Linn County, Oregon Genealogy & History
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Biographies

A

Anderson, Jason
Anglin, Thomas
B

Bach, Stephen
Bilyeu, W. R.
Bilyeu, William (1)
Bilyeu, William (2)
Bishop, Charles
Blakeley, George
Blevins, Alfred
Boetticher, Charles
Bond, Balf
Booth, Joel
Brasfield, Thomas
Bridgwater, James
Bruckman, F. A.
Bryant, Clyde
Buckner, Daisy
Burton, Robert
C

Calavan, Joel
Carrico, James
Carroll, Emil
Chamberlain, George
Christy, John
Church, Stephen
Clark, Daniel
Cooley, John
Crabtree, Newton
Cramer, John
Crawford, George
Crawford, T. H.
Cree, Charles
Cross, Eldon
Cummings, Ida
Curl, Lauflin
D

Davis, Jacob
Driver, Isaac
Dugger, Thomas
Duncan, John
E


F

Forster, Martin
G

Garland, Samuel
George, Hugh
George, M. O.
Gill, Mathew
Guthrie, James
H

Hawke, Wallace
Hewitt, Henry
Hill, Gale (1)
Hill, Gale (2)
Hoult, Enoch (1)
Hoult, Enoch (2)
Hume, Peter
Humphrey, N. B.
Hyde, F. Marion
I - J

Irvine, Norman
Irvine, Robert
Jenks, James
Johnston, Dan
K

Keeney, James
Kent, Oren
Kesling, James
Kinzer, Lewis
Kizer, Francis
L

Lane, Arthur
Lewelling, L. Guy
Luecke, Otto
M

Marks, Willard
McCully, Asa
Miller, Robert
Moody, Fred
Morgan, M. D.
Morris, John
Morrison, Newton
Moss, Stephen
Moyer, J. M.
N

Newport, M. Monroe
O - P

Odell, George
Olliver, Victor
Parker, Allen
Prill, Albert
Q - R

Ralston, Charles
Randall, Albert
Rice, James
Riggs, George
Risley, William
Russell, Rufus
S

Schmitt, Alfred
Shedd, C. J.
Shelton, Joseph
Sommerville, Thomas
Sox, Edward
Speer, Homer
Stanard, C. Edwin
Starr, Isaac
Stewart, Claib
Stewart, Claiborne
Stewart, Salmon
Stites, Thomas (1)
Stites, Thomas (2)
Swafford, Harold
Swan, L. L.
T

Thoms, Duane
Train, Samuel
U - V

Van Vactor, William
W

Wadsworth, Walter
Waggener, Charles
Waltz, Ray
Weatherford, James
Wesely, Joseph
Wheeler, W. F.
Wheeler, William
White, Elliott
Whitney, John (1)
Whitney, John (2)
Windell, Albert
Wight, Harvey
Wilhelm, George
Worth, John
Wright, George
X - Y
Z


Blakeley, George

GEORGE CLARENCE BLAKELEY

George Clarence Blakeley, a pharmacist of state-wide repute, enjoys the distinction of being the oldest established druggist in The Dalles, which for more than forty years has numbered him among its useful and influential citizens. His talents have been exerted as readily for the public welfare as for his own aggrandizement and his record reflects credit upon an honored family name. A native of Oregon, he was born in Brownsville, Linn County, August 29, 1855, and represents one of the oldest and most prominent families of the state. His great-grandfather, Charles Blakeley, was a native of Ireland and when a small boy came to the new world with his parents, who were among the colonial settlers of Virginia. As a soldier in the Revolutionary war Charles Blakeley aided in winning American independence and afterward went to Tennessee. The remainder of his life was spent in that state and when eighty years of age he was called to his final rest. He was the father of Joseph Blakeley, who was also a patriotic citizen and fought in the War of 1812. In 1838 he migrated to Platte county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming and stock raising until his demise, and for twenty-six years served as a circuit judge.

His son, James Blakeley, father of George Clarence Blakeley, was born November 26, 1812, in Knox county, Tennessee, and received his education in the district schools of that state. He remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age and in 1834 married Miss Sarah Dick, who was born November 24, 1815, in Knox county, Tennessee. Mr. Blakeley followed agricultural pursuits in his native state until 1838, when he went to Missouri and filed on a homestead. He cleared and developed the tract, on which he resided until 1846, when he disposed of the property and started for Oregon, joining a large wagon train, of which he was chosen captain. In the fall of 1846 he arrived in Linn county and entered a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres, settling where the town of Brownsville is now located. Here he built a small log house and zealously applied himself to the arduous task of clearing the land and preparing it for the growing of crops. In order to obtain a plow he had to go to Oregon City, a distance of seventy-five miles, and made the trip with a team of oxen. There were no bridges or roads and two weeks were required to complete the journey. In 1847 he produced his first crop of grain and this was probably the first yield in Linn county. A successful stockman, he raised marry head of cattle, horses and hogs and took large herds of cattle to the ranges in eastern Oregon. He fattened cattle for the market and drove them to California, disposing of them to the miners. Mr. Blakeley built the first flour mill in Oregon and in 1848 erected the first store in Brownsville. His trade was largely with the Indians, as there were few white settlers in the locality at that time. For several years he successfully conducted the store and then sold the business to George C. Cooley, his son-in-law. He enlisted in Company D, of the Second Oregon Regiment, and as a captain served throughout the Rogue River Indian war of 1855-56. After retiring from the field of merchandising Captain Blakeley resumed the occupations of farming and stock raising which he followed during the remainder of his active career. He represented Lina county in the state legislature and filled other public offices of importance, faithfully discharging every trust reposed in him. Captain Blakeley long survived his wife, who died June 14, 1888. On November 26, 1912, he celebrated the one hundredth anniversary of his birth and in commemoration of the event a medal was made, which is now in the custody of the State Historical Society. During the latter part of his life Captain Blakeley resided in the home of his son Henry in Brownsville and there passed away January 19, 1913. He was a man of exceptional worth and his death was mourned throughout the state. To Captain Blakeley and his wife were born eleven children: Mrs. Ellen Montgomery and Mrs. Catherine Lewis, who are deceased; William Blakeley, whose home is in Pendleton, Oregon; Mrs. George C. Cooley, who has passed away; Mrs. Margaret Smith, who lives in Montana; Caroline, deceased; Henry, a resident of Brownsville; James, of Baker, Oregon; George Clarence; Joseph, who makes his home in Pendleton; and Mrs. Sarah McFarlane, of Brownsville. In 1926 a splendid granite shaft fourteen feet tall was erected by Captain Blakeley's surviving children te the memory of their father at Main and Blakeley avenues, the original site of his claim. When the shaft was dedicated "Peggy" Chessman, the thirteen-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merle Chessman of Astoria, delivered the following address of presentation:

"Mr. Mayor and friends: I have come here as the great-great-granddaughter of Captain and Mrs. James Blakeley, in whose memory this monument has been erected. It was placed here by their children to stand as a lasting tribute of love and honor to their parents, who settled on this spot when Oregon was almost a virgin wilderness and who made it their home for more than half a century.

"It is the wish of those who caused the monument to be raised that it become the property of the people of Brownsville, that they may ever remember the founders of their city. In a broader sense, it is dedicated to all these early-day pioneers, of whom Captain and Mrs. Blakeley were typical; those pathfnders who blazed the trail to Oregon, enduring the hazards and hardships of frontier life while they builded the foundations of the state, and the fruits of whose labors we of later generations enjoy.

"Acting for the Blakeley family, I am happy to p resent at this time to you, Mr. Mayor, as a representative of the city of Brownsville, a deed to the monument and the plot of ground upon which it stands, that the people of this historic town may have and hold it as theirs forever."

Following is a copy of Mayor Snyder's speech: 'In accepting, on behalf of the city of Brownsville, this document, conveying title to the property upon which we stand, I do so with the greatest appreciation and admiration, not for the intrinsic value represented, but rather for the motive that influenced the donors of the offering.

represented, but rather for the motive that influenced the donors of the offering. "The stately shaft before you, erected to the memory of a man and woman who represented a high type of American citizenship, speaks to you in a language more forcible and delivers the message in a more beautiful and impressive manner than can be conveyed by mortal tongue. It represents an expression of one of the fundamental principles of American citizenship. The great nations of the past have risen in prominence and influence, flourished for a period and passed into a decline. The beginning of this decline may invariably be traced to the loss of the patriotic spirit that predominated during the period of the nation's ascendancy.

"Reverence for an ancestor is a trait very closely allied and akin to patriotism. Just as long as expressions of this nature are in evidence we may rest assured that the spark of patriotism that in times of national peril has been the impelling force to call to the defense of the native land the flower of our sturdy manhood, needs but the call of necessity to fan to the flame that has assembled the mighty armies that have decisively repelled the invader, overwhelmingly put down internal opposition and emerged in triumph from an effort to end a struggle in which civilization itself was threatened.

"A mighty oak stood on the brow of the hill. During the course of years it had grown and developed, attaining the fullness of its sturdiness and splendor. In the strength of its fiber it withstood the storms of the succeeding seasons. In its allotted time strength declined; this, the peer of the forest, bowed before the grim reaper, and the spot upon which it had stood gave no evidence of a former greatness. During the period of its strength and vigor, in accordance with nature's plan, acorns had fallen from its branches, and in passing, the sturdy oak left behind a young and vigorous forest that gave mute testimony that a predecessor had fulfilled its destiny.

"Captain James Blakeley settled on a homestead, on a part of which we are now standing, at a time when the state of Oregon occupied a very meager position in the national government, when the settler faced the problems of existence under conditions most primitive.

"As a nation we are prone to worship at the shrine of heroes, individuals who have reached an eminence through achievements in political, industrial, military or other channels. The power of this republic does not lie in the accomplishment of a few supermen, but rather in the steadfastness, loyalty and, patriotism of the men and women who take up the every-day tasks of existence.

"This splendid column, beautiful in its simplicity, impressive in the significance of its purpose, of which the citizens of this community and county are justly proud, will stand as an inspiration for coming generations in perpetuating the memory of a man and woman who cheerfully assumed the obligation of taking a part in the subduing of the western wilderness, building a home amidst conditions which were at times most discouraging, giving to their country stalwart sons and comely daughters who have earned their rightful place in the affairs of this great state and whose influence and achievements are a living tribute to the memory of the man and woman whom we are her assembled to honor."

In the rural schools of Linn county George C. Blakeley obtained his rudimentary instruction and was next a pupil in the public schools of Brownsville. He attended Albany College for a year and for three years was a student at the Oregon Agricultural College in Corvallis. Entering the educational field, he became a teaeher in the public schools of Brownsville and was made principal, filling the position for three years. He completed a pharmaceutical course and in 1876 went to Detroit, Michigan, becoming a traveling salesman for Frederick Stearns & Company, manufacturing chemists. For six years he represented the firm in that capacity and then went to Canada, spending a year in Victoria, British Columbia. In 1886 he returned to Oregon, locating at The Dalles, and in May of that year entered the employ of R. B. Hood, a local druggist. In January, 1887, Mr. Blakeley purchased the business, of which he has since been the owner. He carries a full line of drugs and medical supplies and the filling of prescriptions is one of the chief features of his establishment, which is not a cafeteria and soda fountain pharmacy. It is known as the Rexall Drug Store, whose trade exceeds the boundaries of the city, extending into the surrounding country. Enterprising, efficient and thoroughly reliable, Mr. Blakeley has won and retained a position of leadership in local drug circles and is also an astute financier. In 1919 he aided in organizing the Wasco County Bank and was elected president of the institution, which is capitalized at one hundred thousand dollars and occupies an imposing building on East Second street. Mr. Blakeley is likewise a successful fruit grower and has a valuable cherry orchard of thirty acres. The ranch is located near The Dalles and irrigated with water from the city.

Mr. Blakeley was married January 29, 1887, to Miss Mary T. Gorman, a native of New York state and a daughter of John and Margaret Gorman. The family went to San Francisco, California, by the water route, making bhe voyage around Cape Horn, and in 1860 came to Oregon. For an extended period Mr. Gorman was engaged in the transfer business in Portland and his demise occurred in the Rose City in 1926, when he had reached the advanced age of ninety-seven years. Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Gorman, two are now living: Mrs. Blakeley, and Mrs. Margaret Ordahl, a resident of Portland.

for the municipality needed reforms and improvements and is always ready to serve his community to the extent of his ability. When he became county judge of Wasco and Hood River counties the public funds were depleted and there was an indebtedness of two hundred thousand dollars. For eight years he was the incumbent of the office and during that period removed this burden of debt from the counties without increasing the taxation. During the World war he was chairman for four years of the committee in charge of the Red Cross activities in Wasco, Sherman, Wheeler and Gilliam counties and succeeded in raising a large amount of money for the organization.

Mr. Blakeley joined the Masonic order, with which, his father was also affiliated, and has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite Consistory. He is a past master of the blue lodge, past high priest of the chapter and past eminent commander of the commandery. Mr. Blakeley is one of the Nobles of Al Kader Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Portland and a life member of The Dalles Lodge of Elks, of which he is a past exalted ruler. Mr. and Mrs. Blakeley are charter members of Columbia Chapter of the Eastern Star and also belong to the Country Club. For a year Mr. Blakeley was the executive head of the Rexall Club, an international association, which draws its members from the United States, Canada and Great Britain. He was the first president of the club elected west of the Rockies and on his retirement from the office in 1916 was presented with a handsome watch, suitably inscribed, as a testimonial of appreciation of his services. Mr. Blakeley was the second president of the Oregon Pharmaceutical Association and served for fifteen years on the state board of pharmacy. In addition to his attractive residence in The Dalles, he has a fine home at Seaside, where he spends a portion of each summer, and is one of the disciples of Izaak Walton. He is also a devotee of golf and an expert player. Worthy motives and high principles have actuated Mr. Blakeley at all points in his career and throughout eastern Oregon he is admired and respected.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Calavan, Joel

JOEL EUGENE CALAVAN

In the field of professional service Joel Eugene Calavan achieved the full measure of success and for more than thirty years was prominently identified with educational work in Oregon. His life was one of great usefulness and fr-reaching influence. A native of California, he was born in Napa county on the 4th of October, 1872, and was one of the four children of James Madison and Amanda (Goin) Calavan. In 1877 his parents came to Oregon and settled on a farm in Linn county.

Joel E. Calavan was reared on the home ranch and attended the high school of Scio, afterward taking summer course at the University of Oregon. In 1892, when a young man of twenty, he began 'teaching near Scio, in the Shelton district, and. in 1896 went to Crook county, Oregon. There he engaged in his chosen line of work for nine years and in 1905 took charge of a school at Maple Lane, four miles east of Oregon City, but in the spring returned to Scio, where he spent two years. In 1908 he again became an instructor at Maple Lane and in 1910 was appointed a supervisor of the Clackamas county schools. For three years he acted in that capacity and in November, 1913, was appointed superintendent of the schools of Clackamas county to complete the unexpired term of T. J. Gary. Mr. Calavan met every requirement of the office, to which he was elected in 1916 for the full term of four years, but resigned soon afterward, having been appointed superintendent of the Boys and Girls Clubs in Oregon, a state office, in which he made a notable record. A great lover of children, he displayed a special talent for the work, and his achievements elicited strong commendation. His duties took him to every part of the state and his popularity steadily increased. He cooperated closely with the Oregon Agricultural College in projects for farm betterment through the young and stimulated the progress of the state along this line to a marked extent. Mr. Calavan located in Portland in 1920 and in April, 1924, became a candidate on the republican ticket for school superintendent of Multnomah county. He was a tireless worker and kept in close touch with the most advanced ideas in regard to education.

Mr. Calavan was married April 6, 1897, to Miss Aver Spear, a daughter of Isaac W. and Martha Ann (Zevely) Spear. Mrs. Calavan's father left Illinois in 1863 and cast in his lot with the early settlers of Union county, Oregon, developing a farm on Biggie creek. He figured prominently in military affairs and during the Indian troubles of 1878-79 was lieutenant commander of the forces in the field. To Mr. and Mrs. Calavan was born a daughter, Erma, who is the wife of F. E. Cantrill, of Klamath Falls, Oregon. Mr. Calavan's career was abruptly terminated February 9, 1928, when he was fifty-six years of age and at the height of his usefulness. In addition to his widow and daughter, he is survived by a sister, Mrs. J. F. Mitts, of Portland; and three brothers, V. L. Calavan, of Albany, Oregon; J. M. Calavan, a resident of Jefferson; and R. E. Calavan, of Stayton.

Joel E. Calavan was a Mason, having joined the order in Oregon City. In religious faith he was a Baptist and in Oregon City was a Sunday school superintendent for a number of years. His life was a serviceable factor in the cause of human progress and the many admirable traits in his character made him greatly beloved.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Sox, Edward

EDWARD F. SOX

In that section of the Oregon Journal devoted to the impressions and observations of Fred Lockley, one of its able writers, the following interesting article appeared under date of May 3, 1926:

"'Fifty-five years ago, when I was a teacher in Albany College, M. C. George, later congressman from Oregon and also circuit judge, was principal of the public schools of Albany,' said Edward F. Sox when I visited him recently at his home at No. 281 Hazelfern place. 'At that time George E. Chamberlain, later governor of Oregon and United States senator, was teaching in a country schoolhouse near Albany.

"'My father attended Heidelberg University and came to this country in 1835, just before his twenty-first birthday. He left Germany because he did not want to serve in the army as all young men were compelled to do at that time. My mother's maiden name was Margaret Owens. Father and mother met and were married near Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, in 1839. When my father came to the United States he worked on the railroad. He went to St. Louis in 1840, and after spending a year or so there he moved to Palmyra, Illinois, where he bought a tract of land, for which he paid a dollar and a quarter an acre.

"'I was born on the banks of old Rock river, near Palmyra, in Lee county, Illinois, January 25, 1846. My earliest recollection is of men stopping at our house when on their way to California. In 1850 two of these men who had returned from the Golden state bought a farm from father, paying him seven thousand dollars for it. I remember this very distinctly, for they paid him in fifty dollar gold slugs, stacking up fourteen piles with ten slugs in each pile. These coins were not round; my impression is they were octagonal. I can't be positive whether they were six-sided or eight-sided. In any event, they were not round. The men said they had turned in their gold dust in San Francisco in exchange for these fifty dollar slugs.

