Obituaries & Death Notices

A

B

Baird, Sarepta
Barnum, Eli
Bird, James
C

D

Davis, John
Douglas, Unknown
E

F

G

Gale, Joseph
H

Haven, Gil
Hecker, Charles
Hilman, C. A.
I - J

Judson, Lewis
K

Kelso, John
L

M

Mayre, Sarah
N - O

Newton, Charles
P - Q

Pratt, Ira
R

Rogers, Stephen
S

Simmons, Unknown
T

Thurston, Samuel
U

Upham, A. D.
V

W

Wang-te-luin
Westfall, Martha
X - Y- Z

Kelso, John

Mr. John Kelso, of Oregon, was killed on Starve-out Creek, near the Canyon, on the 23d by the falling in of a mining drift.

Source: The State Republican (Eugene City, OR) - Saturday, February 8, 1862
Wang-te-luin

Oregon

Last Monday Wang-te-luin, one of the Columbias, who was known to the Cayuse and Umatilla Indians as having been engaged in the last Indian war, when told that he must deliver himself up to the whites, cooly drew a pistol and blew the top of his head off and took a trip to the happy hunting grounds.

Source: The Morning Oregonian (Portland, OR) – Thursday, September 19, 1878

Rogers, Stephen

MYSTERIOUS MURDER – The *Herald* has information of a murder that was committed near the Columbia river about thirty miles from Portland.  The dead body of a man named Stephen Rogers was found in the woods; his clothing was torn in several places, and saturated with blood, and numerous welts and bruises were found to have been inflicted upon the back part of the head with some blunt instrument, the brain was oozing out of the back part of the skull.  An old musket loaded with small shot, was found lying near, the property of the deceased.  It is supposed that he deceased was murdered while out on a hunting expedition.  There were no appearances of a struggle anywhere near by.

Source: Willamette Farmer (Salem, OR) – Saturday, March 23, 1872

Douglas, Unknown

John Douglas of Ogden [Oregon], who shot and instantly killed his wife at Huntsville barely escaped a lynching.

Source: Mountain Democrat (Placerville, CA) - February 26, 1898
Contributed by Robyn Greenlund

Judson, Lewis

Rev. Lewis H. Judson, who landed in Vancouver, on the first day of June 1840, died on the fourth of March, aged seventy-two years.  He was one of Rev. Jason Lee’s party of missionaries who sailed from New York in October 1839, on the ship Lausanne.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, April 16, 1881

Barnum, Eli

Gen. Eli M. Barnum, a resident of Oregon between 1851-61, died at Salt Lake City on 23d of September.  During his life in this State he resided in Salem and was at the time Democratic candidate for Governor of the State.   He organized the Odd Fellows as an order in this State, being a charter member of Chemeketa Lodge, No. 1.  He was a law partner of the late Hon. Jos. G. Wilson.  Surviving politicians of the decade between the dates above named, will remember Gen. Barnum as a man of ability and prominence, and Salem ladies will remember Mrs. Barnum as a woman of fine social attainments.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, October 15, 1881
Westfall, Martha

Martha J., widow of Nathan Westfall, died suddenly of dropsy of the heart on the 5th inst.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, October 1, 1881
Gale, Joseph

An Old Pioneer Gone

Ex-Gov. Joseph Gale, who dates his residence in Oregon from 1834, died at his home in Eagle valley, Union county, on the 13th December.  He was one of the three commissioners who constituted the only government of what is now Oregon and Washington territory, prior to the organization of Oregon Territory.  He passed his entire life on the frontier, and had been many years past a resident of Eagle valley.  He was one of the first settlers of Washington county, and built the first saw mill in the county early in the forties on what is known as Gale creek, a small tributary of the Tualatin.  Gale’s peak, an abrupt and sightly  point of the coast range foothills, near the old mill site is well known to nimrods of the present day.  Mr. Gale was a worthy citizen, and a frontiersman of a type rapidly vanishing from earth.  The record is silent as to his exact age, but it must have bordered closely upon four score and ten years.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, December 31, 1881
Upham, A. D.

