Tillamook County
Genealogy & History






Biographies


Index

A

Alderman, Henry
B

Boals, Robert
Bodyfelt, George
Botts, Hosea
Brant, Peter
Brooks, Frank
Butts, Elam
C

Chance, William
Cone, Winfield
D

Donaldson, Joseph
Drew, Calif
E

Eddy, Benjamin
Elliott, Charles
F

Farmer, Axom
G

Goodspeed, Eli
Goyne, Thomas
H - I

Harrison, Marcus
Hathaway, Benjamin (1)
Hathaway, Benjamin (2)
Hays, William
Henderson, John
Holden, Horace
Hunt, George
J

Jensen, Lars
Johnson, John
Johnson, William
Jones, John
K
L

Lamb, George
Lowry, Henry
M

Marlof, John
McDermott, Henry
McIntosh, Peter
Morgan, John
N - O

Nolan, Oak
Owens, William
P - Q

Patterson, Woodson
Powell, Willis
Quick, Isaac
R

Reynolds, Charles
Rogers, Henry
S

Shearer, Francis
Smith, Jasper
Stillwell, William
T

Thayer, Claude
U

V

Vaughn, Amos
W

Wiley, David
Williams, James
X - Y- Z




Henderson, John

JOHN LELAND HENDERSON

John Leland Henderson, attorney at law at Tillamook city, is descended from distinguished American ancestry in both paternal and maternal lines, the names of his ancestors appearing in the history of this country from the earliest colonial days. His birth occurred in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1851, and he is a son of John and Catherine (Leland) Henderson, the former a native of Indiana. The grandfather, also named John, was one of the most distinguished lawyers of the south and was a contemporary of Clay, Calhoun and Webster. For many years he served his state in the United States senate and Daniel Webster is said to have remarked of him that Senator Henderson was without doubt the best land lawyer in America. His son John, the father of John Leland Henderson, was associated with him in connection with the legal profession.  Like his father he was a man of strong convictions and had numerous friends and enemies. During one of the political riots at the time of reconstruction in the south, he was shot while in the streets of New Orleans in February, 1866, and passed away soon afterward. The American founder of the Leland family was Henry Leland, an English gentleman, who came to this country in 1652, and our subject is a direct descendant through his son Ebenezer of Sherburne and his son Phineas Eleazer of Grafton. A grand aunt of Mr. Henderson's was Abigail Leland, who married Millard Fillmore, later president of the United States. A great aunt, Elvira Leland, married Charles Coolidge and became the great-grandmother of Calvin Coolidge, now serving as vice president of the United States. The mother of Mr. Henderson was a daughter of Judge Sherman Leland, who was for many years probate judge of Norfolk county, Massachusetts, and a member of both house and senate of the state. He was widely recognized as a representative member of the legal profession and as a citizen was always interested in any movement for the development and improvement of the general welfare. Mrs. Henderson was a woman of superior education and for many years, both before and after her marriage, was a teacher of several languages, being able to speak and write them fluently.

Until 1865 John Leland Henderson received his education by use of a fine library, together with instruction from his mother, who was his sole tutor till he entered the Jesuit College of New Orleans, Louisiana. Later he was a student in a military school at Brattleboro, Vermont, and was also for some time enrolled in Cornell University, but upon the completion of his freshman year there took up the profession of teaching on the Pacific coast. In 1870 he came to Oregon, locating in Portland, where he engaged in surveying. In 1871 he taught his first school in Eugene and afterward taught in other places in the Willamette valley. In 1879 he moved to Olympia, Washington, teaching in the Collegiate Institution. In 1891 he went to Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, where his ancestors had lived and there he studied law, being admitted to the bar in 1893. He engaged in the practice of his profession there and also conducted an abstract business until 1898, when he returned to Oregon and was admitted to practice before the bar of this state. He located in Hood River, where he resumed his practice, remaining there for eleven years, when he returned to Portland. In 1911 he located in Tillamook, where he has since resided and has gained recognition as a representative member of the legal profession throughout the state. The zeal with which he has devoted his energies to his profession, the careful regard evinced for the interests of his clients and an assiduous and unrelaxing attention to all the details of his cases have brought him a large business and made him very successful in its conduct. In addition to his professional interests he is secretary and treasurer of the Tillamook Title & Abstract Company, one of the most complete plants of its kind in the state.

In 1873 occurred the marriage of Mr. Henderson and Miss Harriet E. Humphrey, a member of one of Oregon's representative pioneer families, and they became the parents of the following living children: Leland J., a successful engineer of Columbus, Georgia, and the father of the famous Dixie Highway, of which he is president; Louis A., who is a graduate of the University of Oregon and served for fourteen months as captain of engineers in France during the World war; Edwin A., a journalist of Seattle, Washington; Sidney E., a mining engineer, whose home is in Oklahoma and who married Lucia, the only daughter of President P. L. Campbell of the University of Oregon; and Faith, the wife of E. H. Rueppell of Portland. In 1897 Mr. Henderson married Marian I. Grimes of Rapids Parish, Louisiana, and two children have been born to this union: Robert Lynn and William E. The elder son served with the marines during the World war and William joined the navy, making a fine record in the naval school. He is now associated with his father in the operation of a one hundred and sixty acre ranch, located at Sugar Loaf Peak in Tillamook county. Mr. Henderson takes particular pride in his six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren and expects to live to see his great-great-grandchildren.

Fraternally Mr. Henderson is an Odd Fellow and Knight of Pythias, and he has filled all the chairs in both organizations. He is likewise a Mason, having attained the degrees in the chapter and council, and he is an exemplary member of that order. He has always been a great athlete and although he is now nearing the seventy mark, every Sunday he walks to his ranch, a distance of seven miles, where he works all day returning home on foot in the evening. He holds many records as a swimmer and while living in Hood River in 1908 swam the Columbia river from Hood River to Cascade locks, a distance of twenty-two miles. Mr. Henderson's life has been one of continuous activity and he has attained success in every undertaking whether along the line of his profession or in business circles. During the ten years of his residence in Tillamook he has made many friends who appreciate his sterling characteristics and genuine personal worth, and he is readily conceded to be a representative citizen of Oregon.

Source: History of Oregon: Volume II
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922
Submitted by Jim Dezotell

