GILLIAM COUNTY, OREGON
HISTORY AND GENEALOGY




In 1885 Gilliam County was established from a portion of Wasco County and was named after a veteran of the Cayuse Indian War, Cornelius Gilliam.

"Gilliam county is bounded on the north by the Columbia river, on the east by Morrow and Grant counties, on the south by Crook, and on the west by the counties of Sherman and Wasco. Condon is the Crook, and on the west by the counties of Sherman and Wasco. Condon is the county seat. This town is located near the geographical center of the county, and is in the midst of a rich farming district. Condon has a population of about 200, and it is a flourishing business point.
     The total area of Gilliam County is about 2,000 square miles. It fronts on the Columbia river for a distance of about 30 miles, and extends south for a distance of 70 miles to a spur of the Blue Mountains. Aside from the mountainous sections of the county, it is one vast valley stretch of arable land. Wheat, wool and live stock are the principal products of the county. In 1891 800,000 bushels of wheat were raised in Gilliam county, and the average price realized for this wheat was 78 cents a bushel. The average yield of wheat to the acre, as shown by statistics carefully compiled in that year, was 25 bushels. In the same year the shipments of wool from Gilliam county aggregated 2,000,000 pounds, and this wool brought an average price of 12 1/2 cents a pound. The shipments of live stock, during 1891, amounted to 62 carloads of horses, 49 carloads of cattle, and 15 carloads of sheep.
     Gilliam is one of the richest counties in natural resources in the state. Its present population is only 3,600, but from the fact that there are 600,000 acres of government land in the county still unoccupied, and that more than one-half of this unoccupied land is considered valuable for agricultural purposes, it is highly probable that the population of the county will be greatly increased during the next few years."

The Oregonian's Handbook of the Pacific Northwest 1894




Photo Crum Flour Mill built in 1885 near Olex by Gary Halvorson, Oregon State Archives.


Biographies
Births
Cemeteries
Census
Death & Obits
Marriages
Military
Misc.
Newspapers
Pictures
Towns
Updates
Oregon Home

GenTrails Home


As you can see this county needs adopting. Are you interested? Until we can find a new host any contributions will be added as they are sent.  Please contact me to submit data.

Please look around, consider adopting and send in any data you would like to share!
If you are interested in hosting Umatilla County read our
Volunteer Page

We regret that we are unable to perform personal research for folks.
All data we come across will be added to this site.
We thank you for visiting and hope you'll come back again to view the updates we make to this site.


Join our Genealogy Trails Pacifc States

mailing lists

to get email notices
when our county sites are updated.
For the Western States of :
Oregon, California, Washington, Alaksa & Hawaii

N O T I C E :
Please DO NOT subscribe to our mailing list if you
currently use a Challenge/Reply type of spam software
on your computer such as 0spam or dropspam.
These programs are INCOMPATIBLE with mailing lists.  Sorry.

To join our
mailing lists for other
Genealogy Trails states

 

Neighboring Counties

Oregon

Morrow
Sherman
Wasco
Wheeler

Washington

Klickitat


Return


All materials contained on these pages are furnished for the free use of those engaged in researching their family origins. Any commercial use, without the consent of the host/author of these pages is prohibited.  All images used on these pages were obtained from sources permitting free distribution, and are subject to the same restrictions/permissions.   All persons contributing material for posting on these pages does so in recognition of their free, non-commercial distribution, and further, is responsible to ensure that no copyright is violated by their submission.
Copyright Genealogy Trails

All Rights Reserved with Full Rights Reserved for Original Contributor


Updated December 24, 2013