Harney County Oregon Biographies


A


B

Baker, Frank
Bartlett, Jackson
Brown, Nathan
C

Canaday, William
Cary, David
Cawlfield, George
Clark, William
Cote, Ubald
D

Daly, John
Dickenson, James
Donegan, James
Duncan, N. E.
E


F

Fenwick, Melvin
G

Gowan, Delnora
H

Haines, Charles
Hembree, Albert
Howard, Thomas
I - J

Johnson, William
K

Kesterson, Ulysses
L
M

Mahon, James
Martin, W. D.
McClain, Wallace
McKinnon, Robert
Miller, Mary
N


O - P

Page, George
Poujade, Isadore
Q - R

Rann, Charles
Rector, Joseph
S

Simmons, James
Smith, Martin
Smyth, George
Stanclift, George
Stubblefield, Ira
T


U - V


W


X - Y
Z

 

Kesterson, Ulysses


Ulysses Grant Kesterson
21 April 1868 - 17 June 1950
Son of John Henry & Malinda (Jacques) Kesterson
Husband of Delnora Eva Gowen

Delnora Eva (Gowan) Kesterson
03 June 1880 - 29 April 1913
Daughter of Albert Winfield & Delnora (Pitcher) Gowan

Married 01 January 1896 in Harney Co OR
Parents of Fanny Mabel Kesterson  m Charles Elba Turner, Emma Winfield Kesterson m Alvon Douglas Baker and Clara Malinda Kesterson m.  James Henry Oard.


[(Owner of the photo Sharon Gibbons, Contributed by Christine Walters year unknown  place probably Oregon)   Not sure where they are buried.. but they lived in Harney Co OR - might be a wedding photo - they look young enough. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~bandy/kest.html

Haines, Charles

CHARLES A. HAINES

     Charles A. Haines, deceased, was one of the prominent business men of Burns and Narrows, where for many years he was identified with the cities as a representative of various important business interests. No man was ever more respected and no esteem in which he was held. In his lifetime his many friends throughout Central Oregon, recognizing his merit, rejoiced in his advancement and in the honors to which he attained, and since his death they have cherished his memory, which remains as a blessed benediction to all who knew him. Honorable in business, loyal in citizenship, charitable in thought, kindly in action, true to every trust confided to his care, his life was the highest type of Christian manhood.
    
Charles A. Haines was born in Indiana in 1870, a son of John A. and Eliza W. (Jennings) Haines. He received his education in the public schools of his native state and came back to Oregon in 1892. He made his initial step into the business world as a clerk in his brother's store in Harney county and at an early date evinced marked business ability. He soon started into business on his own account, erecting a building at the Narrows, and by his innate ability, backed by strict integrity, built up the most successful trade in that section of the state. Within a short period Mr. Haines rose to a position of prominence in the community and did much to develop and improve the general welfare. For some years he occupied the offices of justice of the peace and postmaster and holding that every public office was public trust he carried out the duties of those offices to the best of his ability. In financial circles he was a well known figure as vice president of the First National Bank at Burns, and he founded the telephone company at the Narrows. His astuteness in business was considered marvelous and at the time of his death in 1916, he had acquired a fortune of three hundred thousand dollars, which he bequeathed to his widow and children. That fortune he had accumulated in less that a quarter of a century and it was the result of self deprivation, sacrifice and unceasing toil.

In 1896 occurred the marriage of Mr. Haines to Miss Annie Comegys, a daughter of Nimrod and Siralda Comegys, whose parents were of old Wisconsin pioneer stock, having lived originally in Virginia. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Haines: Hazel, Wilbur and Marie. Hazel is now the wife of J.D. Leonard, who is a student in the medical department of the University of Oregon. Mr. Leonard was a volunteer in the World war, serving in France as a member of the coast artillery. He was honorably discharged on the 11th of March, 1919, as sergeant in the medical corps; Wilbur, who is a graduate of the Hills Military College, is now manager of his mother's six thousand acre ranch in Diamond valley. He married Miss Mary Jenkins, a daughter of J.R. Jenkins, a well known sheep man; the youngest member of the family, Marie, is a student at St. Helen's Hall, Portland, where her sister was graduated. Mrs. Haines is a woman of much ability and a model mother. Her large holdings are being carefully conserved for her children.

Mr. Haines was prominent in the Masonic circles of the state. He had attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite and was a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He was one of the public spirited men of Burns, always ready to give assistance in promotion every movement that meant the betterment of local conditions or the advancement of community interests. Because of a well balanced mind and a sterling character he was able to see the silver lining to many a cloud that to others would have looked hopelessly black, and he overcame obstacles which to many would have seemed insurmountable.

History of Oregon
Chicago: Pioneer Historical Pub. Co., 1922
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Donegan, James

JAMES JOHN DONEGAN

In August, 1921, James John Donegan was appointed by President Harding receiver of the United States land office at Burns, and he is now serving in that capacity, much to the satisfaction of the people of central Oregon, who have the greatest respect and confidence for him. "Jimmy" Donegan, as he is affectionately called by his many friends, is a native of Oregon and has for many years been prominently identified with its political and commercial life. He was born in Jacksonville, Oregon, on the 29th of August, 1872, a son of Patrick and Margaret (Lynch) Donegan. His father, who was a blacksmith by trade, came to the Pacific coast from New York in 1849 and the following year located in San Francisco, California. He resided in that state a year and then came to Oregon and settled in the mining camp at Sterling, where he engaged in his trade of blacksmithing. He removed to Jacksonville upon its founding in 1855, opened a little blacksmith shop there, and did an increasing business, remaining in that camp until his retirement from active life in 1910. In that year he removed to San Diego, California, where he died October 17th, 1919. "Jimmy" Donegan's mother passed away when he was two years of age and when he was twelve years of age his father married a second time, taking for his wife, Mary Fleming, a native of Ireland, whither Patrick Donegan had returned in the later '70s, for a visit.

In the acquirement of his education "Jimmy" Donegan attended the public and high schools of Jacksonville and upon putting his textbooks aside located in Harney county, where he remained for one year before returning to his birthplace. His father at that time owned a large tract of some five thousand acres on the Rogue river and James John Donegan and his elder brother, Hugh, now a civil engineer in San Francisco, traveled to their father's holdings and engaged in the occupation of sheep ranching until 1894. In that year "Jimmy" came to Harney county and until 1896 worked for William Hanley upon his ranch. The next ten years he spent in the conduct of a mercantile business in Burns, achieving substantial success, and becoming a prominent and representative business man he subsequently drifted into politics. In 1908 he was elected county assessor and was re-elected to that office, serving in all for a period of eight years. He has been a clerk in the legislature and in the senate of Oregon and enjoys great popularity among members and ex-members of both houses. Mr. Donegan is what is termed a good mixer. He is sociable and friendly, a keen observer of passing events and is well versed on the questions and issues of the day. In 1911 he became associated with Samuel Mothershead in the conduct of a real estate, insurance and abstract business, establishing officers in the Masonic building, and they represent some of the best old-line companies in the state and have gained a reputation for capable business methods. He is land and tax agent for many large interests, among them being the Eastern Oregon Land & Live stock Company, the Clerf Land & Live Stock Company and the William Hanley Company.

In 1896 occurred the marriage of Mr. Donegan to Miss Mary L. Smyth, a daughter of John Smyth, the first white child born in Harney county. Her father and mother were Harney county's earliest pioneers and were killed in the Bannock Indian war in 1878. Mr. and Mrs. Donegan have three children: Carmen, the wife of Nels Elfving of Portland; Patrick H., a law student in the University of Oregon; and Frances Mary. The youngest daughter is also a student in the University of Oregon and is majoring in journalism. She is evincing much talent along that line and is local correspondent for the Oregonian.

Since attaining his majority Mr. Donegan has given his allegiance to the republican party and is a member of the republican state central committee from Harney county. He has always been active in civic affairs and during the World war was chairman of the second and third Liberty Loan drives and of the Victory Loan. He was likewise chairman of the Red Cross drives and a member of the draft board and of the United War Work. He is president of St. Joseph's Hospital Building Association and is a member of the executive committee of the Y.M.C.A. Fraternally he is identified with the Elks. "Jimmy" Donegan is placed by public opinion among the influential and leading citizens of Harney county and is a man whose character and business integrity entitle him to be numbered among the most desirable and use citizens of the state. 

History of Oregon
Chicago: Pioneer Historical Pub. Co., 1922
Contributed by Shauna Williams

Smyth, George

GEORGE ABBOTT SMYTH

The demise of George Abbott Smyth, which occurred in September, 1917, lost to Burns one of her representative citizens. He was a native son of Oregon, born at Eugene in 1863, a son of George C. and Margaret (Dent) Smyth. His parents were early pioneers of this state and took up residence in Harney county when George A. was nine years of age. The father met his death while participating in the campaign against the Piute and Bannock Indians.

In Harney county George Abbott Smyth received his education and at an early age put his textbooks aside and engaged in business. In partnership with a brother, Prestley Smyth, he took up land in the Diamond valley and he was active in that association until his death. The firm of George A & Prestley Smyth became well known throughout Central Oregon, is still conducted by Prestley, and owns some eight thousand acres upon which high grade cattle are raised. The brothers won a reputation for integrity that is not confined to Oregon but extends to every cattle market in the United States. Much of the success of the firm may be attributed to the innate business ability and magnetic personality of George A. Smyth. He was prominent in the financial circles of the community as vice president of the First National Bank of Burns and identified his interests with those of the county, contributing in a large measure to the improvement and development of the general welfare.