Fatal Accident

The Telegram of the 18th inst., says: Yesterday morning a fatal accident occurred on the O. R. & N. Co.’s railroad at tunnel No. 2.  The construction train ran into a hand car in that tunnel.  There were five men on the hand car at the time of the collision.  Four of the men saw the danger in time and jumped aside and saved their lives; but one man named D. A. Upham, a laborer, was struck and instantly killed.  The unfortunate man was a Nova Scotian, and leaves a family at Truro, Nova Scotia.  His wife’s name is Emily Upham.  The body of the deceased was taken care of and a coroner’s inquest held yesterday.  The verdict was that the railroad company was in no way to blame for the accident, as it was entirely due to the carelessness of the men on the hand car, who had no business running there at that time.  Mr. H. B. Thielsen telegraphed up orders to have the unfortunate man buried decently at the expense of  the company.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, April 29, 1882
Hecker, Charles

Fatal Accident – Charles Hecker, an employe of the O. R. & N. Co., was instantly killed on Monday evening at the Upper Cascades.  It appears that he was riding on a sort of railroad velocipede, and while running down an incline it left the track, throwing Hecker down an embankment, killing him instantly.  Deceased was a German, about 35 years of age, and, it is believed, unmarried.  His remains were brought to this city on the steamer Traveler.  They were taken charge of by Coroner Garnold.  It is not supposed that an inquest will be necessary.  The body will be buried by the O. R. & N. Co.   – Standard

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, April 29, 1882
Simmons, Unknown

Mr. Simmons who was recently killed in one of the tunnels on the O. & C. R. R., was formerly a resident of this county.

Source: The Eugene City Guard (Eugene, OR) – Saturday, September 9, 1882
Haven, Gil

Bishop Gil Haven died in Massachusetts on the 4th inst.  Many of the readers of the NEWS will remember him as the presiding elder of the last Methodist Conference in this State.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Saturday, January 17, 1880
Newton, Charles

Charles J. Newton, a trapper well known throughout the West, was drowned in Green river, Utah, in September last.  He was a native of Oregon, and is supposed to have relatives living some where in this state.  If there are any such they will communicate with J. E. Wing, Woodside, Utah.

Source: Grant County News (Canyon City, OR) – Thursday, April 5, 1888
Thurston, Samuel

Death of Hon. S. R. Thurston

It becomes our melancholy duty to announce the death of Hon. Samuel R. Thurston, late Delegate to Congress from Oregon.  He died on the 9th ult. On board the Steamship California, eight days from Panama, and his remains were interred at Acupulco, Mexico, a romantic seaport town situated about half way between Panama and San Francisco.  His arduous labors at Washington had prepared his system for an attack of the malignant fever incident to the Isthmus, from the effects of which he had not recovered before experiencing a severe attack of diarrhea, which, together with an affection of the liver, under which he had sometime labored, terminated his earthly existence.

This painful even has spread a pall of gloom over the Territory, and clothed its citizens in sorrow.  By it has been sundered the many tender chords which bound the deceased to earth as a father, husband and friend.  He carries with him to the grave the deep regret of a large circle of devoted friends and admirers, whose sympathies mingle with the tears of an afflicted family.  With them his memory and his virtues will be ever green.

We copy from the San Francisco Alta California the following tribute of friendship.  It is from the pen of B. M. Blake, Esq., one of Mr. Thurston’s early acquaintances and college associates:

Died, on board the steam ship California, at sea, near Acupulco, on 9th of April, aged 35, Hon. Samuel R. Thurston, recently Delegate to Congress from Oregon Territory, to which he was returning, and where his family still reside.

Mr. Thurston was a native of Peru, Maine, and pursued his studies at Bowdoin College, in that State, where he was known to the writer of this notice during the years of 1839, ’42.  He graduated at Bowdoin College, and after the study requisite, was admitted to the practice of law in 1845.  He early manifested a keen ambition for political life, and often asserted to his friends that he aimed for a seat in Congress within five years of the period at which he entered upon professional life.

This ambition was gratified.  After marriage, the West appeared to him the proper field to which he should direct attention, and in 1846, with other immigrants, he entered Oregon, after making the journey thither by land.  At the first election, by the voters in that Territory, Mr. Thurston was chosen by a large majority as delegate to represent them in the councils of the nation, which duty, notwithstanding the misrepresentations and exparte statements which those hostile to the interests of the whole people have industriously circulated, he performed with remarkable energy and fidelity.

Mr. T. was a man whose character contained strong points, and in consequence of this he did not escape the censure of foes.  He was indefatigable in perseverance.  As a student, in his profession as a lawyer, and as a Delegate in Congress, he left nothing to be performed which energy and industry could accomplish, and no delegate from a territory probably ever accomplished so much in one session in Congress.