Boals, Robert

ROBERT TILDEN BOALS, M. D. It is the industry and enterprise of the citizen that enrich and ennoble the commonwealth and from individual enterprise has sprung all the splendor and importance of this great west. Among those who have achieved prominence as men of marked ability and substantial worth is Dr. Robert Tilden Boals, a resident of Tillamook City. Like many other representative citizens of Oregon, Dr. Boals is a son by adoption, for his birth occurred in Kansas in 1877. His parents were John W. and Mary (Kane) Boals, the former a native of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Boals removed from Pennsylvania to Kansas at an early day and when their son, Robert T., was a small boy came to Oregon, locating in Columbia county a few miles from the town of Rainier. There the father engaged in farming and won prominence as one of the representative agriculturists of the vicinity. Robert Tilden Boals received his education in the schools of Columbia county and later entered the State Normal School at Monmouth. For some time he attended the University of California but upon deciding to devote his life to the medical profession, he enrolled as student in the medical department of the University of Oregon and received his M. D. degree in 1905. The following year he served as house physician at St. Vincent's Hospital and at the termination of that period removed to San Francisco just prior to the earthquake of 1906. He lost all of his possessions in that great disaster and soon afterward returned to Oregon, taking up residence in Tillamook City. Upon his arrival there he opened offices for the practice of his profession and during the fifteen years of his residence there he has built up a practice of importance and magnitude. The professional ability of Dr. Boals is widely known and recognized and in addition to his private practice he is surgeon of the Southern Pacific Railway and for such large corporations as the Coats Lumber Company, Tillamook Lumber Company, Yellow Fir Lumber Company, and Whitney Lumber Company. He remains a deep student of his profession and has taken postgraduate courses at the Post Graduate Medical School of New York in 1912, and the Northwestern University at Chicago in 1919. While for the most part Dr. Boals follows general practice he makes a specialty of surgery and has attained high rank in that line. He has not only won prominence as a professional man but as a citizen he was so actively identified with every movement for the development of the general welfare that in 1916 he was called upon to fill the office of mayor, giving to the city a businesslike and progressive administration. It was during his incumbency in that office that the present city hall was erected and the steel bridge across the river was also built. He undertook the concrete paving of the city streets and from every point of view his administration stood for improvement and advancement. He is readily acknowledged by all as the best chief executive the city has ever had. Tillamook City boasts of a one hundred per cent fire department and gives to Dr. Boals entire credit for its organization. The department, containing all of the latest fire fighting equipment, is one of the best in the state outside of Portland and a few of the larger cities. In 1907 Dr. Boals was united in marriage to Miss Clara Tohl, of Nehalem. and to them two sons have been born: Robert E., Jr., and Harlen C, both attending the Tillamook public schools. Mrs. Boals is prominent in the social and club circles of the city and is a woman of magnetic personality. Fraternally Dr. Boals is identified with the Masons, being past master of his lodge, and he is also a Knight of Pythias. He has furthered the interests of the profession in the county by erecting the first general hospital, which he still owns and which is known as the Boals Hospital. The prominence he has gained in the medical profession is indicated by his membership in the Tillamook County Medical Society, of which he is president, the Oregon State Medical Society, and the American X-Ray Society, and he is a fellow of the American Medical Association. For ten years he served the community as county health officer. During the World war and while he was serving as mayor he was a member of the draft board as well as examining physician. Throughout the community Dr. Boals is spoken of in terms of admiration and respect, and a portion of his success may be attributed to his untiring energy and pleasing personality. He has exerted an immeasurable influence on the city of his residence as well as on his profession, and Tillamook City is indeed fortunate in having him for a citizen.

Source: History of Oregon: Volume III
The Pioneer Historical Publishing Company
Chicago - Portland; 1922
Submitted by Jim Dezotell
Smith, Jasper

HON. JASPER SMITH

Is one of the Representatives from Tillamook County, and a pioneer of Oregon. He is a plain, sensible man, with sound ideas on all matters of general interest, and with a particular desire to serve and advance the interests of the farming element. He was born in Laporte County, Indiana, in the year 1842, where his parents resided until he was five years of age. In the year 1847 the family came across the plains to Oregon and remained in the city of Portland about one month. While living there the father of the family, after having encountered all the hardships and privations of the trip was taken sick and died in the land where he had expected to make a new home for his family. Mrs. Smith then removed with her family of young children to Yamhill County and took up a piece of unsurveyed land, and for three or four months lived upon boiled wheat. Although the widow felt the loss of her husband deeply, she was enabled to live and get along well with the assistance of young Jasper and his industrious brothers, and after the lapse of a few years she was again married to Mr. J. C. Geer, a gentleman well known to old Oregonians, and died in 1854. About three years ago Mr. Smith went to Tillamook County, where he has since remained on his farm. He was married in 1866 to Miss Sarah Abigail Harper, and now is the happy father of eight children, seven of whom are boys. In politics Mr. Smith is a Republican.

Source: Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon
Frank E. Hodgkin & J. J. Galvin
Farmer and Dairyman Publishing House
1882
Transcribed by Ann Planca

Brooks, Frank

FRANK BROOKS, who is a partner of Adelbert Brooks in the nursery business, was born August 28, 1871, and the experiences of his early life were largely like those of his brother.  In 1891 they embarked in the nursery business with their father and brothers the enterprise being thus continued under the partnership relations for thirteen years, but the business is now owned by Adelbert and Frank Brooks and is conducted under the style of the Carlton Nursery.  It comprises one hundred acres and is considered one of the finest nurseries of its size in western Oregon.  It is pleasantly located near the city limits of Carlton and their shipments include a very large amount of nursery stock each year.  They also own one hundred and twenty-seven acres of fine land near Carlton and each has a fine residence in the town in addition to a large packing house for their nursery stock.

    On the 31st of May, 1907, Frank Brooks was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hutchings, who was born in Oregon, March 4, 1876, a daughter of Dovis and Amanda Hutchings the former of California and the latter of Oregon although since their marriage they have practically spent their time in the latter state where the father has followed farming.  He still lives at Tillamook but his wife died in 1909.  In their family were six children of whom Mrs. Brooks is the eldest, the others being Cash, Bern, James, Roy and one who died in infancy.  Mr. Brooks belongs to the Masonic lodge and to the Artisans and in politics is independent voting as his judgment dictates without regard to party ties.  Both he and his brother are recognized as men of excellent business ability and of marked enterprise, and the years are bringing to them substantial success in the management of their affairs.

The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated
Volume IV (1912) S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Transcribed by Mary Saggio
Botts, Hosea

HOSEA THOMPSON BOTTS
Residence Tillamook, Ore.; office, same. Born June 8, 1873, at Novelty, Knox County, Missouri. Son of Benjamin and Mary Casey (Mitchell) Botts. Married December 17, 1896, to Maud Bryant. Attended the country schools in Missouri until 1886. Attended Oaklawn College, Novelty, Mo., from 1887 until 1890. Took law course at Missouri State University, graduating in 1893 with the degree LL. B. Admitted to the bar of Missouri, June 8, 1894. Opened office Edina, Mo., in the fall of 1895, and practiced there until his removal to Tillamook in 1901, where he practiced alone until 1904, when he formed a partnership with B. L. Eddy. This partnership lasted one year, when Mr. Eddy moved from Tillamook, and since that time he has practiced alone. Vice-president Tillamook County Bank and treasurer of Tillamook Lumber Manufacturing Company; Mayor of Tillamook City in 1906 and 1907; member School Board since 1905; Chairman Republican County Committee since 1906; Deputy District Attorney 1903-4, and 1910; president Port of Tillamook Commission; Worthy Grand Patron O.E.S. of Oregon, 1909-1910. Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Vicki Bryan

Nolan, Oak

Oak Nolan:
Residence and office, Tillamook, Oregon.  Born in Tillamook, Oregon, September 25, 1870.  Son of John H. and Margaret E. (Jenkins) Nolan.  Attended public schools in Tillamook County, Oregon, 1874 to 1890.  Admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, June 13, 1907.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1911)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

Patterson, Woodson

Woodson L. Patterson:
Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon. Born in Tillamook County, Oregon, June 2, 1877.  Son of Joel and Cordelia A. (Porter) Patterson.  Married to Mildred Linville, June 18, 1903.  Attended public schools of Douglas County, and at Empire City, Oregon; graduated from Oregon Agricultural College at Corvallis, June, 1899, with degree of B. S.  Admitted to the bar at Pendleton, Oregon, May, 1902, and since practiced law in Baker City, Oregon.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1911)
Transcribed by Richard Ramos

Hathaway, Benjamin

B. H. HATHAWAY is the owner of three hundred acres of highly improved land in Tillamook county in the cultivation of which he met with such gratifying returns that he is now able to live retired.  He is a native of the state of New York, his birth having occurred in Lewis county, on May 5, 1831, and is supposed to be the only living member of a family of eight born to I. and Rebecca (Higby) Hathaway.  His parents were also natives of the Empire state, where they spent their entire lives.