In 1891 occurred the marriage of George Abbott Smyth to Miss Classie Seaweard, a daughter of Thomas and Cordelia Seaweard, natives of Missouri, who later removed to Harney county, Oregon, where they were well known residents. One son, Fred W., was born to this union. He is a graduate of the Oregon Agricultural College and is successfully engaged in stock raising in Harney county.

In the Masonic circles of Oregon, Mr. Smyth was well known, being a thirty second degree Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. For some time he was a member of the school board and served as county commissioner. Mrs. Smyth is a past worthy matron of the Eastern Star and a woman of more than ordinary ability. She was a close companion of her husband and stood shoulder to shoulder with him throughout their years together. Mr. and Mrs. Smyth won many friends in Central Oregon, all of whom feel a great loss in the passing of Mr. Smyth.

History of Oregon
Chicago: Pioneer Historical Pub. Co., 1922
Contributed by Shauna Williams
Daly, John

JOHN D. DALY - It is with pleasure that we are permitted to write concerning the talented and enterprising business man whose name appears above, since he is one of those men of honor and stability who form the real strength of any community, and since he is numbered as one of the leading business men of the county of Harney, and has here and elsewhere achieved a success which is very gratifying both in the results to him individually and in the general business world of eastern Oregon, where he has operated.

Mr. Daly was born in Canyon City, Oregon, on May 13, 1866, being the son of Eugene and Mary A. (Donohoe) Daly.  His parents were natives of County Cork, Ireland, and came to the United States in 1862, locating in Boston, whence in 1863 they came via Panama, to California, and in 1864 came on to Canyon City.  His father died in 1881 and the mother died in 1897.  Our subject grew up in Canyon City, gaining a good education from the schools there and at the age of sixteen years started on a course of teaching, wherein he made a commendable record.  He gained sufficient money by this labor to pay his way at college, and he attended at Santa Clara, California.  In the fall of 1890, he came to Drewsey and in partnership with Abner Robbins started a general merchandise establishment, which has since been one of the leading business houses of the county and is operated under the firm name of Daly & Robbins.  They commenced with a small stock of goods, labored hard and have built up a fine trade, because of their wise methods and because of the manifestation of integrity and uprightness in all their ways.  They have a large stock of all kinds of goods from dry goods, clothing, furnishings, boots and shoes, crockery, groceries, and feed to lumber, hardware, and machinery and implements.  In addition to this fine business, Mr. Daly and his partner are among the leading financiers of the section, being largely interested in the First National Bank of Ontario, and the First National Bank at Burns, Oregon.  Our subject is the president of both of these institutions and they are in a flourishing condition and well established.  The firm also handles a sawmill, twenty-two miles north from Drewsey, and Mr. Daly has about one-half dozen ranches of value in various parts of the country, and he manages this large amount of business with marked wisdom and discretion, putting into the entire lines energy and vigor which are characteristic of his own personality.

Mr. Daly was married on May 5, 1894, to Daisy O., daughter of Joseph and Emeline (McAtee) Robertson, and three children have been born to them, as follows:  Mary E., born June 18, 1895; Eunice M., born July 25, 1897; Abner R., born September 10, 1899.  Mr. Robertson was a native of Scotland, came to Illinois, and thence in 1860 to Jackson county, Oregon, crossing the plains with ox teams.  They were six months making the trip having to fight the Indians considerably.  In 1863 he came to Grant county and to Harney in 1889.  Mrs. Daly was born near Canyon City, Oregon, on February 5, 1875.

Fraternally Mr. Daly is affiliated with the A. F. & A. M., Burns Lodge, No. 97, and the A. O. U. W., Drewsey Lodge, No. 119.  He dwells in a fine modern residence of nine rooms, over which his estimable wife presides with a graciousness and dignity that are becoming.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 659
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Rector, Joseph

JOSEPH P. RECTOR - Among those who have gained a remarkable success in Harney county we are constrained to mention the gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph, and who has wrought such wisdom, energy and assiduity that he has gained one of the finest holdings of the county and is numbered among leading stockmen of this section.  This is more to his credit when it is mentioned that he came to the county with no means and has gained his entire property by his thrift and wise management since his advent.

Joseph P. was born in Schenectady county, New York, on August 28, 1844, being the son of Matthew H. and Ruth Rector.  He grew up on a farm and gained his education from the adjacent schools.  In 1869 he came west as far as the railroad ran and then took wagon transportation to the terminus of the Central Pacific and came to San Francisco.  He soon located in Humboldt county and for several years engaged in farming and dairying.  Then he transferred his residence to Palisades, Nevada, and engaged in raising stock.  In 1880 he came to Harney valley and worked for wages for a time and then located his present place, fifteen miles northeast from Lawen and as many miles southeast from Harney.  He devoted his attention to raising stock, cattle and horses, and he has been attended with fine success.  He now has one thousand acres of fine land, all fenced and well improved.  He has a fine grove, excellent orchard and devotes much of his land to raising hay.  His industry and thrift account for the success that he enjoys.  His ranch is known all over the country as the Crow Camp ranch.  The reason for this is that in the early days a Mr. Rankin Crow, who was herding stock for Todhunter & Devine, discovered the excellent springs located at this point and also the abundance of good grass all about, which resulted from the fertility of the soil and the generous supply of pure water free from alkali, and he made it his headquarters for a long time.  Then the soldiers from Camp Harney to their stock to this place.  Since that time it has been known as the Crow Camp ranch and it one of the finest stock ranches in this portion of the state.  Mr. Rector manifested his excellent judgment in securing it and making it a permanent location.  Mr. Rector is esteemed by all and stands well throughout the county.  He has always kept within the realm of the celibate and chooses rather the quiet and comfort of that life to the cares of connubiality.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 660
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Miller, Mary

MARY A. MILLER, familiarly know by all as “Grandma Miller”, is one of the loveable elderly ladies of our county and it is especially gratifying to have the opportunity to append an epitome of her career in this the abiding chronicles of Harney county.  She is a woman of many virtues and graces and has done a noble part in the life of the pioneer and she has many friends who admire her real worth of character, her faithful life, and her own rare qualities of intrinsic worth.  She is now making her home with her daughter, Mrs. Jane Poujade, who is the wife of one of the leading stockmen of Harney county and whose comfortable and commodious residence is six miles east from Harney, on what is known as Cow creek ranch.

Mrs. Miller was born in Richland county, Ohio, on September 29, 1827, and at the age of eleven went with her parents to Henry county, Iowa.  There she married Mr. Isaac H. Jones, on October 26, 1845.  They removed to Boone county, Iowa, where Mr. Jones died on June 27, 1860.  In 1862 Mr. Jones married William Miller and in 1863, with five children, they started across the plains with ox teams for the Pacific coast.   The arduous and trying journey was completed when they landed in Salem.  There Mr. Miller engaged in raising stock for three years and then removed to the Rogue river valley, where he continued in raising stock and farming until the time of his death, which sad event occurred on June 6, 1886.  Since that time, Mrs. Miller sold the property and has come to reside with her daughter, as mentioned above.

By her first husband there were born to Mrs. Miller, five children, names as follows:  Albert J., deceased; Mrs. Elizabeth J. Lu, of Baker City; Mrs. Amy A. McIntyre, deceased; George W., near Portland; Charles W., deceased.  By her second marriage she had four children, Mrs. Mary Savage, of Burns; Mrs. Jane Poujade, near Harney; John C., deceased; Frank S., near Burns.  Mrs. Miller has always lived on the frontier and she has done a noble part in the advancement of civilization into the wilds of the various frontier regions.  She is hearty and well now, and remarks that she loves to dwell in a new country, thus showing the admirable pluck, courage, and spirit of which she is possessed.  She is beloved by all, and her pilgrim years have been crowded with good deeds and now she is enjoying the golden years of life in comfort and happiness.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 660
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Smith, Martin

MARTIN V. SMITH – A veritable pioneer of the pioneers is Mr. Smith, having come to the Pacific coast in the early fifties and continued here in worthy labors in various lines since that time, ever displaying the same courage, capabilities, tenacity of purpose, and integrity, that have made the pioneers such a noble class of people.  Mr. Smith was born in Kennebec county, Maine, on January 10, 1833, being the son of James and Hannah Smith, natives also of Maine, the father being born near Portland.  His death also occurred in that state.  Martin V. received a good schooling and remained with his parents until 1853, when he went to New York and stepped aboard of one of the Vanderbilt ships, that took him to Nicaragua, whence he went to San Francisco and soon we see him in the mines delving with the vigor and strength of young manhood for the hidden gold.  Five years he labored there and then went to Yuba county and took up farming and raising stock.  The hard winter of 1861-62 killed all his stock and he went to freighting from Marysville to various points in California and Nevada.  In 1873 he went to Butte county and settled on one of Judge O. C. Pratt’s grants and went to farming.  His landlord was the first territorial governor of California.  Mr. Smith was successful in this venture and continued until 1880, when he went to the foot hills in Butte county and engaged in gardening and fruit raising until 1884.  Then he freighted until 1886 and came overland to Silver creek, Harney county.  He entered land and took up stock raising until 1892, then traded his ranch for his present home place, two miles south from Lawen, which consists of one quarter of fine hay land and is well improved.  He handles cattle mostly.