"'When I was eighteen years old I enlisted in the One Hundred and Fortieth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry for a term of one hundred days. Our regiment campaigned through Mississippi, Tennessee, Arkansas, Kentucky and Missouri. I received my discharge on October 29, 1864. In the fall of 1865 I entered Wheaton College, which I attended for a year, and was afterward a student at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. I taught school near Sterling, Illinois, for three years. I wanted to go to the Pacific coast and thought there would be a better chance to grow up with the country if I located in a comparatively small town. I chose Portland in preference to San Francisco because Portland had a population of less than ten thousand. I secured a position as teacher in the school in the Holladay addition. Mr. McMillan, whose daughter, June McMillan-Ordway, lives here in Portland, was one of the directors and Mr. Shaver was also a member of the board. S. W. King, later a prominent merchant of Portland, was a teacher in its public schools at that time and R. K. Warren was also engaged in teaching here then. He and I went to Albany, Oregon, he to become president of the college, while I took charge of the department of mathematics and was connected with the institution from 1870 to 1874. Dr. E. R. Geary was also a member of the faculty and his son, Ed Geary, now a well known physician, was one of my pupils. Ed L. Thompson, banker, broker and woolen mill man here in Portland, was also one of my pupils, as were his sister, Hettie Thompson, and her future husband, Dr. Templeton. Jane Connor, now Mrs. James Failing, and Clara Price, now Mrs. Judge Wolverton, were also members of my class. In 1874 I embarked in the hardware business in Albany and sold out three years later, locating in Seattle, which at that time had a population of approximately seven thousand. I became a partner of Martin Ballard and we changed the name of our store to the Seattle Hardware Company. This is one cf the oldest hardware firms in the city and is now capitalized for over a million dollars. I was in business in Seattle from 1882 to 1886, when I sold out and returned to Albany, reentering the hardware business. I ran this store for the next twenty-seven years and retired in 1913. When I went to Albany, Ben Holladay's road, the Oregon & California Railroad, had got as far south as Halsey, where travelers made connections by stage for California points.

"'On the 27th of January, 1874, I married Weltha M. Young, a sister of S. E. Young, one of the prominent merchants of Albany at that time. My son, Canton E. Sox, was born in Albany on October 29, 1874, and completed a course in Albany College. For two years he attended a college at Monmouth, Illinois, later graduating from Stanford University of California, and is now engaged in the practice of law at Albany in partnership with Judge H. H. Hewitt. My son married a sister of Dr. Ellis, of Albany, and they have four sons. Three of them are already six-footers and the fourth soon will be. My daughter, Emma Rebecca Newton, lives in Boston, Massachusetts, also has a son, so that I am rich in grandsons. My first wife passed away in 1921 and later I returned to the east, where I married Mrs. Ella Gary-Ellis, a widow with three children, all of whom were grown. Sixty-one years ago we had been classmates at Wheaton College, and since our marriage we have resided in Portland. My wife is a native of Wheaton and one of four children who lived to maturity. Her brother, Judge Elbert H. Gary, was born in Warrenville, Illinois, and among my wife's treasured possessions are some quaint pictures representing him as a boy and as a young man. In one he 'was wearing a home-made suit of checked cloth and you can see that he was very proud of his first overcoat. As president of the United States Steel Company he was nationally known and his demise occurred in July, 1927. His brother, Olin Geary, is living in St. Louis, Missouri. My wife's daughter, who married a doctor, is an artist of rare ability and the paintings you see on the walls of our home were painted by her.' "

In Seattle, Mr. Sox attended the services of a Congregational church and while living in Albany he was active in the work of the United Presbyterian church. He has served as Sunday school superintendent and also as president of the Young Men's Christian Association. Since age conferred ipon him the right of franchise Mr. Sox has been a strong republican but the honors and emoluments of political office have never appealed to him. As a business man he attained high standing, displaying keen sagacity in the conduct of his affairs, and was also an able educator. He has played well his part and enjoys the tranquility of spirit and contentment of mind resulting from the knowledge that he has accomplished, something 'worth while. Mr Sox has a wide acquaintance and stands deservedly high in the esteem of his fellowmen, for his life has been upright and useful.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Keeney, James

JAMES MAYNARD KEENEY

As a prosperous rancher and hotel owner James Maynard Keeney was widely and favorably known throughout Oregon and during the period of his residence in Portland he held a secure place in the esteem of its citizens. Of resolute purpose and marked strength of character, he surmounted obstacles and difficulties which would have thoroughly discouraged the average man and pressed steadily onward to the goal of success. He was born in Brownsville, Oregon, October 15, 1865. His father, Elias Keeney, crossed the plains in an early day and settled on a donation land claim near Brownsville.

James M. Keeney was reared on the home farm where he remained until he reached the age of eighteen, experiencing many phases of pioneer life in western Oregon. For two years he was a student at the State University and next attended a business college in Portland. After the completion of his course he returned home and when he attained his majority was given one thousand dollars by his father. With this sum he purchased a flock of sheep in Arlington, Oregon, but lost most of them during the ensuing winter, which was unusually severe. After this venture he opened a livery stable in Arlington and also served as postmaster of the town. Later he entered mercantile circles of Portland, conducting a cigar store at First and Yamhill streets, but through his partner lost the business. In addition he was burdened with a debt of eight thousand dollars, incurred through no fault of his, but by hard work and self-denial paid all of the creditors of the firm and started life anew. From 1893 until 1895 Mr. Keeney was variously employed. Soon after the Maine was sunk in Havana harbor he saw an opportunity to make money and took advantage of it. Leasing a large ranch, he became a breeder of horses, which he sold to the United States government, and was thus engaged for four years. During that time he was offered and accepted the management of a hotel at Shaniko, Oregon, and was so successful that he purchased the property soon afterward. For several years he conducted the business, and then went to Vale, Oregon, where he owned another hotel, which he operated successfully for seven years. Meanwhile he had joined J. N. Burgess in purchasing the Cunningham ranch at Pilot Rock and for eighteen years he was active in the cultivation and improvement of that tract. On disposing of his holdings in eastern Oregon, Mr. Keeney located in Portland and bought a cherry orchard of one hundred acres near Salem. In 1920 he sold his interests in the ranch. His death occurred September 19, 1923, when he was nearly fifty-eight years of age. For years he fought a losing battle against disease but maintained his courageous spirit until the end, being a man of exceptional will power and determination.

Mr. Keeney was married July 20, 1904, to Miss Elizabeth Matlock, a daughter of Tom J. and Mary E. Matlock. In 1853, when a child of three, Mrs. Keeney's father crossed the plains with his parents, who settled near Eugene, Oregon. In 1875 he removed to Heppner, Oregon, and embarked in the sheep business. During the great flood at Heppner in June, 1903, he was seriously injured and his wife was drowned. Their daughter Elizabeth fainted and thus narrowly escaped death by drowning.

Mr. Keeney joined the Elks lodge of Pendleton but had few outside interests, as he loved his home, finding therein hi greatest happiness. In matters of citizenship he was loyal and public-spirited, and his innate courtesy and kindness of heart endeared him to all with whom he was associated. He was a man of straightforward, honest character, broad-minded, unselfish and helpful, winning his way on earth and going out of the world worthy of that eternal life beyond.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume II - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Bishop, Charles

CHARLES P. BISHOP

Charles P. Bishop was born in Contra Costa county, California, September 23, 1854, and was the oldest of the family of Rev. W. R. and Elizabeth Jane Bishop. His ancestors were English and first appeared in North Carolina and went from there to Tennessee. His great-grandfather was killed in the war of 1812 and his grandfather first appears in Tennessee. He went from there to Alabama, to Indiana and from there to McLean county, Illinois, in 1836.

Mr. Bishop's father came to California in 1850 and his mother in 1846. In 1856 they came to Oregon and first lived east of Lebanon, and in 1861 went from there up on the Calapooia river above Brownsville. Mr. Bishop's father was a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian church and was a school teacher. During the early youth of Mr. Bishop his father was compelled to be away from home much of the time and, as he was the oldest of the family, naturally the responsibilities of the family came to him quite early.

He stayed on the farm until he was twenty years old and up to that time had had very scant opportunities for an education. In his early childhood he had a vision that he wanted to be a merchant, and at the age of twenty years took a position as clerk in the store of Kirk & Hume in Brownsville, at twenty-five dollars per month. This was in October, 1874. On the expiration of two years he went into the Brownsville Woolen Mills store in Brownsville as clerk and salesman. At the expiration of two years, Robert Glass and Mr. Bishop purchased a store in Crawfordsville, where Mr. Bishop went and where the store was operated until 1884. He sold his interest to Mr. Glass and went to McMinnville and started a clothing store there. This was in 1884. In 1889 he sold his interest in the business and, with the late Thomas Kay, organized and built the Thomas Kay Woolen Mills, of Salem, Oregon. In 1890 this company started at Salem what was known as the Salem Woolen Mills store, and in 1891 Mr. Bishop acquired this business and operated it as sole proprietor until 1924, at which time he incorporated it as the Bishop Clothing & Woolen Mills Store and sold it to his Sons and R. H. Cooley. The popularity and prestige of the business has had a continual growth, until every few years additional space has been required to handle the increasing business, and it is now the leading clothing store between Portland
and San Francisco.

Mr. Bishop has given of his time to public affairs, having been elected mayor of Salem for three successive terms; he also served as state senator from Marion county in the sessions of the legislature in 1915 and 1917.

His early alliance with the Brownsville Woolen Mills developed in him an interest in northwest manufacturing, and he has always taken a special interest in assisting in every way possible manufacturing projects, large or small, and always had a warm heart for the small manufacturer, who is trying to build up and establish a business.

Mr. Bishop has been a member of the board of trustees of the Willamette University since 1897; likewise a member of the board of trustees of the Young Men's Christian Association of Salem since 1892, and has been a most liberal contributor to their development, in both time and money.

On October 8, 1876, he was united in marriage with Fannie Kay, the daughter of the late Thomas Kay. To them three sons have been born, Clarence M. Bishop, Roy T. Bishop and Robert Chauncey Bishop. These sons were seemingly natural born. woolen manufacturers. They learned the rudiments or beginning of the business under their grandfather, and they were then sent to Philadelphia, where they took a course in scientific woolen manufacturing, they having a large vision of the building up of the woolen manufacturing industry in the northwest. Mr. Bishop cooperated with them and encouraged them in every way, the result of which has been that they have built up the Pendleton Woolen Mills, of Pendleton, Oregon, the Washougal Woolen Mills, of Washougal, Washington, and acquired the Eureka Woolen Mills, of Eureka, California. Roy T. Bishop has built up the Oregon Worsted Company in the manufacture of worsted yarns, which are used on this coast by sweater and bathing suit manufacturers, approximating one million dollars annually. The Pendleton Woolen Mills has a nation wide reputation in the manufacture of what is known as the "Pendleton" Fancy Indian Blankets. They are used in every sbate of the Union.

For the Washougal Mills, at the close of the World war, in 1919 Mr. Bishop developed a men's suiting line, and called it the "Washougal" suiting line, and so far as Mr. Bishop knows, this was the beginning of the manufacturing and featuring of what has since become known as "virgin wool fabrics"which means made of new wool, no shoddy or re-worked wool in its construction. This fabric, within a year, had attracted the attention of clothing manufacturers in. the east, and one manufacturer has been taking the entire output of the Washougal Mill of this suiting line, it finding a ready market throughout the east, and especially in New England, the cradle of the American woolen industry, which was a great surprise to all, and this year of 1928 there has been organized in Syracuse, New York, what is known as the Washougal Clothing Company, of which Mr. Bishop is the president. This organization will specialize in the manufacture of clothing out of these suitings.

Mr. Bishop is by faith a Presbyterian and politically a republican.

Mr. Bishop desires that special mention be made of four men with whom he was allied, that left their impress upon him and who he remembers with gratitude today, and who have long since passed away.

First, was W. H. Baber, of Junction, who gave him the first inspiration as a young man that, if he would keep up the pace, he would make a merchant.

The next was W. R. Kirk, of Brownsville, who was kind to him and overlooked his faults and imperfections and assured him that he had the capabilities of a merchant.

Next was Robert Glass, of Crawfordsville, who from the year 1861 was a warm friend of the family, and whose high ethical standards were as a beacon light to the boy, the youth and the young man.

Lastly, Mr. Bishop's wife's father, the late Thomas Kay, who died in 1900. His indefatigable industry, his more than broad vision of what a young man could do gave Mr. Bishop an inspiration that has had much to do with whatever success may have attended him.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume III - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Bruckman, F. A.

F. A. BRUCKMAN

In the field of invention the name of F. A. Bruckman is well known inasmuch as he was the inventor of the first automatic machine for the successful manufacture of ice cream cones: The story of his life is one of notable achievement in which determined purpose overcame difficulties and obstacles and desired results were at length obtained. Mr. Bruckman comes to the northwest from Illinois, his birth having occurred in Hancock county, that state, in 1873. He is a son of Frederick and Eve (Kropp) Bruckman, both now deceased. The father, who was born in Germany, came to the United States at nineteen years of age in order to avoid compulsory military service in his native land. He had learned the cabinetmaker's trade in Germany but after taking up his abode in Illinois followed the occupation of farming. In his later years he removed to Albany, Oregon, where he owned farm property but rented it.

In his youthful days F. A. Bruckman attended school in Illinois and later became a student in Albany, Oregon, where after leaving the public schools he spent two years in Albany College. When his textbooks were put aside he turned his attention to the creamery business in Albany and learned the butter-making trade in its entirety. He afterward operated several creameries and in 1900, associated with his father, established a creamery at Brownsville, Oregon, where they conducted business for six years. F. A. Bruckman then purchased his father's interest and carried on alone until 1906, when he came to Portland and was here associated with the Weatherly Ice Cream Company until 1908. In that year he organized the Pacific Coast Cone Company, with Mr. Weatherly as silent partner. In 1920 he sold his interest in the business, which at that time was manufacturing forty-five million cones annually. The same name is retained in the management of the undertaking, but the business is now being carried on by consolidation of manufacturers operating under Mr. Bruckman's patent. Mr. Bruckman built the present plant, having previously occupied an upstairs room in the building of the Crystal Ice Company. In the meantime he developed a plant for the manufacture of the ice cream cone. He realized how great an expenditure of time and labor was required for the manufacture of the cone by hand or by the crude machinery then in use. For years he studied the problem. He watched his wife in the efficiency of household management and he looked at his children, who were his incentive for success. He felt that he must make a cone that would be a healthful one, that it would not only have an excellent taste but have real food value, and that he must make it so that it would be within reach of the child who had only an occasional nickel to spend for sweets. The trouble with the hand operated machines was that the cone could not be loosened from the mold without a vast lot of breakage. This was one of the things that made the cone then on the market impracticable and without a great commercial value. He studied the problem night and day. There were certain little seemingly minor elements that entered into his success. He watched his wife making little timbale cases and he compared her process with his. Moreover, on one occasion he stood near two engineers in charge of the building of a big bridge and heard them say something about the big steel cross bars adding strength to the complete structure. This gave him another idea, resulting in his changing the raised markings of mold, but even yet the cone did not come cleanly out of the mold; and eventually there developed in his mind the idea that if he could not take the cone from the mold, he might take the mold from the cone, and with this came the fulfillment of the dream that he had long entertained. Not only, too, was his cone to be mechanically perfect but it must taste good and have real food value, and this problem was solved in the manufacture of Bruckman's Real Cake Cones. The result was a perfected machine turning out hundreds of cones, and later he met infringement suits which he successfully prosecuted. The development of the business is shown in the fact that in 1915 thirty-five million cones were made and sold from the Portland plant, fifty million by its machine in Dayton, Ohio, and ten million each by its machines in Fort Worth, Texas, and Toronto, Canada. All mixing and other methods of manufacturing the cones was by machine until they were ready to be packed.

In Albany, Oregon, Mr. Bruckman was married to Miss Hettie May Drais, who was born in Kansas, a daughter of T. Z. Drais. Mrs. Bruckman was only an infant when taken to California and when about fifteen years of age came to Oregon. By her marriage she has become the mother of one son, Merle D., who was born in Plainview, Oregon, in 1898. When a boy in high school he showed a leaning toward mechanics and he was graduated from the Benson Polytechnic School as a mechanical draftsman. He then became associated with his father in the manufacture of cones and when but twenty years of age took charge of the manufacturing end of his father's plant with thirty-five or forty people working under him. He married Miss Helen Long, a native of Portland and a daughter of John Long, and they now have one child, Elizabeth Anne, commonly known as Betty.

With his retirement from the manufacture of ice cream cones Mr. Bruckman concentrated his efforts in other directions and is now interested in the development of the Breitenbush Mineral Springs, located twelve miles from Detroit on the North Santiam river and about fifteen miles due west of Mount Jefferson. This is being transformed into a health resort and the water of the springs, judged by the medicinal qualities, ranks with the best in the country. His son Merle is also associated with him in this enterprise, taking active part in the development of the project. Fraternally Mr. Bruckman is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and Multnomah Camp No. 77 of the Woodmen of the World. He also belongs to the Portland Golf Club, which indicates something of the nature of his interests and activities outside of business. His has been a very active life and one of great usefulness in contributing to the happiness and pleasure particularly of the young through his inventive genius. Success is now his - the success which persistent and indefatigable labor merits.