Mr. Hathaway was reared at home, receiving his education in the common schools.  When he was nineteen years of age he left the paternal roof, to seek, as did many others at that period the greater possibilities the west offered, and went to Wisconsin.  After remaining there for three years he removed to Minnesota, where for twelve years he engaged in farming, with the exception of a period of service during the Civil war.  When the call came for troops during the time of the nation's need in the '60s he responded, enlisting and going to the front with Company F, Fourth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry.  He enlisted in 1861 and among the battles that his regiment was engaged in were Vicksburg, Jackson, Mississippi, Champion's Hill, Black River, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Altoona Pass, and many others.  He served with General Grant until the latter was made commander of the Army of the Potomac, when he came under the command of General Sherman and took part in his march to the sea.  He spent three years and three months in the service, participating in thirty-two engagements but was never wounded.  Receiving his discharge at Savannah, Georgia, on December 22, 1864, he returned home, resuming life as a farmer.  He continued to reside in Minnesota for some years thereafter and then again started westward, with Oregon as his destination.  Upon his arrival here he filed on a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres of land to the cultivation and improvement of which he immediately turned his energies.  He met with such success in his agricultural pursuits that he was later able to increase his possessions until he ultimately acquired three hundred acres, all of which is well improved and in a high state of productivity.  Mr. Hathaway always used intelligence in the direction of his undertakings and, a man of progressive ideas, was practical in his methods of application.  Such success as came to him in the course of his active career was the direct result of capably and definitely directed effort.  His plans were always carefully made and executed for the accomplishment of one purpose and his progress always permanent and orderly.

Mr. Hathaway has been married twice.  His first union took place in New York state to Miss Nancy Smith and to them were born two children:  Catherine, who is deceased; and J. H., who is a resident of Tillamook county.  Mrs. Hathaway passed away in 1878 and in 1880 Mr. Hathaway married Mrs. E. R. Wilson, the widow of J. C. Wilson, who lost his life in the Civil war.

His political support Mr. Hathaway gives to the republican party, but he has never been an aspirant to office.  Both he and Mrs. Hathaway hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, while fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order, belonging to the lodge at Tillamook.  He is now enjoying the ease and comfort assured by his comfortable competence and the income from his large ranch, both acquired by means of many years of hard work.

The Centennial History of Oregon 1811-1912 Illustrated
Volume IV (1912) S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Transcribed by Mary Saggio

Goyne, Thomas

Thomas Henry Goyne
    Residence, Tillamook, Ore.; office, same.  Born in Roaring Creek, Pennsylvania, October 13, 1964.  Son of William Henry and Nancy (Stephens) Goyne.  Came to Oregon August 15, 1886.  Married to Daisy Eveline Latimer, December 25, 1888.  Attended common and private schools, and one year at Academy in Columbia County, Pennsylvania.  Admitted to bar of State of Oregon, June 7, 1897, practicing law in Tillamook City, Oregon, alone to date.  School Clerk of Tillamook City, Deputy County Clerk, April, 1891, to July, 1894, County Clerk, 1894 – 1896, Justice of the Peace, 1898 – 1900.  Republican.

History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon
Historical Publishing Company, Portland, Oregon (1910)
Transcribed by Nancy Overlander
Jensen, Lars

LARS JENSEN. In common with the sons of Switzerland, the children of Denmark seem to possess particular ability for successful dairying. This statement finds confirmation in every state and territory in the west and for years has been demonstrated in the eastern and Middle Western parts of the country. An encouraging example is found in Lars Jensen, who is spending the best years of his life a long way from his native land and in Tillamook County has built up a dairying enterprise which fields him an income far in excess of similar undertakings in his sea swept fatherland.

    Mr. Jensen was born in Denmark, March 26, 1843, and, according to the custom prevailing in the land, took his father's first name, the original name being Jens Rasmusen. The father was a farmer and dairyman during his entire life, and died in Denmark in 1868, at the age of fifty five years. He was survived by his wife, formerly Boar Hansen, who also was born in Denmark, and died there in 1871, at the age of fifty five years. Lars is the youngest of the five sons and two daughters born to his parents, and owing to financial stringency in the family his early education was extremely limited. The greater part of his knowledge has been gained since coming to America in 1872, for under the new conditions he had more leisure to devote to the improvement of his mind, and more incentive to make the most possible of his opportunities. After a voyage in a sailing vessel, he landed in New York City, and located in Middlesex County, N. J., where he found employment at digging fireclay. Four years of this sort of work sufficed to inspire greater ambitions, and Mr. Jensen decided to avail himself of an opportunity to come to the west, which he reached by way of Panama, and located in Bakersfield, Cal. A year later he came to Oregon over the Grande Ronde trail, with a pack horse which enabled him to travel over the mountains at the rate of twenty-six miles a day. After looking around for a favorable location, he settled on his present farm of one hundred and thirty-six acres, near Hebo, where he has lived ever since, and engaged in dairying, stock raising and general farming. Eighty acres of his property have been cleared and fine improvements made, including a comfortable house, and convenient barns and outhouses. Mr. Jensen milks eighteen cows, and is meeting with encouraging patronage from a large trade. He has a thorough understanding of dairying, enforces the first principles of neatness and dispatch, and presents in his home and enterprise a typical example of the successful and thrifty farmer and dairyman. Mr. Jensen belongs to the Lutheran church, towards the support of which he contributes generously, and for the best interests of which he and his family actively work. He is a Democrat in politics, but has never taken any particular part in local or state affairs, contenting himself with meritorious service on the school board for many years. He married Sophia Hansen in Denmark in 1867, and of this union there have been born six children, four of whom are living: H. L, engaged in farming near Blaine. Ore.; C. C., living on a farm adjoining that of his father; Millie, wife of W. Sappington of Tillamook, Ore.; and Mary, living at home. Mr. Jensen is energetic and capable, and in his adopted county and state has established a reputation for progressiveness and integrity, as well as for adaptiveness to the conditions which are so materially different from those among which he was reared and educated.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Eddy, Benjamin

BENJAMIN LEE EDDY. The splendid spirit of western progress finds daily expression in the life of Benjamin Lee Eddy, lawyer, Republican politician, legislator, promoter of financial stability, and developer of coast resources. Mr. Eddy, who is one of the most prominent men in Tillamook County, is a native son of Oregon, and was born in Washington County, October 30, 1865. His family was established in the west by his father, Seth W. Eddy, who was born in Sacket Harbor, N. Y., in 1824, and came to California in 1852. Not being very successful as a miner he later turned his attention to farming in Washington, Multnomah and Clackamas counties. Ore. His death occurred soon after his removal to California in 1890. He came west as a young and ambitious man of eight and twenty and sometime after his arrival met and married a widow, whose maiden name was Mary Miller. She was a native daughter of Pennsylvania, whose father, Jacob P. Miller, also a native of Pennsylvania, came to Oregon with his family in the early days of the state.

    The oldest son and second oldest child in a family of three sons and as many daughters, Benjamin L. Eddy began a self supporting career as a telegraph operator, and from the age of fifteen to twenty-one was employed by the Western Union Telegraph Company in Portland, Seattle, and Tacoma. In 1886 his faithfulness to trusts imposed won him recognition from important railroad officials, and he became secretary to F. P. Weymouth, of the Northern Pacific Company. In 1887 he became identified with the Oregon Pacific Railroad at Corvallis, and from the position of stenographer worked his way up to that of chief traffic clerk. In 1888 he became secretary to S. G. Reed, at that time a promoter and capitalist of Portland, and in the fall of 1891 engaged as secretary to John Hays Hammond, of South African fame, locating in San Francisco, where he remained about a year. In the meantime he had begun the study of law, and after about eighteen months with Mr. Hammond he entered the office of Milton W. Smith, of Portland, with whom he remained for two or three years. He also attended the law department of the University of Oregon, and was admitted to the bar in June, 1894. Until 1896 he engaged in a general law practice in Portland, but has since been identified with Tillamook, where he enjoys a large and lucrative practice.