On January 28, 1864, Mr. Smith married Miss Mary E. Kennedy, in Yuba county, and two children were born to them, Othniel, deceased; Izora, wife of Scott Hayes, near Lawen.  In August, 1867, at Marysville, Mr. Smith was called to mourn the death of his wife.  On Thanksgiving day, 1876, Mr. Smith married Sarah (Linn) Gorman in Butte county, California, and two children have been born to them:  Ada L., wife of Charles T. Miller, near Lawen; Otto V., of Tulare county, California.

It is of note that Mr. Smith was one of the delegates to the war convention in California, from Yuba county and the times were exciting as many were for the south.  Mr. Smith was a stanch Union man.  In religious persuasion, Mr. Smith is allied with the Universalists.  In 1900 he was appointed as census enumerator in Harney county.   He is a man of good standing, and now is passing the days of the golden years of his life in the enjoyment of his portion in peace, being beloved and esteemed by his associates and acquaintances.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 661
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Poujade, Isadore

ISADORE L. POUJADE – This prominent citizen and leading stockman of Harney county is one of the men who deserves to be accorded space in the history of the county because of his worth, because of his uprightness, integrity and probity, and because of the excellent work that he has accomplished in the upbuilding and progress of the county.

Mr. Poujade was born in Marion county, Oregon, on December 8, 1857, being the son of Andrew and Matilda (Clinger) Poujade.  At the age of fifteen he went to Jackson county with his parents, with whom he resided until 1880.  He gained his education in these places and also a wealth of excellent training in the practical walks of life and in raising stock and in farming.  In 1880 he came to Harney valley and engaged as foreman for Todhunter & Devine.  Six years were spent in this responsible position, and then he engaged in partnership with Charles W. Jones, in the stock business.  They purchased what is known as the Cow creek ranch.  This estate consists of eight hundred acres of fine meadow land, six miles east from Harney, and is improved with a fine dwelling of twelve rooms, good shop, barns, corralls, fences and all implements for handling a first-class stock and hay ranch. After the death of Mr. Jones Mr. Poujade purchased all the stock, but owns the ranch in partnership with Mrs. Jones, the widow of his late partner.  Mr. Poujade is one of the prosperous stockmen of the county, and has demonstrated his ability to so conduct the affairs of business that a crowning success is his to enjoy.

On May 20, 1888, Mr. Poujade married Miss Jane Miller, and to them have been born five children:   Lulu Ivy, Verna Lee, Mary Matilda, Floy Willina and Amy Girtrude.  Mr. Poujade stands well among his fellow, has earned the prestige that he enjoys and Harney county is favored to have domiciled within her borders such men of talent, integrity and faithfulness.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 661
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Fenwick, Melvin

MELVIN FENWICK – A true pioneer, a man of exemplary standing and life, possessed of capabilities and qualities of worth, the estimable gentleman of whom we now speak, is entitled to representation in the volume of Harney county’s history.  His parents, Alexander and Nancy (Long) Fenwick, were natives to Kentucky, and his father crossed the plains to California in 1849.  He was a blacksmith and carried his tools on a pack horse and wrought at his trade, shoeing horses, and so forth, all the way.  In 1851 he returned via Panama, and with his wife and seven children he came in 1852 to Amador county, California.  There our subject was born on May 18, 1855, being the ninth child.  The family removed to Napa county in 1858, and in August, 1863, came thence to Lane county, Oregon.  There the father remained until his death in 1883.  It was in February of that year that Melvin came to the Harney valley.  He entered land at his present home place four miles north from Burns, and has engaged in farming and raising stock there since that time, being favored with abundant success on account of his industry and perseverance.  He now owns five hundred acres of land, well improved and skillfully tilled.  He formerly handled hogs, but is now devoting his attention to cattle mostly.  When Mr. Fenwick came here there was but one house where Burns now stands, and settlers were very few in the country.  Bacon cost thirty-five cents per pound and flour ten cents.  Mr. Fenwick put up the first barbed wire fence in the valley, the year being 1884 when this was done.

The marriage of Mr. Fenwick and Miss Jennie, daughter of Arthur and Mary Wallace, who were natives of Kentucky and came to Oregon in 1876, was solemnized on September 22, 1889.  In political matters Mr. Fenwick was allied with the Democratic party, but at the time of McKinley’s election he voted for that worthy man and has since cast his vote with the Republican party.  In 1872 and 1873 Mr. Fenwick enlisted to assist in quelling the Modocs, he being in Captain Roger’s Company E, of Oregon militia.  Mr. Fenwick has quitted himself in all the various relations of the frontiersman in a commendable manner and he stands high among his fellows to-day and is a worthy citizen of our county.

It is not right to close this article without a special mention of one item that has had much bearing on the general history of the county of Harney and in which Mr. Fenwick took a leading part, though it cost him much effort and money to do so.  Early in 1887 fifty-eight of the small farmers of the county banded together and formed a corporation known as the Harney Valley Dam and Ditch and Irrigation Company.  The purpose was to divert the water from the Silvies river to irrigate their barren lands.  Labor and money were freely expended by all these hard working men until the dam and ditches were all completed.  At that juncture W. B. Todhunter, one of the cattle kings of Harney county, commenced suit against this company and secured injunctions stopping proceedings of their work and project.  The shareholders were poor people and fifty of the fifty-eight threw up their shares and quit the field.  Some men’s mettle is shown only the better when in the face of desperate opposition, and so in this case.  Mr. Fenwick saw the crisis, the wonderful amount depending on the issue and so threw himself into the breach and fought, supported by the other seven, with such desperate and telling force and manifestation of right and demand for justice that after three years of severely contested litigation, Todhunter threw up his case and victory was gained for the common people once more.  Twelve thousand dollars and more were spent in the fight of this unreasonable opposition to proper improvement, and it is with great pleasure that we can chronicle that this move and worthy stand on Mr. Fenwick’s part was entirely successful, and it has materially changed the history of Harney county, and it is the entering of the wedge that will allow Harney county to become one of the leading political divisions of the west, for the sullen and avaricious heel of monopoly can not and shall not forever stay the way of the chariot of progress and development.  Mr. Fenwick is now and has been secretary of this company from its incipiency and he is a man of resolution and ability and has nobly cleared the way for further improvement and advancement.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 662
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Baker, Frank

FRANK BAKER – This native young Oregonian has demonstrated what pluck and perseverance can do when manipulated with wise management in the things of the financial world, as conditions obtained in this country, having made a brilliant success, as will be noted from the following.

Mr. Baker was born in Lane county, Oregon, on June 20, 1870, being the son of George and Mary (Watson) Baker.  His mother died in that county and the father with his children removed to Washington county in 1874.  In the fall of 1878 he came with his family to Harney valley, settling where the town of Burns is now located.  The children were three boys and two girls.  The father went to freighting and soon died, thus leaving the little group orphans in a frontier region.  Our subject had but little opportunity to gain an education from schools, but made the best of what he did have and also by careful and diligent research qualified himself for the battle of life.  He soon went to riding the range for wages and continued diligently at this occupation until 1894, when he started in for himself, handling livestock.  He gained steadily and in 1898 he purchased his present place of one hundred and sixty acres three miles northeast from Burns, which is a well improved ranch, producing abundant crops of hay for his stock, which consists mostly of cattle

The marriage of Mr. Baker and Miss Grace, daughter of Milton and Eliza Riggs, was solemnized on December 15, 1896, and two children have been born to them, Lulu and Frank.  Mr. Riggs was an early pioneer of Oregon and died in Burns in 1895, while his widow still lives here.

Mr. Baker has, unaided, and by his own efforts of industry and skill, gained a fine property holding and bids fair to be one of the leading property owners in the county.  He has always manifested with these fine qualities mentioned a becoming stability and integrity and he is counted by all as a reliable, upright and stanch young man.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 663
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Clark, William

WILLIAM L. CLARK – Among the successful business men of Harney county is to be mentioned the gentleman named above, whose well known establishment of general merchandise at Lawen, where he has done business for some time, is one of the prosperous business houses of the county; and in addition to handling this, Mr. Clark has a hay farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he attends to and also raises cattle, and also he has been a mail contractor of the interior of Oregon.