History of the Columbia River Valley - From The Dalles to the Sea
Volume III - Chicago
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company - 1928

Stewart, Claiborne

Judge Claiborne H. Stewart, who is now serving for the second term as postmaster of Albany, having been reappointed to that position by President Wilson in 1919, is discharging the duties of that office in a prompt and capable manner. He was born in Knoxville, Marion county, Iowa, December 29, 1852, and is a son of Dr. William Q. and Ann R. (Humphrey) Stewart, natives of Ohio. The family is of Scotch-Irish descent, representatives of the name emigrating to America and becoming residents of Pennsylvania. As a child the mother went with her parents to Illinois and then to Iowa at a very early period in the development of that state. This was prior to the Black Hawk war, at which time Burlington was but a trading post, the country being sparsely settled. The father was a merchant and physician and practiced his profession at Knoxville and Albia until 1865, when he crossed the plains to Oregon, spending his first winter in this state near Mount Tabor, in the vicinity of Portland. In 1866 he removed to Albany, Linn county, and purchased property which is now owned by Claiborne H. Stewart of this review and on which he has reared his family. Owing to impaired health the father did not engage in the practice of medicine in Oregon but subsequently became connected with the drug business, in which he was interested for several years. He continued a resident of Albany until his demise, which occurred on the 17th of March, 1882, when he was sixty-seven years of age, for he was born on the 5th of May, 1815. The mother, surviving him for many years, passed away in 1917 at the advanced age of ninety-six years, and both were highly esteemed and respected in the community where they resided.

Claiborne H. Stewart acquired his early education in the schools of Albia, Iowa, and completed his studies at Albany, Oregon. On the 5th of June, 1867, he entered the office of the Democrat as printer's devil and there thoroughly mastered the printer's trade, at which he worked for several years, and then purchased that publication, which he conducted until the spring of 1882, when he disposed of his holdings therein, having a short time before sold an interest in the paper to United States Senator George Chamberlain. In 1882 he was called to public office, being elected county clerk of Linn county, in which position he served for two years. In 1884 he entered mercantile circles, establishing a hardware business as a partner of E. F. Sox, under the firm style of the Stewart & Sox Hardware Company. They engaged in the sale of farm implements and sawmill machinery and through their progressive business methods and honorable dealing succeeded in building up a business of extensive proportions, their trade covering all of Benton and Linn counties and a portion of Lane, Marion and Polk counties. They continued in business for twenty-four years, during which period they gradually extended the scope of their trade until theirs became a most substantial and profitable enterprise. In 1904 Mr. Stewart had been honored with election to the office of county judge, in which position he proved most capable, rendering decisions which were strictly fair and impartial. Upon leaving the bench he became associated with his son-in-law in the conduct of a store dealing in electrical appliances and was thus engaged until 1915, when he was appointed by President Wilson to the position of postmaster of Albany. He rendered such satisfactory service in that connection that he was reappointed in August, 1919, so that he is still filling that office, discharging his duties in a most capable and efficient manner. Always courteous and obliging and prompt and faithful in the care of the mail, Mr. Stewart has proved a most popular official.

On the 4th of January, 1877, Judge Stewart was united in marriage to Miss Cora J. Irvine, a daughter of the Rev. S. G. and Mary (Rainey) Irvine, the former a native of Wooster, Ohio, while the latter was born near Belfast, in the north of Ireland. Her parents emigrated to the United States when she was but two years of age and settled at Cambridge, Ohio. Rev. Mr. Irvine came to Oregon from Wooster, Ohio, as a missionary and owing to the wild state of the country at that time was obliged to travel on horseback from place to place in the performance of his duties. He was a minister of the United Presbyterian church and continued to preach the gospel at Albany and Oakville, Oregon, the remainder of his life, his work proving a potent force for good in the communities which he served.

To Judge and Mrs. Stewart were born ten children, three of whom died in infancy. Those who survive are: Stanley I., secretary and manager of the Lebanon Electric Light & Water Power Company; William Edgar, a practicing physician of Portland, maintaining offices in the Selling building. He enlisted for service in the World war, in which he did most important work for his country, being engaged in the task of organizing hospitals in France. He served throughout the period of the war, being discharged as major at the close of the conflict; Charles H. was assistant deputy governor of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco until January 1st, 1921, at which time he was appointed one of the vice presidents of the Northwestern Bank of Portland. He organized the Salt Lake City branch of the bank, of which he was manager until January 1, 1920, when he was called to San Francisco to assume the duties of his present position. He is very prominent in financial circles of the west, having formerly acted as bank examiner of Oregon; Mary R. is the wife of Joseph H. Ralston, who is engaged in the electrical business at Albany, Oregon; Ralph is also a veteran of the World war. He served with the artillery forces and was so fortunate as to escape injury, although he participated in many a hard-fought battle. He is now engaged in the work of estimating lands for taxation purposes in Roosevelt county, Montana; Kate, who is an employe of the First National Bank of Albany, is residing at home; Robert L. also participated as a soldier in the World war, serving throughout the period of hostilities as a member of an artillery company. He is now connected with the Mountain States Electric & Power Company.

Judge Stewart gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and he has taken a prominent part in public affairs, serving for four terms as a member of the city council, while tor about twelve years he was chief of the fire department, thus rendering valuable service to the city. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the United Presbyterian church and for over twenty years he served as its secretary, and he has also been secretary of the Albany Commercial Club. He is a man of strict integrity, ever holding to high ideals of manhood and citizenship, and no public trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed. His life has been so varied in its activities, so honorable in its purpose and so far-reaching and beneficial in its effects that it has become an integral part of the history of his section of the state and his sterling worth is attested by all with whom he has come into contact.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Morgan, M. D.

M. D. Morgan, editor and lessee of the Harrisburg Bulletin, published at Harrisburg, Linn county, was born in Dubuque, Iowa, May 16, 1876, a son of John and Bertha (Moan) Morgan, the former a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, while the latter was born in Norway. The father accompanied his parents on their removal to Platteville, Wisconsin, and there followed the wheelwright's trade. He was an honored veteran of the Civil war, enlisting as a member of Company I, Tenth Wisconsin Infantry, with which he served for two years, when he was discharged on account of illness. On regaining his health he reenlisted, becoming a member of Company I, Twenty-seventh Wisconsin Infantry, and served with that command until the close of the war. He received a number of wounds and several times was taken prisoner but succeeded in making his escape. At the close of hostilities he returned to his Wisconsin home, but after a short time went to Dubuque, Iowa, where his marriage occurred. In 1877 he went to Dows, Iowa, and opened a wagon shop, continuing its conduct until ill health compelled him to retire. Coming to the west in search of a brother, he reached the state of Oregon, and finding the mild climate here to his liking, he took up his abode in Salem in 1904, there residing until 1909, when he removed to Harrisburg, in which city he spent his remaining days. He passed away April 30, 1915, and the mother survived him but a year, her death occurring May 31, 1916.

M. D. Morgan was reared and educated in Dows, Iowa, and there learned the printer's trade, which he followed in different parts of the country. Subsequently he took up the study of telegraphy and for two years worked at that occupation, but not finding it to his liking, he resumed his former trade of printer and on the 1st of January, 1899, purchased the Renwick (Ia.) Times, which he operated for two years and then sold. Purchasing the Butler County Tribune, published at Allison, Iowa, he continued to conduct that paper for a period of six years and, then decided to seek other fields of operation and came to Oregon, becoming connected with the Statesman, issued at Salem, where he remained until July, 1908. His next venture was in connection with the Harrisburg (Ore.) Bulletin, which he operated until December 1, 1917, and then sold, purchasing a farm near Harrisburg, in Linn county, but this investment did not prove a profitable one. He carried on his farming operations entirely by tractor, but owing to continued drought his crops proved a failure and he was obliged to abandon the project. He then went to Vancouver, Washington, where he once more took up his former trade, becoming connected with The Columbian, having charge of the job department and doing editorial work. In June, 1919, he returned to Harrisburg and leased his old paper, the Bulletin, which he has since conducted. He is thoroughly at home in this line of work, owing to his long connection with newspaper interests, and he is making the Bulletin a very readable and attractive journal, devoted to the interests of the community which it serves and to the dissemination of home news. He has introduced the most progressive methods in management and publication and has added to the substantial reputation which the Bulletin has always enjoyed. Mr. Morgan is still the owner of his farm near Harrisburg. It comprises one hundred and fourteen acres and from its rental he derives a substantial addition to his income.

On the 20th of February, 1901, occurred the marriage of M. D. Morgan and Miss Lola Irene Michael, and they have become the parents of eight children: Leland, who assists his father in the publication of the Bulletin; Wayne, who is also connected with the work of the paper; Genevieve, who is the second in order of birth; and Joseph, Carroll, Donald, Irene and Edith.

Mr. Morgan gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has taken an active interest in public affairs of his community, serving as a member of the various town councils in the communities in which he has resided. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order. He stands at all times for improvement in everything relating to the development and upbuilding of the county along intellectual, political, material and moral lines, and in his editorial capacity he is producing a newspaper of much interest and value to the community in which he lives.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Kinzer, Lewis

Lewis W. Kinzer was for over four decades one of the progressive and enterprising agriculturists of Linn county but since 1916 has lived retired, leaving the active operation of the farm to the capable management of his son, John W. Kinzer. Although he has passed the seventy-first milestone on life's journey, he is remarkably well preserved and appears to be a man of fifty. Mr. Kinzer was born in Des Moines county, Iowa, in June. 1849. his parents being Lewis and Louisa M. (Wolf) Kinzer. the former a native of Ohio, while the latter was also born in Des Moines county. Iowa. The father removed to Iowa at an early period in the development of that state and for a short time resided in Des Moines county. He had previously been a resident of California, whither he had gone in quest of gold, but not meeting with success in his venture he returned to the interior of the country and for a time made his home in Iowa. Once more he started for the west and with ox teams crossed the plains to Oregon, settling in Linn county, where he purchased land near the present site of the town of Crabtree, becoming the owner of three hundred and twenty acres. This he improved and developed and was active in its management throughout the remainder of his life. He died about 1870 at the comparatively early age of forty-nine years, while the mother, surviving him for a quarter of a century passed away about 1895, when sixty-seven years of age.

Lewis W. Kinzer has passed practically his entire life within the borders of this state, for he was but a year and a half old when brought by his parents to Oregon. He pursued his education in the district schools and remained at home until he attained his majority, when he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of the old home farm, devoting his energies to its further development and improvement for many years. His well directed labors and progressive methods were rewarded by a substantial measure of success and he became the owner of a most valuable property, continuing active in its conduct until 1916, when he suffered a paralytic stroke, since which time his son, John W. Kinzer, has capably directed the work of the farm.

On the 6th of June, 1875, Mr. Kinzer was united in marriage to Miss M. Ellen Arnold, who was born near Brownsville, Oregon, April 2, 1857, and is a daughter of Isaac and Priscilla (Hannah) Arnold, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Iowa. The father followed farming in the Hawkeye state until 1852, when he started for Oregon, becoming one of its early pioneers. Settling in Linn county, he took up land two miles from the present site of the town of Brownsville and this he cleared and developed for five years, when he sold that ranch and purchased land four miles east of Scio. This he continued to cultivate throughout the remainder of his life, passing away May 3, 1883, when seventy-three years of age. The mother survived him for seven years, her death occurring May 12, 1890, when she had attained the age of sixty-seven years. To Mr. and Mrs. Kinzer were born three children: John Wesley, the eldest, is now operating the home farm, upon which he resides. He married Rose Belyeu and they have two children, Lyle K. and Reta D.; Letha E. married Benjamin Franklin Carman and they reside at Eugene, Oregon; Lizzie E. became the wife of W. O. Wimmer and passed away in November, 1918, a victim of the influenza epidemic.

In his political views Mr. Kinzer Is a republican and his wife is a member of the Baptist church. He is not affiliated with any fraternal organizations but through his membership in the Grange he has ever kept in touch with the most advanced and scientific methods of farming. His present success is the result of his former years of indefatigable effort, enterprise and thrift and in the section where his life has been passed he is widely known and universally honored.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Marks, Willard

Willard L. Marks, attorney at law and member of the well known law firm of Hill & Marks, with offices in the Cusick Bank building at Albany, was born near Lebanon, in Linn county, Oregon, June 25, 1883, a son of James M. and Mary P. (Blain) Marks, natives of Indiana. The father crossed the plains to Oregon in company with his parents in 1852 and took up a donation land claim near Lebanon. The mother came to this state with her parents in 1848, being at that time but four years of age. Her father was a minister of the Presbyterian church and later became one of the founders of the United Presbyterian church. Upon coming to this state he first located in Oregon City, where he became editor of the Oregon Spectator, which was the first newspaper published west of the Rocky Mountains. Not long afterward he removed to Linn county and established a church and school at Union Point, in the vicinity of Brownsville. He died at Albany many years ago. James M. Marks, the father of Mr. Marks of this review, traded the donation land claim near Lebanon, which he had acquired on first coming to this state, for other land in that vicinity and this farm he operated for many years. He was one of the leaders in religious and educational affairs in his community and became one of the founders of the First Presbyterian church at Lebanon. He at length removed to Albany, where he resided for some time, and subsequently went to California, where he passed away in 1914, when nearly eighty years of age. The mother, however, survives and is now residing in Napa, California.

Willard L. Marks was reared and educated in Linn county. Oregon. He attended the public schools at Lebanon and at Albany and later entered Albany College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1904. While a student there he not only won scholastic honors and was a member of the college debating team but was prominent as an athlete and was a member of the track team which won the state championship in 1903. He also served as president of the old Collegiate Athletic League of Oregon. He met most of the expenses of his academic education by doing newspaper work and in addition to doing his school work served as city editor of the Albany Daily Herald during most of his senior year in college. After completing his college course he engaged in newspaper work and was for a year a reporter on the Portland Telegram. In 1906 he became chief deputy county clerk of Linn county and four years later was elected county clerk, being the first candidate for public office in Linn county ever nominated on both the republican and democratic tickets. He rendered such good service in that office that he was reelected without opposition in 1912.

Shortly after his graduation from college Mr. Marks began the study of law in connection with his other work and while serving as county clerk was admitted to the bar. On the 1st day of January, 1915, he retired from the clerk's office to take up the practice of law, and on that date formed a partnership with Gale S. Hill and since then has been associated with the law firm of Hill & Marks at Albany. Upon taking up the practice of law he was appointed deputy district attorney for Linn county and filled that position for six years.

On the 16th of April, 1907, occurred the marriage of Willard L. Marks and Miss Beryl Turner, a daughter of John and Fluella M. (Fisher) Turner, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Missouri. The father was a railroad agent in this state for several years and followed that line of work throughout his entire life. He passed away in 1903 but the mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Marks have two children, a son, Robert Leighton Marks, who was born August 4, 1914, and a daughter, Marian Elizabeth Marks, born February 17, 1921.

In politics Mr. Marks is a republican and he has been an active worker for the party. He served some time as secretary of the republican central committee of Linn county and has represented the county as a member of the state central committee several years. He was a member of the executive committee of the party in Oregon during the presidential campaigns of 1916 and 1920. He has had different opportunities to fill public office but prefers to devote his attention to the conduct of his extensive law business. Mr. Marks is prominent in fraternal circles. He has filled various offices in the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias and served as grand chancellor of Oregon in 1915 and 1916. He is also a member of different bodies of the Masonic order and other organizations. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church.

Mr. Marks is deserving of much credit for what he has accomplished in life, for he worked his way through college and through the exercise of determination, energy and native ability has advanced steadily in his profession until he now ranks with the leading attorneys of his section of the state.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Speer, Homer

For thirty years Homer Speer has been a resident of Oregon, having come to this state when but twelve years old. Eight years of this time he has lived in Tangent, where he is successfully conducting a merchandise business, and he is now serving Tangent as postmaster, in which position his genial personality and business aptitude have won for him many friends.

Homer Speer was born in Bushnell, Illinois, in June, 1878, his parents being Marcus H. and Emma (Painter) Speer, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. The father engaged in farming and later removed to Illinois, where he rented a fine piece of land which he operated until 1890. In that year he came to Oregon, settled in Marion county and resumed farming, purchasing some land which he immediately set about to improve and on which he resided the remainder of his life. He passed away, February 25, 1918, and had survived his wife four years, her death having occurred in October, 1914.

The subject of this review, Homer Speer, was reared and educated in the district schools of McDonough county, Illinois, until he was twelve years of age, when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Oregon. The family settled in Marion county and here Mr. Speer resumed his education to the age of nineteen years, when he removed to California with the idea of completing his education. He commenced the study of law, applying such close industry and mental concentration upon this work that his health began to fail and he was forced to give up his studies. He remained two years longer in California, however, and having regained his health, returned to Oregon and to his home county, starting a general store at Mehama, Marion county, which venture proved a success and in which he continued for four years. At the expiration of this period he removed to Mill City and there was employed at various occupations for a while, later establishing another store, which he operated for three and one-half years. For one year he had a grocery store, but preferring to handle merchandise he removed to Tangent, Linn county, and purchased a large general store, which he has since operated. In the conduct of his store he has employed only the highest standards and has endeavored in every possible way to please his patrons, believing that satisfied patrons are the best advertisement.

Mr. Speer was married March 2, 1902, to Miss Alice Pratt and to them have been born four children: Opal F., whose birth occurred in November, 1902; Marion A., born April 5, 1908; and Merwin H., born August 18, 1914. The wife and mother died February 25, 1919. after an illness of two years, her death being deeply regretted by many friends who had learned to esteem her highly.

Mr. Speer is well known in Masonic circles and also in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he is a republican, giving support to the principles of the party, yet never seeking nor desiring office. His religious faith is manifested in his membership in the Christian church and the sterling worth of his character has won for him the high esteem of all with whom he has come into contact.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Shedd, C. J.

A notably successful career is that of C. J. Shedd, manager of the Davis-Shedd Company, dealers in general merchandise, and president of the Bank of Shedd, in which connection he is controlling important and extensive interests at Shedd, Linn county. Mr. Shedd is a native son of Illinois, his birth having occurred in June, 1857, and his parents were Frank and Emily (Olin) Shedd, the former born in New Hampshire and the latter in Ohio. In 1839 the father removed to Illinois, where he engaged in farming until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted as a member of the One Hundred and Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, becoming Captain of Company C. At the end of a year he was discharged on account of illness and in 1864 he started across the plains to Oregon as captain of a wagon train traveling with ox teams. Settling in Linn county, he purchased land now adjoining the town of Shedd, of which he became the founder and which was named in his honor. He improved and developed his farm, converting it into a valuable property and continuing its cultivation throughout his remaining years. He was most highly respected and esteemed in his community and for one term was a member of the state legislature. He passed away in 1893, having for nine years survived the mother, whose demise occurred in 1884.