    A stanch supporter of Republicanism, Mr. Eddy served as mayor of Tillamook from 1898 to 1900, and has held the office of school director for six years. For two years he has been deputy district attorney for Tillamook County, and in 1900 he was elected to the state legislature as joint representative of Yamhill and Tillamook counties. During the session he was chairman of the committee on food and dairy products, and also a member of the judiciary committee, and so well did he represent the needs and aspirations of the people that he was reelected in 1902, serving in the session of 1903. During this session he was chairman of the house judiciary committee, and a member of the dairy products committee, and during the absence of the house speaker he was elected temporary speaker of the house. He was appointed a member of the legislative committee to greet President Roosevelt on his visit to Salem. Mr. Eddy is the author of the bill enacted into law in the session of 1903 known as the Eddy Corporation Tax law, which provides for raising revenue for state purposes lay the taxation of both domestic and foreign corporations in the state. It has met with almost general approval, and is yielding revenue of about $100,000 per year to the state treasury. This law marks a distinct advance in the legislative history of the state. He was also the author of other important measures which were enacted into law.

    Mr. Eddy is one of the original promoters and organizers of the Tillamook County Bank, incorporated in 1902, in which he is still a stockholder and director. Few enterprises in the town and county but have either directly or indirectly profited by his influence or substantial help. He is a member of the foremost clubs and societies of the county, and is fraternally associated with the Ancient Order of United Workmen; Willamette Lodge No. 2, A. F. & A. M., of Portland; Woodmen of the World, and the United Artisans. Mr. Eddy is a member and an active worker in the Presbyterian Church. His marriage with Laura A. Applewhite occurred in Corvallis. November 7, 1888. Mrs. Eddy is a native of Staunton, Va., and daughter of Dr. James M. Applewhite, who was born in Natchez, Miss. Dr. Applewhite came to Oregon about 1882, and from then until his death, in 1894, practiced medicine in Corvallis. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Eddy, Lulu, Benjamin A. and Ruth. As a lawyer Mr. Eddy enjoys the distinct advantage of practical experience in nearly all departments in his profession, and his gratifying outlook is fully warranted by recognized capability, deserved popularity and thorough adaptation to the requirements and amenities of his calling.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca
Johnson, John

JOHN JOHNSON. One of the best known of the mariners plying an ocean craft between New York and Liverpool during the fore part of the last century was Capt. Romulus Johnson, a sturdy son of England, and a natural follower of the sea. Nevertheless, in his younger days the captain was equally at home in shouldering arms, and in this capacity served in the war of 1812 under the American flag. He married Anna Johnson, a native daughter of Denmark, who accompanied her husband on many of his ocean voyages. March 27, 1831, while his ship was in New York harbor, his oldest child, John, was born. Besides him there were three daughters. It happened that Captain Johnson changed his course in 1845 and made a trip to Hamburg, Germany, and while there he died, while yet in the prime of life, and the height of his popularity as a sea captain.

    After the death of his father, when the son was thirteen years of age, John Johnson remained with his mother in Germany until her marriage to John H. Glashoff in 1848. He then came to America and settled her affairs in Albany, N. Y., after which he went to Fond du Lac county, Wis., and from there to Racine county. Here he attended the public schools for three years, and, beginning with 1849, was increasingly interested in the discovery of gold on the coast. An opportunity came his way in 1852, and he crossed in the same train with his uncle, having two yoke of oxen of his own, and a complete outfit. Leaving Calumet, Wis., April 4, he arrived in Marysville, Cal., after a journey of six months, during which time his party experienced terrible deprivations, and suffered from cholera and Indian outbreaks. In 1854 he was a member of the vigilance committee in San Francisco. That Mr. Johnson remained in the vicinity of Placerville for eight years argues a fair measure of success as a miner, and a particular liking for that means of making a livelihood. In 1859, in company with one hundred men, he started on an expedition into Arizona. Indians stampeded their horses, and from Fort Yuma they had the protection of the United States Cavalry. A pan yielding $18 was all the gold they secured. In 1861 he went to the Elk City mines of Idaho, but returned to Portland in the winter of 1861-62 and engaged in teaming until 1871.

    From Portland Mr. Johnson came to Tillamook County and located on his present place of one hundred and sixty acres, where he farmed and raised stock for many years, and where he is at present living retired. He has seen much of the pioneer life of the west, has practically grown up with the country, and has had a hand in many of its dearly won battles. As a private he enlisted in Company D, First Oregon Infantry, and served under Captain Powell on the frontier and at Fort Hall, being discharged after a service of eighteen months. He belongs to Tillamook Post, G. A. R., and at the reunions of the company has many interesting stories to tell of the border days which are now a matter of history. In politics Mr. Johnson is a Republican, and he has served as school director for twelve years and as road supervisor for three terms. In 1872 Mr. Johnson married Mary Rose, who was born in New York State, November 7, 1832. Charles A. Johnson, the only child of this union, is deputy assessor of Tillamook County, and a resident of Tillamook. In Wisconsin and Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson were members and active workers in the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Holden, Horace

HORACE F. HOLDEN. A career of exceptional breadth and merit is that of Horace F. Holden, miner, Indian fighter, ship builder, freighter, dairyman and stock raiser, and one who has held the majority of prominent local offices in his adopted county of Tillamook. Mr. Holden has passed through about all of the experiences supposed to accompany the pioneer on his way to success, and that he has made a practical study of the resources, conditions and people among which he has elected to reside, and has become an authority on all phases of western development, is evident from the many positions of trust and responsibility which he has been called upon to fill. Many of the reliable and conservative traits of character which have served to establish his enviable reputation are traceable to his English ancestry, which recognized no limit to its daring or endurance, and the abilities of which found an outlet in many directions of activity. Remote ancestors immigrated to the New England states, settling presumably in New Hampshire, where Horace Holden, the father of Horace F. was born July 24, 1810. As a young man the elder Horace moved to Massachusetts, where he married Mary Millen, who was born about 1819, and died at Honolulu, Sandwich Islands, at the age of thirty-three years. There were five children of this union, two daughters and three sons, Horace F. being the oldest child. The two daughters are deceased.

    More than passing mention is due Horace Holden, whose life has been an adventurous one, and who, at the age of nearly ninety-four, is still living in Salem, a direct refutation of the theory that a strenuous life is necessarily a limited one. Mr. Holden started out in life as a seaman before the mast and at the age of about nineteen years was taken captive while shipwrecked, and held for three years by a band of savages on the Pelew Islands. During this time a portion of his body was tattooed; but as he learned the language of the savages he found that he could prevail upon them to desist from tattooing his entire body, including his face, by threats of vengeance on the part of the white man's God. Through the exercise of strategy he managed to affect his escape, and finally succeeded in reaching his anxious and well nigh distracted mother in Concord.