William L. was born in Carroll county, Indiana, on April 3, 1845, being the son of Thomas and Ann (Davidson) Clark.  In the spring of 1853, the father started across the plains with his family in an ox train from Carroll county, Indiana.  They made the trip successfully, but the last six weeks they had to live on the flesh of the oxen they killed, without even the luxury of salt.  Fresh meat with water for six weeks is not so pleasant as might be imagined.  They came through the Harney valley and settled in Lane county, near Eugene.  The remaining oxen ate poison weeds in the valley and all died.  The father took a donation claim, and, being a miller, wrought at his trade in Eugene as well as handled his farm.  He died in Eugene in December, 1896, and the mother died in 1899.  On April 6, 1865, William L. enlisted in Company K, First Oregon Volunteers, under Captain A. B. Ingraham, to fight the Piutes and the Snake Indians.  He was in one battle on the middle fork of the Malheur and one on the south fork of the John Day. He was in the service for one year and did scout duty most of the time. He covered the entire portion of eastern Oregon and did valuable work.  Being honorably discharged at the close of the conflict, he went home, and there on February 12, 1867, he married Nancy E., daughter of William and Irene Ogle.  The father was a soldier in the Union army and is living in Missouri.  Mrs. Clark came across the plains with an uncle in 1864.  Mr. Clark learned the wagonmaker’s trade at Springfield and wrought at that after his marriage.  In1880 he went to Eagle Point in the Rogue river valley and worked at his trade and then returned to Lane county, where he did the same labor.  It was in 1885 that he came to Harney valley and entered a homestead near Lawen.  He has it well improved and handles stock and raises hay.  In 1898 he took the contract of carrying the mail from Burns to Crane, which ended on July 1, 1902.  In 1900 he engaged in the general merchandise business in Lawen, and owns a block of lots with his store buildings and also a residence there.  He does a good business and is fast working up a first class patronage.

To Mr. and Mrs. Clark there have been born six children, names as follows:  Mrs. Irena A. Way, of Klamath county, Oregon; Mrs. Bertha A. Johnson, near Lawen; Mrs. Viola J. Page, of Coos county, Oregon; George W., Ira B., Thomas R.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 663
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Stubblefield, Ira

IRA STUBBLEFIELD – A man of great adaptability, with vigor to carry him through his various undertakings, and wisdom to guide him in the safe path, and, withal, possessed of executive force to manipulate enterprises with success, the subject of this article is a man to whom we gladly accord representation in this volume of Harney county history.  He was born in Blanco county, Texas, on April 28, 1866, being the son of W. K. and Eliza (Lumas) Stubblefield.  The father of our subject was born in Tennessee, October 30, 1816, and at the age of fourteen went to Bolivar, Missouri, and in his twentieth year he went to Texas and lived in twenty-three different counties in that state.  He was on the frontier all of the time and did much hunting and scouting and fought the Indians continually.  He was with the noted cattle king, Bob Tout, and the two doubtless slew more Indians when the savages were on the murderous raids than any other men of the country.  At one time eight white men, including Mr. Stubblefield and Bob Tout, were attacked by Indians, seventeen in number, and all of the whites fled but Stubblefield and Tout and two companions, and they fought the savages to a finish, completely whipping them.  Mr. Stubblefield was in many a battle and skirmish with the treacherous savage and always came out victorious.  In 1868 he went to Carroll county, Arkansas, and bought a farm and settled down until 1885 when he came to Walla Walla, thence to Portland, then to Lagrande and finally to the Imnaha country, where he raised stock.  In 1896 he sold his property and moved to Enterprise and started a livery stable, where he is doing a good business at the present time.  He is eighty-six years of age, well preserved and hearty.  In his younger days he shouldered and carried five hundred and sixty pounds of iron on a bet of twenty-five dollars.  He was always a quiet man but never found any one who could withstand him in a struggle.  During his life Mr. Stubblefield married six times, each wife dying a natural death, the last one passing away on the Imnaha.  He is the father of twenty-six children, fourteen of whom of whom are living, named as follows:  Mrs. Martha Mickle, of Boundary county, Texas; Thomas, in Indian territory; Mrs. Sarah White, of Boone county, Arkansas; Jasper, in Nebraska; Mrs. Christina Blue, in Stone county, Missouri, born on Clear creek, Blanco county, Texas on January 22, 1864, being a full sister of our subject; Ira, the subject of this sketch, now in Harney county; William and Mickle, in Wallowa county; Mrs. Eliza Newell, of Burns; Haymon, of Wallowa county; Mrs. Lydda Rowley, of Union county; Fancho, Newell and Breman in Wallowa county.

Returning more particularly to our subject, we note that he came to Wallowa county in 1886 and to Burns in 1888, where he bought and sold stock, taking a band to the Willamette valley.  On September 23, 1890, Mr. Stubblefield married Miss Ettie, daughter of Jefferson and Emily (Smith) Byerly.  The father came across the plains in 1846, from Illinois, and settled in the Willamette valley, so Mrs. Stubblefield is a native-born Oregonian.  Mr. Stubblefield took his young wife to Chico, California, thence to Lagrande, Enterprise, The Dalles, Prineville and Burns, arriving here in 1892.  In 1893 he went to Newport, Oregon, and in 1894 to Garfield county, Washington, thence to Whitman county, then to Wallowa county, and in June, 1899, he returned to Burns, having been trading and buying and selling stock, etc., on all these trips, in which he did well.  He bought a place near Burns and in the spring of 1902 he sold and bought his present home place, six miles northeast from Burns, where he has a quarter section of good land, well improved, and gives his attention to tilling it and raising stock.  He also owns another quarter near by.  To Mr. and Mrs. Stubblefield there have been born four children; Christina died in Wallowa county; Peach, born August 16, 1896, in Colton, Whitman county, Washington; Fancho, born April 1, 1898; Ruth, born February, 1901.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 664
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Dickenson, James

JAMES P. DICKENSON has gained a good success in material things in Harney county since his advent here and is one of the substantial and leading stockmen and farmers to-day.  He and his family have two good hay farms near the Narrows and also three near Lawen.  These fine tracts of land return him annually large amounts of hay and give him opportunity to handle many head of stock.

James P. was born in Grayson county, Virginia, on February 18, 1842, being the son of John and Rosa (Hale) Dickenson.  He grew up on the farm and gained his education from the common schools, and in the spring of 1861 he enlisted in Company C, Forty-fifth Virginia, as second lieutenant under General John B. Floyd.  He was in the battles of Wytheville, Parisburg, Big Sewell Mountain and Carnifax Ferry, besides many skirmishes.  At the end of the year for which he enlisted he retired from the army and went home and was chosen tax collector for Grayson county.  Eighteen months later he enlisted in the Twenty-second Virginia Cavalry and took part in the battles of Lynchburg and Luray valley, at which last place his horse was shot from under him and he was captured.  He languished in the war prison at Point Lookout, Maryland, until the close of the war, July, 1865.  The treatment was sever in the prison.  He returned to Grayson county, and in February, 1866, he married Miss Laura A. Milton.  He engaged in farming and stockraising until 1872, then came via San Francisco and Portland to Linn county, Oregon.  There he farmed until 1888, and then migrated to Crook county, and in 1889 came near to Lawen.  He entered a homestead on the Malheur lake and took up raising stock.  He resides at Lawen and is a worthy and progressive citizen.  Mr. Dickenson is a member of the Stock Association of Harney Valley.  To Mr. and Mrs. Dickenson there have been born three children, Mrs. Effie M. Syrne, of Burns; Guy E., at Lawen; Mrs. Rosa C. Kern, of Lawen.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 665
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Howard, Thomas

THOMAS HOWARD – This substantial and capable gentleman is one of the real builders of the county of Harney, and it is quite proper that he should be accorded representation in its history, being a man greatly respected and worthy of the high esteem given to him.  He was born in the city of New York, on May 11, 1833, being the son of Patrick H. and Mary (Ford) Howard.  The father was an engineer, operating a stationary engine.  Thomas grew to manhood, gaining a good education meanwhile, and part of the time working in the markets, where he learned the butcher trade.  In the memorable ‘forty-nine he was one of the gold seekers, going from New York on a steamer to Panama and thence to San Francisco on a sailing vessel.  The trip was hot and tedious, being two months from Panama to the Golden Gate.  He mined for a time and then went at his trade in Marysville and other places in the state.  It was in 1859 that he went to Carson and Virginia Cities, Nevada, and there operated at his trade, and also wrought in Esmeraldo.  In the spring of 1862 Mr. Howard was hired at a wage of one hundred dollars per month to accompany a herd of cattle belonging to Job Dye to Florence, Idaho.  The water around Harney lake being so high that it was impossible to make headway, they were turned aside, not knowing the route they were taking, and came where Canyon City now stands.  They discovered the first gold on the creek and their band of cattle were the first cattle that were driven into this section.  The first gold that they discovered on Canyon creek went as high as one dollar per pan.  Mr. Howard butchered the first beef in Canyon country, and the meat sold at thirty cents per pound.  They went to Auburn and the cattle were left on Powder river and there part of them were butchered and the balance was driven to Boise.  In 1864 Mr. Howard was nominated for sheriff of Wasco county on the Democratic ticket, but was defeated.  However, he carried his portion of the county by a large majority.  While stumping the county he was on his way to Rock creek with two men who were going to The Dalles.  They had the express, about ten thousand dollars of dust, and Mr. Howard had two hundred ounces of dust with him.  They were attacked by Indians, who shot his horse and headed off the express men, who were running away with the mules.  All the saddles, canteens, purses, etc., were taken, but the dust was left, the Indians not seeming to know its value.  They were shot at a number of times, but the savages seemed poor marksmen.  Mr. Howard got a party of men to go back with him and he secured nearly all of his gold.

After Grant county was cut off from Wasco Mr. Howard was elected in 1866 sheriff on the Democratic ticket, being the first incumbent of that office in the county, serving six years, and was nominated for the fourth time but removed from the county before the election.

