6th Judicial District of Oregon January 6, 1890, and elected and served three successive terms.  Retired in 1904 and has since practiced law in Baker City, Oregon, and is now senior member of the firm of Clifford & Correll.  He is a member of the Masonic fraternity in the 32nd degree, Knights Templar, a Shriner and past Grand Master of the Masonic fraternity of the State of Oregon, also a member of the Odd Fellows and B. P. O. E. fraternities.  Democrat.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Angela Skelton

Levens, William

WILLIAM STEPHENS LEVENS
Residence, 1783 Valley avenue; office, County Courthouse, Baker City.  Born January 28, 1873, at Baker City, Oregon.  Son of Basil Wells and Sarah Ann (DeGuire) Levens.  Married June 18, 1896, to Estelle Randall Parker.  Educated in the public schools of Baker City and at the Hopkins Academy, Oakland, Cal., graduating from the same in 1893.  Entered Yale College, Law Department, in 1893, and graduated in 1895, with degree of Bachelor of Laws.  Admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon July 20, 1895, and to the Supreme Court of California in January, 1896.  Admitted to the Circuit and District Courts of Oregon in 1903.  In 1900 formed partnership with W. G. Drowley, under the firm name of Drowley & Levens, which continues to date.  Elected Police Judge of Baker City three times; resigned to qualify as District Attorney.  Elected District Attorney for Eighth Judicial District in June, 1908.  Member Masonic, B.P.O.E., K of P. and W.O.W. fraternities.  Democrat.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Valerie Hehn Brown

McColloch, Claude

CLAUDE CHARLES McCOLLOCH
Residence, 1413 Third street; office, Second and Court streets, Baker City, Oregon.  Born January 14, 1888, at Red Bluff, California.  Son of Charles Henry and Mary Elizabeth (Wooddy) McColloch.  Received his early education at the grammar and high school in Portland, Oregon having come to this state at the age of two years.  Attended Leland Stanford University from 1904 to 1907, and the Law Department of the University of Chicago from 1907 to 1909, graduating with Ph. B. degree.  Admitted to the bar of the State of Oregon in May, 1909.  Member Phi Delta Phi fraternity and Kappa Sigma Academic fraternity.  Independent.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Valerie Hehn Brown

Drowley, William

WILLIAM GILBERT DROWLEY.
Residence, Baker City, Oregon; office, same. Born December 7, 1864, at Caledonia, Minnesota. Son of "George C. and Jane (Brown) Drowley. Married December 4, 1899, to Lucy A. Barnard. Educated in the public schools of Minnesota, at Caledonia Academy, from which 'he graduated in 1880; at the University of Minnesota, College of Law, from which he graduated in 1892 with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the Supreme Court of Minnesota in June, 1892. Came to Oregon in 1899 and was admitted to the Supreme Court of this state in May, 1900. Admitted to the Supreme Court of the State of Washington in November, 1908. Member Masonic, W. O. W. and B. P. O. E. Fraternities. Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Valerie Hehn Brown
Heilner, Joseph

Joseph Jacob Heilner
    Ressidence, Baker City, Oregon; office, same.  Born July 9, 1877, at Portland, Oregon.  Son of Sigmund A. and Clara (Neuberger) Heilner.  Educated at the public schools of Baker City, Oregon, at The Bishop Scott Academy, Portland, Oregon, and in the Legal Department of the University of Oregon, from which he graduated in June, 1896, with degree of LL. B.  Admitted to the bar of Oregon at Salem July 13, 1898, having taken and passed his examinations before the Supreme Court in 1896, but lacking two years of having attained the age of majority.  Was City Attorney of Baker City for six years, from 1901 to 1907.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Hart, Julius

Julius Newton Hart
    Residence, Baker City, Oregon; office, same.  Born, May 13, 1869, in Wayne County, Illinois.  Son of John s. and Minerva J. (Neal) Hart.  Married December 21, 1890, to Irene Dempsey.  Educated in the public schools of Illinois.  Came to Oregon in 1885, and finished his common school education in this state.  Attended La Creole Academic Institute at Dallas, Oregon, in 1886-7.  State Normal School, Monmouth 1887-8.  La Creole Academic Institute, 1888-9, graduating in June, 1889.  Attended Law Department University of Oregon, 1891-92.  Admitted to Oregon bar in November, 1895, and practiced alone at Dallas, Oregon, until 1900, when he formed a partnership with James H. Townsend, under the firm name of Townsend & Hart, which lasted until 1902.  Practiced alone, 1902-1904, when he moved to Baker City and formed a partnership with William Smith, under the firm name of Hart & Smith, which lasted until 1906.  Then formed partnership with James H. Nichols, under the firm name of Hart & Nichols, which lasts to date.  Was School Superintendent Polk County, 1896 to 1900.  District Attorney Third Judicial District, 1900 to 1904.  Presidential Elector in 1904.  State Senator, Baker County, 1906 to 1910.  Member Oregon Conservation Commission, 1908.  Reappointed, 1909.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Nancy Overlander

