Biographies for Curry County, Oregon



Index

A
B


C

Colebrook, Fredrick
D


E


F


G

Gibson, Milton
Guerin, George
H - I


J


K

Koch, J. A. H.
L

Langlois, James
M

McKenzie, Robert (1)
McKenzie, Robert (2)
McSiglin, John
N - O


P - Q

Packwood, William
R


S

Stewart, Frank (1)
Stewart, Frank (2)
T

U


V
W

Woodruff, Delos
X - Y- Z




 

William H. Packwood, Sr.
   He was born in Jefferson County, Illinois, October 23, 1832. His father came from Virginia to Kentucky, thence to Illinois where he was married in 1831. When William was quite young the family moved to Sparta, Randolph County, where he attended school until he was twelve years old. His mother died that years (1844) and for six years he was occupied working on a farm in the summer and clerking in a store in the winter. In 1848 he enlisted in a rifle regiment and the next year was sent, with twenty-four others under Captain Morris, to California, as an escort for General Wilson who had been appointed superintendent of Indian affairs on the Pacific coast. M. P. Deady came with the same company, and on Goose Creek General Joel Palmer joined them and returned home, he having been with the escort going east. The company crossed the Sierra Nevada Mountains the 24th day of October, and arrived at Hangtown with 19 men. At Hangtown gold had recently been discovered. The company went on to Sacramento, at that time a city of tents, and Mr. Packwood had a severe spell of sickness. The soldiers nearly all deserted, and those who remained wintered at Sonoma, where General Joe Haoker, then a Colonel, was tried by a court martial. Mr. Packwood was appointed orderly sergeant at the trial. Of the army officers present who afterwards won distinction in the civil war, were Gen. Halleck, Gen. Pleasanton, Gen. Hooker, Gen. Lyon, Gen. Wessels, Gen. Casey, Gen. Percifer Smith and Gen. Page. What reflections that array of names awakens.
   In April 1850, Packwood came with his company to the Columbia River in a vessel commanded by Captain McArthur, the father of Judge L. L. McArthur. The company was at Vancouver till the next year when they were ordered to Benicia, Cal., where they arrived in May and remained till August. Packwood was then sent with an escort for an Indian agent who was visiting the coast and Northern California Indians. Returned to Benicia and in December 1851, the company was ordered to Port Orford, Oregon, and were shipwrecked near Coos Bay, January 3, 1852. The company made their way to Port Orford, cutting what was called the seven devils trail through the timber, reaching their destination in May. Packwood was then transferred to the 1st. Dragoons, and served as quartermaster sergeant. He received his discharge in 1853, and engaged in mining on the beach and packing goods, until the Indian war of 1855-56, when he entered the service again, serving as captain of a company fifty-three days, and as orderly sergeant during the remainder of the war. In 1857 he was sent as delegate to the constitutional convention from Curry County. He was afterwards clerk for a while at Stiletz Indian agency, and then went into partnership with [Knight] Abbott in stock raising.
   In 1861 Abbott undertook to drive their cattle to Salmon River but failed to cross Snake River, as related elsewhere, and that led Packwood finally to the Powder River mines. He was one of the founders of the town of Auburn in 1862, where he was engaged in selling goods for some time, and was one of the foremost men in the ditch enterprise of the Auburn Water company and also the Clarks creek ditch in 1863. From 1865 to 1867 he was a member of the Burnt River Toll Road, Bridge and Ferry Company, and then began construction of the Eldorado ditch in which he was engaged until 1870. Disposing of his interest in that ditch he began building the Eagle creek ditch in Union county. Mr. Goodrich attempted to survey a route for a ditch in 1863, but pronounced it impracticable to build on account of the perpendicular cliffs which he encountered. Mr. Packwood employed Foster as surveyor and succeeded in locating a practical route, and the work of building was begun.    In 1872 he sold the uncompleted ditch to Bowen & Cranston by whom it was finished at a total cost of $90,000.
   He had an interest in the quartz mine at Sanger which he sold in 1874, and from that time until 1887 he was in charge of the Eldorado ditch, and was elected recorder of Baker City in 1888, which office he has held ever since.

Excerp from Real Pioneers in Baker County, Oregon
 

©2007 Robyn Greenlund for Genealogytrails.com

McSIGLIN, John M.