The marriage of Mr. Howard and Mrs. Shinn, a native of Illinois, was celebrated on April 18, 1865.  Mrs. Shinn had been a pioneer of 1861.  After leaving Grant county Mr. Howard traveled to various places and then returned to that county, and in 1883 he came to his present place, four and one-half miles west from Drewsey.  He entered land and went to the commendable labor of improving and he has been numbered with the leading men of the county since his advent here.  Mr. Howard now has a fine estate of one section, and plenty of water for irrigating purposes.

This worthy couple have one son, Edward J., who lives at home.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 665
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Canaday, William

WILLIAM HENRY CANADAY – It is fitting that in a work that purports to accord to the leading citizens of Harney county representation there should be special mention of the well known business man whose name heads this article and who has labored in our midst for a number of years, gaining a good success and making for himself a name and standing which are enviable.

Madison Canaday was born in Hillsboro, Highland county, Ohio, on October 21, 1831, and when a boy went with his parent to Illinois and then to Iowa, whence they crossed the plains with ox teams in 1852.  They settled in Douglas county, Oregon, the parents taking a donation claim.  Later they removed to Yam Hill county.  Miss Sarah E. Abbott was born near Springfield, Missouri, in 1842, and started across the plains with ox teams in 1852, having traveled to Texas and returned to Missouri in 1844.  The train was a large on and the dreaded cholera attacked them and her father was the first victim to succumb to that terrible disease, passing away on June 9.  Before the journey was completed the mother died also, the date being September 30, and she sleeps near where Baker City now stands.  Thus from the happy eastern home this child was left an orphan on the dreary plains.  She came on to Yam Hill county, Oregon.  There she met and married Madison Canaday, the date of this happy wedding being 1857.  In 1860 they went to Douglas county, and in 1862 to Lane county, where our subject was born on May 26, 1863.  They still live in that county, near the old homestead place, and are honored and respected citizens.  William H. was reared in Eugene, in Lane county, and there received his education.  He also learned sawmilling and became head sawyer.  In 1883 he went to Weston, Umatilla county, and there learned the art of the photographer.  He bought the gallery later and removed it to Heppner, where he did business for a time and then returned to Lane county.  He worked at his trade and in a sawmill there for a time.  In 1887 he came to Longcreek, in Grant county, and there did business in a gallery, after which he came to Drewsey.  He built a gallery there and then came to Burns, where he opened the first gallery in the town.  This was in the fall of 1887.  He has continued in the county since that time.  In addition to his business he entered land, and later sold it, and also has operated at the saw milling business some.

On December 22, 1897, in Portland, Mr. Canaday married Miss Mary C., daughter of Silas W. and Elizabeth McMurphy, natives of Canada and Ohio and born July 6, 1836, and May, 1841, respectively.  They were early pioneers from Iowa to California, and in 1885 they came to Harney valley, where they now live.  Mrs. Canaday was born in California, on January 26, 1872.  To Mr. and Mrs. Canaday two children have been born, Ambrose W., born July 4, 1899; Sylvester M., born June 3, 1901. Mr. Canaday is past grand in the I. O. O. F., Harney Lodge No. 77, of Burns, while he and his wife belong to the Rebekahs.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 666
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
McClain, Wallace

WALLACE McCLAIN – This well-known and representative business man and patriotic citizen of Harney county is one of the firm of McClain & Biggs, liverymen and dealers in horses and mules in Burns, where their stables are, being also owners of a fine stock ranch. Our subject was born in Scotland county, Missouri, on September 16, 1854, being the son of Martin and Sarah (Childers) McClain.  The father was in the Confederate army and in the battle of Pea Ridge lost his right arm.  He served under Price.  In 1866 the family removed to Schuyler county and our subject was educated in these two localities and he remained with his parents until 1875, when he went to Waterloo, Iowa, and took up the grocery business.  In 1877 he went to Elk City, Kansas, and the next year he came to San Francisco, and thence by steamer, George M. Elder, to Portland and soon he was in Linn county.  He was engaged in a flouring mill until 1881 and then came to Summerville, Union county, and freighted from Umatilla to Idaho.  It was 1883 when he came to the Silvies valley, engaging with Lux & Miller, stockmen.  He took a train of twenty-one cars of cattle to Chicago and another to Omaha and was foreman of the company until he met with an accident of falling under a wagon, which unfitted him for the arduous labors of a stock foreman.  This was 1886, and he went into business in Drewsey and in 1889 Mr. McClain married Mrs. Eva (Robertson) Whittle and then moved to Umatilla county.  He took up the business of making and selling ties, took land, operated a store and butcher shop, also ran a butcher shop in Pasco, Washington, continuing in these lines until 1897, when he sold out and came to Burns.  He opened a hotel and livery stable and in 1900 he sold the hotel and entered into partnership with John W. Biggs, and they are now handling a general horse and mule market in addition to their livery business.  They handle more stock than any company in the county and are leaders in their line.  They own fine stables and a full quota of rigs and good stock.

Fraternally Mr. McClain is affiliated with the W. of W., being council commander of Harney Valley Camp, No. 381, in Burns.  Mr. and Mrs. McClain have one child, Harry Goulden.  It is of note that Mr. McClain was special deputy sheriff under W. J. Furnish in Umatilla county and was one of twelve invited to see the hanging of a noted criminal, “Zoon,” in Pendleton.  Mr. McClain is well known throughout the county and is respected by all and stands high both in business circles and in the social realm.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 667
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Duncan, N. E.

N. E. DUNCAN – It is with pleasure that we are enabled to write concerning the estimable gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, since he has been one of the potent factors in the development of Harney county, has manifested wisdom and enterprise in all his ways here, has labored as a true pioneer in many other sections of the country and has always manifested the same unswerving integrity, moral uprightness and sound principles, having sustained a reputation as an exceptionally reliable man, and ever arraigned on the side of right.

Mr. Duncan was born in Williamson county, Illinois, on March 27, 1838, being the son of Dudley W. and Elizabeth Duncan.  On April 16, 1859, Mr. Duncan started to New Orleans on the Panama route to California.  He had an adventurous spirit and was ready to grapple with the hard problems of pioneer life and has since proved himself of the right kind of stuff.  He stopped five days on the way, at Havana, and then landed in San Francisco on May 16.  He worked for wages until the fall of 1861, then went by steamer to Portland, Oregon.  On April 16, 1863, he started to Auburn, Baker county, arriving there on the 16th of May, and for fifteen years he was numbered with the hardy and worthy miners of that vicinity.  It was 1878 that he came to upper Willow creek and took up ranching.  In 1884 he came thence to the vicinity of Drewsey, and there engaged in farming and stock raising.  He took raw land, two hundred and forty acres, and made of it a fine farm, and was successful in raising stock.  Later he sold the farm and neat stock and handled sheep and horses exclusively.  In 1899 he sold his entire property holdings in this section and retired for a time from active business.  He is at present continuing his retired life.  Fraternally he is affiliated with the I. O. O. F., Drewsey Lodge, No. 147.  Mr. Duncan was nominated for county commissioner on the Republican ticket, and notwithstanding his protests he was elected, but refused to qualify.  Mr. Duncan has never ventured on the matrimonial sea, but is enjoying the quieter placidity of the celibate.  He is a man of unquestioned integrity and stands high in the estimation of the people.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 667
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Page, George

GEORGE W. PAGE – Among the leading stockmen of the country, the subject of this article also stands with the prominent and substantial citizens of the county of Harney and is one of the real pioneers of this section, being also a westerner by birth.  He owns Sonoma county, California, as his native place and February 13, 1858, is the date thereof.  His parents were Joseph W. and Nancy (Johnson) Page.  In 1867 they all came overland to Lane county, Oregon.  The father had been operating a large dairy in California, and in Oregon he devoted his attention to farming, also raised stock.  In 1884 our subject came to Harney county and operated a sawmill.  After this he roved about in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon and in 1893 came to Harney county and engaged in the sheep business, entering into partnership with G. W. Bartlett.  Later he sold out and then went into partnership with James Campbell.  They divided up in 1901 and Mr. Page sold one-third interest to his brother Edward N., and his nephew, Claud Hendricks.  They own several thousand head of sheep and are prosperous in this business, being skilled in handling them.  Mr. Page is a member of the I. O. O. F., Drewsey Lodge, No. 147.  He is a man of public spirit, has always labored for the advancement of the county and is one of the promoters of substantial progress.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 668
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Simmons, James

JAMES T. SIMMONS – Among the arrivals in Harney county who have come from native places to identify themselves with this progressive region, we must not fail to mention the gentleman whose name is at the head of this article and who has wrought here with untiring energy and unflagging zeal in the line of stock raising, and in addition now handles the mail and stage line from Diamond to Andrews.  Mr. Simmons was born in Berryville, Arkansas, on March 22, 1862, being the son of Isaac and Sarah Simmons.  He grew up on a farm and received his education from the public schools and in 1877 went to Millville, California, afterward returning to Arkansas.  It was in 1888 that he came to the Harney valley, and here at the Narrows, on January 1, 1893, he married Mrs. Mary A. Burneson, daughter of Albert and Mary Hembree, who are mentioned in this volume.  To this happy union there were born two children, Alice Esma and Rose Alliene.  By her former marriage Mrs. Simmons had two children, Charles Albert and Ira D. P.  Mr. Simmons engaged in raising stock and handles the stage line in addition.  His father was a captain in the Union army and died soon after the war was over.