Hyde, Charles

CHARLES F. HYDE
Residence, Front and B, streets; office, City Hall, Baker City, Oregon.  Born October 29, 1858, at Yreka, California.  Son of Henry H. and Susan Hyde.  Married September, 1887, to Mollie E. Packwood.  Attended Pacific University, Forest Grove, Oregon, and graduated from Heald's Business College, San Francisco, California, in May, 1875.  Admitted to the bar of the State of Oregon at Salem in 1882.  Has been member of the following firms:  Hyde, Johns & Olmstead; Hyde, Johns & Rand; Hyde & Packwood.  City Attorney, Baker City, 1885-90, and 1907-10, and District Attorney, Sixth Judicial District, 1892-1896.  Was Colonel on staff of Governor Pennoyer.  Member Masonic, B. P. O. E., K. of P. and Redmen fraternities.  Democrat.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger
Johns, Charles

CHARLES A. JOHNS
Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon.  Born June 25, 1857, in Jackson County, Missouri.  Son of James M. and Elizabeth A. (Darby) Johns.  Married November 15, 1882, to Mabel Ellis.  Came to Oregon December, 1858, and attended public schools at Scio, Linn county, Oregon, and also at Marion, Oregon.  Attended Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, graduating from there in 1878 with A. B. degree, and later receiving A. M. degree from the same institution.  Admitted to the bar at Salem in 1881.  Was Lientenant-Colonel on governor Geer's staff for four years; Judge of Polk county for two years; Mayor of Baker City for four terms, and also School Director, Baker City, for four terms.  Member of State School Text-Book commission three terms.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Lachner, William

WILLIAM J LACHNER
Residence, 1610 Dewey street; office, Baker City.  Born November 30, 1869, at Canyon City, Oregon.  Son of J. M. and Walburga Lachner.  Married Novmber 30, 1899, to Ida N. Tribolet.  Attended the common schools at Baker City, and studied law one year in the office of Calvin T. Hyde.  Entered the Law Department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, in 1894, and graduated with LL. B. degree in 1896.  Admitted to the bar of this state at Pendleton in October, 1896.  Practiced alone from 1896 to 1900, and in partnership with John C. Leasure about eight months, since when he has practiced alone.  Member O. N. G. for three years.  Was proprietor of Baker City Herald in 1894, and was Postmaster of the same city in 1907.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Trimble, John

    JOHN TRIMBLE, one of the prosperous ranchmen and esteemed citizens of Baker comity, Oregon, is the owner of a hay and stock ranch of three hundred and twenty acres on Burnt river and also owns one hundred and twenty acres of timber land.  His birth occurred in Noble county, Ohio, on the 7th of October, 1845, his parents being Jacob and Elizabeth (Stewart) Trimble, who spent their entire lives in the Buckeye state, the father cultivating a farm.  They reared a family of three children, namely:  John of this review; Mrs. Eliza Jane Burlingame, who is deceased; and Charles, who is a resident of Noble county, Ohio.

    John Trimble remained a resident of his native state until twenty-eight years of age, when he removed to Kansas where he remained for one and a half years and was engaged in hunting buffalo, killing in excess of five hundred during this time.  He was always an enthusiastic hunter and many a deer and elk fell before his gun since coming to Oregon.  He next made his way to California, spending one year in the Golden state.  Going to Washington, he there remained for five years and on the expiration of that period, in 1880, took up his abode on the Burnt river in Oregon, near Hereford, where he has resided continuously since.  At the present time he owns three hundred and twenty acres of land on the river and also has a tract of one hundred and twenty acres of timber land.  He devotes his ranch to the running of stock and also markets hay and has brought the property under a high state of improvement, it being entirely covered with sagebrush at the time it came into his possession.  The place yields about four hundred tons of hay annually.  At one time Mr. Trimble owned three hundred head of horses and two hundred head of cattle.  Throughout his entire business career he has devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits and his efforts have been attended with a splendid measure of success.  At the time of his arrival in this state he had only six hundred dollars but by dint of unremitting industry and capable management has augmented his capital until he is now numbered among the wealthy citizens of his community.

    In 1864 Mr. Trimble wedded Miss Kate Stevens, who was born in Ohio in 1844 and passed away in that state in 1896.  By this marriage there was one son, James, whose birth occurred on the 5th of November, 1869, in Noble county, Ohio, where he resided until the spring of 1883.  Since that time he has made his home on the Burnt river in Oregon and now owns two fine hay and stock ranches, comprising one hundred and sixty acres and two hundred and forty acres of land respectively.  In 1902 James Trimble married Miss Lena Wonder, who was born in Baker county, Oregon, on the 3d of February, 1878, and is a daughter of Fred Wonder of Buffalo Gulch.  Unto them have been born three children:  Elsie, Alfred and Arthur.