The health of Mr. Thurston was delicate for some time past, and his disease – liver complaint – was aggravated by the confinement incident to his duties while at Washington.  On board the steamers Empire city and the California, we are happy to learn Mr. T. received the kindest attentions from the surgeon of the ship and other officers, as well as from numbers of friends.  He often spoke of his wife and children, and of domestic life, as far dearer to him than all else; and it will be no little gratification to her whom he hoped soon to greet after so long an absence, to know that his last anxieties were concerning her, and that his fair country women, of whom he had several in his charge, will bear to her his dying requests.  His remains were interred at Acapulco.   C. M. B.

Source: The Oregon Statesman (Oregon City, OR) - Friday, May 2, 1851



Funeral Sermon

Rev. Mr. Hoyt, of Salem, will preach the funeral sermon of the late Hon. Samuel R. Thurston, at the M. E. Church, in Oregon City, on Sunday, the 20th inst.

Source: The Oregon Statesman (Oregon city, OR) - Tuesday, July 8, 1851
Pratt, Ira

Died

At Janesville, Wis., Nov. 30th, Ira Pratt, aged 73 years, father of Judge Pratt, late of Oregon, now of San Francisco.  At the Tremount House, San Francisco, recently, Mr. Wm. Elliott of Jacksonville, aged 29 years, formerly from Shoneyville, Johnson co., Iowa.

Source: The Oregon Argus (Oregon City, OT) – Saturday, January 29, 1859
Hilman, C. A.

Died

In San Francisco, Dec. 27, C. A. Hilman, aged 31 years, formerly of Southern Oregon.

Source: The Oregon Argus (Oregon City, OT) – Saturday, January 29, 1859
Mayre, Sarah

Died

In St. Louis, Mo., on the 18th of December, 1858, after a brief illness, Mrs. Sarah Evaline, wife of Simon B. Mayre, Esq., and daughter of W. W. Chapman, of Oregon.

Source: The Oregon Argus (Oregon City, OR) – Saturday, March 5, 1859
Davis, John

Death of Gov. Davis

Hon. John W. Davis, at one time Governor of Oregon Territory, died at his residence in Carlisle, Sullivan county, Indiana, on the 22d of August last.  Gov. Davis occupied a prominent space in the public history of the nation.  He served several terms in Congress, and in 1845 was chosen Speaker of the House of Representatives.  He was subsequently appointed Commissioner to China, where he remained about a year.  He was elected President of the Baltimore National Convention, in 1852, which nominated Gen. Pierce for the Presidency, and in the exciting struggle attending that nomination, came within one vote in the caucus of the Virginia delegation of being their choice for President, a vote which decided the nominee for the Convention.  President Pierce appointed him Governor of Oregon Territory, which he retained but a short time, becoming disgusted with the low arts and petty trickery of Oregon Democratic politicians.  His honest soul revolted a the contemptible meanness exhibited by men whom he was obliged to associate with in this country, and throwing up a commission in disgust which he accepted to favor President Pierce, he sought a clime where he could enjoy the society of men of honor, instead of being condemned to associate with blackguards and ruffians.

Gov. Davis had been in precarious and failing health for a long time, and his decease was not therefore unanticipated by his immediate friends.  He was a man of strict personal and political integrity, and during a long career retained in an eminent degree the confidence and respect of his personal and political friends.

The Indiana State Sentinel, after recounting the prominent events of his life, says: “John W. Davis was a good citizen.  He was sincere in his political conviction, and faithfully maintained them.  His long and varied public career, commencing early in life, and continuing until failing health and declining years prevented his participation in public affairs, is the best evidence which can be presented of his worth as a citizen, and the value of his public services.”

Source: The Oregon Argus (Oregon City, OR) – Saturday, October 15, 1859
Bird, James

Died

In Yreka, Cal., May 1st, James Bird, late of Oregon, aged 32 years.

Source: The Oregon Argus (Oregon City, OR) – Saturday, May 21, 1859
Baird, Sarepta

Born in Iowa in 1842. Was an Oregon pioneer of the early fifties, where she married Carrol Baird in 1859. They came to Idaho in '64, the first settlers on Squaw Creek, later moved to Boise, finally to California. She died on October 6, 1929, survived by two daughters, Mrs. Sam Davis of Boise, Mrs. W. H. Robertson of Oregon, and two sons, Ben and John Baird.

Source: Biennial report of the Board of Trustees of the State Volumes 8-15; Publ. 1921-1936; By Idaho State Historical Society, Board of Trustees
Transcribed and submitted by Andrea Stawski Pack



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