Mr. Simmons is a man of sound principles and has won friends in his walk, being well known and respected by all.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 668
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Hembree, Albert

ALBERT HEMBREE – It is indeed very gratifying to be allowed to epitomize the career of this esteemed pioneer, being, as he is, one of the earliest pilgrims who ever crossed the dreary plains and rugged mountains toward the setting sun; and since that early date he has been identified with the progress and development of the great west, having ever done a worthy share where his lot has been cast.  It will be of interest to chronicle some of the more definite details of this life and we note first that Mr. Hembree was born in Tennessee on April 23, 1833, being the son of Joel J. and Sarah Hembree.  While a child he came with his parents to Dade county, Missouri, remaining there until the spring of 1843.  In that spring they joined the famous train of four hundred wagons led by Captain and Jesse Applegate, and guided by the noted and beloved Dr. Whitman, which wound its way across the plains to the latter’s home near Walla Walla.  No roads were built and the work had to be done as they progressed.  And incident of the journey illustrates the nature and courage of the man to whom, more than to any other single individual, we owe the opening of this vast territory, Dr. Whitman.  While crossing the Platte our subject’s mother and some other women were in one wagon and the teams became tangled up.  Dr. Whitman saw the trouble which threatened death to the women and cried out, “Boys, are you going to let those women drown?”  He at once sprang into the water and swam to the teams, straightened them out, and so saved the occupants of the wagon.  The train divided in Oregon, our subject’s parents going to Dr. Whitman’s home, near Walla Walla, and thence to The Dalles and finally to Yam Hill county.  There a donation claim was located and the worthy pioneers settled to develop the country.  The father operated a store at Lafayette and later at McMinnville, where he died in 1867.  The mother died in 1854.  The father started across the plains with nine children; one died en route and one was born on the way.  Our subject grew up on the farm and in the store and acquired a good education and then went to teaching school.  On December 28, 1854, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Calvin P. and Mary (Aladine) Pell.  Mr. and Mrs. Pell were married in Holmes county, Ohio, where Mrs. Hembree was born on April 8, 1839.  Mr. Pell moved to Missouri in 1840, and in 1852 came across the plains with a large ox train direct to the Willamette valley.  Mr. Pell had two brothers, Gilbert and John, and their father, Nathaniel Pell, served in the Revolution.  They descended from English lords.

In 1856 Mr. Hembree removed to Lane county and went to farming and raising stock.  In 1886 he brought a band of stock to Harney county, settling on Poison creek.  In 1891 he came to the Narrows and took a homestead and sold his cattle and engaged in mercantile business.  In 1899 the store was burned, entailing a great loss.  Since that time Mr. Hembree has been operating a hotel and livery stable and handling his farm.  He also owns the ranch on Poison creek.  Mr. Hembree kept the postoffice for six years at the Narrows.

To Mr. and Mrs. Hembree have been born nine children, as follows:  Mrs. Mary A. Simmons; Mrs. Annie L. Hamilton; Mrs. Emma D. Moomaw; Mrs. Minnie E. Wooley; Eugene F.; John L.; of Portland; Guy L., a merchant at Silver Creek; Mrs. Rose E. McGrath; Loren C.  Mr. Hembree’s uncle, Abraham Hembree, was a captain in the Indian war of 1855-6.  Mr. Hembree and his estimable wife are worthy citizens of this county and have earned and enjoy in generous measure the esteem, confidence, good will and admiration of all who know them, being good people and worthy pioneers.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 668
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Stanclift, George

GEORGE M. STANCLIFT – Surely the subject of this review has passed the various stages of all kinds of pioneer work, with its hardships, deprivations and dangers, while he has met each point with a calm determination to overcome and make his way through it all, which he has done in a most commendable manner, being now one of the stanch and upright men of Harney and one of its well-to-do citizens, having his home on one of the finest pieces of soil in central Oregon, the same being one hundred and fifty-three acre, one mile north from Burns, which forms the family home and is a good dividend producer.

Mr. Stanclift was born in Erie county, New York, on April 25, 1837, being the son of Reuben and Elvira (Adams) Stanclift.  At the age of fifteen he went with the family to Cass county, Michigan, and thence to Berrien county, where his mother died.  In February, 1855, he came via New York and Panama to San Francisco, crossing the Isthmus with the first through passenger train. On the sea they encountered great storms that made the passage unpleasant.  Upon landing in California he went to the Poor creek country, and thence to Plumas county and mined.  Yuba county he later took up mining and dairying together and in the spring of 1860 he went to the vicinity of Virginia City.  But the second winter there his partner was killed by the Indians, and all the stock driven off by them, entailing a loss upon Mr. Stanclift of seven thousand dollars.  He went to work for wages again and on January 8, 1867, he married Miss Mary C., daughter of Gabriel and Kitty A. Stephens, who were natives of Kentucky, their daughter also being born there; and they had removed to Missouri, where they died.  Mrs. Stanclift came across the plains with an elder brother in 1853, the trip being exceptionally tedious.  After his marriage Mr. Stanclift came by wagon to Douglas county, Oregon, and took up stock raising, the year being 1871.  In 1876 he came to Harney valley with a band of cattle and in 1878 he removed his family over here, it being the year of the Bannock war.  He was exposed to much danger and hardship, there being but eight families in the valley.  He settled on his present place, and soon he sold his cattle and bought sheep and later sold them and confined himself to farming alone.  To Mr. and Mrs. Stanclift have been born three children; Mrs. Etta Horton; Mrs. Laura P. Biggs, of Prineville; Lewis L., of Montana.  It is of note that the grandfather of our subject, John Stanclift, fought in the Revolution, and was with Washington’s army at Valley Forge.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 669
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Martin, W. D.

W. D. MARTIN – One half mile southeast from Harney is one of the finest small grain farms in the county.  It consists of eighty acres of choice land and is well under cultivation.  The improvements are of a quality and kind quite fitting such an estate and its owner is the subject of this article.  Mr. Martin was about the first man to try raising grain in this locality and he has made a marked success in this direction.  He raised in 1901 the largest crop of any one man in Harney county and he is classed as one of the leading agriculturists of middle Oregon.

W. D. Martin was born in Walla Walla county, Washington, on February 13, 1865, being the son of John and Nancy (Owens) Martin.  The parents came from the state of Iowa overland with ox teams direct to Walla Walla and the father took a ranch that joined Oregon, and within one hundred yards of the state line our subject was born.  Soon after that event, the family removed to the Oregon side and dwelt in Umatilla county until 1885.  W. D. was educated in the common schools there and grew up on a farm, developing both his mental and physical powers in a becoming manner to a western born son.  In 1885 he came to Baker county, near North Powder and on June 8, of that year, he married Miss Leorah, daughter of Jason and Margaret Wyatt, who were pioneers from the state of Indiana to Baker county in 1876.  Mrs. Martin was born in Indiana.  They removed to Walla Walla county and thence in 1891 to Harney county.  He at once engaged in farming here and was one of the very first to raise grain on the fertile face of this county.  He succeeded in good shape and in 1895 he took his present place, gaining title by purchase.

To Mr. and Mrs. Martin, five children have been born, named as follows:  Earl L., Oran, Christine, deceased, Agnes and Ester, twins.  Mr. Martin’s parents are living in Walla Walla and are among the prosperous and wealthy residents of that city.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 670
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Cary, David

DAVID CARY – The stockmen and farmers are the ones who have made Harney county what she is at this time, and it is they who have wrought out the wealth here that gives the county a standing among her sisters and to them is due the credit of opening the country and developing its resources in a commendable manner.  One of this worthy class is named at the head of this article and it is with pleasure that we grant him consideration in this volume of this county’s annals.

Mr. Cary was born in Jackson county, Missouri, on January 16, 1836, being the son of Armenious and Anna Cary.  David grew up on a farm in the native country, gaining an education from the primitive schools held in the log cabins.  It was 1852 when the father provided the ox team conveyances and undertook the long journey across the plains to the Pacific coast.  Six months were consumed on the trip and our subject drove an ox team the entire distance.   They arrived at Oregon City on October 22, and settlement was made in Linn county.  The train with which these people came was composed of twenty wagons and some deaths occurred from cholera, the grandmother and uncle of our subject being among those who perished.  In 1854, David went to California and engaged in mining and the following year he returned to Oregon, and then enlisted in Captain Keeney’s company to fight the Indians and he participated in the struggle until the savages were repulsed and then returned to California and in 1860 came again to Oregon.  Thence he went to Idaho and wrought in Oro Fino, Florence, Warren, and other camps until 1865, when we see him again in Linn county and on December 26, of that year he married Miss Rebecca A., daughter of Jesse and Anna Barr, pioneers from Iowa in 1853, having made the trip with the ox teams of the day.  Our subject took up farming, and also operated at general merchandising and in 1883 he sold out and removed to Harney valley.  Here he gave his undivided attention to stock raising.  His present home is six miles northwest from Crane postoffice and he owns one thousand six hundred acres of good grazing and meadow land.  Mr. Cary pays attention to cattle mostly and has a goodly band.  He was one of the first settlers and has always wrought on the frontier and while he started the battle with nothing, he has now a commendable holding and is one of the substantial men of the valley.  He is road supervisor, and always active in the advancement of the interests of the country.  The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cary:  Mahalie A., wife of George Shelley, ex-sheriff of Harney county; Mrs. Malinda A. Stenffer; Clarence T.; John L.; Gracie.  Mr. Cary has always so conducted himself that he has maintained an untarnished reputation, and he stands high among his fellows.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 670
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Brown, Nathan

NATHAN BROWN – The worthy pioneer and capable business man of whom we now have the privilege of speaking is one of the leaders in the business realm of Burns, being senior member of the firm of N. Brown & Sons, general merchants, who have one of the largest stocks in the county and do a mammoth business, being well established and highly esteemed by all.