HON. JOHN M. SIGLIN

The hold-over Senator from Coos and Curry counties is a gentleman who at once attracts attention on the floor of the Senate. He is of ordinary height and weight, with piercing black eyes and prominent features, black beard and hair and plainly dressed. When in street costume he generally wears a tall silk hat, which style this session is an exception rather than a rule. He often indulges m debate, and his opposition to a measure is generally vindictive and severe, while his support is considered a strong feature in its favor. He is a Democrat on general principles, but in obedience to what he claimed was the wish of a majority of his constituency, he was a strong supporter of Hon. John H. Mitchell, Republican nominee for United States Senator. He did not take this stand, however, until fully convinced in his own mind that there was no possibility of the election of a Democrat, when he naturally had his preference among the Republicans named. Mr. Siglin was born in Monroe County, Pennsylvania, in 1840, and at the age of twelve years moved with his parents to Illinois, where at Galena he received the benefits of an academic education. At the breaking out of the civil war he enlisted as a private in Company F, l3th Illinois Infantry, under the gallant Col. Wyman. For meritorious conduct at the battle of Wilson's Creek, in Missouri, he was promoted to a Second Lieutenancy and transferred to the 8th Illinois Cavalry, Company B, and was the youngest commissioned officer in that regiment. He participated in a number of engagements, including Fair Oaks and the seven-days' battle before Richmond, being compelled to resign in 1863 owing to failing health. Returning north, he commenced reading law and was admitted to the bar in 1867. He came to Oregon in 1872 and settled in Coos County, where he has resided ever since. He started the “Coos Bay News," the first newspaper published in that county, and was its editor for a period of eight years. He at once was accorded a prominent part in politics and has taken an active part in every campaign since his arrival there. In 1880 he was elected joint Senator from Coos and Curry, that being the first political office for which he was ever a candidate. By the way, Mr. Siglin is conceded to be one of the finest linguists in the State, he being able to speak several languages very fluently. He was married in 1863 to Miss Nellie Sherman, of Kane County, Illinois, she being the first cousin, once removed, of Gen. W. T. Sherman, U. S. A, In 1881 he was for sent back to Washington City, D. C, on behalf of the citizens of his county, to press their claims for favorable action on the part of Congress in the way of appropriations for certain harbor improvements, and in his mission met with gratifying success.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

HON. FRANK A. STEWART

Whatever of praise may be due to the man who has, with the advantages of a collegiate education and abundant leisure for after study, risen to a position if honor and trust in the government of the country, we must record still greater need of praise to the youth, who, without those advantages, has struggled with the waves of adversity, and, by sheer force of ambition and native integrity, has attained an education and elevated himself into a position of honor by the suffrages of his fellow citizens. The former is entitled to commendation for the ripened culture of the mind while on the latter we must bestow the praise due to force of character and singleness of purpose. The Hon. Frank A. Stewart started in life without any of these advantages. He is indebted to no man for the mental gifts which he possesses, and the degree of erudition to which he has attained. He is a plain-spoken man, thoroughly independent and honest in his dealings with his fellow man. Frank was born in Grass County, Illinois, in 1843, and immigrated to Oregon with his parents in 1854, and in that same year was left an orphan by the death of his mother. He resided from 1855 to 1858 with W. C Brown at Dallas, Polk County. He was educated at Belpassi, Marion County, and after going through the course of instruction in the schools, became a professional teacher, which calling he followed for several years. He went to Curry County in 1866, and has resided there ever since. He was for ten years a merchant at Ellensburg, during which time he established a reputation for probity and good character unblemished. During his varied career in Oregon, Mr. Stewart has also been engaged in salmon fishing, mining, lumbering, etc. He has also been a contributor to many of our leading journals, and his articles and poems have been very widely copied. At present he is residing on a stock farm at his home in Curry County, and is engaged in the occupation of stock-raising and raining.

Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca


    ROBERT McKENZIE.  Modern, progressive agriculture finds a worthy representative in Robert McKenzie, who owns one thousand acres of land in Curry county, near Port Orford, and by his practical, intelligent and systematic methods has made it one of the finest farm properties in this section.  His success is the result of specialized activity and earnest labor along developing lines and has made him one of the leading figures in agricultural circles of Curry county.  He was born in Scotland in 1835, a son of John and Catherine McKenzie, who lived and died in their native country, the father passing away when the subject of this review was only six weeks old.  He and his wife had two children, of whom Robert McKenzie is the younger.  His brother David died in Australia.

    Robert McKenzie was educated in the public schools of his native country and remained at home until 1857, when he went to Australia and lived in that country until 1874.  In the latter year he went to San Francisco, coming shortly afterward to Curry county, where he settled on a farm at the mouth of Elk river, purchasing four hundred and eighty acres of land from George Dyer, to which he has subsequently added.  He owns one thousand acres, well improved and highly developed, one of the largest and most valuable agricultural properties in this section of the county.  Upon this farm he carries on stock-raising and specializes in dairying, keeping a fine herd of sixty cows for this purpose.  His dairy buildings are modern, sanitary and thoroughly equipped and the entire enterprise is ably and intelligently conducted and is a valuable addition to his income.  He also specializes in the breeding and raising of high-grade stock, handling sheep, cattle and hogs, which he sells in the Oregon markets.  He is interested in every phase of development in this section of the state, which is manifest in his investments in various important local enterprises.  In his farming operations he has been thorough and energetic, his well directed labor and progressive methods resulting in gratifying success.  He has devoted practically all of his time since the beginning of his active career to agricultural pursuits and by upright and honorable standards has gained that prosperity which results from earnest and well directed efforts and is accounted one of the substantial and leading citizens of his district.

    Robert McKenzie was married on July 18, 1863, in Australia to Miss Georgina Tulloch, a native of Scotland, and they became the parents of ten children:  John, of Elk river; Kate, whose death occurred in Curry county; Eliza, who resides at home; Annie, the wife of Eugene Schuyler, of Santa Barbara, California; Margaret, at home; Isabelle, who married Ed A. Ashman, of Santa Cruz, California; Ena, who is following the profession of nursing at San Francisco, California; Flora, at home; David, who is married and resides on the Elk river; and Robert G., at home.  The family belong to the Presbyterian church.

    Mr. McKenzie gives his allegiance to the republican party but never seeks public office, preferring to devote his attention to the development of his farm.  Actuated always by the most practical and scientific methods and guided by high ideals of business integrity, he has through his own well directed energies worked his way upward until he is today classed among the wealthy and prominent agriculturists of Curry county.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated; Volume IV (1912) S. J. Clarke Publishing Company; transcribed by Mary Saggio

    FREDRICK WILLIAM COLEBROOK.  Probably no man has done more for the development, upbuilding and advancement of agricultural and business interests of Curry county than Fredrick William Colebrook, who died on his old homestead in that county in 1889.  He was one of the early settlers of Oregon and the most forceful years of his life were given to the representative industry of pioneer times.  His death was felt as a distinct loss to his many friends who honored and respected him for the quality of his attainments and his honorable and upright life.  Mr. Colebrook was born in England in 1818 and educated in Blue Coat College, London, in preparation for a career as a sea captain.  He held that position on an English vessel until 1849 when he crossed to America and went to California where he was engaged as store keeper in French Camp in the gold mines.  He afterward followed general farming upon a large tract of land which he rented and after several years spent in that occupation came to Oregon, settling in Curry county, where he took up a number of acres of land upon which he carried on stock-raising.  He was elected county surveyor and surveyed almost the whole of Curry county.  Later he purchased land half way between Port Orford and Gold Beach, buying five hundred and twenty acres upon which for a number of years he engaged in stock-breeding and raising.  It is today considered the finest ranch in this section of the country.  Mr. Colebrook gave his entire time and attention to the improvement and development of this property, breeding his stock along the most modern and progressive lines.  Whatever success he attained in life was a direct result of his industry and well directed activity.  His widow now owns a tract of six hundred acres of fertile and productive land in Curry county, a farm which is one of the finest and most intelligently developed in this section.