    In politics Mr. Trimble is independent, supporting men and measures rather than party.  His fraternal relations are with the Masons and he is a worthy exemplar of the craft.  Believing that the northwest offered opportunities unrivaled in any other part of the country, he took up his abode here in early manhood and has since worked his way steadily upward to a position of prominence and prosperity.

Oregon Pictorial and Biographical Deluxe Supplement
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, Chicago (1912)

Transcribed by Mary Saggio

Holcomb, James

    The life record of James N. Holcomb stands in contradiction to the old adage that, "a rolling stone gathers no moss."  He has always been of a somewhat restless spirit and yet on the whole each change in his life has meant advancement and progress.  For the past thirty years he has resided in Eagle valley where he is the owner of a fine fruit and cattle ranch.  He was also the founder of the town of Newbridge and in February, 1909, he established a general mercantile store here.  Various other business enterprises have at different times claimed his attention and profited by his business ability, and at the same time, he has a most interesting and thrilling record as a pioneer, his experiences proving the old saying that, "truth is stranger than fiction."  Mr. Holcomb was born in Ionia county, Michigan, April 24, 1845, a son of Gideon C. and Amanda (Houseman) Holcomb, natives of Ohio and New York, respectively.  They were pioneers of Michigan in which state they were married and in 1849 the father made his way to the Pacific coast.  Here he followed mining during the greater part of his life, save for the last ten years when he was engaged in farming in Eagle valley where he settled during its period of pioneer development.  He was also interested in mining in Baker county from 1862 until about ten years prior to his demise.  His wife had preceded him to the home beyond, passing away at Prairie City, Grant county, Oregon.  In their family were four children:  James N.; Mrs. Amelia Bliss, now deceased; Polly Amanda, the deceased wife of Julius Lebret; and Sarah M., the wife of James Cleaver of Baker City.

    James N. Holcomb resided at the place of his birth, until at the age of eighteen years.  In February, 1864, he enlisted as a member of Company A, Twenty-first Michigan Volunteer Infantry with which he served for eighteen months, or until the close of the war.  He was with the Army of the Cumberland under General Sherman and took part in all the engagements with his company.  He was wounded by a three buck shot in the left arm at Lookout Mountain and was frequently in the thickest of the fight.

    When the country no longer needed his military aid, Mr. Holcomb returned to Michigan and in 1866, by the way of the isthmus route, came to Oregon.  The following year he returned and brought his mother and three sisters to this state, again coming by the isthmus route.  They settled at Prairie City where the father and James N. Holcomb had placer mining interests.  For nearly twenty years the latter followed placer mining and about 1872 located in Eagle valley.  He is familiar with every phase of pioneer life and with all the hardships, trials, difficulties and dangers which fall to the lot of the early settler.  During the Modoc Indian war he went to California and served as scout and mail carrier for the government, during which time he saw a number of Modocs hung at Fort Klamath.  He carried the mail from Lava Beds to Jacksonville, Oregon, and to Yreka, California.  For two or three years he was in that section of the country and then returned to Eagle valley where he has remained most of the time since.  He followed mining at Shasta and also in Idaho, but retained his home in Baker county.  About six years of his life were devoted exclusively to hunting and he had many wonderful experiences, many of which were so unusual that he hesitates to relate them, fearing that his veracity may be questioned.  With two companions he killed twenty-four head of elk in one day and he has killed as high as nine on several days.  He is regarded as the best shot in eastern Oregon, still holding that distinction.  While hunting he has averaged a bear each day for ten days and he has not only killed bears and elks, but also deer, cougars and panthers, using them for hides, or meat, as the case warranted.  He was thus engaged for about six years, making his home in the mountains.  He packed the meat to the mining camps where he sold it and also disposed of the hides.  He has acted as a scout during all of the Indian wars in eastern Oregon since 1870 and there is no phase of pioneer life or of Indian warfare unfamiliar to him.  For the past thirty years he has made his home on his ranch in Eagle valley, raising fruit, grain and cattle.  There were only four houses in the entire valley when he came here.  It is now one of the richest sections in the state, all land being irrigated.  He purchased the townsite of Newbridge and platted it in 1909, giving it the name of the postoffice that was already here.  In February, 1909, he established his present general mercantile store and in 1910 he organized the Eagle Valley Canning Company, incorporated, of which he is the president.  They have conducted a successful business during the past year, placing upon the market canned goods of the highest grade.  The wholesale dealers have experienced great satisfaction with their product and the record they have established is a most gratifying one.  Mr. Holcomb has owned land and planted fruit over three fourths of Eagle valley and he also dug one of the principal irrigating ditches there.  Perhaps no other man has done as much for its development and substantial improvement and his work certainly entitles him to the recognition and praise of his fellow townsmen.