C. J. Shedd was but seven years of age at the time of the removal to Oregon and in the district schools of this state he pursued his education. After completing his studies he engaged in cultivating the home farm until 1895, when he was appointed postmaster of Shedd and served in that capacity for a period of four years. In 1900 he turned his attention to general merchandising in association with J. R. Davis and in 1912 the business was incorporated as the Davis-Shedd Company, of which Mr. Shedd has since been the manager. They carry a very large stock of merchandise and under the able direction of Mr. Shedd the business has assumed extensive and substantial proportions, the progressive methods and reliability of the firm winning for them a large patronage. Being a man of resourceful business ability, Mr. Shedd has extended his efforts into various lines and in March, 1913, in association with others he organized the Bank of Shedd, of which he has since served as president, the other officers being J. B. Bell of Eugene, vice president, and J. C. Clay, cashier. The bank has a capital stock of fifteen thousand dollars, its surplus amounts to five thousand dollars and its deposits have reached the sum of one hundred and seventy thousand dollars. Mr. Shedd has made a close study of the banking business and has ever made it his purpose to safeguard thoroughly the interests of depositors, so that the institution of which he is the head has ever enjoyed the full confidence of the public and has become recognized as a sound and substantial moneyed institution. He likewise is the owner of farm land which he leases and is thus continually broadening the scope of his activities, carrying forward to successful completion everything that he undertakes

In December, 1893, Mr. Shedd was united in marriage to Miss Anna Botsford and to them have been born three children: Bertha Lucille, Frank Raymond and Harold L., all at home. In his political views Mr. Shedd is a democrat and for one term he represented his district in the state legislature, where he rendered Important and valuable service, giving thoughtful and earnest consideration to all the vital problems which came up for settlement. For over twenty-five years he has served as justice of the peace, rendering decisions which have ever been characterized by fairness and impartiality. Mrs. Shedd attends the Methodist church and fraternally Mr. Shedd is identified with the Masons and the Woodmen of the World. A man of keen business discernment and sound judgment, Mr. Shedd has made for himself a creditable place in financial and mercantile circles of Linn county and his activities have always been of a character that have contributed to public progress and prosperity as well as to individual success. His life has ever been actuated by high and honorable principles and he is loyal to all those Interests which make for true manhood and progressive citizenship.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Wheeler, William

As editor and proprietor of the Brownsville Times, William H. Wheeler is producing a newspaper of much interest and value to the community in which he lives. He was born in Vermont, November 10, 1850, a son of William Henry Harrison and Ann (Standish) Wheeler, the former a native of the Green Mountain state, while the latter was born in Canada. In the east the father followed the trades of a carpenter and tanner and also engaged in farming for many years, but in 1853 he crossed the border into Canada and remained a resident of that country throughout the remainder of his life. He passed away in 188l at the age of sixty-six years, while the mother's death occurred in 1897, when she was seventy-seven years of age.

Their son, William H. Wheeler, was reared and educated in Canada, within fifty feet of the United States boundary line, and there learned the printer's trade. Returning to his native state, he became editor of the Vermont Farmer, serving in that capacity in 1873 and 1874. Two years later he went west to California and in 1877 he purchased a paper at Watsonville, California, which he conducted for three years and then went to San Francisco, where he became a member of the editorial staff of the Chronicle. At the end of four years he severed his connection with that publication and turned his attention to farming. Coming to Oregon, he took up a homestead in Lane county and this he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for a period of seventeen years. He then sold the property and turned his attention to other lines, conducting a hotel at Seaside, Oregon, for two years. Reentering the field of Journalism, he went to Eugene and while a resident of that city was connected with the Register for seven years. In June, 1919, he arrived In Brownsville and leased the Brownsville Times, which he has since operated, but previous to that time had acted as correspondent for city papers. The Times is one of the best and most influential newspapers in this section of the state. Its local columns are always full of interest and the news of the world is clearly and concisely set forth. Its information is accurate and reliable and it has become popular' with the reading public, enjoying a large circulation, and is therefore a good advertising medium. Mr. Wheeler is familiar with every phase of newspaper publication and in the management of the Times is meeting with excellent results.  While operating his farm in Lane county he specialized in the raising of Jersey cattle and he is still the owner of a residence in Eugene.

In September, 1919, Mr. Wheeler was united in marriage to Mrs. Anna A. Harvey, and by a former marriage he has a son, Marion P. Wheeler, who is postmaster at Greenleaf, Oregon, and a daughter, Mabel, who is the wife of Alfred Steinhauer and also resides at Greenleaf. Mr. Wheeler owes much of his success to his wife, who ably assists him in his editorial work. In politics he is independent and Mrs. Wheeler is a member of the Christian church. He stands at all times for improvement in everything relating to the upbuilding and development of the county along intellectual, political, material and moral lines and his many sterling traits of character have won for him the high regard of all who know him.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Dugger, Thomas

Thomas L. Dugger, editor and proprietor of the Scio Tribune, published at Scio, Linn county, has for a half century resided within the borders of this state and is therefore entitled to classification with its honored pioneers. He was born in Macoupin county, Illinois, December 17, 1S46, a son of Leonard W. and Sarah (Penn) Dugger, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Illinois. Brought by his parents to Illinois when but three years of age, the father was reared and educated in Madison county, that state. After completing his studies he took up farming and purchased land in Macoupin county, which he improved and developed, continuing its operation for a number of years. He then disposed of his farm and started for the west, coming to Oregon in 1876, but after remaining in the state for a year he returned to Illinois and purchased his old farm in Macoupin county, which he continued to operate during the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1882. His wife survived him for three years, passing away in 1885.

Thomas L. Dugger was reared and educated in Macoupin county, Illinois, and subsequently entered Blackburn University at Carlinville, Illinois. Previous to pursuing his college course, however, he had fought as a soldier in the Civil war, enlisting in 1862 as a member of Company M, Eleventh Missouri Cavalry, with which command he served for three years, participating in many hard fought battles and enduring many hardships and privations during that memorable conflict. Upon leaving college, or in 1870, he came west to Oregon and for one year engaged in teaching school in Portland, after which he removed to Linn county, where he followed that profession tor a period of eleven years. He was very successful as a teacher, imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge he had acquired, and he became known as one of the prominent educators of the state, having charge of Santiam Academy at Lebanon, which has since been discontinued. He then turned his attention to agricultural pursuits on a farm six miles west of Lebanon, which he cultivated and improved for three years, when he was obliged to abandon his farming operations on account of his wife's health. He was next engaged in canvassing the county for subscribers to the Albany Herald, of which he later became associate editor, gradually acquiring a knowledge of the printer's trade in his own shop. In 1890 he became a resident of Scio, purchasing the Scio Press, which he conducted for a period of seven years and then sold, retaining, however, his subscription list. His next removal was to Albany, where he became connected with the publication of the Peoples Press, but at the end of six months he returned to his farm near Lebanon and was active in its operation from 1900 until 1905. In the latter year he returned to Scio and again purchased the Santiam News, continuing its publication until 1912, when he sold out and purchased a new plant, founding The Tribune In Lebanon, where he conducted the paper for a year and then removed his plant to Sweet Home, Oregon. At length the business men of Scio induced him to establish his plant in Scio, where it has been in operation since 1914. Two years later, or in 1916, he purchased once more his old paper, the Santiam News, and consolidated the two publications under the name of the Scio Tribune, which he now owns and edits. He has a thoroughly modern newspaper plant, equipped with the latest presses and machinery, and he has made The Scio Tribune a most valuable and interesting journal, devoted to the welfare and Interests of the community which it serves. Its local columns are always full of interest and the general news of the world is clearly and completely given, the aims of the nation are well set forth and political questions are treated Justly and without prejudice. The principal policy of the paper has been to serve the public promptly and well and that Mr. Dugger has succeeded is evident from the large circulation which his publication enjoys. He is the only Civil war veteran in the state who is actively engaged in publishing a newspaper.

On the 13th of September, 1872, Mr. Dugger was united in marriage to Mrs. G. A. Henderson, who passed away February 3, 1921. They became the parents of two children: Samuel W., the elder, was born in 1873. He became a member of the regular army, serving for about ten years as a musician, and he passed away at El Paso, Texas, in February, 1918, at the age of forty-five years, while still in the service of the government; Sarah E. was born in 1878 and her death occurred in 1893.

In his political views Mr. Dugger is an independent democrat and he is now serving as justice of the peace at Scio and as notary public. In religious faith he is a Spiritualist and fraternally he is identified with the Leonidas Lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Scio, of which he is a charter member. He renews associations with his comrades who wore the blue by his connection with McPherson Post., G. A. R., of Albany, of which he is also a charter member. Identified with this section of the state from pioneer times, Mr. Dugger is most widely known and his sterling traits of character have gained for him an enviable position in public regard. He is actuated by a most progressive spirit in all that he undertakes and he has made the Scio Tribune the champion of every measure and movement calculated to upbuild the town and promote the growth of the surrounding district.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Hill, Gale

Gale S. Hill, former district attorney of Linn county, is an able member of the Oregon bar, holding to the highest standards of the profession. He is likewise a member of the law firm of Hill & Marks, leading attorneys of Albany, whose clientele is extensive and of a representative character. Mr. Hill is a native son of Oregon, his birth having occurred in the city where he still makes his home on the 11th of November, 1887. His parental grandfather. Dr. R. C. Hill, was a Baptist minister who crossed the plains to Oregon in 1852 and for a time resided in Benton county. Subsequently he became a resident of Albany and here founded the Baptist church, of which he continued as pastor throughout the remainder of his active life, his work in that connection proving of far-reaching and beneficial effect. His son. Dr. J. L. Hill, was but four years of age when his parents made the journey to Oregon from Tennessee. For a time he worked on farms in the state and then learned the printer's trade, after which he entered Willamette University, and working his way through that institution of learning and was graduated therefrom in 1871, at which time the M. D. degree was bestowed upon him. He engaged in the practice of medicine at Buena Vista, Polk county, tor a year and then opened an office in Albany, where he continued in practice to the time of his death. In addition to his private practice, which was extensive and important, he was surgeon general of the Oregon National Guards under Governor Moody and his professional standing was of the highest. He was careful in diagnosis, and wide reading and study kept him abreast with the advancement continually being made in the methods of medical and surgical practice. He also wrote extensively for newspapers and was a man of broad learning, who possessed one of the best libraries in the state and was likewise said to have the finest museum on the Pacific coast. He traveled extensively and at the opening of the World war he was making a tour of. the world, being a passenger on a German boat en route from Australia to Aden. The steamer was pursued by war ships and at length was obliged to put into a neutral port in East Africa, from which point Dr. Hill made his way home as best he could, being compelled to follow the African coast, but finally reached his native land in safety. He had wedded Mary Pennington, a native of Linn county, Oregon. Her father, Stewart M. Pennington, came to this state in 1847 and took up a donation claim in Linn county, which he improved and developed, and subsequently went to Pendleton, Oregon, where for some time he engaged in merchandising, in which he won success, acquiring a substantial competence which enabled him to live retired in his later years in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. He represented Umatilla county in the state senate for two terms and gave earnest and thoughtful consideration to all vital questions which came up for settlement. He passed away at Albany in 1913. Dr. Hill was prominent in the Knights of Pythias, being grand chancellor of his lodge for the state of Oregon. He was a man of high intellectual attainments, who, working his way through college, attained high rank in his profession and was classed with the most skilled physicians of his section of the state. He passed away in July, 1919. At the age of seventy-four years, while the mother's death occurred in December, 1896.

Their son. Gale S. Hill, attended the public schools of Albany and later enrolled As a student in Albany College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1897. He then read law in the office of J. K. Weatherford and spent one year in the office of his uncle, W. Lair Hill, at Oakland, California, being admitted to the bar in 1900. He opened an office in Albany and has continued in practice here. His knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and he is seldom, if ever, at fault in the application of a legal principle. On the 1st of January, 1915, Mr. Hill formed a partnership with W. L. Marks, and this association has continued, the firm now being accorded a large and representative clientage. Mr. Hill's ability in his profession has won recognition by election to public office and for eight and a half years he served as deputy district attorney under John H. McNary of Salem. In 1912 he was elected district attorney for the old third judicial district, comprising Linn, Marion. Polk. Yamhill and Tillamook counties, and held that office until the district was divided, when he served for Linn and Marion counties. When each county was made a district he was elected district attorney for Linn county in 1916 and served in that office until January 1. 1921.

Mr. Hill gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his fraternal connections are with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, while along the line of his profession he is identified with the American, Oregon State and Linn County Bar Associations, and of the last named has served as president. He is the owner of a fine law library and is a man of high professional attainments, whose standing at the bar is an enviable one. He is deeply interested in all that pertains to public progress and improvement, giving his aid and cooperation to all plans and movements for the general good, and his enterprise and public spirit have made him a valued citizen of his community.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Wilhelm, George

George J. Wilhelm is prominently operating in the field of banking at Harrisburg as vice president and cashier of the First National Bank and is also identified with other important business enterprises which have won him a place with the substantial and prosperous men of his community. Mr. Wilhelm was born in St. Cloud, Wisconsin, October 24, 1880, a son of George and Agnes (Andreas) Wilhelm, natives of Germany. When but a year old the father was brought by his parents to America, the family locating near Kiel, Wisconsin. There the grandfather of George J. Wilhelm took up land, which he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for a number of years, when he sold it and in 1860 started on the long journey across the plains to Oregon, making the trip with ox teams. Locating at Monroe, in Benton county, he there purchased land, which he operated for some time and also assisted his son in the conduct of a general merchandise business. He passed away in 1890, when eighty years of age, and his wife's death occurred in 1889. The son, George Wilhelm, did not accompany his parents on their removal to Oregon but remained in Wisconsin, where for a time he followed farming, but ill health compelled him to abandon the arduous task of developing his land and he turned his attention to the hotel business, in which he engaged at St. Cloud and later at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, thus continuing until his demise. He was a man of prominence in his community and at various times his fellow townsmen sought to secure his services as a public official, but he declined all nominations, preferring to give his undivided attention to his business affairs. He passed away in April, 1900, and the mother's death occurred in August, 1898.

George J. Wilhelm attended the parochial schools of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, from which he was graduated in 1894. On starting out in the business world he secured a position as clerk in a large hardware store at Sheboygan when but fourteen years of age and remained with that firm for a period of six years, during which time his capability and faithful and conscientious service won him various promotions until he became assistant manager, being at that time a young man of twenty years. He next became connected with the Aladdin Soap Company in the capacity of secretary-treasurer and manager and under his direction the business was established upon a paying basis. In 1902 he severed his connection with that firm and became traveling representative for the B. J. Johnson Soap Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, remaining with that house for a year. He then came west at the request of the firm of A. Wilhelm & Sons, whose headquarters were at Monroe, Oregon, and assumed charge of its entire grain and milling business. This firm operated three flour mills and was the owner of four warehouses and conducted an extensive business, turning out three carloads of flour and feed per day. He remained with this firm until 1907, when he turned his attention to the banking business, conducting the Bank of Harrisburg, a private financial institution, for a period of ten months, or until June, 1908, when the bank was nationalized, becoming the First National Bank of Harrisburg. This he operated alone for a year. The capital stock of Mr. Wilhelm's private bank was ten thousand dollars, which was increased to twenty-five thousand dollars after its nationalization. During the first year of its existence as a national institution it paid a seven per cent dividend, a nine per cent dividend the second year, a dividend of ten per cent for the next three years, twelve per cent for the succeeding four years, while in 1919 a sixteen per cent dividend was paid, in addition to which it built up a twenty-five thousand dollar surplus, its deposits reaching the sum of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. It now has a surplus of twenty-eight thousand one hundred and fourteen dollars and deposits amounting to two hundred and seventy-one thousand, two hundred and sixteen dollars. The present officers of the bank are. R. K. Burton, president; W. A. Lane, vice president; George J. Wilhelm, vice president and cashier; and H. F. Halverson, assistant cashier, all being thoroughly reliable and progressive business men of their section of the state. Mr. Wilhelm personally attends to practically all of the business connected therewith and is proving most capable in the conduct of its affairs, although he had had no previous banking experience when he became connected with the institution. He is a man of sound business principles and in the management of the First National Bank has made it his first consideration to see to it that the depositors and stockholders are well protected. However, he has been progressive enough to extend credits when they were sought by responsible parties and has in that way promoted business and agricultural enterprises. Being a man of resourceful business ability he has extended his efforts into various lines and is president of Hill & Company, which firm carries a seventy thousand dollar stock of hardware, harness, implements, furniture, carpets, rugs and general house furnishings, and also has the agency for automobiles, recently erecting a fine garage at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars. At the time of its organization the business of the firm amounted to eight thousand dollars per year and the extent of Its growth is indicated in the fact that in 1919 its business amounted to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, while its transactions for 1920 exceeded that amount. Mr. Wilhelm was also the founder of the Harrisburg Warehouse & Lumber Company, which he established in 1912, and is now serving as its president. The company is engaged in the conduct of a wholesale grain and hay business of extensive proportions. He is likewise the founder of the Harrisburg Lumber & Manufacturing Company, which was organized in April, 1920, and is now serving as secretary and treasurer of the company, which owns some of the finest and largest tracts of hardwood timber in the state, including maple, ash, oak, fir and balm lumber. The firm has established a new market for balm lumber with manufacturers, who heretofore had not made use of this product, and their shipments are made principally to Wisconsin. Mr. Wilhelm also has extensive farming interests in the vicinity, being the owner of six farms which he engaged in operating until the past year, but now rents his holdings. He was formerly extensively engaged in stock raising. Mr. Wilhelm is a man of large affairs who is continually broadening the scope of his activities with good results and carries forward to successful completion everything that he undertakes, for in his vocabulary there is no such word as fail. In all business affairs he readily discriminates between the essential and the non-essential and, discarding the latter, utilizes the former to the best possible advantage.