    On the 23d of July, 1876, Mr. Colebrook was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Shmitt, a daughter of Jacob and Barbara (Martin) Shmitt.  She was nine years of age when her parents removed to Indiana and she later took up her residence in Oregon.  Mr. and Mrs. Colebrook became the parents of seven children:  Fredrick, deceased; Mary, who is the wife of William Coy of Curry county, by whom she has five children;  Ellenora, who became the wife of Otto Newman of Bandon, by whom she has six children; Louisa, who married Richard Svius, of California, and who is the mother of four children; Anna, the wife of George Jensen, of San Diego, California; and William J., and George, both of whom reside in Portland.  Mr. Colebrook was a consistent democrat and took an intelligent interest in public affairs although he never sought public office.  He was prominent in the Masonic order and had many friends in the section in which he resided for so many years.  The importance of his work in agricultural circles and the place he had attained in the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens were evidenced by the widespread regret at his death which was a genuine tribute of sorrow, for the close of a useful, valuable and upright life.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated; Volume IV (1912) S. J. Clarke Publishing Company; transcribed by Mary Saggio

    J. A. H. KOCH is living retired in a pleasant home in Port Orford after an active career in Curry county of almost thirty years.  He has been a resident of this section since 1871 and during this period a great deal of the time has been a general farmer, operating for a number of years attractive land on Elk river which he acquired as a homestead claim.

    He was born in Prussia, February 25, 1824, and his parents died in that country when he was a child.  He received his education in the public schools of Germany and came to America when he was twenty years of age, having followed the sea for a number of years.  He landed in New Orleans in 1844 and for three years sailed out of that port.  In 1851 he came to California where he resided until 1871, spending his time in mining for gold.  In the latter year he moved to Oregon and mined in Curry county for two years before he took up stock-raising in which line of activity he engaged for a short time.  Eventually, however, he proved up a homestead claim and there lived until his retirement.

    Mr. Koch had served for six months in the American army during the Mexican war and in 1887 applied to the government for a pension and for the back pension due him.  This was granted in 1890 and shortly afterward he sold his homestead and came to Port Orford where he erected a comfortable home in which he lives.  He gives his allegiance to the democratic party but has never been an office seeker.  During the forty-one years of his residence in Curry county he has made many friends in the section, all of whom honor and esteem him for the upright and straightforward qualities of his mind and cliaracter.

Source: The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated; Volume IV (1912) S. J. Clarke Publishing Company; transcribed by Mary Saggio

MILTON B. GIBSON. No further proof of the high standing and moral character of Milton B. Gibson is required than the statement that he has served as treasurer of Curry county for sixteen years, and during that long occupancy of a position of great trust and responsibility no dissenting voice has been heard to criticize either his ability or disinterested devotion to the best interests of the people. Mr. Gibson was elected first in 1876, holding the office for ten years, and he was again elected in 1892, remaining in office until 1898. His devotion to Republican politics secured his appointment as postmaster of Ellenburg for four years, and he has held other local offices within the gift of an appreciative and intelligent community.

    Mr. Gibson began life on a small farm in Kentucky, where he was born October 19, 1835, and where he gained that excellent constitution and practical knowledge which have been of such vital importance in fashioning his successful career. In 1859 he removed to Kansas with large expectations of success in that state, but after living on land thirteen miles from Fort Scott for a year, decided to come further west, where crops and general prospects were more to be depended on. With his brother he crossed the plains with ox- teams in the spring of 1860, and after a fairly pleasant journey located on a ranch on Beachers creek, Curry county, near Gold Beach. Here he mined for a short time, and afterward got timber out of the woods, in time becoming an important factor in the building up of this now prosperous region. Gold Beach was then known as Ellenburg, and it needed the impetus of business careers and men solid in their worth and judgment. Mr. Gibson proved just such a man, and his boot and shoe enterprise, started in a small way, and gradually enlarged to meet a growing demand, proved of great benefit to the community. For fifteen years he sold boots and shoes to the town and county residents, and then became a member of the Ellenburg Business Association, which contributed so largely toward the up building of the town.