    Mr. Holcomb has been married thrice.  In Michigan, when twenty years of age he wedded Martha Bowen who died here and they had one child, W. A., who lives in Eagle valley and is married and has two children, Arthur and Oscar.  For his second wife Mr. Holcomb chose Eliza Keeny who died, leaving two children:  Gideon T., of Newbridge, who has five children; and Maude, the wife of Charles Ashley of Newbridge, by whom she has one son, William.  In 1895 Mr. Holcomb was again married, his present wife having formerly been Corintha Emily Kiersey.  They have six children, Earl, Ralph, Isabelle, Frank, Annie and Theodore, all yet at home.

    Mr. Holcomb has been a lifelong republican and has held some local offices.  He belongs to Irvin Lodge, K. P., in Eagle Valley and also to the Grand Army of the Republic.  He is a typical frontiersman in his knowledge and experiences of pioneer life, appreciative of true worth of character, as is every man who learns to look beneath the veneer and polish that society may give to the real value of the individual.  His life history if written in detail would constitute a most interesting and ofttimes thrilling volume.  He has an extensive circle of friends throughout the state and all who know him are proud to number him among their acquaintances.

Oregon Pictorial and Biographical Deluxe Supplement
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, Chicago (1912)

Transcribed by Mary Saggio
Haines, Israel

    HON. ISRAEL D. HAINES, who passed away two decades ago, enjoyed a reputation more than state wide, for he was a lawyer of pronounced ability, winning for himself a name respected by every man in the profession throughout the state and bringing to his office many distinguished clients.  His sincerity of purpose and broad-minded interests in the general welfare, combining with sterling integrity and worth a degree of native ability, entitled him to occupy a place of leadership and prominence among his fellows.  A pioneer of pioneers, he knew well the topography and understood well the genius of the west, facts which caused him to become distinguished in the counsels of the state during his long service in the Oregon legislature.

    The birth of Mr. Haines occurred in Xenia, Greene county, Ohio, on the 7th December, 1827, being the second son of Reuben and Nancy (Connely) Haines, who were natives of Augusta county, Virginia.  The mother having departed this life three years after our subject was born, the father married a second time.  Mr. Haines moved with his parents to Missouri in 1844, settling on the Chariton river near Bloomington, Macon county, where he resided until the spring of 1849, when as a youth of twenty-one, he bade farewell to home and friends and began the journey across plain and mountain to the wild and unknown Pacific Coast country.  He was then connected with the quartermaster’s department of the Rifle Regiment, United States Army, commanded by Colonel W. W. Loring (better known later as a general in the Confederate army), which was ordered west to take possession of all Hudson Bay territory under the United States treaty with Great Britian.  While en route he was stricken with cholera, but recovered from the disease, being in this respect more fortunate than many of his fellow comrades.  After a journey beset with many dangers and hardships the regiment arrived at Vancouver, taking possession of the same.

    The following taken from Mr. Haines’ own personal memoirs presents more vividly the difficulties encountered in his trip across the plains, and his earlier connection with the history of Oregon:
    “Gold was discovered in California in 1848, at Sutters Mill on the American river near Sacramento.  I was at Hannibal on the Mississippi River in the summer of 1848, waiting at the hotel for the steamboat to go down the Mississippi to St. Louis, and was talking to some men about the news of the discovery and told them that I was bound for California, although nothing but a boy.  I went to St. Louis and back to Bloomington, and with some others that had just returned from the Mexican war, fitted up a team in the fall of 1848, and supplies of all kinds for six of us, armed with bowie knives, Allen’s revolvers, and rifles for the trip to California.  I told the boys that I would go on up the Missouri river to Fort Leavenworth in Weston and informed me that that the wagon would be along and we and Weston, Missouri.  My brother Robert met me a few days later would go to St. Joseph, and meet it there about the first of May, 1849.  But before this, or about this time, I became acquainted with some parties that were fitting out trains for the Rifle Regiment, ordered by the secretary of war to cross the plains to Oregon to take possession of all the Hudson Bay territory and property, under the treaty made with the United States by Great Britain, with the result that on the 23d of April, brother Robert and myself enrolled our names and were assigned to the quartermaster’s department under acting quartermaster, Lieutenant Frost, who later became a general in the Confederate army.