On the 17th of April, 1907, Mr. Wilhelm was united in marriage to Miss Cecil Rampy, a daughter of Robert A. and Sarah (Johnson) Rampy, who were pioneers of this state, emigrating to Oregon from Missouri in 1860. They became residents of Harrisburg, where for many years Mr. Rampy successfully conducted a drug store, while later he operated a bank, gaining a prominent position among the substantial business men of this section of the state. He continued to make his home in Harrisburg until his demise, which occurred in 1908, while the mother passed away in 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm have become the parents of five children: George R., Agnes E., Marjorie C, Millard F. and Gretta C.

In his political views Mr. Wilhelm is independent and has taken an active interest in public affairs of his community, serving for several terms as city treasurer. His interest in the welfare and upbuilding of his city is indicated by his membership in the Harrisburg Chamber of Commerce, and during the influenza epidemic of 1918 he was instrumental in curbing the disease by caring for the patients in the public schools, which were used as hospitals, many cases being treated in this manner. In religious faith he is a Catholic and his fraternal connections are with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Columbus and the United Artisans. He is a most patriotic and public-spirited citizen and during the World war rendered valuable aid to the government as chairman of Liberty Loan and Red Cross drives and also as chairman of the Harrisburg Council of Defense. Mr. Wilhelm is a man of keen discrimination and clear vision, possessing executive ability of an unusually high order, and his achievements in a business way entitle him to classification with America's captains of industry. He is wide-awake and alert and in his life exemplifies the spirit of progress which has been the dominant factor in the upbuilding of this section of the country.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Wesely, Joseph

A man of keen business discernment and sound judgment, Jos. P. Wesely has made for himself a creditable place in business circles of Scio as the proprietor of a well appointed mercantile establishment, and for the past five years he has also acted as local express agent. He was born in New York City, New York, June 20, 1873, a son of John and Frances (Young) Wesely, natives of Bohemia. The father was a marble cutter by trade and in 1870 he emigrated to the United States, thinking to find better business opportunities in this country. For three years he resided in the eastern metropolis and then removed to the middle west, establishing his home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. At the end of three years he left that state and in 1877 went to Kansas, where he took up a timber claim of one hundred and sixty acres. He cleared and developed his land, continuing its operation for many years, and it was there that he passed away in 1904 at the age of fifty-three years. The mother, however, survives and now resides in Scio. She reared a family of fifteen children, of whom five sons and five daughters are living.

Jos. F. Wesely pursued his early education in the district schools of Kansas, his first lessons being received in a sod house, while subsequently he was graduated from the Ellsworth schools. In order to secure the money for his academic course he clerked for two years in a grocery store and then entered the normal school at Salina, Kansas, where he pursued a preparatory course in business and a course in teaching. He also entered upon the work of the scientific course, which, however, he was obliged to discontinue, owing to ill health. Subsequently he engaged in teaching in the district where he had attended school, remaining a teacher in that locality for a period of seven years. Mr. Wesely is a well educated man of marked linguistic ability, conversing fluently in the Bohemian, German and English languages, and as an educator he was very successful, imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had acquired. In the year 1898, in company with his uncles, he came to Oregon and for a year was in their employ. He then became connected with the flax industry at Scio, remaining for a year, after which he went to Salem, where he also followed that line of work for a year. Returning to Scio, he engaged in general merchandising in partnership with his brother, John Wesely, an association that was maintained for four years, when the business was divided, Mr. Wesely's brother becoming the owner of the stock of dry goods, while Mr. Wesely took over the grocery establishment, which he has since conducted. He is very careful in the selection of his goods and his known reliability, enterprising methods, reasonable prices and courteous treatment of patrons have secured for him a large patronage. For the past five years he has also acted as local express agent and he likewise has farming interests, owning and operating a tract of fourteen acres just outside the city limits. The land is rich and productive and from its cultivation he is deriving a substantial addition to his income. He is an energetic and farsighted business man and in the conduct of his varied interests he is meeting with most gratifying success.

On the 30th of June, 190S, Mr. Wesely was united in marriage to Miss Rose L. Sticha and they have become the parents of four children, namely: Maximilian, aged eleven years: Frances R., who is nine years of age; Angeline, aged two; and Stanley, who died in April, 1913, at the age of seven months.

In his political views Mr. Wesely is independent, voting for the candidate whom he deems best fitted for office without regard to party affiliation. He has taken a prominent part in the public affairs of his community and for five years has served as city treasurer, while for thirteen years he acted as school clerk, the cause of public education ever receiving his stalwart support. His fraternal connections are with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Wesely has led a busy, active and useful life, employing every opportunity to advance, and he deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, for he started out in life empty-handed and his present prosperity is the direct outcome of persistency of purpose and undaunted energy. He is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, whose sterling worth has won for him the high regard of all who know him.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Weatherford, James

Hon. James Knox Weatherford, a distinguished member of the Oregon bar practicing at Albany, was born in Putnam county, Missouri, in March, 1850, his parents being Alfred H. and Sophia (Smith) Weatherford, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. In an early day the father removed to Illinois, in which state his marriage occurred, and shortly afterward he went with his bride to Missouri, purchasing land in Putnam county. This he improved and developed and he was later called to public office when Putnam county was organized as a separate county. He was appointed by the governor as the first county judge and at the next general election was elected clerk of the county, which position he held until his death in 1856. He was a man highly respected in this community. The mother's death occurred in 1862.

James K. Weatherford was reared and educated in his native county to the age of thirteen years and in 1864 started for Oregon in company with a Mr. Morgan, a friend of his father. For a time Mr. Weatherford engaged in driving ox teams in eastern Oregon and then secured employment in a woolen mill at Brownsville, in Linn county, where he remained until the mill was destroyed by fire in 1865. He then returned to the eastern part of the state and resumed his former occupation of driving oxen, being thus engaged until the fall of 1865, when he again became an employe in the woolen mills, working under Tom Kay. He continued to work in the mills for three years and in 1868 went to Corvallis, Oregon, where he enrolled as a student in the Oregon Agricultural College, from which he won his A. B. degree upon graduation with the class of 1872. While attending college he resided in a small dwelling which he had erected at a cost of seventy-five dollars and in order to defray the expenses of his tuition he worked in the harvest fields during vacation periods, but was still eight hundred dollars in debt at the time of his graduation. For six months he engaged in teaching school and in 1874 he was elected county school superintendent, occupying that position for two years, during which time he bestowed certificates upon many who later were numbered with Oregon's most prominent men. among whom were United States Senators George E. Chamberlain and C. W. Fulton. In the meantime Mr. Weatherford had engaged in the study of law and in September, 1876, he was admitted to the bar. He opened an office in Albany and during the intervening period of forty-five years has here continued in practice, having associated with him as partners at various times such distinguished members of the profession as Judge W. C. Piper, D. R. Blackburn, ex-attorney general of Oregon; United States Senator George E. Chamberlain, Ex-Senator O. P. Coshow of Roseburg, J. Fred Abates, county judge of Benton county, Oregon; Gale S. Hill, ex-district attorney of Linn county; R. C. Cooley of Enterprise and A. K. McMahan of Albany, and J. R. Wyatt, who is his present partner and Mark V. Weatherford, also a member of the firm. Mr. Weatherford of this review has specialized in the practice of criminal law, in which he has been very successful, having won a state-wide reputation. He is an adept trial lawyer and has probably defended more men held for murder than any other attorney in the state. He is the possessor of the largest private law library in the Willamette valley, if not in the state, which is of invaluable assistance to him in his legal work. Mr. Weatherford is also the owner of extensive realty holdings. He owns the store and office building in which his office is located, also his fine residence at No. 505 Montgomery street, and several of the large business blocks of the city, including the Rolfe Theater building. He likewise has large farming interests in Linn county and timber holdings in Lincoln county and for a number of years has been associated with the woolen mills at Salem, his activities thus covering a broad scope.

Mr. Weatherford gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and in 1876 he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature, where he served for two years and was then made speaker of the house. He likewise served for three terms as state senator, was the nominee for secretary of state and twice ran for congress but was defeated. In 1885 Mr. Weatherford was appointed a member of the board of regents of the Oregon Agricultural College and for the past twenty years has been its president. At the time of his graduation the college consisted of but one small wooden building, but as a member of the building committee he has been influential in securing the erection of a number of fine buildings. He has ever been much interested in the cause of public education and for over forty years has served on the Albany school board, doing everything in his power to advance the standards of the schools. For one term he also was mayor of Albany, giving to the city a businesslike and progressive administration. He is prominent in fraternal circles, being a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past grand master. He is likewise identified with the Masonic order, holding membership in the lodge, chapter, commandery and shrine, and he also is connected with the Eastern Star. During the war with Germany he gave indisputable proof of his patriotism and devotion to his country.

In February, 1877, Mr. Weatherford was united in marriage to Annette Cottle, at that time a resident of San Jose, California, but a native of Linn county, Oregon. They have two children: Realto L., who resides at Corvallis and is operating his father's farm at Harrisburg; and Alfred B., who is connected with the internal revenue office at Portland.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Bond, Balf

Balf. M. Bond, cashier of the Halsey State Bank of Halsey, Linn county, is making a creditable record in the office by the prompt and faithful manner in which he is discharging his duties, looking after the welfare of depositors and safeguarding the interests of the institution. He has here passed his entire life, for he was born in Halsey on the 15th of February, 1891, a son of Owen and Mary C. (Keeney) Bond, also natives of this state. The father, who was born in Linn county, engaged in farming and stock raising on a ranch six miles west of Halsey where he continued to reside until his demise on the 1st of February, 1913. The mother, however, survives.

In the public schools of Halsey, Balf. M. Bond pursued his education and on entering the business world became an employe of S. E. Young & Son of Albany, with whom he was connected for some time. In 1912 he entered the Halsey State Bank as assistant cashier and in the following year purchased stock in the institution, becoming cashier, in which position he has since served most conscientiously and efficiently, the growth of the bank being due in large measure to his initiative and ability. The institution was organized in 1910, at which time a modern bank building was erected. Its present officers are: C. H. Koontz, president; D. Taylor, vice president; and B. M. Bond, cashier, all of whom are reliable and progressive business men of this section of the state. The bank is capitalized for twenty thousand dollars and has a surplus of twelve thousand dollars. Its deposits will average one hundred and eighty thousand dollars and its total resources are two hundred and fifty-two thousand dollars. Mr. Bond is also connected with farming interests, being the owner of the home farm of three hundred and ten acres, which he purchased from the other heirs. This property he rents and thereby derives an additional source of revenue.

On the 20th of August, 1919, Mr. Bond was united in marriage to Miss Esther Marie Frisbee and they have many friends in their community. Mr. Bond is a republican in his political views and has taken a prominent and active part In public affairs of his city, serving as city treasurer for three years, while for six years he has been clerk of the school board. He attends the Methodist Episcopal church and in its work he is actively and helpfully interested, having served as a teacher in the Sunday school for the past four years. His fraternal connections are with the Odd Fellows, the Rebekahs, the Masons and the Eastern Star. Mr. Bond is a young man of excellent business qualifications who has already advanced well toward the goal of success and the sterling worth of his character is indicated In the fact that in the community where he has spent his entire life he is held in the highest esteem.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Cooley, John

John P. Cooley, postmaster of Brownsville, to which office he was appointed in 1914, is one of the native sons of Oregon, for he was born near Woodburn, in Marion county, December 29, 1852, his parents being Jackson and Harriet L. (Dimmick) Cooley the former born in Missouri and the latter in Illinois. In 1845 the father crossed the plains from Clay county, Missouri, to Oregon, the journey being made with ox teams. He was accompanied by two brothers and a sister and upon reaching this state he settled in Marion county, taking up a government claim, and upon this land a portion of the town of Woodburn is now located. He cleared and developed his claim and continued its operation until 1870, when he sold out and removed to Salem, where he lived retired throughout the remainder of his life. He passed away August 16, 1884, at the age of sixty-seven years and the mother's demise occurred in March, 1892, when she was fifty-seven years of age. They were honored pioneers of the state and were greatly esteemed and respected in their community.

Their son, John P. Cooley, pursued his education in the district schools of Marion county and in the high school of Belle Passi. After completing his school work he was employed in the woolen mills at Salem, Oregon City and Brownsville, Oregon, from the time he was eighteen years of age until about 1913, and during that period he also engaged in farming to some extent. On the 12th of September, 1879, he removed to Brownsville and has since resided in this vicinity. In 1914 he was appointed postmaster of Brownsville and is now serving in that capacity, discharging the duties of that office with promptness and efficiency. He still has farming interests, owning twenty-seven and a half acres of land within the city limits of Brownsville, and this he leases to good advantage. He is alert, energetic and capable in the management of his business affairs and is known as a man of thorough reliability and integrity.

On the 28th of November, 1875, Mr. Cooley was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Cole, and they became the parents of three children, namely: Oleti P., who for the past ten years has been engaged in teaching school in Portland, Oregon; Albert Sidney, a prominent attorney of Enterprise, Oregon; and Florence M., who became the wife of R. H. Jonas and resides at Forest Grove, Oregon. The wife and mother passed away August 1, 1910, after an illness of eighteen years and her loss was deeply felt by the members of her household.

In his political views Mr. Cooley is a democrat and he has taken an active and prominent part in public affairs of his community, serving as mayor, councilman and school director, in which connections he rendered important and valuable service to his city. Fraternally he is identified with the United Artisans and the Masons and in religious faith he is a Baptist. He has always been loyal to any public trust reposed In him and puts forth every effort for the benefit and upbuilding of the city in which he makes his home. From pioneer times he has resided within the borders of Oregon and his career has ever been such as has reflected credit and honor upon the state.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Bach, Stephen

Stephen P. Bach, president of the First National Bank of Lebanon and also connected with mercantile interests as president of the firm of Bach-Buhl & Company, engaged in general merchandising in Lebanon, is a native of Germany, his birth having occurred at Hoch Hansen, June 27, 1860. His parents Joseph and Rosalia (Bartlemay) Bach, were likewise natives of Germany, where the father engaged in merchandising during the greater part of his life. He passed away in March, 1892, and the mother survived him for but a month her death occurring in April of that year.

 Stephen P. Bach was reared and educated in Germany and after his testbooks were put aside he was employed for two years as clerk in a lumber-yard. In 1880, when twenty years of age, he crossed the ocean to the United States, becoming a resident of Cleveland, Ohio, where he remained for one and a half years. He then came to Oregon and for two years worked on a farm near Salem after which he was for four years employed in a grocery store conducted by John Hughes. In 1890 he came to Lebanon and engaged in general merchandising, in which he has continued, admitting George H. Buhl as a partner in 1904. Mr. Bach later became connected with and was one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Lebanon in 1907, at which time he was made vice president of the institution. In 1912 the bank was reorganized and Mr. Bach became its president, in which capacity he has since served, most capably directing its affairs. He is a man of sound judgment and keen discrimination and under his management the business of the bank has steadily grown along substantial lines until it is today recognized as one of the sound financial institutions of this part of the state. It is capitalized for fifty thousand, its surplus and undivided profits amount to sixteen thousand five hundred and four dollars and its deposits have reached the sum of seven hundred and thirty-nine thousand, four hundred and seventy-two dollars. The officers of the bank are: S. P. Bach, president, J. C. Mayer, vice president, and Alex Power, cashier, and all are thoroughly reliable business men of this section of the state. Mr. Bach is also a stockholder in the Lebanon Light & Water Company and the Pacific States Fire Insurance Company and in addition he owns considerable city property and from these various lines of activity is deriving a most gratifying Income. In all that he does he manifests a progressive spirit. He does not fear to venture where favoring opportunity leads the way and opportunity is ever to him a call to action.

In January 1891, Mr. Bach was united in marriage to Miss Theresa Sheridan, a daughter of John and Kate (Michaelburg) Sheridan, the former a native of Canada and the latter of Wisconsin. Her father became one of the pioneers of Oregon, having come to this state fifty years ago, and here he spent the remainder of his life, engaging in the occupation of farming in Linn county. He passed away in 1916 but the mother survives. Mr. and Mrs. Bach have become the parents of a daughter, Bessie Louise, who was born in November, 1893, and is yet at home.

Mr. Bach is a democrat in his political views and has taken a prominent part in public affairs of his locality, serving as mayor of Lebanon, as a member of the city council and also on the school board and in each of these connections has rendered important and valuable services to the city. Fraternally he is identified with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and in religious faith he is a Catholic. In the conduct of his business affairs he has displayed sound judgment and his energy and enterprise have gained him recognition as one of the substantial and valued citizens of his part of the state. Untiring in his activity for the public good and ever actuated by high and honorable purposes in all relations of life, his labors have been far-reaching and resultant.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Crabtree, Newton

Newton Crabtree, an honored pioneer of Oregon and a representative of one of its oldest families, his parents having arrived in this state in 1845, is now engaged in cultivating a tract of fifty acres of rich and arable land three miles south of Scio. He was born near The Dalles, Oregon, October 22, 1845, and is a son of John J. and Melinda (Yeary) Crabtree, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Kentucky. At an early day the father went to Missouri, where he resided for about five years, and in 1845 he started from Independence, that state, for Oregon, traveling with ox teams and wagons. The party set out on their journey in May and it was not until November that they arrived in Vancouver, Washington. Upon their arrival at The Dalles they constructed a raft, upon which they placed their seven wagons, and in that manner proceeded down the Columbia river to Vancouver. They spent the winter in Yamhill county, Oregon, and in the following spring made their way to Linn county, where the father took up a donation land claim. He at once set about the arduous task of clearing and developing his land and after many years of persistent and unremitting labor he succeeded in bringing his farm to a high state of productivity, becoming the owner of a most valuable property. He was one of the real builders of the west, who bravely endured all the hardships and privations of frontier life and aided in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the present progress and prosperity of the country. He became a man of prominence in his community and it was in his honor that the town of Crabtree was subsequently named. He reared a family of fifteen children, five of whom were born in Virginia, five in Missouri and five in Oregon, and six of his sons participated in the Washington and Rogue River Indian wars. The twin brother of the subject of this review was Jasper Crabtree, who died about 1890. The father passed away on the 28th of March, 1892, at the venerable age of ninety-two years, while the mother survived him for six years, her demise occurring in 1898, when she had reached the advanced age of ninety years. They were truly cast in heroic mold. Braving the dangers of the unknown west they courageously faced the hardships and privations of that long and arduous journey, devoting their lives to the redemption of the Pacific coast region and counting no sacrifice too great that was made for the benefit of their home locality.