    When the namesake Horace F. was a year old the father took his family to the Sandwich Islands by way of Cape Horn, taking five months for the ocean voyage, and once there he located on the Isle of Kauai, engaging in the culture of the silk worm in company with a man named Peck, and afterwards in the raising of sugar cane. His plantation was a large one and he remained here about seven years, finally disposing of his land and locating in Oregon, twelve miles south of Salem on the Santiam. In the spring of 1844 he took up a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres in as dense and inhospitable a region as the imagination can conceive of, and before gold or agricultural inducements had stimulated emigration to any extent, tilled his timbered land until the fall of 1849. He then sold out and removed his family to California, in order to take advantage of the gold excitement, but after a brief effort at mining turned his attention to sawmilling and stock-raising in the northern part of the state. In 1850 he returned to the Sandwich Islands, and after a brief residence in Honolulu returned to San Francisco, leaving his family in the islands. While engaged in business in the California town his wife died and his families were divided, and in 1854 he removed north to Salem, Ore., where he has lived ever since. Formerly he owned and operated a farm near the town, but disposed of the same in 1893, and has lived retired ever since. To a remarkable extent he retains his health and faculties, and his mind is a veritable store house of happenings on sea and land, upon both of which he has traversed to a greater extent than is given to many of the sons of the earth. An interesting historic event in the life of Horace Holden occurred July 4, 1847, when there was unfurled to the breeze from a sixty-foot pole two miles from Salem a flag made by Mrs. Holden from material which her husband procured by a special journey through the wilderness to Portland. This was the first American flag made in Oregon, and was subsequently carried by the Oregon troops during the Indian troubles following the Whitman massacre known as the Cayuse Indian war. It is also worthy of note that Mr. Holden and his son, Horace F., devoted much time later in the year in making rawhide ropes, which the Oregon soldiers used for lariats during the Indian campaigns. There was much self denial in those days and the Holden family, as well as many other pioneer settlers, lived principally on boiled wheat during the winter months.

    When seventeen years old Horace F. Holden left the Sandwich Islands and came to Oregon, traveling throughout the state and finally arriving in Idaho during the mining excitement in 1861-65. He was in the midst of the Indian troubles of 1855-56, enlisting as private in September, 1855, and serving for six months under Captain Charles Bennett. The various places in which his youth was passed permitted of a broad and liberal education, acquired in the Sandwich Islands, in the public schools of Oregon, and at the Willamette University. In the fall of 1856 he spent a couple of weeks in Tillamook County, was well pleased with the opportunities presented, and returned again from the Willamette valley in 1858. Although he located a claim on the Nehalem, he failed to prove up on it, and after about a year spent in Tillamook he turned his attention to ship building, learning the useful occupation from the foundation up. He assisted in the building of the J. C. Champion, and after its completion assumed charge of the vessel, running it for freighting purposes for about three years. He located on his present farm in 1870, and has one hundred and sixty acres four miles southeast of Tillamook City, where he is engaged in dairying and stock raising. The farm has modern improvements, fine buildings and the latest agricultural implements; at present he is milking about thirty cows.

    A Democrat ever since he was old enough to be interested in politics, Mr. Holden's ability has drawn him into offices of large responsibility, including that of county treasurer for six years during the troublous times of the seventies. So successful was his service as county commissioner that he was elected for an additional two years, serving in all four years. From 1890 until 1894 he served as county judge and at various times during the past decade he has been school director and clerk, also road supervisor. He has always been an advocate of progressive movements, particularly of good roads, having assisted in the construction of many miles of the best roads in the country. He likewise has shown a deep interest in the welfare of schools and has always favored liberal appropriations for their maintenance. He has been steward and chief promoter of the Grange of Fairview, and has been an active factor in almost every line of public development in this county for many years. May 18, 1870, Mr. Holden was united in marriage with Margaret Ellen Edwards, a native of Keokuk county, Iowa, and a daughter of Joseph and Margaret Wallace (Dinsmore) Edwards. Mr. and Mrs. Holden became the parents of three sons and two daughters: Anna B., J. Chester and Hattie Clara, deceased, who became the wife of Fred Stoddard; Verner E., and Arthur E. They are also rearing Letha Marie Stoddard, their granddaughter. Mr. Holden's family was one of the very first to be represented in this state, and the industry and integrity which found expression in his now aged sire have been duplicated and exalted in the life of a remarkably resourceful and versatile son.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Johnson, William

WILLIAM JOHNSON. The story of the life of William Johnson is not unlike that of many other resourceful easterners, who reached Oregon with few assets of a material nature, yet forced their way to the front by sheer grit and determination. Mr. Johnson has passed through the various stages of pioneer life, has helped to temper the ferocity of the Indians, and has planned and worked as industriously and wisely for the up building of his adopted state as any who have sought a home and competence within its borders. He was born in Montreal, Canada, February 13, 1828, and through his veins flow the blood of a sturdy English ancestry. His father, William Johnson, was born at Newcastle on Tyne, England, and in his youth learned the ship carpenter's trade. Immigrating to America at an early day, he engaged in ferrying on the St. Lawrence River, and was thus employed at the time of his death, about 1836, at the age of fifty years. His wife, Sarah (Swales) Johnson, was born in Cumberland, England, and survived him for more than half a century, her death occurring in 1892, at the age of ninety years. For a second husband she married Peter Provost, the latter of whom still lives in Canada. There were six daughters and three sons in the family, William being the fourth in order of birth.

    The youth of William Johnson was an eventful one, for his father's death left a large responsibility with his mother, who found difficulty in providing for her nine children. Accordingly William was sent to live with an uncle when he was ten years old, and he soon afterward began an apprenticeship of three years at the cooper's trade. The news of gold on the coast penetrated to the fastnesses of Canada, and inspired the cooler headed northerners with as much enthusiasm as it did the dwellers further south in the states. Mr. Johnson was impressed with the favorable reports which broke in upon his peaceful coopering career, and in 1849 he came across the border, his idea being to arrange for emigration to the coast. For a year he worked at such occupations as same his way, and in the spring of 1850 crossed the plains with horse teams, meeting with few accidents or exciting experiences. He came via Salt Lake City, stopping in Hangtown, now Placerville, and mining thereabouts with moderate success until 1855. With his little hoard he traveled across the mountains to the mines of eastern Oregon, and there found life and property endangered because of the encroachments of the Indians. As became a loyal miner he joined his comrades in an effort to suppress the troublesome red men, and November 16, 1855, enlisted for service as a private in the Indian war. He served for one hundred and twenty days, and received his discharge February 20, 1856. He served as a private throughout the service under Hummison, one of the daring leaders of that memorable campaign.

    For some months Mr. Johnson lived at The Dalles and engaged in ferrying over the Deschutes River, and in 1857 came to Tillamook County, where he took up a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres on the Trask River. In time he added to his land as his interests increased, and he finally came into possession of four hundred and fifty acres, all of which was divided among his children in 1895. He engaged extensively in stock-raising and dairying, and so invested his earnings that a small fortune came his way, and is now giving a start to the children who, unlike himself, have not been obliged to fight their battles of life single handed and alone. He married Rhoda Quick, and six of their seven children are living, two sons and four daughters: Lewis is living on the Trask River; Etta married B. Higginbotham; Jessie married John Embum; Eva became the wife of Henry Leach; Thomas P. also resides on the Trask River; Lottie is single and makes her home with her father. Mr. Johnson is a Socialist politically, and has held various local offices, including those of road supervisor and school director. He is devoted to his children, has done everything in his power for their welfare, and since dividing his property has made his home with them. He is a typical western pioneer, broad in his views and generous in his acts, and of sterling truth and uprightness. Many friends have congregated along his path of life, brightening it with their appreciation of his character, and their joy at his success.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Goodspeed, Eli

ELI GOODSPEED. Among the retired easterners who have stamped their worth and individuality upon various lines of activity in Oregon may be mentioned Eli Goodspeed, who lives on valuable property near Tillamook, and who is loaning the snug little fortune acquired by years of well applied industry. Born in Genesee County, N. Y., December 30, 1827, Mr. Good speed had few educational or other opportunities in his youth, and whatever he has achieved of success has been of his own making. The ten children in the family were reared on a comparatively small farm, but as only two sons and five daughters grew to maturity, the sons were obliged to shoulder responsibility at a very early age. The father, Jeremiah Goodspeed, was born in Vermont, and after living for a time at Warsaw, N. Y., removed to Hancock County, Ohio, near Fort Finley, where he died in 1837. His father, Hosea Goodspeed, lived to a ripe old age. Eli Goodspeed's mother, Sybil (Shumway) Goodspeed, was born and reared in Massachusetts, and her marriage occurred in Genesee County, N. Y., whither she had removed in order to make her home with friends.