Mr. Brown was born in Germany, in January, 1835, and at the age of thirteen years came to America.  In 1852 he came via Cape Horn to San Francisco, and thence to Oregon City, where he engaged in business for a few years.  We next see him in Walla Walla, where he took up the business of general merchandising, and in 1866 he returned to San Francisco and there operated at the clothing business until 1883, at which time he sold out his entire business there and came to Burns.  It was 1884 when he entered into business here, taking his two sons, Benjamin and Leon M., as partners.  They began in a small way and by careful attention to business and deferential treatment of the patrons have increased their trade until it is at present of far reaching and generous proportions, and success in a very brilliant form is theirs to enjoy.  In 1896 they erected a large two-story structure, which they occupy at this time, the upper story being rented to the I. O. O. F. lodge of Burns, and the United States land office.  They carry a large stock of merchandise and are favorably known all through the country.  In addition to the merchandise the firm owns several tracts of land in the county, mostly improved hay and grain land, which is rented.  Mr. Brown has a wife and two married daughters and the two sons mentioned, all of whom reside in San Francisco.  Mr. Brown is a man of excellent capabilities and has won success, while he is highly esteemed by all, and is a man of unswerving integrity and intrinsic worth of character.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 671
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Cawlfield, George

GEORGE W. CAWLFIELD – This worthy gentleman is to be numbered with the younger men of Harney county who have attained a good success in the stock business here and who bid fair to gain much better in the future, judging by their faithful and wisely bestowed labors of the past.  George W. was born in Johnson county, Kansas, on October 21, 1870, being the son of David A. and Abigil (Evans) Cawlfield.  The father was a native of Tennessee, and went across the plains to California in an early day and then returned via Panama, after which for some time he acted as government freighter on the frontiers and finally settled in Kansas.  In 1874 the family came overland to Pueblo county, Colorado, and there the father followed stock raising.  In 1888 the father, with his wife and ten children, came by covered wagons to Harney and settled on Rye Grass flat, east from Burns, and there engaged in raising stock.  Our subject attended schools in various places of his residence, and in 1891 he went to Portland and acted as express messenger and baggageman to two different points on the O. R. & N.  This continued for two years, and he returned to Harney county, and there, on November 24, 1897, he married Miss Hattie, daughter of Jesse O. and Emma Bunyard.  To them have been born two children –Gladys R., born February 3, 1899, and Edna, born July 1, 1901.  In 1898 Mr. Cawlfield located a homestead twelve miles north from the Narrows, where he lives now.  This he has improved in good shape, having a good six-room house, barns, outbuildings, corralls and all necessary conveniences for a first-class stock ranch.  In 1899 he formed a partnership with his father, in the stock business, and they are succeeding well.  His parents live with him now.  The father also owns a ranch of one-half section on Cram creek.  Our subject started in with no capital and now has a large band of cattle, a good home and is prospering well.  He has labored faithfully and managed his business interests with excellent wisdom and practical judgment, all of which combine to make him the competence which he now enjoys.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 671
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Mahon, James

JAMES F. MAHON – It is especially gratifying to be enabled to chronicle in this volume of the history of Harney county the salient points in the career of the estimable gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch, since he has done so much for the development and advancement of this county, has demonstrated his ability as a financier and to handle successfully large interests, of which he is happily possessed at the present time, being doubtless the largest grain farmer in the county and also a leader in raising fine horses and mules; while individually, Mr. Mahon is a man of marked ability and integrity, always dominated by sound principles and possessed of an executive force and practical judgment that array him on the side of success, and his moral virtues and untarnished reputation for honor and uprightness are commensurate with his other qualifications of high order.  The account, therefore, of Mr. Mahon’s operations in the county would form an important parts of its history, and it is but right that such giants of achievement, whose labors have wrought such advantage to all, should be granted a position which their sagacious conduct rightly marks as their own.

Reverting more particularly to the personal history of our subject, we note, which accounts for his indefatigable energy and the boundless resources of his personality, which demonstrate him equal to any emergency, that he comes from stanch Irish blood, his parents being natives of the Emerald Isle.  He, himself, was born on April 29, 1855, in Syracuse, New York, to Patrick and Catherine Mahon, who had come hither while young.  James F. was reared on a farm, gaining his education from the schools of his vicinity, and early he manifested the precocity which later produced the success winning talents which have characterized him in his entire walk.  At the budding age of nineteen, James F. started out for himself, and soon we see him in the far west in the vicinity of Stockton, California.  He engaged on the farm of Jacob Grundike, as a laborer.  The estate of this worthy gentleman consisted of two thousand five hundred acres of land devoted to grain and stock.  Mr. Grundike was a man of keen perception and sound judgment and withal of a kind and dissrminating spirit and soon he discovered that in his employee, he had a man of no ordinary ability and trustworthiness, and he did the wise thing both for himself and out subject, he placed him in the position of superintendent of the entire estate, which was a very responsible incumbency.  For two years in that capacity and also as renter of the entire property for five years, Mr. Mahon remained with Mr. Grundike; and the only outcome that could resolve itself to the skill, energy, industry, and excellent judgment of Mr. Mahon was the unbounded success that attended his efforts, both to his own and Mr. Grundike’s financial advantage.  During these years, Mr. Mahon’s father had come to join his son and in 1879 they disposed of their interests in California and came thence to central Oregon, settling in Harney valley.  Let it be said to the honor of the kind benefactor of Mr. Mahon, Mr. Grundike, that he willingly placed to the credit of our subject the financial backing necessary to start this young man on a career that has won a most brilliant success.   Space forbids the details of the years since the first settlement in Oregon to the present, but a brief summary of the present will manifest plainly the talent with which Mr. Mahon has wrought.  For a time his father remained in partnership with him and then the son bought his interest and now he is one of the heaviest property owners in the state.  Coming early, and being a practical farmer, Mr. Mahon secured the choicest farms to be had in Harney county.  He has five different well improved ranches in the county.  Two of them, aggregating two thousand five hundred acres, make the finest grain farm in the county.  The other three amount to four thousand acres, which Mr. Mahon has a number of sections of fine grazing land.  His home place is at Steins mountain, and the postoffice was named by Mr. Mahon, Mule, from the fact that he handles so many of these animals.  Mr. Mahon makes a specialty of raising horses and mules and is the largest owner of these quadrupeds in the county.  On his home place he has twenty-six miles of fencing and utilizes it as the breeding ranch for his entire stock.  His horses are all well bred black Percherons and he owns a Dexter Prince stallion, Thomas H., which paces in two-fourteen, and many other horses of fine blood, as Clydesdale, and so forth.  Mr. Mahon is a noted nimrod and has some fine animals for the chase consisting of Chesapeake hounds and Blue Dane; and many exciting chases he participates in.

The marriage of Mr. Mahon occurred in 1881 and his wife died in 1886.  He contracted a second marriage and has four children by this union, Emily F., a graduate of Oxford; Iva J., attending school in California; Pearl R., and Stella M., deceased.  Fraternally he is well connected, being a member of the Masons, the Elks, the I. O. O. F., the K. of P., the A. O. U. W., and the M. W. of A.  Politically he is allied with the Democratic party and is active in the interests of good government.  Mr. Mahon is a fine expert with horses and an admirer of that beautiful animal.  He is a leading man in the county, and has done much for the advancement of its interests.  From the time his faithful labors attracted the kindly notice of his worthy employer, Mr. Grundike, who promptly placed him on the road to brilliant success, which he has achieved, Mr. Mahon has always been faithful, upright, progressive, dominated by wisdom of a high order, and he has made a name and place for himself among men that is worthy of emulation, and the prestige which he now enjoys is the result of his intrinsic worth wrought into crowning achievements.  Mr. Mahon is taking great pains and sparing no expense to grant his children all opportunity to gain a first class educational training.  He has recently given his son, Ira J., an interest in the business.  The young man is proving his ability and mettle by making a success which is a credit to himself and his father.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 672
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Bartlett, Jackson

JACKSON A. BARTLETT – This well known and representative business man of the town of Drewsey has a fine hotel, where he does a thriving business and also a large livery and feed stable, being a man of excellent capabilities and one of the prominent figures in this part of Harney county.  He was born in Owen county, Indiana, on August 31, 1847, the son of James and Sarah (Alexander) Bartlett.  He was reared on a farm and gained his education from the public schools of the vicinity and when he heard the call for troops in the times of fratricidal strife he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Company B.  He was largely on post duty, being in Louisville, Kentucky; Nashville, Tennessee; and Decatur, Alabama.  The date of his enlistment was February 14, 1865, and his honorable discharge occurred in October, 1865.  He at once returned to his home in Indiana.  In 1868 he migrated to Scotland county, Missouri, and there on December 25, 1870, occurred his marriage with Miss Arminta J., daughter of William and Margaret Myers.  He followed farming there until 1887, and then with his family of wife and seven children he made the trip across the country to Union county, Oregon.  The following year he came to the agency, in the vicinity of Beulah, Malheur county, entered a homestead, improved it and settled to raising stock.  It was in 1896 that he came to Drewsey and bought a hotel and embarked in that business.  He did a good business from the start, but in 1899 the entire property was destroyed by fire.  He immediately rebuilt a fine two-story structure, fifty-six feet front and forty-four feet deep.  He has a nice large office, parlors, dining room, kitchen and twenty sleeping apartments.  In 1890 he sold his ranch and stock and devoted his entire attention to the hotel and feed stable.