    “In about two weeks, everything being in readiness, the regiment and trains started.  Our first camp presented a most imposing appearance, being near a small stream, on a beautiful rolling prairie.  The wagons, three hundred in number, were formed into a circle and fencing quite a large field.  The soldiers, one thousand in number, had their tents pitched in regular order, making quite a city.  It was really a pleasing sight to see so many fine animals and men, all seemingly in high spirits, enlivened by the martial music of the military band; but the pleasing side was destined to soon wear off.  Colonel Loring, our commanding officer, in order to facilitate our progress, found it necessary to divide the command into three divisions, giving to each one hundred wagons.  I was assigned to the third division, while brother Robert was transferred to the staff in the hospital department, and was ordered forward with the first division, in which he drove a six mule ambulance the remainder of the journey.  Consequently I saw no more of him until we arrived at Fort Hall.  Doctors Moses and Smith, and one or two other surgeons, and the hospital stewards were kept very busy with the cholera patients.  Every night more or less men were turned out of the ambulance my brother drove, victims of the dreaded disease; and the regimental band played the dead march most every night, from the time we left Fort Leavenworth, until we arrived at Fort Laramie.  Robert never took the cholera, although he handled the patients every day, taking them out of the wagon, and putting them in; but I, who was with the quartermaster train, where there were only three persons out of four hundred teamsters that had the cholera, was one of the victims.  Thanks to Dr. Smith, regimental surgeon, who blistered me all over and doped me with opium and sugar of lead pills, I survived the cruel cholera crisis.

    “How well I remember coming to Green river, and then over to Bear river, and across the divide over to Snake river at Fort Hall, where we turned in seventy-five wagons, and left some troops and mules; and well remember coming on, down around the bend of Snake river through Idaho, and into Oregon, then known as Oregon territory.  And well do I remember coming into Powder River valley about the first of September, 1849.  The rye grass in this valley was so high that when we turned our mules out we had trouble in finding them, for at that time we had, after leaving those at Fort Laramie and Fort Hall, about three thousand animals, consisting of horses, mules and cattle.  We camped here and all went fishing for trout in Powder river and Chris Hinkler’s slough.  We had with us some Freiberg mineral experts, who prospected for gold on the Chris Hinkler slough and also on the North Powder river, and they found the glittering metal and so reported to Colonel Loring, and the secretary of war.  We went over the Ladd road to Grande Ronde valley, where our sappers and miners worked upon the road along Ladd creek and hill, so that we could get across the valley, crossing about where Old LaGrande now stands.  They were sent ahead to work on the road over the Blue Mountains, so that we could get over with the regiments and teams, and were instructed to treat with the Indians, that the emigrants might travel with more safety.  We arrived at Umatilla near the middle of September, and found plenty of grass.  There we made acquaintance with the Indians and presented them with scarlet cloth and beads, and a couple of horses; and they returned to Colonel Loring three or four very fine cayuse horses, and about a dozen fine beef cattle, which was a rare treat to the regiment and quartermaster men, for we one more had juicy beefsteaks.

“After traveling some hundred miles down the Columbia river, we arrive at The Dalles, where we remained about a week to recuperate.  Owing to deaths and desertion the command was now reduced to about one third, and a hard looking lot to behold.  Here we took the palisades of the old Methodist Mission, which were formerly used as a protection against the Indians.  From these we made a raft by bolting the hewed logs together with the three thousand iron picket pins, used by the regiment to picket horses and mules.  After the raft was completed, I intended going down on the same to Cascade Falls, but by mere accident I did not get off.  But two of my messmates, John and Henry Macklin, and a man by the name of Biglow, saddler of the regiment, and Miller, a carpenter Kinlock, and an Irishman named Vaughn, captain of the raft, and the other named Ford did go down the river with disastrous results.  The raft was loaded with quartermaster stores, saddles, bridles, spurs, camp equipage, and boxes of dragoon revolvers and some rifles.  Toward evening when they had arrived opposite the landing of the Upper Cascades, the men wanted Vaughn to land the raft, but he demurred, and John and Henry Macklin paid an Indian sixteen dollars to take them ashore in his canoe.  Then Kinlock wanted Captain Vaughn to land the raft, and he said, ‘No, I am going to run her on down, if I run her to hell.’  He did run her down and when he got her in the current of the cascades Kinlock, a big Scotchman, caught Vaughn around the waist and said to him:  ‘You were going to run the cascades or run the raft to hell, now we are going to hell together’.  He held him like a vise, and the raft went over the Cascade Falls; and not a particle of the logs or anything else was ever seen afterwards, except that Ford and Biglow, who were washed ashore by the current, were saved; but nothing was ever seen of Kinlock or Vaughn.

    “We crossed the Cascade Mountains on what is now known as the Barlow road, arriving at Oregon City on the 15th day of October, where we remained for three days.  We were short of supplies coming over the mountains and consequently had to subsist on about a one-half ration, except for beef straight, and that was poor and tough.  Leaving Oregon City and going down the Williamette river, on the last lap of our journey in Uncle Sam’s service, to the great Oregon country, we crossed the Columbia at Switzlers ferry and entered Fort Vancouver, Washington, and took charge of the same pursuant to the treaty with Great Britain.  Vancouver was the main headquarters of the Hudson’s Bay Company, extending to the 49th parallel north latitude.  Brother Robert and myself were discharged and paid off with Mexican dollars and doubloons, there being no United States coin in this country at that time.  We had more Mexican dollars than we could very well carry and the troops started various Monte banks on the sward between the fort and the river, and we soon had more or less Mexican coins.  While the others were playing their games of Monte on the green grass, I went to see about our canoe, and saw a man floating down the river.  I went back and reported to the boys and with one of them, I took the canoe and pushed out into the river and picked up the body and it proved to be that of Miller, the carpenter of the regiment, who went over the Cascades on the raft fifteen days before.  We took him ashore and buried him at the fort.