    Eli Goodspeed was ten years old when his father died, and even at that early age he assumed a considerable share of the management of the farm, in time giving his energy to the support of the entire family. In 1856 he located with the family on a farm in Guthrie County, Iowa, and in 1863 crossed the plains with ox teams, being four months on the way, and living the first year in eastern Oregon. Washington County became his home in 1864, and in the vicinity of Forest Grove he engaged in general farming on rented land. In 1871 he located near Salem, Marion county, and in 1876 came to Tillamook, purchasing one hundred and sixty-four acres of land, upon a portion of which the town has since reared its homes and industries. A few years ago he traded with his son for his present home, where he is living retired.

    In no capacity has Mr. Goodspeed better illustrated the fine and honorable traits of his character than as a politician and supporter of the Republican Party in his adopted state. At the time of the county seat controversy he was serving as clerk of Tillamook County, and therefore took an important part in securing its location at Tillamook. In fact, it was largely through his efforts that the change was brought about, but in this respect he showed no more than his usual public spirit. He has also served as road supervisor, and many years ago in Iowa was an important factor on the school board. He has taken a foremost part in promoting various enterprises of an up building nature, and his judgment has come to be valued for its conservatism and regard for practical common sense. He is the father of three children: Columbus, living in Baker county, eastern Oregon; Emma, widow of Aaron Weller, a resident of Baker City, and Henry F., of Tillamook, mentioned at length in another part of this work. Of late years Mr. Goodspeed has been troubled with failing eyesight, yet even in the face of this serious drawback, he maintains a cheerful and contented spirit, living in the meantime in the world of memory, which in his case fails not, but rather is a ceaseless reminder of work well done, and of ambitions at least partially realized.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Wiley, David

DAVID J. WILEY, M. D. Both New Brunswick and Nova Scotia claim early members of the Wiley family, and in the former province Dr. David J. Wiley, of Tillamook, were born March 10, 1843. His father, Robert Wiley, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, and received both his classical and professional education in the city of Dublin. When ambition suggested a removal to America as a more fitting field for advancement, he embarked in a sailing vessel for Nova Scotia, where an uncle on the paternal side was engaged in practicing medicine. On the way the ship was wrecked and Dr. Wiley drifted to an island, where passing fishermen discovered his sorry plight, and obligingly gave him passage to his relatives in Nova Scotia. He subsequently went to another uncle in New Brunswick, in time settling on land near the Maine line, in which locality he was the pioneer physician, and where his practice spread for miles on both sides of the boundary line. He was stricken with cholera in 1886 and died at the age of seventy-six years. Dr. Wiley never talked much about his father or family, and it is supposed that the name was connected with some of the stupendous but unsuccessful movements of earlier times to lift the yoke of oppression from the necks of Erin's sons. It is known that his father, John, was born in Ireland that he was of Scotch-Irish extraction, and a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church. He owned an estate in County Tyrone, and was an extensive breeder of fine horses. Dr. Robert Wiley married Clarissa Dibble, who was born and who died in New Brunswick. It is thought that the Dibble family settled in the New England States at a very early day and possibly that they were United Loyal Legion followers. At any rate, the paternal great grandfather removed to New Brunswick during the Revolutionary war, taking with him Edwin, supposedly born in New York, and who was the father of Mrs. Wiley. Edwin Dibble was a blacksmith by trade and the possessor of great mechanical ingenuity. He owned a large farm in New Brunswick, where he accumulated quite a fortune for his time, and where he was highly esteemed for his progressiveness and fine traits of character.

    David J. Wiley is the oldest child of the three sons and three daughters born to his parents, of whom two daughters and three sons attained maturity. In his youth his educational opportunities were those of a crude and pioneer region but time developed unexpected chances in the shape of a grammar school course, in addition to the professional and general training which he received from his father. In 1859 he entered the medical department of Harvard University, remained for two years, and then continued his studies at the University of Vermont, from which he was duly graduated with the degree of M. D. in June, 1862. Thereafter he engaged in practice with his father at Florenceville, New Brunswick, and in 1867 started out to practice by himself in the same town. In 1888 he removed to Fort Fairfield, Me., remained there for three years, and in 1891 removed to Vancouver, Wash. In search of a desirable permanent location, he traveled over Washington and Oregon, and in 1892 located in Tillamook, where his many gifts and profound knowledge gained him a ready recognition.

    In New Brunswick Dr. Wiley was united in marriage with Elizabeth McCain, a native daughter of New Brunswick, and whose father, James McCain, was born in the north of Ireland. Mr. McCain was an early settler in New Brunswick, where he owned a large farm and became well to do. His death occurred on the Steamer City of Boston, en route for his native land. To Dr. and Mrs. Wiley have been born five children, and it is doubtful if any father on the coast has reason to be prouder of the characters formed under his personal supervision, and guided by his moral and intellectual soundness. Isabella, the oldest daughter, is living at home; Robert Weldon is a scientist and mining assayist, at present attending to the affairs of some large corporations operating in Dawson, Alaska; James lives in Portland; Lottie is the wife of Rev. A. R. Griggs, Presbyterian minister of Hoquiam, Wash.; Percy J. is having at home and studying medicine with his father, and will graduate from the medical department of the State University in the class of 1904; Thomas McCain is a resident of Florenceville, New Brunswick. All of the sons are physicians. Dr. Wiley is a Republican in politics, and has been the recipient of many political honors in his native town, including that of chief executive of the city for two terms. He is fraternally connected with the Blue Lodge and Chapter of Tillamook, and in religion is a member and elder of the Presbyterian church.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Stillwell, William

WILLIAM D. STILLWELL. Closely identified with the agricultural and industrial interests of Tillamook County, is William D. Stillwell, who owns a well-improved and productive ranch in Tillamook, where he is profitably engaged in farming and dairying. As an Oregon pioneer, the son of a pioneer family, and a citizen of prominence, he is especially deserving of mention in this biographical volume. A son of the late Thomas Still well, he was born November 16, 1824, in Logan County, Ohio, near Bellefontaine. His grandfather, Elias Stillwell, was born in Wales. At the age of fourteen years he came to this country and settled in the southeastern part if Virginia, where he afterwards engaged in farming. Selling his plantation to his oldest son in 1810, he removed to Ohio, where he resided until his death, at the age of ninety-six years. He was a soldier in the Revolution.