Newton Crabtree was reared and educated in Linn county and has here spent his life. He attended district school, the schoolhouse being a log cabin, for the country was then wild and undeveloped and the Indians far outnumbered the white settlers. On reaching mature years he took up the occupation of farming, cultivating a tract of land which his father had given him. This he further improved and developed and subsequently purchased additional land, but later disposed of the greater portion of his holdings, retaining fifty acres, which he is now operating. He has ever followed the most progressive methods in the cultivation of the soil and his unabating energy and well directed efforts have won for him a substantial measure of success. His land is rich and productive and its value is much enhanced by a small stream which runs through the farm and which was named Crabtree creek in honor of his father.

In October, 1871, Mr. Crabtree was united in marriage to Miss Frances Wilson and they became the parents of five children: Fred, who died November 26, 1894; Nellie, whose demise occurred on the 4th of March, 1906; Maggie, who is the wife of Frank Sommer, a farmer of Linn county; Flo, who married C. C. Smith and resides in Portland, Oregon; and May, the wife of Arthur Lettenmaier of Oregon City. The wife and mother died November 16, 1915, after an illness of six months, and on the 9th of February, 1920, Mr. Crabtree was married to Emma Bann.

In his political views Mr. Crabtree is a democrat and he has taken an active part in public affairs of his community, serving for many years as a member of the school board, while for a quarter of a century he acted as clerk of that body. Fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, which order he joined on the 3d of November. 1880, and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member of the Oregon Pioneers Society and is one of the oldest residents of the state, having spent the entire period of his life, covering seventy-five years, within its borders. He remembers when the country was wild and undeveloped, with only a few scattered dwellings to show that the seeds of civilization had been planted. The passing years have brought their influx of settlers, and with interest he has watched changing events and in considerable measure has contributed to the development of the community, his aid and influence being ever on the side of progress and improvement. He has led a busy, active and useful life and is widely known and universally honored.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Anderson, Jason

Jason T. Anderson, a veteran of the World war, who rendered valuable service to the country during the most critical period in its history, is now serving as postmaster of Harrisburg. discharging the duties of this position most capably and efficiently. He was born in this city July 3, 1891, a son of Thomas J. and Emma (Thomas) Anderson, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Iowa. In 1872 the father went to Nevada and remained a resident of that state until 1880, when he came to Oregon, securing employment in a store in Harrisburg, with which he was connected for a period of fifteen years. He was then elected to the office of county assessor, in which he served for one term and then returned to Harrisburg, where he engaged in the real estate and insurance business from 1902 until 1916, when he was appointed postmaster, which office he continued to fill until his death on the 19th of May, 1919, when he was sixty-one years of age. He was prominent in the public affairs of his community and for fifteen years was city recorder of Harrisburg. The mother survives and is now a resident of Portland, Oregon.

Jason T. Anderson was reared and educated in his native city, attending the public and high schools. On completing his studies he was variously employed until 1916, when he was made assistant postmaster of Harrisburg. In April, 1918, he enlisted for service in the World war and was sent to Camp Lewis, Washington. He was assigned to the Twenty-second Engineers and was transferred to Montgomery, Alabama, becoming member of Company C. From there he was sent to Camp Merritt and on the 30th of June sailed for France. He participated in some of the heaviest fighting of the war but fortunately escaped without injury, and at the battle of St. Mihiel was placed in charge of a working party which for thirty-two days was subjected to the most intensive and continuous shell fire. During this most trying ordeal he handled his men with great coolness and good judgment, winning high commendation from his superior officer, First Lieutenant Ridgley of Bremerton, Washington. Mr. Anderson was made first-class sergeant and was discharged May 12, 1919, because of his father's dangerous illness, arriving home twenty-four hours before the latter's demise. The son was then appointed acting postmaster and after successfully passing the required examination received a permanent appointment as postmaster in February, 1920. He is a most courteous and obliging official and the duties of the office are promptly and efficiently discharged.

On the 12th of October, 1919, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Velma Purkerson and they have many friends in Harrisburg. He is a democrat in his political views and fraternally he is a member of the Rebekahs and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to both the lodge and encampment. Mrs. Anderson's religious affiliation is with the Christian church. Mr. Anderson is always loyal to any cause which he espouses and faithful to every duty and he is a patriotic, public-spirited citizen, interested in all that has to do with public progress in the community, his aid and influence being always on the side of advancement and improvement.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

White, Elliott

Elliott E. White, engaged in the hardware and implement business at Brownsville and also serving as mayor of his city, is a man of enterprise and progressive business methods whose efforts are bringing to him substantial and well deserved success. He was born in the southern portion of Pennsylvania, near the city of Emmitsburg, Maryland, in October, 1862, a son of Elliott and Clarissa Jane (Waybright) White, both of whom were natives of the Keystone state. The father engaged in farming in Pennsylvania and during the Civil war he enlisted for service in the northern army, becoming a member of the Pennsylvania Infantry, with which command he remained for ninety days. On the expiration of his term of enlistment he was honorably discharged and returned to the pursuits of civil life, his health being much impaired by the hardships and privations he had endured while in the service of his country. Going to Illinois, he resided for about six years in that state and in 1877 went to Kansas, where he purchased land, which he improved and developed, continuing its operation until his demise in 1900, when he was fifty-six years of age. The mother survives and is yet a resident of the Sunflower state.

Elliott E. White attended school in Illinois, Kansas and Nebraska and remained at home until he attained his majority, when he engaged in the cultivation of rented land. Having carefully saved his earnings he was subsequently able to purchase land in the vicinity of Hutchinson, Kansas, and this he continued to operate until 1906, when he came to Oregon. Turning his attention to mercantile pursuits, he engaged in the hardware and farm implement business at Brownsville and has since been active along that line. He carries a large stock of shelf and heavy hardware and also deals in farm implements, handling the Case tractors, and he is likewise agent for the Willys Overland cars. He has a well appointed establishment and his thorough reliability, progressive methods and reasonable prices have secured tor him an extensive patronage. He is watchful of every detail of his business and of every indication pointing to success, and his close application and unfaltering energy have been the dominant features in his advancement.


In July, 1889, Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Clara Macklin of Kansas, and they have become the parents of three children, namely: Ina, who married V. E. Weber and resides in Portland, Oregon: Ethel B., who is a teacher of music at Tillamook, Oregon; and Blanche M., a teacher in the public schools of Portland.

In his political views Mr. White is a republican and he takes an active and prominent part in the affairs of his community, being a most progressive and public-spirited citizen. In the fall of 1918 he was elected mayor of Brownsville and in 1919 he assumed the duties of his office, which he is now capably discharging. His administration is proving most beneficial, for he has been instrumental in securing many needed municipal improvements, including the grading, graveling and paving of streets, which work he finally succeeded in putting through after much opposition. He also served as a member of the city council for some time, in which connection he also rendered valuable and important service to the municipality. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order and in religious faith he is a Presbyterian, actively and helpfully interested in the work of the church, in which he is now serving as one of the elders. His genuine worth, his fidelity in office, his reliability in business and his progressiveness in citizenship have made him highly respected, and his worth is acknowledged by all who know him.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Prill, Albert

Dr. Albert G. Prill, who for almost a quarter of a century has engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery at Scio, has won an enviable position among the prominent representatives of the medical profession in Linn county. He was born in Springville, New York, May 5, 1869, a son of John and Mary (Tardell) Prill, natives of Germany, who emigrated to America in 1842. They settled in Erie county. New York, where the father purchased land thirty miles south of the city of Buffalo, and to its cultivation and improvement he devoted the remainder of his active life. At length, however, he retired and took up his residence in Springville, New York, where his death occurred in 1917, when he was more than ninety years of age. The mother survived him for but two years, passing away in 1919, at the venerable age of eighty-six years, and both were highly respected in the community where they made their home.

Their son, Albert G. Prill, attended the public and high schools of Springville, New York, later becoming a student at the Griffith Institute. Deciding upon the practice of medicine as a life work, in 1886 he entered the medical school of the University of Buffalo, from which he was graduated with the class of 1890. Soon thereafter he came west to Oregon and opened an office in Salem, but after six months removed to Lebanon, Oregon, where he continued in practice until 1896. That year witnessed his arrival in Scio, Linn county, and he has remained a resident of this city, his professional skill and ability winning for him a liberal patronage. In addition to his private practice he has conducted a hospital containing six beds for the past four years, two trained nurses being in attendance at the institution. He is a skilled physician and surgeon, whose professional experience has been broad and varied and whose ability has been constantly promoted, not only by experience but by wide reading and study, which have kept him abreast with the advancement that is being continually made in the methods of medical and surgical practice.

In June, 1889, Dr. Prill was united in marriage to Anna C. Satterly Bates and they became the parents of two children, both of whom died in infancy, Ariel V., passing away in August, 1891, when a year old.

In his political views the Doctor is a republican and an active worker in behalf of the party. For the past twelve years he has served as city health officer and he was also mayor of Scio for three terms of one year each and is now filling that office for the second two-year term. His administration has proved most beneficial to the interests of the city and when first elected to the office of mayor he was instrumental in securing the installation of municipal lighting and water systems and during his present tenure of office he is improving the power plant by putting in sixty thousand dollars' worth of new equipment. He also was a member of the town council for a number of years and his interest in the cause of public education is indicated in the fact that for eighteen years he served as a director of the local school board. In fact, he is interested in everything that tends to promote the welfare and advancement of his community and was one of the organizers of the Linn County Fair Association, of which he was president for eleven years. For the past twelve years the fair has been held at Scio, but in future the meetings of the association will take place at Albany. Dr. Prill is much interested in the study of ornithology and is a recognized authority in that science. He has made some very fine collections and has donated valuable specimens to the State University at Eugene, to the Smithsonian Institution at Washington, D. C, and to the museum at Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, constantly adding new specimens in the way of mounted birds, eggs and Indian relics to the museum of the State University. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian, and fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the chapter, commandery and shrine. He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, while his professional connections are with the American Medical Association and the Oregon State and Central Willamette Medical Societies, and of the latter organization he served for one year as president, thus indicating his high standing among his colleagues and contemporaries in the profession. The activity of Dr. Prill in relation to the public welfare has been of wide scope and no man has done more to further the interests and upbuilding of the town. His life has at all times measured up to the highest standards and he has ever stood as a man among men, honored and respected for his sterling worth as well as for his pronounced professional ability.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Lewelling, L. Guy

L. Guy Lewelling, attorney at law who is filling the office of city recorder of Albany, is a native of Nebraska, his birth having occurred at Kearney, September 8, 1882. He is a son of Asa and Amanda V. (Hord) Lewelling, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Virginia. For a considerable period the father was an instructor in the Illinois Reform School, but owing to ill health was obliged to resign that position and went to Nebraska, taking up a homestead near Kearney. This he improved and developed and while there residing was elected county clerk of Phelps county, in which office he served for one term. In 1892 he crossed the plains to Oregon, hoping that the milder climate of this state would prove beneficial to his wife's health. He settled in Linn county, where he rented land, but following his wife's death in 1895 he removed to Albany and while here residing was appointed deputy sheriff, serving in that capacity for four years or two terms. During his second term in the office he married Mary E. Blevins, a daughter of Andrew J. and Alvilda Blevins, who were pioneers of Oregon, coming to this state in the early '50s. Following the completion of his service as sheriff Asa Lewelling resumed his farming operations, in which he has continued, being now seventy-five years of age. He is an honored veteran of the Civil war, having served as a member of an Iowa regiment. While in Texas he was captured and in company with three others managed to escape from prison and make his way to safety. His uncle, Alfred Lewelling, established the first nurseries in this state at Milwaukie, and in the museum of the Oregon Historical Society is to be seen the first cherry tree planted in the state by Mr. Lewelling. These trees were hauled across the plains from Iowa with ox teams and were then transplanted in the soil of Oregon.

L. Guy Lewelling was but ten years of age when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Oregon and his early education was acquired in the schools of Nebraska and of Albany, Oregon. Subsequently he became a student in the Albany College and was graduated therefrom in 1899, when seventeen years of age. He then taught school in Benton and Linn counties for two years, after which he went to Salem and there attended night school for one year, pursuing the study of law, for it was his desire to become a member of the bar. That his education was obtained under difficulties is shown in the fact that in order to meet the expenses of his schooling he secured employment at the state prison, which was then under the supervision of Governor Chamberlain, who later became United States senator from Oregon. Entering Willamette University, he there pursued a law course, still continuing his work at the prison, and was graduated from Willamette University in June, 1911, at which time the LL. B. degree was conferred upon him. In the same month he was admitted to the bar and coming to Albany he opened an office and has continued in practice here. In 1915 he was elected city recorder and municipal judge and his efficient service in that connection won him reelection in 1917 and in 1920 he was elected district attorney taking office January 1, 1921, in which position he is discharging his duties most capably and efficiently. His knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and he is regarded as a most able jurist.

On the 13th of October, 1912, Mr. Lewelling was united in marriage to Miss Edna Blevins and they have become the parents of two sons: Asa Lorenzo, who was born April 4, 1915, and Alfred Blevins, born July 11, 1920. Mr. Lewelling gives his political allegiance to the republican party and in 1912 he was elected to represent his district in the state legislature, where he gave earnest and thoughtful consideration to all the vital questions which came up tor settlement and earnestly fought for the support of bills which he believed to be of great benefit to the public at large. His fraternal connections are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Masons and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and in the last named organization he has attained high rank, having passed through all the chairs in the lodge and also filled the office of exalted ruler. He is patriotic and public-spirited and during the World war rendered important and valuable service to the government as a member of the executive board during the Liberty Loan campaigns and also served on the Council of Defense and the Legal Advisory Board, laying aside all business interests and devoting his time and aid to the support of his country at this most critical period of its history. He is a splendid example of American manhood and chivalry and his standing as lawyer and citizen is of the highest.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Stanard, C. Edwin

C. Edwin Stanard, a lifelong resident of this state, who for over three decades has been continuously connected with mercantile interests of Brownsville, is a man of most enterprising and progressive spirit, constantly taking forward steps along business lines. His entire life has been passed in this vicinity, for he was born three and a half miles northwest of Brownsville, February 22, 1860, a son of A. W. and Elizabeth (Hill) Stanard, the former a native of New Hampshire and the latter of Missouri. In 1852 the father started across the plains from Missouri with ox teams, Oregon being his destination. Settling in Linn county, he took up land near Brownsville, which he cleared and developed, adding thereto many improvements which greatly enhanced its value. He also engaged in stock raising and was very successful in all of his business enterprises, being classed with the substantial men of his community. He continued to reside upon his ranch until two years before his demise, when he removed to Brownsville and there lived retired in the enjoyment of a well earned rest. His position was one of prominence in his section of the state and he filled many important public offices, serving as county clerk of Linn county for two terms and also as mayor of Albany. He likewise represented Linn county in the state legislature for two terms, giving careful and thoughtful consideration to all the vital questions which came up for settlement, his aid and influence being ever on the side of advancement and improvement. He passed away in 1917, while the mother's demise occurred in 1916. Coming to Oregon in pioneer times, they shared in the hardships and privations of frontier life and aided in laying broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the present progress and prosperity of the state. Their confidence in the future of Oregon was great and they lived to see it justified.

Their son, C. Edwin Stanard, was reared and educated in Linn county, attending the public schools of Albany, and for one year was a student in the State University at Eugene. He then entered business life as clerk in a store in Brownsville, where he remained from 1878 until 1880. Having carefully saved his earnings until he had accumulated the sum of four hundred dollars, he started a little notion store in Brownsville, which he successfully conducted for three years, when he was appointed postmaster of the town by President Harrison and served in that capacity for a period of five years, proving a courteous and capable official. In 1889 he engaged in general merchandising in partnership with a Mr. Cable and this association was maintained for twenty years, at the end of which time Mr. Stanard purchased the interest of his partner and admitted his son, H. Wayne Stanard, into the firm, which then became known as C. E. Stanard & Son, under which style it is now operating. They carry an extensive and carefully selected stock of general merchandise and their courteous treatment of patrons, reliable and progressive business methods and reasonable prices have secured for them a liberal patronage. Mr. Stanard is a man of keen business discernment and sound judgment and in the conduct of his business affairs has met with well deserved success. He has also become interested in farm lands in Linn county, from which he derives a good revenue, and whatever he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion.

In October, 1881, Mr. Stanard was united in marriage to Miss Olive Averill and they have become the parents of two children: H. Wayne, born in October, 1884, is now a member of the firm of C. E. Stanard & Son and is ably assisting his father in the conduct of their extensive mercantile business. He married Edna Hodson, by whom he has two children, Boyce and James; Lela F. married W. F. Whealdon and they reside at Portland, Oregon.

In his political views Mr. Stanard is a democrat and he has been called to positions of public trust, having for several terms served as mayor of Brownsville and has also filled the offices of councilman and school director, his services in these connections proving of great value to the city. His fraternal relations are with the Woodmen of the World and the Masons, his membership being in the Royal Arch Chapter, and in religious faith he is a Baptist. As a business man his course has been marked by steady advancement, for he has closely studied trade conditions and the wants of the public and in conducting his store has made it his purpose to be always ready to meet public needs and demands. He is everywhere spoken of as a citizen of worth, possessing many sterling traits of character which have been of value in the upbuilding and progress of the community and which have won for him the high regard of all who know him.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Guthrie, James

James Lawrence Guthrie, vice president of the firm of Hill & Company, Inc., and manager of its automobile and tractor department, is a prominent figure in business circles of Harrisburg, where he is known as a man of integrity and reliability. He was born in Jacksboro, Jack county, Texas, October 16, 1884, a son of James P. and Eva (Amos) Guthrie, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Indiana. In 1883 the father went to Texas, where for two years he engaged in farming, and then returned to the Blue Grass state, there following agricultural pursuits for several years. Subsequently he removed to Missouri and purchased land in Newton county which he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for several years. Eventually he went to Montana and there resided with his sons until his death, which occurred in October, 1913. The mother also passed away in that year, her demise having occurred in January.