    After forty years at Ellenburg, or Gold Beach, Mr. Gibson came to Dairyville and lived with his son-in-law. E. B. Thrift., with whom he has since made his home. Three children were born of his marriage with Johanna Bailey in 1873. Mary, the oldest daughter, is the wife of E. B. Thrift; Anna E., now known as Sister Aquinas, is a teacher at Mount Angel Convent; and Jeanette B. Mrs. Gibson, died June 14, 1885. Mr. Gibson was reared m the Catholic faith, and all of his family is stanch in their devotion to the church of their forefathers. A man of great dignity and force of character, Mr. Gibson holds an honored place in the hearts of all who know him, and his exemplary and highly useful life may well serve as an inspiration to his younger friends bravely struggling for a name and competence.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca


JUDGE DELOS WOODRUFF. An association of more than half a century with various parts and occupations of the far west has made of Judge Delos Woodruff one of its staunchest advocates and most sincere appreciators. Not that his coming here in 1852 was any indication of far-sightedness, or of enthusiasm engendered by impelling accounts of gold or practically exhaustless timber lands. He came as a soldier in response to command, object as a soldier should, and after an honorable discharge looked around him for the opportunity which he had been taught comes into the life of every human being, whether he sees it or not. How well he has succeeded in grasping his chance is best indicated by the splendid country property which has been his home since 1878, and which might well be the envy of those less resourceful mortals who look rather for large endings than small beginnings. The Woodruff farm is eleven miles north of Gold Beach on Euchre creek, and is six hundred acres in extent. Few improvements had as yet been made when the present owner took possession, yet today it bears the stamp of progressiveness and scientific management, and is one of the chief centers for raising cattle and sheep, and for a model dairy business in Curry County. Twenty-seven cows contribute toward the maintenance of the dairy, and general produce meets a ready sale in the local markets. The Woodruff home is roomy and comfortable, well-furnished and hospitable, and during the course of a year many friends find entertainment beneath its roof. Judge Woodruff was born in East Aurora, Erie County, N. Y., September 30, 1834, and lived on the paternal farm until his eighteenth year. He was one of the hundreds of youths in the country to start upon their active careers as soldiers in the army, and in absence of active warfare he enlisted in Company A, Fourth United States Infantry, in what was known as Grant's regiment. The regiment soon afterward embarked on the United States starship Fredonia, captured from the British in the war of 1812, and started on the long journey around the Horn, being two hundred and ten days on the water. From San Francisco they were transferred to steamer Columbia and from there to Fort Vancouver, after a short time being sent to The Dalles. From The Dalles the company went to Fort Steilacoom on Puget Sound, and remained there until September, 1856. Mr. Woodruff was then discharged for disability, and forthwith went to Astoria, where he became interested in mining in California. Until the fall of 1863 he mined with fair success in Siskiyou and Trinity counties, Cal., and Nevada City, Cal., and then located in San Francisco, where he became a member of the police force. During the eleven years on the force he was given special warrants, and about all of his time was spent on the Chinese cases in the city. He became familiar with the Chinese quarter, its denizens and their modes of life, as well as the trickiness so graphically portrayed in the famous poem by Bret Harte.

    In 1874 Mr. Woodruff came to Curry County and down the Rogue River to Gold Beach, bringing with him a $1,000 stock of merchandise, with which he started a general store. From December, 1874, until April, 1878, he met with a liberal patronage from the settlers, and then sold out his business to R. D. Hume. In the meantime he had become popular and prominent, and was known as a stanch upholder of Republican principles. Mr. Woodruff is also a member of the Grand Army, and receives a pension of $10 per month. He was elected judge of Curry County in 1875, and served four years, and he was also justice of the peace three terms. In the meantime he has settled upon his present farm and since the expiration of his term as judge has contented himself with casting his vote on the side of intelligent and conscientious government. In 1870 Judge Woodruff married Eliza Willard, and, in the absence of children of his own, adopted three children into his family. Judge Woodruff has a marked and impressive personality, is remarkably well informed on current events, and has contributed not a little to the stable and substantial up building: of his neighborhood.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca


FRANK A. STEWART. In Frank A. Stewart Curry County not only has a progressive and successful farmer, but a prominent politician and legislator, as well as bearer of high fraternal honors. It is to such men as Air. Stewart that the rising generation looks for guidance to an all around practical and useful life, and his example cannot be too greatly appreciated or too closely studied. This honored land owner was born in Cass County, January 25, 1843, and when eleven years of age crossed the plains to Oregon with his mother and stepfather his mother dying en route. They were six months on the way and met with the usual experiences, arriving in Polk County in the fall of 1854, when the families were obliged to separate. All of the eight children obtained as good educations as the county schools of Illinois and Oregon provided.