    “Our regiment left Fort Leavenworth on the 10th day of May, 1849 and arrived at Oregon City on the 10th day of October, 1849; completing a distance of two thousand, three hundred and sixty miles.  Cholera and desertions had reduced the regiment from one thousand to a little over three hundred men.  Some of the men deserted during the winter following their arrival and headed for California, and were killed by the Indians in Rogue river and Shasta valley, for in the spring of 1850, I was with a party in the Rogue River valley, who captured a lot of Indians and found on them, soldiers’ buttons and revolvers and gun caps strung on strings like beads.
 
    “After leaving Vancouver and the service, I went to Milwaukie and helped to get out timbers for a Mr. Luallen, who built the first sawmill in Oregon.  I worked at this until the rain came in November, when I concluded to spend the winter in Portland.  Portland at that time was but a small village containing about one hundred souls of a roving, restless disposition, but all with the same object and purpose in mind:  that of searching for that hidden treasure, nature’s most precious gift to humanity, and the regulating medium of society – Gold.”

    The spring of 1850, we find Mr. Haines buying horses and fitting out an expedition to go overland to California, the goal of his trip to the Pacific’s golden shores.  Leaving Portland the 15th of April, he traveled up the Willamette, over the Calapooia mountains and across the Umpqua and Rogue River valleys; over the Siskiyou mountains and across the Shasta valley; over the Shasta mountains and crossing the Sacramento river at Soda Springs.  After an encounter with the Indians he arrived at Major Redding’s ranch, the present site of Shasta.  The latter place was the first mark of habitation since leaving the Umpqua, a distance of nearly three hundred miles of the most rugged mountainous country.  From here he went over on Hopkins creek, and the South Feather river, where he spent the summer mining; his diggings yielding never less than fifty dollars per day and frequently one thousand dollars a day.  The fond dreams of his excited imaginations having been realized, he returned to Portland, Oregon, sailing from San Francisco, and being out at sea for thirty-three days before reaching Astoria.  In Portland he and his brother engaged in the mercantile business, and remained there until 1853, when they moved to Jackson county and opened a general merchandise store at Jacksonville.  They were in business here but a short time when the Randolph gold excitement broke out.  They subsequently went to Coos Bay and erected the first house there, using it as a hotel and general merchandise store.  Their goods arrived on the sailing vessel Synosure; Mr. Haines acting as her pilot and guiding her safely across the bar, she being the first sailing vessel that, laden with merchandise, ever entered that harbor.  They returned to Jacksonville in the fall of 1854, and carried on a general merchandising business until 1862, when the subject of our sketch began to read law under the Honorable P. P. Prim, his brother Robert, taking up the study of medicine.

    In 1864, Mr. Haines was admitted to the bar and began the practice of his chosen profession, opening an office in Silver City, Idaho.  He soon won distinction as a legal practitioner of unusual ability, and was retained as counsel in the Poor Man mining case, and many other celebrated and important litigations.  He spent the winter of 1865-6 in San Francisco, having for companions Binger Herman, Thomas H. Brents, and others who have since become equally successful in public life.  Here the brothers separated, Dr. Robert H. Haines remaining in San Francisco, engaging in the mining brokerage business.  Up to this time they had been bosom companions in all business enterprises and adventures, except during the period that Robert H. fought with Captain W. H. Harris’ Coos County Volunteers, in the Indian was of 1855-6.  In the spring of 1866 Mr. Haines began the return trip to Idaho, and while passing through eastern Oregon he met a number of old friends and comrades of the “days of ‘49”, at Auburn in Baker county.  By these he was persuaded to remain, but not long, however, for the next year he moved to Baker City where he resided ever since, again turning his attention to the practice of law, beginning his career of success and usefulness as an attorney and political leader.  He was a stanch democrat and a strict partisan.

    As a man of affairs he won the honors of an admiring constituency and enjoyed a distinguished reputation in the state as a shrewd, just, and loyal representative of the people of Baker county in both houses of the legislature for a continuous period of ten years, in which body he previously represented Jackson county in the lower house in 1862.  Mr. Haines was a ready speaker and took an active part in all debates.  His long service in the legislative assembly has caused his name to become almost a household word in the history of our state.  It was largely due to his efforts that the county seat of Baker county was removed from Auburn to Baker City in 1869.  Mr. Haines became the owner of extensive landed interest and great herds of sheep in Powder River valley, and also accumulated much valuable realty in Baker City.  He likewise founded the town Haines, which has now become an important shipping point for the produce raised in the valley.  The townsite is still owned by his heirs.