James L. Guthrie was reared and educated in Missouri and on starting out in the business world secured employment as a street car conductor in Carthage, Missouri, being thus engaged for four years. Going to Salt Lake City, Utah, he was similarly employed in that locality for three years and then went to Montana, purchasing two sections of land in that state, which he operated tor a period of five years. He then traded that property for land in Lane county, Oregon, in 1917, but after cultivating the tract for six months he exchanged it for a stock of hardware in Harrisburg, Oregon. This establishment he conducted for a short time, when he consolidated his business with that of Hill & Company, of which he is now vice president, and he is also manager of the automobile department. They carry a seventy thousand dollar stock of hardware, harness, implements, furniture, carpets, rugs and general house furnishings. They also have the agency for the Ford cars and Fordson tractors and have recently erected a fine garage at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars. Mr. Guthrie is a man of keen business acumen, thoroughly reliable and enterprising, and as vice president of Hill & Company he has contributed in substantial measure to the growth and expansion of the business, which is now one of large volume and importance, its annual sales exceeding the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars

On the 10th of February, 1906, Mr. Guthrie was united in marriage to Miss Alma Safer and they have become the parents of two children: Pauline, who was born November 25, 1908; and Marion James, born March 15, 1917. In his political views Mr. Guthrie is a democrat and in religious faith he is a Presbyterian, while his fraternal connections are with the Masons, the Eastern Star, the Rebekahs and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Throughout his career he has closely applied himself to the work in hand and has steadily advanced, each forward step bringing him a broader outlook and wider opportunities until he is now numbered with the substantial business men of his part of the state. His sterling traits of character are manifest in every relation of life and his record is a most creditable one.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Davis, Jacob

The entire business career of Jacob Randal Davis, who for many years was prominently identified with mercantile and financial interests of Shedd, was marked by steady progression, resulting from close application and indefatigable energy, prompted by laudable ambition. He was born in Knox county, Illinois, February 20, 1849, a son of Peter and Harriet (Cannon) Davis, natives of Kentucky. In early life the father removed to Indiana and there followed farming. Subsequently he went to Illinois, settling in Knox county, where for many years he devoted his attention to the cultivation of his land, but at length he removed to Wataga, Illinois, and there lived retired throughout his remaining years, his death occurring on the 15th of March, 1871. The mother survived him for two decades, and passed away in November, 1891.

Jacob R. Davis was reared and educated at Wataga, Illinois, and also attended the district schools of Knox county. When but fifteen years of age he responded to President Lincoln's last call for troops in the Civil war and served for three months, or until the close of the conflict. After receiving his discharge from the service he engaged in railroad work as a brakeman and thus continued until his foot was accidentally crushed, when he was obliged to abandon that line of activity. For several years thereafter he was employed in drug stores and in dry goods establishments and in 1878 he came to the west, settling in Linn county, Oregon, where he operated rented land until 1889. In that year he removed to Shedd, where for about two years he was employed in a store, at the end of which period he purchased a half interest in the establishment and engaged in general merchandising under the firm style of Crume & Davis. Subsequently Mr. Crume sold his interest to C. J. Shedd and the firm then became known as Davis & Shedd. From 1908 until 1912 Mr. Davis' daughter Zella was a partner in the business, which was then operated under the firm style of Davis, Shedd & Davis. In 1912 the firm was incorporated as the Davis-Shedd Company, and Mr. Davis continued active in the management of the enterprise throughout his remaining years. He was an energetic, farsighted and resourceful business man whose life was marked by constant progress, resulting from the attainment of his objective in the business world, and through his efforts the business of the company increased from year to year until it assumed extensive proportions. They carry a large and carefully assorted stock of general merchandise and their enterprising methods, reasonable prices and courteous treatment of patrons have secured for them a liberal patronage. Being a man of resourceful business ability, Mr. Davis extended his efforts into other lines and was one of the stockholders of the Bank of Shedd from its inception.

On the 318t of August, 1876, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Miss Dora Botsford, a daughter of Josiah C. and Azubah (McCloud) Botsford, the former a native of Canada, while the latter was born in Ohio. The father was a prominent and successful merchant of Wataga, Illinois, and was also active in public affairs of that locality, serving for many years as postmaster. In 1869 he removed to Missouri, purchasing land in Carroll county which he developed and improved, continuing its operation until his demise on the 22d of April. 1903, while the mother passed away August 18, 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Davis became the parents of a daughter, Zella May, who was born August 5, 1883, and is now a stockholder in the Davis-Shedd Company. She married Charles W. Kennedy and they make their home in Shedd.

Mr. Davis was a republican in his political views, and his religious faith was indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. Fraternally he was identified with the Masonic order and the Eastern Star, with which Mrs. Davis is also connected, and through his membership in the Grand Army post at Albany, Oregon, he maintained pleasant associations with his old army comrades who bravely followed the stars and stripes on the battle fields of the south. Mr. Davis passed away on the 27th of April, 1913, at the age of sixty-four years, and in his passing the community lost one of its valued citizens, his associates a faithful friend and his family a devoted husband and father. He was a successful business man, diligent and determined in all that he undertook, and his record proves that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. Mrs. Davis is a stockholder in the Davis-Shedd Company and also in the Bank of Shedd and is an excellent business woman, capably managing her interests. She has long been a resident of Linn county, where her fine womanly qualities have endeared her to a large circle of friends.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Church, Stephen

In a history of Oregon, its settlement, its business development and its progress along various lines, the name of Stephen T. Church figures prominently, for at various periods he was closely associated with mercantile interests and with the development of navigation. He was born at Lackawanna, Pennsylvania, in 1831, a son of Stephen and Harriet Church. He spent his early life in the Keystone state and acquired his education in the schools there. He was ambitious, however, to try his fortune elsewhere and when twenty-one years of age, in company with other young men. He outfitted with ox teams and wagons and started tor the west. They traveled across the entire breadth of the continent to Oregon, arriving in the fall of 1852 after many weary months of travel across the hot stretches of sand and over the high mountains until at length their vision was gladdened by a sight of the green valleys of Oregon.

From that time until his death Mr. Church remained a resident of this state and lived to witness its development from a wild and unsettled region, largely inhabited by Indians, into a populous and prosperous commonwealth having all of the advantages known to the older east. With his partner Mr. Church engaged in mining on Althouse creek in southern Oregon and there they operated very successfully and are still operating. Mr. Church also established a store and purchased mules and conducted a pack train between Oregon City and the mines, having twenty-eight pack mules. At the time of the Indian war. however, the government took over his mules and the mines. As it was no longer possible for him to continue in the business he became associated with Joseph Teal in a mercantile enterprise at Eugene. Later he removed to Harrisburg, where he again engaged in merchandising in association with Asa and David McCully. While thus connected with the McCully brothers he likewise engaged in the transportation business, which they conducted under the name of the Peoples Transportation Company and Mr. Church was thus identified with navigation interests to the time of his death, their boats plying between Harrisburg and Oregon City. In all that he undertook Mr. Church was actuated by a most progressive spirit He was constantly seeking to improve conditions and the company built a breakwater at the falls at Oregon City, a part of which is still standing. He readily recognized the opportunities that lay before the new commonwealth and ever sought to contribute to public advancement and improvement as well as to promote his individual interests.

In 1857 Mr. Church was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth C. Lister, a daughter of William and Catherine Lister who were natives of England and came to the United States in early life, afterward removing to Oregon where they settled in pioneer times. The father of Mr. Lister had previously come to the United States and purchased a ticket for Kentucky but was never heard from again. It is supposed that he died of cholera. William Lister afterward crossed the Atlantic and took up his abode in Kentucky where he resided until March, 1853, and then started by ox team for Oregon, arriving there in the fall. He then secured a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres in the Mohawk valley.

Two daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Church: Harriet I., now the wife of Dr. A. J. Giesy of Portland; and Elizabeth Luella, the wife of Lewis G. Clark of the firm of Woodruff & Clark of Portland. They also had one son, Samuel W., who died in early life. The death of Mr. Church occurred in 1872 and thus passed away one who had been a valuable contributor to the pioneer development of the state. The navigation company with which he was connected did what no other company ever accomplished, raising and lowering the tariff according to its value at that time. Fraternally Mr. Church was both a Mason and an Odd Fellow and was most loyal to the teachings and high purposes of these organizations, exemplifying in his life the beneficent principles upon which they are founded.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Wadsworth, Walter

Walter E. Wadsworth, secretary-treasurer and general manager of Hill & Company, Inc., conducting one of the leading mercantile establishments of Harrisburg, was born in Marion, Indiana, December 21, 1865, a son of Ariel S. and Sarah Wadsworth. the former a native of Massachusetts and the latter of Kentucky. The father, who was a contractor and builder, removed from Massachusetts to Indiana at an early period in the development of that state, Indianapolis at that time being but a village. In the vicinity of that town the father purchased a tract of land which he operated in addition to his work as a contractor and builder, and he continued to reside in that locality the remainder of his life, passing away in 1878. The mother survived him for several years, her death occurring in 1892.

Their son, Walter E. Wadsworth, was reared and educated in Indianapolis, attending the public schools and a business college of that city. On starting out in the business world he engaged in work as a bridge carpenter and later became a contractor and builder. Going to Missouri, he constructed practically all of the buildings in Thayer, Oregon county, and continued in that line of work for a period of twelve years. He then went to Arkansas and engaged in the conduct of Hotel Wadsworth at Eureka Springs, of which he was proprietor for three years. On the expiration of that period he traded his hotel property for twenty-one hundred acres of timber land in the southeastern part of Arkansas, which he still owns. He next became traveling representative for the Racine Sattler Company of St. Louis, which he represented on the road for six years, his territory comprising southeastern Missouri and Arkansas. In 1908 he came to Portland, Oregon, as salesman for the Moline Plow Company, with whom he continued for about nine years, or until 1917, when he removed to Harrisburg, Oregon, and purchased an interest in the firm of Hill & Company. Inc., which he has since served as secretary-treasurer and general manager. The company deals in house furnishings of all kinds, implements, etc., and conducts one of the largest mercantile establishments in this section of the state, their annual business transactions now exceeding the sum of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. They have just completed a fine modern garage one hundred by one hundred feet in dimensions, at a cost of fifteen thousand dollars, tor which Mr. Wadsworth drew the plans and also supervised the work of erection. The company also has the agency for the Ford and Fordson products and the business is very extensive and profitable, conducted along the most modern and progressive lines. Being a man of resourceful business ability, Mr. Wadsworth has extended his efforts into various lines and has become the owner of valuable oil holdings in Kansas. He also has twenty-one hundred acres of timber land in Arkansas, of which one thousand acres is virgin oak, and he is likewise a stockholder in the Harrisburg Lumber Company. He is a farsighted and sagacious business man, whose interests have been most wisely and carefully conducted, bringing to him a gratifying measure of success.

On the 10th of November, 1885, Mr. Wadsworth was united in marriage to Miss Clara P. Yates and they have become the parents of five children: Elmer L., Aileen, Fern, Dwight and Jennie L. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and his religious faith is indicated by his attendance upon the services of the Methodist Episcopal church. He is prominent in fraternal circles, belonging to the Masons, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in the last named organization he has filled all the chairs and is one of the grand officers of the Grand Encampment of Oregon. Mr. Wadsworth has led a busy, active and useful life, employing every opportunity to advance, and his success is the direct result of his close application and laudable ambition, while at all time his career has been such as would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. He is everywhere spoken of as a citizen of worth, possessing many sterling traits of character which have won for him the high regard of all who know him.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Blevins, Alfred

Hon. Alfred Blevins, a pioneer of Oregon and a veteran of the Indian wars, for two terms represented his district in the state legislature and is now one of the leading agriculturists and influential citizens of Linn county, operating a valuable ranch of one hundred and sixty acres located one and a half miles west of Tangent. He was born in Kentucky, October 24, 1837, of the marriage of Isaac and Eliza (Maupin) Blevins, the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Kentucky. In early manhood the father followed blacksmithing and in 1840 he removed to Missouri, purchasing land in Henry county, which he continued to operate until the 12th of May, 1850, when with ox teams he started across the plains for Oregon, arriving in the Willamette valley in the following October. While crossing the Cascade mountains he was caught in a snowstorm and was obliged to abandon five wagons there. He proceeded with the two remaining wagons and it was not until the following summer that he was able to recover those which he had left in the mountains. On arriving in Oregon he took up land in Linn county and this he cleared and developed, continuing its cultivation throughout the remainder of his life. He died in 1885 at the age of eighty-four years and the mother passed away in 1889, when she had reached the venerable age of ninety years.

Their son, Alfred Blevins, was educated in the schools of Missouri and Linn county, Oregon, being thirteen years of age when he accompanied his parents to this state. When eighteen years of age he volunteered for service in the Indian war and after three months' service he was discharged in 1856. Later he re-entered the service, going with a wagon train engaged in hauling supplies to the soldiers who were fighting the red men, and was thus connected with Indian warfare tor about a year. After receiving his discharge he returned home and for a time followed farming but subsequently went to California and for seven years was engaged in mining in that state and in southern Oregon, Idaho and British Columbia. On the expiration of that period he returned to Linn county and purchased his present ranch of one hundred and sixty acres, situated one and one-half miles west of Tangent. Of this he cleared about twenty acres, which in its present highly developed state gives little indication of its raw and unimproved condition when he became its owner. He has made a close study of the needs of the soil and climate in relation to the production of crops here and everything about his place indicates that he follows practical and progressive methods. He has since operated his ranch with the exception of seven years spent in the warehouse business in Tangent and two years at Corvallis, where the family resided during the time the son was pursuing his studies. All of the features of the model farm of the twentieth century are found upon his place and it is one of the attractive farms of Linn county.

On the 18th of September, 1870, Mr. Blevins was united in marriage to Miss Louisiana Maxey, who was born in Monroe county, Missouri, June 8, 1852, and is a daughter of John J. and Laura (Morris) Maxey, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Ohio. When but three years of age the father was taken by his parents to Missouri and in 1860 he started for the west with the intention of settling in Oregon, but went instead to California. However, after residing in the Golden state for four years he made his way to Oregon and in Linn county he operated rented land for some time, later purchasing a tract which he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation for several years, when he went to Idaho and there made his home with his children, passing away in that state in March, 1899. He had survived the mother for a decade, her demise having occurred in 1889. To Mr. and Mrs. Blevins were born nine children, of whom seven survive, namely: Wade H., Clara, Alfred, Georgiana, Edna L.. Hattie and Glenn. Those deceased are: Alice, who died in October, 1871, when but an infant; and Laura, who was born in March, 1874, and died in 1891, at the age of seventeen years.

In his political views Mr. Blevins is a democrat and in public affairs he has taken an active and prominent part. In 1883 he was chosen to represent his district in the state legislature and his creditable record in office won for him reelection in 1892. In his public service he ever looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the opportunities and possibilities of the future. He closely studied all the vital questions which came up for settlement and was a stalwart champion of many measures which found their way to the statute books of the state and are proving of great value to the commonwealth. He has likewise served as road supervisor and in public office he always stood for development and for constructive measures. He holds membership in the local Grange, and fraternally he is identified with the Masons. Coming to this state in 1850, when a boy of thirteen, the various experiences of pioneer life are familiar to Mr. Blevins, and through his industry and enterprise he has contributed to the substantial development and progress of the section in which he lives. He can remember when many of the well cultivated farms were covered with a dense growth of forest trees and when great stretches of land that are now thickly populated presented no indication of civilization. He has made good use of his time and in the evening of life can look back over the past without regret and forward to the future without fear.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Johnston, Dan

Dan Johnston, a prominent attorney practicing at Albany, was born near Virden, Macoupin county, Illinois, September 23, 1882, a son of Isaac N. and Emily F. (Chapman) Johnston, natives of Macoupin county, Illinois. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Johnston of this review was one of the earliest settlers in Macoupin county, going to that section of Illinois from Tennessee in 1830. He was a farmer by occupation and followed that pursuit in Macoupin county during the remainder of his life. He was familiar with Indian warfare, having served as a soldier in the Black Hawk war. And he was one of the worthy pioneers of his section of the state. Isaac N. Johnston, the father of Mr. Johnston, also followed farming in Macoupin county, Illinois, and remained a resident of that section of the state until death called him on the 14th of January, 1896, when he was fifty-two years of age. He was an honored veteran of the Civil war, in which he served for three years as a member of Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The mother has also passed away, her demise occurring in June, 1912, when she had reached the age of sixty-two.

Dan Johnston was reared and educated in the district schools of Macoupin county, Illinois, and then entered Valparaiso University of Valparaiso, Indiana, as a law student, receiving his LL. B. degree from that institution upon his graduation with the class of 1910. In June of that year he was admitted to the bar of Indiana and in the following month came to Oregon, where he was admitted to the bar. Opening an office in Albany, he has here continued in practice and in the interval that has elapsed has built up a good clientele. In 1915 he was called to the office of city attorney of Albany and so acceptable were his services in that connection that in January, 1919, he was honored with reelection and also acted as city attorney of Harrisburg, Oregon, for several years. His knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and he prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care, readily recognizing the value of any point as applicable to his cause. Mr. Johnston has not confined his attention to his professional interests but has also been active in commercial lines, being secretary of the D. E. Nebergall Meat Company, which operates a packing plant and retail market. He is also secretary of the Far West Manufacturing Company, engaged in the manufacture of ladders, cedar chests, wheelbarrows and wood specialties.

On the 27th of May, 1910, Mr. Johnston was united in marriage to Miss Ada D. Douglas, a daughter of E. D. and Rose (Haymon) Douglas, natives of West Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston are the parents of two children: Prances Rose, who was born in December, 1914; and Robert D., born in January, 1916.