    Born November 11, 1787, in Grayson County, Va., Thomas Stillwell grew to manhood in his native state. In 1809 he went to Ohio as a frontiersman, taking up land in Logan County, where he cleared and improved a farm. Removing to Kalamazoo, Mich., in 1829, he took up a preemption claim under President Jackson, and there followed farming three years. In 1832 he became one of the original settlers of Laporte County, Ind., and Stillwell Station and Stillwell Prairie, in that county, were named in his honor. In the spring of 1834 he visited Racine, Wis., with a view to locating there, going via Chicago, which was then but a rude hamlet. Not being favorably impressed with Wisconsin, he returned to Michigan in 1835, and the following three years lived in Cassopolis, Cass County. In 1838 he and his family, consisting of his wife and five children, left Michigan with the intention of proceeding directly to the Oregon country, but as no party of immigrants left the rendezvous at Independence, Mo., after their arrival until the spring of 1843, Mr. Stillwell remained in Louisa county, Iowa, near Wapello, until the latter year. He then started for Independence to join an emigrant train there, but arrived after the party had started on its westward journey. Crossing the plains with ox teams in 1844, it was six months before he arrived in Yamhill County, where to take up a tract of land that was still in its virgin wildness. Thinking to find a more desirable location farther south, he sold out in 1850 and took up a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres at Yoncalla, Douglas County. Ten years later he came to Tillamook and purchased the Edrick Thomas donation claim, on which a large part of the town now stands. He improved a good farm, and until his death, which occurred in 1871, at the age of eighty-four years, he was one of the most esteemed and respected residents of the place. Laying out the town of Tillamook, he first named it Lincoln, but finding there was another town of that name in the state he changed it to Tillamook, the plural of which, Tillamook’s, in the Indian vernacular, means the meeting of many waters. He married Elizabeth Whygant, who was born in New Jersey, married in Ohio, and died, in 1860, in Yamhill County, Ore., at the age of three score and ten years. Her father, Tobias Whygant was born in Holland. In 1730, while a boy, he immigrated to America, locating first at Newark, N. J., afterwards removing to Warren County, Ohio. Serving under General Greene in the Revolutionary war, he was wounded at the battle of Ottawa Springs, being shot in the shin with a ball, which he carried to his grave. He was a farmer by occupation and lived to the remarkable age of one hundred and seventeen years, dying in Logan County, Ohio. Of the union of Thomas and Elizabeth (Whygant) Stillwell, five sons and seven daughters were born; five daughters and three sons grew to years of maturity, and two of the daughters and three sons came to Oregon as pioneers.

    The fifth child, and second son, of the parental household, William D. Stillwell, attended the district school a short time, but acquired the larger part of his education at his own fireside. Coming with his father to Oregon, he took up a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres, lying just southwest of North Yamhill, a town which he started and named. (North Yamhill Yawhilles, Indian, means "crossing," or "the other side" called by Indians of east side of river.  By industry and perseverance he improved a good ranch, on which he lived until 1870, when he rented the farm and came to Tillamook to care for his father, who was then old and feeble. Subsequently purchasing the home farm he has carried on farming and dairying with excellent pecuniary results, having two hundred and seventy-five acres of good land at the present time. A few years ago Mr. Stillwell laid out the thirteen blocks of land known as Stillwell Addition to Tillamook. December 20. 1847, Mr. Stillwell enlisted in Company D, First Oregon Regiment, and served under Capt. Philip Thompson and Colonel Gilliam for six months. While in a skirmish with the Indians he was wounded in the left hip by an arrow point, and two days later, still suffering from the wound, he took part in the battle of Stag Hollow, and was afterwards in the engagement known as the battle of Sandy Hollows, or Butter Creek Buttes, or Wells Springs. He also fought in the battle of Two Canons. June 25. 1848, he was discharged from service. In January, 1856, he enlisted in Company C, .Ankeny Recruiting Battalion, and participated in the Yakima Indian war. He afterwards rode from Camp Cornelius to The Dalles, two hundred and twenty-five miles, for ammunition, being escorted by fifteen men, he and a companion by the name of Smith going through. They traveled horseback the entire distance to The Dalles, which was covered in forty-eight hours, an almost incredibly short space of time for such a long and rough journey. Upon his return Mr. Stillwell found the battle of Snake River in progress, which continued for two days. He also participated in the battle on the Yakima River, in which Captain Hembree was killed. Mr. Stillwell still carries in his left hip the arrow point with which he was injured in the fight already referred to.

    Mr. Stillwell has been three times married. At North Yamhill, in 1851, he married Elizabeth Baxter, who was born in Warren County, Mo., and died in Yamhill County, Ore., in 1863, aged thirty years. Of the six children born of their union, two died in infancy, and four are living, namely: Thomas G., of Seaside, Ore.; Levi Lee, of Tillamook; Minnie V., of Tillamook, and Baxter, living in California. J.lr. Stillwell was married a second time, in Yamhill county, to Annie Johanna Gubser, who was born in Switzerland, and died in Portland, Ore. Six children were born of this union, two of whom died young, and four are living, namely: Willa, wife of William H. Eberman, of Tillamook; Arthur J., of Tillamook; Wilbur J., of Tillamook, and Walter Royal, also of Tillamook. Mr. Stillwell was married the third time in Tillamook to Mary E. (Armentrout) Myers. Mr. Stillwell is a stanch adherent of the Republican Party, and has taken an active part in public affairs. In 1872 he served one term as sheriff of Tillamook County; was county assessor of Tillamook County in 1888; in 1874 was elected county superintendent of schools and served one term; and in 1890 was a representative in the state legislature, in which he served on the committees on credentials, fish and game.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Hunt, George

CAPT. GEORGE HUNT. Remote from the beaten paths in which man seeks a livelihood is the occupation of those against whose storm defying homes ocean waves thunder remorselessly, and whose mission it is to light the night path of the marines. From time immemorial the light house keeper has figured in song and story, and when brought to notice, the isolation, loneliness and self sacrifice of his life appeals to the chivalry of human nature as naught else can. Yet a watery gulf intervenes between this heroic life saver and the great army of land workers, and it is only now and then, when a daring rescue is effected, when his whistle salutes one's ship in passing, or his beacon illuminates our murky echo of appreciation in our hearts and minds. All along the Pacific coast, at every point of danger, some human life ascends nightly stairs, lights a lamp, and at sunrise extinguishes his beacon out of deference to the more benign light of day. One of these who for years were depended on to send rays of warning to travelers upon the deep was Capt. George Hunt, head keeper of the Cape Meares light house, eight and a half miles west of Tillamook, in the Pacific Ocean. This was the third station along the coast occupied by this trustworthy keeper since he entered the business, in 1883. As assistant keeper he was located at the Cape Flattery lighthouse, Tatoosh Island, at the extreme northwest corner of the United States, for two years and three months, and was afterward transferred to the position of head keeper of the Tillamook Rock lighthouse, thirty miles down the coast from Astoria. Four years at this convinced the government that he was one of the most efficient and reliable men in the service, and in consequence he was given the more responsible position of keeper of the Cape Meares lighthouse, the duties of which position he performed with the help of three assistants.

    Captain Hunt was born in County Kildare, Ireland, December 17, 1845, and came to America with his parents in 1846. He was the third youngest child born to Mark and Letitia (Lee) Hunt, who were born and married in Ireland, and five of whose nine children were sons. The parents located in Genesee County, N. Y., where the father owned a large farm and engaged in general farming and stock raising on a large scale. About 1865 he took his family to Bremer county, Iowa, and after five years of farming removed to Clay county, the same state, where his death occurred in 1869, at the age of sixty-six years. Later his wife sold the Clay county farm and returned to the old home in Genesee County, N. Y., and died there in 1875. Captain Hunt accompanied his parents to Iowa and there completed his education in the public schools and served an apprenticeship to a carpenter. In the winter of 1865 he moved to Holt County. Mo., and engaged in the livery business until the spring of 1866, and then returned to Bremer county, Iowa, and removed with his parents to Clay county. In 1873 he went to Clark County. Wis., and worked at his trade for two and a half years, then made his next home in Minneapolis, and returning to Clay county at the end of eight months.