    In Baker City, Oregon, on the 23d of November, 1871, Mr. Haines was joined in wedlock to Miss Sarah Minerva Dorsett, a native of Quincy, Illinois, and daughter of James A. and Sarah Ann (Ross) Dorsett of southern lineage, who crossed the plains to Auburn, this state, in 1864.  Unto them were born five children, namely:  Stella M., who is now the wife of Judge J. B. Messick of Baker City; Robert W., an accountant and bookkeeper, and captain of Company A, Third Infantry, Oregon National Guard, of Baker City; Any C., a stenographer and teacher, of Baker City; J. David, a musical director and teacher, and lieutenant in the National Guard, of Baker City; and Elsie A., who is deceased.

    In 1873, after twenty-four years of successful adventure in the west and having enjoyed some of the good things pertaining to this life, Mr. Haines and his brother Robert made an extended tour of the eastern states, and visited their old home for the last time.  The year next following, Mr. Haines received the painful intelligence of the death of this brother in San Francisco, who then was married but six months.

    Fraternally Mr. Haines was identified with the Independents Order of Odd Fellows, his name being on the charter of Baker Lodge, No. 25, and he attained the high office of past chief patriarch of Eleazer Encampment, No. 7, a degree of the same, at Baker City.  His demise, which occurred on the 19th of June, 1892, was the occasion of deep and widespread regret.  No man was ever more respected, and no man ever more fully enjoyed the confidence of the people; and none ever better deserved such respect and confidence.  In his lifetime the people of his state, recognizing his merit, rejoiced in his advancement and in the honors to which he attained, and since his death they have cherished his memory.  It is an important public duty to honor and perpetuate as far as possible the memory of an eminent citizen – one who by his blameless and honorable life and distinguished career reflected credit not only upon his city and state but upon the whole country.  Through such memorials as this at hand the individual and character of his services are kept in remembrance and the importance of those services acknowledged.  His example in whatever field his work may have been done, thus stands as an object lesson to those who come after him, and though dead he still speaks.  Long after all recollection of his personality shall have faded from the minds of men, the less perishable record may tell the story of his life and commend his example for imitation.  The period of his residence in this part of the country covered forty-three years and during that time he witnessed and aided the work of upbuilding and development, until the frontier region had been transformed into a district replete with all the evidences of an advanced civilization.  His widow still survives and makes her home in Baker City, where she has a host of warm personal friends.

Oregon Pictorial and Biographical Deluxe Supplement
S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, Chicago (1912)

Transcribed by Mary Saggio

Rand, John

JOHN LANGDON RAND

Residence, Baker City, Oregon; office, same.  Born October 28, 1861, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.  Son of J. Sullivan and Elvira W. (Odiorne) Rand.  Married July 23, 1895, to Edith G. Packwood.  Educated at the public schools of Portsmouth, New Hampshire; at Smith's Preparatory School, Portsmouth, N. H.;   at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, from which he  graduated in 1883 with degree of A. B.  Admitted to the bar at Walla Walla, Washington, in May, 1885; came to Oregon in July of that year, and was admitted to the bar of the State of Oregon in May, 1886.  Elected District Attorney, Sixth Judicial District, in 1888, and in 1894; State Senator for Baker, Malheur and Harney Counties in 1902.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company; Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

White, William

WILLIAM E. WHITE

Residence and office, Baker City.  Born December 3, 1861, at London, England.  Son of William and Bessie (Worn) White.  Was admitted to the bar at Provo, Utah, while that state was still a territory.  When Utah became a state he was admitted to the Supreme Court of the state.  Came to Oregon in 1905 and was admitted to the bar of this state in 1906.  Certificate issued by the Supreme Court in May, 1909.  Democrat.


History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company; Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Liz Dellinger

Haines, I. D.

Biographs of the Members of the Senate
Baker County

I. D. Haines of Baker was born in Greene County, Ohio, Dec. 7th ’28.  His father located in Randolph Co.  In ’49 Mr. Haines emigrated to California where he joined Col Loving’s Rifle Regment of Volunteers.  He was a member of the Oregon Legislature from Jackson County in ’62 and from Baker Co. in ’76 and was elected to the Senate in June last.  Senator Haines is a lawyer of more than ordinary ability, an experienced legislator and an active worker and one who looks well to the interests of his constituents.  Mr. Haines is a bedrock democrat.

The East Oregonian (Pendleton, OR)
Saturday, October 5, 1878

Fyfer, Julius

Julius T. Fyfer-“Blest be the tie that binds.”  We mean the railroad tie.  Civilization goes on steel.  Only a few of the most hardy and adventurous would come to Oregon “the plains across” or “the Horn around.”  By rail we have the world; and the daily, semi-daily and hourly trains that speed to and fro are the pulse-beat of national life.