    When Frank A. Stewart was twelve years old he went to Dallas for three years, and then to Belpassi, Marion County, and in the two places attended school for eight years, teaching at intervals. In 1865 he came to Gold Beach, on the Rogue River, and engaged in merchandising, fishing and saw milling in partnership with Hon. Michael Riley Ten years later he sold his store and saw mill to R. D. Hume, and in 1877 Mr. Hume also became possessor of the fishery business. Mr. Stewart thereupon engaged in sheep-raising in Squaw Valley, and in 1882 came to his present farm of three hundred and forty acres on Greg's creek. For a mile and a half his property skirts the beach, and mines for the whole distance facilitate an extensive mining industry. A practical and enlightened mind has aided the present owner in supplying improvements of a high order on his mine, and one looks in vain for the laborious and old time methods of less progressive miners. His home is one of the most beautiful locations to be found on the entire Pacific coast, and a fine library and piano help to render his home life happy.

    Almost continuously since the early 80s Mr. Stewart has been before the public as a Republican official, his first office of importance being that of member of the legislature, to which he was elected in 1882, his second election to the legislature occurring in 1895. From 1888 until 1890 he was county superintendent of schools, and for the following four years discharged the duties of county treasurer. He was deputy collector of customs at Port Orford for two and a half years, and served as collector of customs for the district of southern Oregon from 1890 until 1894. Mr. Stewart was a charter member of the now abandoned Gold Beach Lodge No. 70, A. F. & A. M., was its master for several years, and was the first senior deacon of the lodge. He is a frequent contributor to the local and state papers in both prose and verse, and is universally well read. In 1867 Mr. Stewart was united in marriage with Hattie Riley, whose untimely death in 1868 temporarily clouded his home. In 1872 he married Laura E. Riley, sister of his first wife, and of which unions there have been born five children: Frank R., deceased; Fred Dewey; Hardy Thurston; Ruby M.; and Pearl A.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca


GEORGE H. GUERIN. An important factor in the agricultural and business life of Curry County for the past twenty-seven years has been George H. Guerin, whose expectations in the west would seem to be fully realized, at least from the standpoint of financial advancement. At present engaged in the hotel business in Myrtle Point, the occupation represents relaxation from many years of ceaseless activity on one of the finest and largest farms in this part of Oregon, each acre of which was purchased and worked for by as zealous an advocate of industry and sobriety as one would meet in a year's travel. At his pleasure Mr. Guerin can leave his hotel in other hands and drive into the fertile farming regions of Curry County, twenty-five miles east of Myrtle Point, and survey the farm of twelve hundred acres purchased by him and his sons at various periods since 1876, and his home until removing to Myrtle Point in 1897. Here Mr. Guerin spent by far the most satisfactory years of his life, and during that time experienced all of the trials and deprivations which characterized the life of the pioneers. Many improvements had been made by the former owner, but they belonged to pioneer days, and die new owner found them altogether inadequate for his more enlightened needs. Each year witnessed the clearing of more unbroken land, and the better cultivation of that which had already been upturned by the plow. Produce of all kinds, grains and fruits, as well as high grade Shorthorn cattle supplied the principal revenue during Mr. Guerin's occupancy of his ranch for twenty-two years, and now that the city has become his home, his practical and progressive policy is being maintained by his capable and resourceful son, Harry A.

    The ancestors of Mr. Guerin have been both farmers and trades people, and prior to the establishment of the family in America, lived in France. William Guerin, the father of George H., was born in New Jersey September 15, 1815, and all his life cherished just pride in his Huguenot forefathers, exiled because of their intolerant mother country, Mr. Guerin was an expert carpenter, cabinet maker and wood worker, and when well established in business in Newark, N. J., married, in 1840, Charlotte N. Tichenor, born in Newark in 1818, and daughter of a shoe manufacturer. In 1841 Mr. Guerin moved with his family to Mobile, Ala., where his son, George H., was born September 23, 1842, and where he made his home until returning to Newark in 1847. In this, his favorite city, his death occurred in September, 1852. George H. and his mother preceded the father upon the return to Newark, and after the death of the latter the mother removed to the old home stead and lived there until going to Philadelphia, Pa., in 1857. This continued to be her home until 1872, when she went to Waverly, N. Y., but since coming to Oregon in 1876 she has made her home with her son.