The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett:  Jesse, near Longcreek, Grant county; James C., who was elected in 1900, on the Democratic ticket, as superintendent of the schools of Harney county; Mrs. Grace Arnold, of Pine creek; Hattie, Hettie, Hugh, triplets, Hugh being deceased; Carl and Stella V.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 673
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
McKinnon, Robert

ROBERT J. McKINNON – This worthy pioneer is a man of energy, ability and stirring qualities of worth, having wrought with a ready hand and willing heart in the noble work of developing the western wilds and he is now one of the well-todo and respected stockmen and farmers of Harney county, residing about nine miles northwest from Burns, on Curry Garden creek.

Robert J. was born in Hancock county, Indiana, on January 22, 1837, being the son of Thomas D. and Elizabeth McKinnon.  He attended school in a log cabin with a mud chimney, and the expenses of the teaching were borne by subscription.  In 1853, he removed to Des Moines county, Iowa, and in 1857 the family went to Page county and there on November 7, 1858, our subject married Miss Emily H., daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Long, who had resided in Indiana, where out subject was born, and these young people had been raised together.  In 1861 our subject and his wife removed to Keokuk county, and in 1863 he came via Panama to California, then to Virginia City, Nevada, and took up mining and lumbering and in 1864 he went to Downing, California, and there did the same work until 1865, when he came back to his Iowa home.  In 1869 he removed to Jackson county, Missouri, and in 1875, returned to Page county, Iowa, whence he journeyed to California, settling in Shasta county.  He entered government land and also did freighting.  In the fall of 1881 he went to Red Bluff, and in 1886 he came overland to Harney valley.  He lived near Burns on a rented farm and did freighting until 1888, when he came to his present place, which is well improved with good house, orchard, shrubbery, and so forth.  He handles stock, mostly horses.

To Mr. and Mrs. McKinnon there have been born eleven children, James Edward, of Cornucopia, Baker county; Mrs. Ida M. McCampbell, of Shasta county, California; Robert J., near Burns; Andrew J., of Santa Rosa, California, who was sheriff o this county from 1896 to 1900, being elected both times on the Democratic ticket; Mrs. Lucy J. Baird, of South Dakota; Mrs. Belle Dora Clark, of Harney, her husband being superintendent of the French Glen ranches; Thomas D., of Cornucopia; Hattie Elizabeth, deceased; Mrs. Emma Alice Clark, near Burns; William L., who was killed in Burns in 1898; Mrs. Elsie Alvie Cleveland of this county; Mrs. Essie Geneva Smith, of Burns.  Mr. McKinnon owns a half interest in a good mining property in the Virtue district in Baker county. He also took a trip to Alaska in 1900, and also went the next year, prospecting and mining, and made the trip in 1902.  He has a good farm of one-quarter section.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 674
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Cote, Ubald

UBALD J. COTE – This enterprising gentleman is one of the worth citizens of Harney county and is a man who has demonstrated his excellent qualities in the estimable success which he has wrought out here in our midst, as is evidenced by the fact that when he came to this country he tells us that he was somewhat in debt, but now he has a find estate of six hundred and eighty acres of hay and grazing land, all fenced, a good six-room house, barns and outbuildings, a good blacksmith shop, a band of stock and is well-to-do and prosperous.  Mr. Cote is also a man of integrity and sound morals and is esteemed by all.  He was born on August 4, 1866, in Champlain county, Canada, being the son of Antoine and Marie Cote, natives of France.  In 1871 the family came to Lowell, Massachusetts, and there he attended common school, worked in the cotton factories and at fourteen entered as apprentice to a blacksmith, where he served for three years.  He worked there at his trade until he came west in 1886.  During this time he took three different trips to Canada and in date mentioned he came to Winnemucca by train and thence by stage to Burns.  He went to work for wages, herding sheep for a number of years, and gained some stock of his own, and in 1895 he entered a homestead where he now lives, about half way between Riley and the Narrows, in Warm Springs valley.  He also took a desert claim and commenced to raise cattle.  He has improved in good shape and is a name of influence and integrity, which is recognized by all.

The marriage of Mr. Cote and Miss Annie, daughter of John Emma Bankofier, was solemnized on June 22, 1902.  Mr. Bankofier was a native of Germany and his wife of California, to which state he was an early pioneer.  Mrs. Cote was born in Nevada county, California, and her father died there in 1882, but her mother, Mrs. John McNulty, lives there still.  Mrs. Cote came up from California in 1893 and has followed teaching school in Harney county since that time, being one of the leading educators of the county, and having the confidence and hearty approval in her work of all wherever she taught.  Mr. Cote has a good home.  He is a member of the I.O.O.F., Harney Lodge, No. 77, of Burns

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 674
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Rann, Charles

CHARLES W. RANN is well known in Harney county, and he has been a great traveler and consequently has gained much experience that give him prestige and enables him to gain a good success in his labors.  He was born in San Francisco on December 14, 1848, being the son of Caleb and Lucinda Rann.  He was among the very first white children born in that place.  The father was a native of Nova Scotia and came to Maine and thence around Cape Horn to San Francisco in 1846.  The mother crossed the plains in 1847 with ox teams from Tennessee.  They were married in Santa Clara and removed to San Francisco.  The parents removed to various places in the state and finally settled in Peach Tree calley where the home was until 1864.  Then they came to Canton City region and the parents went to raising stock while out subject went to mining and followed it until 1871.  We next see him in White Pine county, Nevada, where he mined for two years.  On April 10, 1874, he was in Canyon City again and married on that date to Miss Mattie Harper.  Four children were born to this union, Clifford, Frank M., Maggie, and Agnes.  In 1880 Mr. Rann went to Butte, Montana, thence to Fort Benton and Walla Walla and in 1882 he settled in Srague, Washington, where he went into business until 1886.  Then he came to Canyon City remaining until 1890.  From that date until 1900 he was in various places in Idaho, Nevada, Arizona, California, Washington, and Oregon, prospecting and mining.

On August 8, 1901, Mr. Rann married a second time, the lady then becoming his wife was Mrs. Ione (Whiting) Baker.  At present Mr. Rann has a good building in Harney where he operates a retail liquor store, carrying a choice stock of wines, liquors, tobaccos and so forth.  He is doing a thriving business.  He also owns a good residence in the town.  Mr. Rann stands well among the business men and is one of the energetic workers for the welfare of the county.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 675
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today
Johnson, William

WILLIAM B. JOHNSON – Among the enterprising citizens of Harney county we should mention the gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph, and who has labored here faithfully and continuously for a long time, being at the present time one of the influential men of this section.  Mr. Johnson was born in Crawford county, Arkansas, on September 24, 1852, being the son of John L. and Frances J. (Elliott) Johnson.  The father was an orderly sergeant in the Confederate army and died in service.  The widow was left with four children and the improvements of the plantation were all destroyed by the ravages of war.  Bravely she stood with her little flock and kept them together.  Our subject received a primary education from the schools of his native place and in the spring of 1868 came with an uncle to California, assisting to bring a band of cattle.  The landed in Merced county and he worked with stock for a time and then attended school for two years, one of which was at San Joaquin college at Stockton.  In 1874 he went to Modoc county and there engaged in farming, stock raising, and dairying.  He owned a good farm there, but in 1883 he brought his stock north to Silver Creek, Harney county, and in 1884 he sold his California property, and the year following his family joined him in  the Oregon home.  They settled first near their present home, but later removed to the place where they now reside, five miles northwest from Riley postoffice.  Mr. Johnson has two hundred and forty acres of fine land, well improved with good house, barn and outbuildings, orchard and plenty of water.  His stock consists mostly of cattle and he is one of the thrifty men of this section.  Politically, Mr. Johnson is allied with the Democratic party and is active in that realm, being now central committeeman for his county, while in educational matters he is zealous for advancement and betterment of school facilities.

On August 3, 1873, Mr. Johnson married Miss Mary E., daughter of John and Martha A. Street, of Merced county, California, and they have become the parents of eight children, Francis A., deceased; Mrs. Martha Dibble, of Silver creek; Alfred J.; Mrs. Elizabeth Garrett, deceased; Lulah; Roxana; Mary E.; Clarissa, deceased.

Mr. Johnson’s mother died in Arkansas February 27, 1868.  Mrs. Johnson’s father died on August 31, 1883, but her mother still resides in California.

An Illustrated history of Baker, Grant, Malheur and Harney Counties, page 675
Western Historical Publishing Company, 1902

Transcribed and contributed by: The History of Today

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