Mr. Johnston gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church. He is a Knights Templar Mason and also belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge and the B. P. 0. E., while along the line of his profession his identification is with the Linn County Bar Association. Mr. Johnston is patriotic, loyal and public-spirited and on March 5, 1904, enlisted in the United States navy, from which he was discharged March 4, 1908, as chief yeoman. During the war with Germany he rendered important and valuable service to the government in promoting the Liberty Loan campaigns and other war measures, devoting a large part of his time to that work, all personal interests and considerations being laid aside. He is a representative of America's best type of manhood and his colleagues and contemporaries speak of him as an able lawyer and one whose ability has brought him prominently to the front.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Swafford, Harold

Harold A. Swafford is well known in mercantile circles of Linn county as mill manager of the Crown Willamette Paper Company at Lebanon. Mr. Swafford is one of the sons of the  state, his birth having occurred in Oregon City, February 10, 1890. His parents were James L. and Temperance (Rands) Swafford, the former born in Oregon and the latter in Stacyville, Iowa. For many years the father engaged in the real estate business in Oregon City, in which he won a substantial measure of success. He was a man of prominence in his section of the state and for several terms served as county treasurer of Clackamas county, ably discharging the duties of that office. He remained a resident of Oregon City until his death in August, 1914, when he was sixty years of age. The mother survives and still makes her home in Oregon City. The paternal grandfather of Harold A. Swafford was one of the early pioneers of this state. He crossed the plains with ox teams to Oregon In 1852 and took up land in Clackamas county which he improved and developed, continuing Its cultivation until his demise In 1908.

Harold A. Swafford was reared and educated in his native city and on starting out in the business world became connected with the Crown Willamette Paper Company, which was at that time known as the Willamette Pulp & Paper Company. His energy, ability and faithful and conscientious service won him promotion from time to time and in June, 1919, he was made manager of their Lebanon plant, in which capacity he is now most ably serving. The company also operates plants at Camas, Washington, at Oregon City and Lebanon, Oregon, and at Floristan, California, its headquarters being maintained at San Francisco, while a printing plant is operated at Los Angeles. They are engaged in the manufacture of paper from timber and their business is a very extensive one. As manager of the Lebanon plant Mr. Swafford's position is one of large importance and responsibility, for which he is well qualified. During the fourteen years of his connection with the company he has become thoroughly familiar with every branch of the business and is thus able to direct wisely the labors of those under him. He Is a man of sound judgment, keen discrimination and energy and is most capably directing the interests intrusted to his care, his labors being entirely satisfactory to the company.

On the 20th of July, 1917, Mr. Swafford was united in marriage to Miss Ivy Ford, a daughter of Rev. T. B. and Mary Ivy Ford, natives of Arkansas. Her father entered the ministry of the Methodist church at the age of nineteen. He became very prominent in church circles of Oregon, continuing as a preacher of the gospel in this state for about twenty years, his labors proving a potent force for good in the localities which he served. He passed away on the 14th of December, 1919, while the mother's death occurred in August, 1915. Mr. and Mrs. Swafford have become the parents of a son, Thomas James, who was born March 10, 1920.

Mr. Swafford gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen of the World and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He also belongs to the Order of the Eastern Star and is a prominent Mason, being a past master of Multnomah Lodge, No. 1, at Oregon City. Mr. Swafford is a veteran of the World war, having enlisted on the 23d of May, 1917, with the Eighteenth Oregon Engineers, a specially recruited outfit, and was among the first twenty thousand to reach the other side. He was stationed in England and France and was discharged at Camp Dix, New Jersey, March 20, 1919, with the rank of second lieutenant, having rendered most valuable service to the country in its hour of need. Mr. Swafford has ever been actuated by high and honorable purposes in all relations of life and his is a most creditable record, characterized by devotion to duty, by integrity and enterprise in business, and by loyalty in citizenship.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Randall, Albert

Albert E. Randall, a retired farmer residing at Scio, where he is filling the position of assistant postmaster, has spent his entire life in the section where he now resides, for he was born three-quarters of a mile south of Scio, in December, 1859, his parents being Elisha H. and Susanna (Earl) Randall, natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a cabinet-maker by trade and in his later years followed the occupation of farming. In 1847 he started across the plains with ox teams, Oregon being his destination, and four years later purchased a claim near Scio, and it was upon this property that the birth of his son, Albert E., occurred. To the development and improvement of his ranch the father devoted his energies for many years, his death there occurring in January, 1883, when he was seventy-two years of age. The mother long survived him, passing away March 8, 1899, at the advanced age of eighty-four years.

Albert E. Randall was reared in Scio and there attended the public schools, residing with his parents until they passed away. He assisted his father in the cultivation of the home farm and when the latter retired he successfully continued its operation until 1900, when he rented the property and took up his abode in Scio, where he has since resided. In 1916 he was made assistant postmaster and is now serving in that capacity, being most conscientious and efficient in the discharge of his duties. He has also become interested in financial affairs as vice president of the Scio State Bank and in this connection has been largely instrumental in promoting the growth and success of the institution. He is a man of keen business discernment and sound Judgment, who in the attainment of success has always followed the most honorable methods, and he has therefore gained the confidence of all who have had business dealings with him.

In January, 1908, Mr. Randall was united in marriage to Miss Melvina Miller and they have a large circle of friends in the community where they reside. Mr. Randall gives his political allegiance to the republican party and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, while his fraternal connections are with the Masons and the Knights of Pythias. His entire life, covering sixty-one years, has been passed in this county, and in the locality where he makes his home he is widely and favorably known, being recognized as a man of sterling worth who in every relation of life exemplifies the highest standards of manhood and citizenship.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Boetticher, Charles

Prof. Charles W. Boetticher, superintendent of the city schools at Albany, was born at Powhatan, Ohio, July 20, 1866, a son of George Frederick and Louise (Hoeltzla) Boetticher, the former born near Powhatan and the latter a native of Wheeling, West Virginia. During his earlier years the father engaged in engineering work but the latter part of his life was devoted to farming. He was an honored veteran of the Civil war, enlisting at Powhatan, and serving for three months toward the close of hostilities as a member of a regiment of Ohio infantry. He passed away May 30, 1903, at the age of sixty-eight years, while the mother's death occurred in April, 1900, when she was fifty-eight years of age.

Charles W. Boetticher attended the public and high schools of Powhatan and later was a student in a normal school, after which he engaged in teaching school in Ohio for a period of five years. In 1889 he came west to Washington and for one year followed the profession of teaching in the vicinity of Spokane, after which he came to Oregon, becoming identified with the school at Silverton, which he was largely instrumental in organizing. At the end of a year, however, he returned to the east and enrolled as a student in Marietta College at Marietta, Ohio, from which he was graduated with the class of 1895. He then resumed the work of teaching and became principal of the high school at Gallipolis, Ohio, filling that position for eight years. At the end of that period he went to Parkersburg, West Virginia, as principal of the high school of that city, and in 1909 returned to Silverton. Oregon, where he remained for two years. He then came to Albany and accepted the position of superintendent of the city schools, in which capacity he has since served, covering a period of ten years. His thorough education and long experience as a teacher well fit him for his duties in this connection and he is proving a most capable educator, ever holding to the highest professional standards. He has made a splendid record in office and has done much to improve the curriculum of the schools and the methods of instruction followed. In addition to his professional duties Mr. Boetticher also has banking interests at Clarington, Ohio, which are proving a profitable investment.

On the 18t of January, 1889, Mr. Boetticher was married to Miss Mary C. Dotta and they have become the parents of two children: Robert F., aged twenty-two years, who is a student in the State University of Oregon; and Marion L., who is twenty years of age and is now attending the Oregon Agricultural College.

Mr. Boetticher is a republican in his political views and his religious faith is indicated by his attendance upon the services of the Methodist Episcopal church. Upon all vital questions he is well informed and he keeps abreast with the best thinking men of the age concerning the political, sociological and economic questions of the day. He has ever been actuated by a spirit of progress and enterprise and in his position as superintendent of schools has contributed in marked measure to the educational advancement of the city.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Olliver, Victor

Victor Olliver, a prominent attorney of Albany, now serving as justice of the peace, in addition to his practice, was born in Boonville, Indiana, October 18, 1886, of the marriage of John and Elizabeth (Lockyear) Olliver, the former a native of England and the latter of Indiana. When about twenty-one years of age the father emigrated to America, and going to southern Indiana, he purchased land in the vicinity of Boonville, which he improved and developed, continuing its cultivation throughout the remainder of his life. He passed away in October, 1894, while the mother's death occurred in February, 1901.

In the public schools of Warrick county, Indiana, Victor Olliver acquired his education. After his graduation from the high school he engaged in teaching school in different parts of the state for a period of five years and then pursued a course in the Oakland City College of Indiana, while later he became a student at the University of Indiana, from which he was graduated with the LL. B. degree in 1912. He then practiced law at Marion, Indiana, for one year and in 1913 came to Oregon, opening an office in Albany in November of that year, and here he has continued in practice, with offices in the First National Bank building. His fellow citizens, recognizing his worth and ability, called him to public office and in 1916 he was appointed city attorney of Albany, so serving until 1919. He was elected justice of the peace in November, 1918, and since the 18t of January, 1919, has ably filled that office. His standing in the community is indicated in the fact that he was nominated by both parties, although not a candidate for office. He is an able attorney, well informed in all branches of the law and his ability is manifest in the logic of his deductions and the clearness of his reasoning.

On the 25th of October, 1915, Mr. Olliver was united in marriage to Miss Mildred Slomaker, a daughter of A. S. and Nettie (Gray) Slomaker, natives of Indiana. The father is engaged in farming in Randolph county, Indiana, and the mother also survives. Mr. and Mrs. Olliver have become the parents of a daughter, Mary Louise, whose birth occurred on the 2d of September, 1916.

In his political views Mr. Olliver is a republican and his fraternal connections are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Masons. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is actively interested in its work, being secretary of the official board. Along the line of his profession he is identified with the Linn County Bar Association. He stands high as a man and citizen and he enjoys the respect, goodwill and confidence of his associates at the bar.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Wight, Harvey

Harvey A. Wight, member of the Oregon bar, practicing at Lebanon, was born at East Wrightstown, Wisconsin, August 15, 1892, a son of Howard and Lillian (Jenkins) Wight, the former a native of Minnesota and the latter of Wisconsin. In an early day the father went to Wisconsin, where he worked at the carpenter's trade, remaining a resident of that state until 1905, when he came to Oregon, locating in the foothills of Linn county. There he engaged in the stock business until 1910, when he moved to the vicinity of Lebanon and is now a resident of that locality, living practically retired, although he supervises the operation of a small prune orchard. The mother also survives.

Harvey A. Wight attended the country schools of Wisconsin to the age of thirteen years, when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Oregon, completing the work of the eighth grade and also pursuing a high school course at Lebanon. He then entered the Willamette University, where he pursued a two years' course in the liberal arts department. In 1917 he was graduated from the law department of that university and on the 18th of July of that year was admitted to the bar. He then opened an office in Lebanon and continued in practice here until September, 1918, when he enlisted for service in the World war, being sent to Vancouver Barracks, Washington. He was later assigned to the Local Board No. 4, at Portland, Oregon, where he assisted in the legal work and was then transferred to Camp Lewis. Washington, where he was mustered out in January, 1919. He then returned to Lebanon, where he has remained, and is building up a good clientage, which his diligence and solid attainments well merit. He is thorough and painstaking in the preparation of his cases, is clear and cogent in his reasoning and logical in his deductions. He is an earnest and discriminating student, thoroughly familiar with the principles of jurisprudence, and is careful to conform his practice to the highest ethics of the profession.

Mr. Wight gives his political allegiance to the republican party and while attending the university served as chief deputy circuit court clerk of Marion county in 1917. His fraternal connections are with the Masonic order, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, of which he is now serving as foreman. He likewise belongs to the American Legion, his membership being in Leo Sturdevant Post No. 51, of which he is commander. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian. Mr. Wight is always loyal to any cause which he espouses and faithful to every duty and he is a public-spirited and loyal citizen and a rising young attorney of the community, where he is justly held in high regard by all who know him.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Brasfield, Thomas

Thomas H. C. Brasfield was born in Clay county, Missouri, February 11, 1856, a son of Thomas W. R. and Elizabeth (Breckenridge) Brasfield, who were natives of Kentucky. The father engaged in merchandising during the greater part of his life and in an early day he removed to the west, taking up his residence at Smithville, Clay county, Missouri, where he opened a mercantile establishment, which he continued to conduct throughout the remainder of his life, becoming one of the successful business men of his community. He was born September 16, 1817, and died November 8, 1873, at the age of fifty-six years. The mother's birth occurred on the 15th of April, 1819, and she passed away May 15, 1883, when sixty-four years of age.

Their son, Thomas H. C. Brasfield, was reared and educated at Smithville, Missouri, and after his father's death he assisted his brother in the store, remaining at home until 1881, when he went to Denver, Colorado, and later to Idaho and Washington. In 1883 he came to Oregon, first locating in Linn county, where he remained for two years, or until 1885, when he removed to Grant county and took up land, which he cleared and developed. He also devoted considerable attention to the raising of stock and met with good success in that line of activity. He continued to operate his ranch for a period of seventeen years, or until 1902, when he returned to Linn county and purchased a portion of the old Porter homestead adjoining the town of Shedd, which he has since owned and conducted, his enterprising methods and well directed efforts resulting in the attainment of a substantial measure of prosperity. His farm comprises three hundred and eighty-nine acres and he leases all of the plowed land, deriving a good income from its rental.

On the 27th of September, 1898, Mr. Brasfield was united in marriage to Miss Ida M. Porter, a daughter of David P. and Parthena (Haley) Porter, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Missouri. In 1851 her father removed to Iowa, where he resided for a year and then started across the plains to Oregon as one of a large party traveling by means of ox teams, being six months en route. Locating in Marion county, Mr. Porter there taught school for the first winter in one of the pioneer log schoolhouses. Subsequently he removed to Linn county, where he took up a donation claim of one hundred and forty-four acres located near the present site of Shedd, which property is now owned by his son-in-law, Mr. Brasfield. He brought his land to a high state of development and continued its cultivation throughout the remainder of his life, becoming known as one of the substantial agriculturists of his community. He was a public-spirited and progressive citizen and became the first county assessor of Linn county, serving for two terms in that office. He was born June 22, 1827, and his death occurred April 23, 1889, when he was sixty-two years of age. His wife's birth occurred on the 9th of May, 1837, and she passed away September 7, 1917, at the advanced age of eighty years. They became the parents of nine children, three of whom are deceased. Their daughter, Mrs. Brasfield, was born on the old homestead in Linn county, November 12, 1865, and by her marriage she became the mother of two children: Thomas W. R., who was born July 25, 1901, and died five days later; and Eleanor K., who was born November 11, 1902, and died September 17, 1908. Mrs. Brasfield is a stockholder in the Davis-Shedd Mercantile Company of Shedd, and she holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church.

In his political views Mr. Brasfield is a democrat, and his fraternal connections are with the Masons and the Eastern Star, of which organization his wife is also a member, and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church. He has worked diligently and persistently as the years have passed, and his has been an active life, filled with honorable purpose and accomplishment. Since 1883 he has resided within the borders of this state.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922

Russell, Rufus

Rufus M. Russell, county clerk of Linn county, was born at Sutter, California, January 14, 1884, a son of August P. and Harriet E. (Rarrick) Russell, the former a native of Maine and the latter of California. When eighteen years of age the father went to California during the gold rush of 1849, making the journey in a sailing vessel by way of Cape Horn. He engaged in placer mining in that state and later took up the work of draying and teaming. Subsequently he followed farming in the Sacramento valley until 1889, when owing to ill health he sought a change of climate and came to Oregon, settling in Douglas county. He resided in that locality for ten years and then removed to Linn county, purchasing a farm at Shelburn, where he lived until the fall of 1909, when he purchased a farm at Macleay, Marion county, where he resided until he took up his residence in the city of Salem, Oregon, a few months prior to his death, which occurred in March, 1919, when he was eighty-five years old. He first married Sarah Rarrick and they became the parents of three children: Ella, who is now Mrs. Oscar Lybecker; Amelia, who married Jay Harris; and Edward. Mrs. Russell passed away when her oldest child was but ten years of age and Mr. Russell later wedded her sister, Harriet E. Rarrick, by whom he had fourteen children, three of whom are deceased. Frankie, the first born, died at the age of seven years and Jess and Avery met accidental deaths while in the employ of the Spaulding Logging Company, the former dying in June, 1915, and the latter in 1901. Those who survive are: Rainous O., Robert W., Rufus M., Arch L., Earl, Theron, Homer, Mrs. Etta Todd, Mrs. Verda Lentz, Mrs. Alma Lentz, and Mrs. Inis Lathrop. In addition to rearing her own large family Mrs. Russell also tenderly cared for the three children of her sister, upon whom she bestowed the affection of a mother. She passed away in November, 1918, when sixty-five years of age.

Rufus M. Russell has spent practically his entire life in Oregon, for he was but five years of age when he was brought by his parents to this state. He attended the district schools of Linn county and subsequently completed a commercial course in Albany College, from which he was graduated in 1907. He then assisted his father in farming until 1909, when he secured a position as stenographer in the office of the county clerk, later becoming chief deputy. In 1914 he was elected to the office of county clerk, in which office he is serving his fourth consecutive term.

It was on the 14th of April, 1915, that Mr. Russell was united in marriage to Miss Goldia Jones, only child of Edward and Minnie (McDonald) Jones, both natives of Oregon, and both born in Linn county. The father is engaged in farming and stock raising at Shelburn, Linn county, and has won a substantial measure of success in the conduct of his business affairs. The mother also survives and both are highly respected citizens and honored pioneers of the state.

Mr. Russell is a republican in political belief and on that ticket was elected to his present position as county clerk of Linn county, which is sixty-five per cent republican. His fraternal connections are with the Masons and the Knights of Pythias, and his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church. He is likewise a member of the Albany Chamber of Commerce, in which connection he is aiding materially in promoting the upbuilding and advancement of the community in which he makes his home. For thirty-one years Mr. Russell has been a resident of Oregon and has therefore been an interested witness of much of the growth and development of the state, and he is numbered in Albany as one of its progressive and reliable citizens, enjoying the friendship, confidence and regard of all with whom he has been associated.

History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922






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