    After the removal to Philadelphia George H. entered Saunder's Military Academy, one of the finest institutions of the kind in the United States. To the training thus received he attributes a large share of the mental and physical development which has so materially contributed to his success. In 1862 he entered upon an independent career in Newark, as manager of a coal yard, and a year later he went to Jeddo. Pa., and was employed in a general merchandise store. March 20, 1866, he was united in marriage with Priscilla Dobinson, a native of England, born January 16, 1848, and for the following nine months traveled extensively in Kansas and Nebraska with a surveying company. Returning to Pennsylvania in the fall of 1867 he entered the employ of the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company, remaining with the company in various capacities until 1875. During this time he made his home in Waverly, N. Y., and afterward moved to Buffalo, N. Y., and was given entire charge of the docks of C. A. Blake & Company in that city.

    Starting for Oregon in 1876, Mr. Guerin had a pleasant trip by rail, and at once took up his residence on his present farm. For about fifteen years he engaged in mining and prospecting in Oregon, with his farm as headquarters, but in his mining venture he met with only average success. Besides being the owner of valuable property in Port Orford he also owns houses and lots in Myrtle Point. He was instrumental in building the wagon road into Curry county, and he has been public spirited in all things that have built up Curry and Coos counties. From time to time he has taken active interest in politics, although he owes allegiance to no particular party. For fourteen years he was justice of the peace in Curry County, and has held many of the local offices. Mr. Guerin is social in his inclinations, and enjoys a good story, and pleasant evening with friends. He is a member of Myrtle Lodge No. 78, A. F. & A. M., Arago Chapter, R. A. M., St. Omar Commandery of Elmira, N. Y., and with his wife is a member of the Eastern Star.

    Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Guerin, of whom William, the oldest son, is deceased; Harry A. is managing the home place; Thomas D. is engaged in the hotel business with his father; George H. Jr. is in Alaska; James T. is engaged in farming and stock-raising in the vicinity of Myrtle Point; Waterman C. is living in Myrtle Point and is engaged in mercantile business; Charles V. is also in Myrtle Point in the government employ; Anna R. is the wife of Warren W. Deyoe, of Myrtle Point; Eckley C. lives at home; and John died in infancy. Mr. Guerin is justly poud of his capable and well established sons, and has found them of great help in carrying on his farm and business. He engaged in the hotel business upon locating permanently in Myrtle Point, and was so successful that in 1901 he erected his present hotel, a three story modern structure, containing twenty-seven well lighted, well-ventilated and well furnished rooms. He caters to the best of the traveling public and rightly regards his culinary department as of prime importance in maintaining an excellent standard. Mr. Guerin is a practical and straightforward business man, honorable in all of his transactions. In all his affairs Mr. Guerin has had the assistance and counsel of his wife and to her he owes his success in business ventures and the training of their family.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca


ROBERT McKENZIE. The appreciator of the moods of the sea and the beauties of the Shore land would find the ocean skirted farm of Robert McKenzie an ideal place in which to live. To inland dwellers the view from one of the finest country homes in Curry County, down and out upon the ocean, is surpassingly beautiful and inspiring. Six miles to the south is the little town of Port Orford, and four miles north gleams the beacon light of Cape Blanco light house. One thousand acres in one body is the rich possession of Mr. McKenzie, who came to his shore home in the middle 70s, and at first bought four hundred and eighty acres of the George Dyer donation claim, which served as the nucleus of his present farm. Splendid improvements are the result of years of patient labor at clearing and apportioning his land, and he now conducts one of the largest dairy enterprises in the county. Mr. McKenzie has a large mind and correspondingly large resources and not a department of his farm but has been elevated to the highest possible agricultural and dairying standards. He has a creamery on his place, and the butter manufactured there finds a ready market in the city of San Francisco. Eighty of the one hundred cows owned by him are milked for the dairy, and no better brand of cattle graze in the meadows of Curry County. General produce farming is conducted in addition to dairying and stock-raising. Mr. McKenzie is a vigorous, pushing and thorough man, and his character, home and business, reflect credit upon the great state of which he is a citizen.