The gentleman whose name appears above followed the railroad as it was built, and is now a leading citizen at the important place of Huntington.  He was born in Quebec, Canada, in 1843, but removed to New York at an early age.  During the war he served as assistant to his brother, who was a sutler of the Seventy-second New York Volunteers.  Returning to civil life in 1865, he busied himself in the oil fields of Pennsylvania until the gigantic enterprise of connecting the Atlantic with the Pacific by rail attracted him to the extensive opportunities of the West.  At Cheyenne, then the terminus of the Union Pacific, he found employment in railway construction, and followed the road steadily to its junction with the Central Pacific, seeing the golden spike driven home, the last blow upon which was felt in every telegraph office in the union.  Mining in Idaho and Montana engaged his attention until the Short Line was undertaken; and he then found work at his old business, taking an extensive contract to haul iron to the American Falls.  Coming to Huntington, he engaged in the mercantile business, building a first-class store in 1887.  He keeps there a large stock of goods, and is recognized as an enterprising man, working zealously for the progress of his section.  He was postmaster there for a time; and it was he that opened out a road to Mineral City and the Seven Devils’ country.  He has also large interests in the Pine creek mines.

He is a Democrat in politics, and has an interesting family.

History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II, 1889, compiled and published by the North Pacific History Company of Portland, Oregon
Transcribed & Contributed by Maaike Kortleever

Heilner, Sigismund

Sigismund A. Heilner-This leading merchant, who is described as one of the most energetic, broadminded and liberal citizens of Eastern Oregon, exhibits in his life that romance of business which has made many of the phases of Western life so fascinating to the young men of our state.

He was born and educated in Bavaria, and in 1853 came to New York, repairing soon to Washington, District of Columbia, and within two years more to Crescent city, California, and Althouse, Oregon.  At that point he was engaged in business, and was there during the war of 1856.  As commander of an expedition for packing arms and ammunition to the volunteers, he saw active service, and was barricaded for some time.  Upon this packing trip he found one man killed and another wounded by Indians, who had surprised them on the road; and his report of this outrage was the news which precipitated the war in that section.  He saw service thereafter under Captain Driscoll.

In 1865 Mr. Heilner left merchandising, and being unsuccessful in quartz mining came up to Portland in search of an opening.  Taking a stock of goods, he set out for the wild region at the Little Dalles, and thence passed to the Big Bend country.  Thereafter he penetrated as far as Bear Gulf, Montana, and there disposed of the remainder of his goods.  He now showed his facility by taking up a business which he had learned in the Old Country, that of landscape and portrait painting.  In this pursuit he was successful; but it did not last long, and he returned to Portland, where he found employment with the Alaska Fur Company.

Upon his return some years later from the north, he was married to a lady of recognized position in Portland; and he engaged in business at Sparta in Union county, but subsequently removed to Baker City, Oregon, where he is at the present time successfully engaged in the forwarding and commission business, and the renting of several fine business houses.  A magnificent design for a structure, in the hands of architect A. M. Milwain of Portland at present, will be erected during the season of 1889 by him; and he is always on the alert for improving Baker City.

His two oldest sons, Jesse and Joe, are cadets in Bishop Scott’s Academy, Portland, Oregon.

History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II, 1889, compiled and published by the North Pacific History Company of Portland, Oregon
Transcribed & Contributed by Maaike Kortleever

Kinnison, J. P. & H. A.

J. P. and H. A. Kinnison-These two brothers, who have united their fortunes through life, were born on the Mississippi river about one hundred miles below St. Louis in the years 1838 and 1840, respectively.  They received a common-school education, and, developing a roving disposition, crossed the plains in 1853.  San Mateo, California, was their first home, and stock-raising their business until l1862, when they came to the Powder river valley, and were the first to break the ground of that beautiful region.  They have been engaged in agriculture and stock-raising ever since, and consider themselves fairly successful.

In 1876 they drove a band of a thousand cattle across the plains to Wyoming, and sold them to advantage.  The brothers now own eighteen hundred acres of choice agricultural land six miles west of Baker City, upon the site of their first location.  They now have residences in Baker City, Oregon, and are in the full enjoyment of life, having accumulated sufficient means, as a reward for their perseverance, to take life easily.

Mr. J. P. Kinnison was married to Miss Mary Chandler in 1864.  In 1884 this companion died; and his present wife, formerly Mrs. N. W. Hannah, conducts his household, caring for her own two girls and her husband’s five boys.

Mr. H. A. Kinnison married Miss Mary A. George in 1867.  They have one boy and a girl now living.

History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, Volume II, 1889, compiled and published by the North Pacific History Company of Portland, Oregon
Transcribed & Contributed by Maaike Kortleever


 

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