    As the most casual acquaintance would readily believe, Mr. McKenzie is a Scotchman, and was born in County Ross, September 5, 1835. He was reared on the very land which his father had occupied for three hundred years, and in the nearby school he gained a fair practical education. When twenty-two years old in 1857, he went to Australia on a sailing vessel, spending sixteen weeks and three days on the ocean, a distance now accomplished in forty days from London. In the colony of Victoria, Australia, he became overseer on a large grain farm for a year, and then in Queensland colony he superintended a stock ranch for two years. In New South Wales he held a similar position on a cattle ranch for two years, and while there married, in 1863, Georgiana Tulloch, soon afterward embarking in a mercantile business. In 1874 he came to San Francisco on a sailer, and after a few weeks in San Francisco came to Port Orford and selected his present home. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McKenzie, all of whom are living: John; Catherine; Eliza; Annie, the wife of E. Schuyler, of Santa Barbara, Cal.; Margaret; Belle; Kenneth; David; Robert; and Flora. Mr. McKenzie is a stanch Republican, and he worships in the Presbyterian Church.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca


JAMES S. LANGLOIS. Twenty-seven years ago, on August 12, 1876, James S. Langlois came to Cape Blanco Lighthouse, off the Coast of Curry County, and ever since has kept the lights in order that seafarers might be warned of danger. November 2, 1872, his faithfulness to duty had already won recognition from his superior, C. H. Pierce, and from then until 1883 he served as first assistant at what is one of the most important stations along the coast. Succeeding to the position of head keeper of the station, he has made his name an honored and trusted one, and through the stress and loneliness of an isolated existence has preserved that evenness of disposition and kindness of heart so admired by his friends and associates. Mr. Langlois inherits his liking for the sea, and his patience with its tantalizing and dangerous moods. His father, William, who was born in England, spent many years of his life on ocean craft, and it was while in the port of San Francisco in 1846 that he determined to leave the sea and lead a less exciting and adventurous life. For some months he lived and worked with Spanish land owners in the vicinity of San Francisco, and in 1847, shortly after the discovery of gold, he went to Sutters Mills, and made considerable money. With the proceeds of his mining expedition he settled on a donation claim of a section in the fall of 1867, his farm being near the present site of the town of Silverton, Ore., where his son, James S., was born April 29, 1848. In 1849 he returned to the mines of California, and in 1854 came to Port Orford, where he engaged in a mercantile business for about a year, later moving his family to the beach near the lighthouse, where he mined for a season. His next home was on a ranch in the vicinity of Dairyville, where his death eventually occurred.

    Leaving home at the age of fourteen, in 1864, James Langlois worked on a farm for a year, and in 1865 enlisted in Company A, First Oregon Cavalry, for three years. During the service he was stationed at Fort Klamath, and from there went upon expeditions in the frontier service in different parts of Oregon and Idaho. After his discharge at the end of eighteen months he was variously employed in Albany, Salem and Jacksonville, and afterward devoted himself to hauling freight from California to Oregon. He then came to a farm near Dairyville and engaged in the cattle business, afterward clerking in a store at Coos Bay for a year. Mr. Langlois next venture was a sheep industry in this county, but it proved disastrous, and he sought employment with the lighthouse service with which he has since been connected. He has two assistants.

    February 12, 1873, Mr. Langlois married Miss Elizabeth A. Rudolph, and of this union six children have been born: William, following his father's example, is lighthouse keeper at the Tillamook Rock Lighthouse; James M., born in 1878, is a member of the Life Saving Service of Coquille River Life Saving Station, Ore.; Oscar R., born February 16, 1880, is living at home; Mary G., born November 3, 1882, is also at home; Idelia G., born April 8, 1884, died April 5, 1889, at the age of five years; and Audrey E., born January 6, 1898, is living at home. Mr. Langlois is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the Episcopal Church. Fraternally he has long been identified with the Masons, and from the Coquille Lodge No. 68, was transferred to the Bandon Lodge No. 50. He is also a member of the Occidental Chapter No. 45, O. E. S.

Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca




Source: Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca


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