    In 1878 Captain Hunt engaged in independent farming in Clay county, Iowa, but soon afterwards determined to try his fortune in the west, to which he came by way of Panama and San Francisco. Locating at The Dalles, he worked at his trade for about a year, and for the same length of time in Portland, removing then to Seattle, Wash., which continued to be his home from 1880 to 1885. From then until he was called to his final reward he was engaged in the lighthouse service and became one of the best known of the men whose lives have been devoted to the welfare of the coast mariners. Captain Hunt was married March 10, 1903, to Augusta Boyington, who was born in Long Island, N. Y., and came to the west many years ago with her parents. A Republican in politics, Captain Hunt took considerable interest in the political undertakings of the localities in which he lived, and while in Tillamook County served as postmaster of Barnegat. He was also school director for a number of years, and held other offices of a minor character. Captain Hunt was made a Mason in Spencer, Iowa, and after coming to Oregon joined the Fraternal Union of Tillamook. He died at Cape Meares lighthouse station July 10, 1903, after an illness of but four days. One line on his tombstone tells of the esteem in which he was held: Beloved by all.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Lamb, George

GEORGE B. LAMB. The present high standard of education maintained in the public schools of Tillamook County is largely due to the progressive and practical methods of the county superintendent of schools, George B. Lamb, who assumed his large responsibility after his election in 1898, and in the meantime his indefatigable efforts have been directed towards the best possible of attainment along educational lines. As an example of early success Mr. Lamb's brief career is encouraging in the extreme, and is additionally gratifying because he is a native son, and member of a prominent pioneer family. He was born on a farm five miles south of Tillamook, June 11, 1873, and both his character and constitution were developed in the hard school of a general farming enterprise. Francis M. Lamb, the father of George B., was born in Jones County, Iowa, in December, 1847, and in 1865 crossed the plains with horse teams, taking four months for the journey. Locating on a farm near Albany, Linn County, he removed the following year to a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Tillamook County, and about thesame time bought his present dairy farm of fifty acres in the vicinity of the city of Tillamook. He is engaged in the dairy business, and is a fairly successful man. Through his marriage with Pauline F. Daniels, a native of Missouri, whom he met after coming to Oregon, five sons have been born.

    George B. Lamb attended the public schools while living on the farm, and in 1896 entered the normal school at Monmouth, from which he was graduated in 1898 with the degree of B. S. D. In the meantime, from 1894 until 1896, he had taught school in this county, and it was the proceeds of his labor in this direction which partially covered his expenses at the normal. Mr. Lamb has taken a keen interest in politics ever since attaining his majority, and his rational appreciation of the duties and obligations of the politician, as well as of the educator, made his election to the public school superintendence a natural and eminently fitting one. Various fraternal organizations profit by the membership of Mr. Lamb, among them being the Tillamook Lodge No. 57, A. F. & A. M., the Eastern Star, Ancient Order United Workmen, and the Woodmen of the World. The superintendent of the Tillamook county schools is a young man of high moral character and lofty ideals, and his life inspires a disposition to wise endeavor in all with whom he is brought in contact. He finds a religious home in the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which he is a trustee, and for the best interests of which he is a zealous and earnest worker.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Hays, William

WILLIAM SMITH HAYS. Occupying an assured position among the veteran agriculturists of Tillamook is William Smith Hays, who has been quite successful as a general farmer and dairyman. He is a typical representative of the self made men of the county, having acquired a competency chiefly through his own exertions, his sturdy industry, wise perseverance and judicious management bringing him a due reward. A native of Washington County, Pa., he was born December 29, 1831, being the oldest son, and third child, of Robert Hays.

    A native of Pennsylvania, Robert Hays removed to Ohio in 1838, settling first in Butler County, and afterwards in Logan County, near Bellefontaine, where he resided a number of years. Migrating to Dewitt County, in 1854, he engaged in farming, during the harvesting seasons running a threshing machine in connection with his other labors. He continued his residence on the farm that he there improved until his death, in 1872, at the age of sixty-six years. He married Maria Smith, who was born in Pennsylvania, and died, about three weeks before he did, in Dewitt County. Of the eight children born of their union, two died in infancy, and three sons and three daughters grew to years of maturity, although only two are now living, W. S. Hays and Julia Ann Turner.

    Reared and educated in the suburbs of Bellefontaine, Ohio, William Smith Hays was there a trained to agricultural pursuit under the judicious instruction of his father. At the age of twenty-two years he embarked in farming with his father, and met with excellent success. In 1875 he left the Prairie state, coming to Oregon. Locating in Clackamas County, he lived for eight or nine months in Milwaukee, and then went to Collinsville, Cal., where he spent about five years, a large part of the time running a threshing machine in that vicinity. Returning to Oregon in 1881, he had a billiard hall and tobacco stand in East Portland, for four years, being located on Fourth Street. Becoming a resident of the city of Tillamook in 1885, Mr. Hays engaged in farming and dairying, in which he met with signal success. He also purchased land within the city limits, buying a tract of thirty acres, which he and his son, Robert R. Hays, laid out as the Hays addition to the city, ten acres of which is already built up, being used for resident and business purposes. Politically Mr. Hays is a steadfast Republican, but has persistently refused all official honors. Fraternally he is a prominent member of the Masonic Order, belonging to Tillamook Lodge, No. 57, of which he is treasurer.

    Mr. Hays married, while living in Illinois, Angeline Ross, who was born in Ohio. Their only child, Robert Ross Hays, was born June 3, 1856. He learned the surveyor's trade when young, and worked at it for some time. He was a very bright, active young man, and his death, which occurred at his home in Tillamook, in 1897, was deeply lamented. True to the political faith in which he was reared, Robert R. Hays was a stanch Republican, and served one term as county clerk, and for two terms was clerk of the House of Representatives. He was a delegate to the National Republican Convention, which met in Minneapolis, Minn., in 1892, and was the only member of the Oregon delegation who voted for Harrison for president. He was a member and master of Tillamook Lodge, No. 57, A. F. & A. M., and member and presiding officer of Johnson Chapter, R. A. M., Council and K. T. of Portland. He left a widow, Mrs. Ella (Ross) Hays, and four children, namely: R. Blaine, Ella T., Helen H. and Robert R.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Vaughn, Amos

AMOS N. VAUGHN. The distinction of being one of the oldest of the native born citizens of Tillamook County belongs to Amos N. Vaughn, a representative agriculturist, and the leading dairyman of Tillamook. He is pleasantly located about five miles north of Tillamook, having a well appointed farm, which, with its tasteful and convenient residence, barn and out buildings, gives substantial evidence of the excellent care and skill with which it is managed. A native of Tillamook County, he was born August 1, 1863, a son of Warren N. and Harriet (Trask) Vaughn, who were the parents of fifteen children, five sons and ten daughters. Further ancestral history will be found elsewhere in this biographical work, in connection with the sketch of the father, W. N. Vaughn.

    In succession of birth Amos Vaughn is the third child of his parents. Attending the district school three months each year, he acquired a practical knowledge of the common branches of learning, and during the time became familiar with the various branches of agriculture. At that time the toils of the field were arduous and almost endless the labor saving machinery of today being unknown in many localities. At the age of twenty years he began life on his own account, and the following ten years was employed in the logging business on Tillamook Bay, being quite successful. He assisted in building the first tram road in the county, working with a crew of twelve or more men. Giving up logging in 1893, Mr. Vaughn secured a farm of one hundred and sixty acres about five and one half miles north of the city of Tillamook, securing the title thereto by the payment of the indebtedness on the property, which was left to him by a friend, with the provision that he clear the title. Here he has made improvements of a superior character, and has one of the best dairy ranches in this locality. Keeping about twenty Jersey cows, Mr. Vaughn has spared no expense in the development of his dairy business, having a separator, and a butter factory on the farm, and all the modern appliances necessary in that particular line of industry.

    Mr. Vaughn was married, August 2, 1891, to Miss Sadie Baxter, who was born in Polk County, Ore., near Bethel, in 1865. She is a daughter of William T. and Margaret (Hickland) Baxter, pioneers of Oregon, the former having previously been a resident of Illinois and the latter of Indiana. Of the two children born to Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn only one is living, namely: Nina, who resides with her parents. In politics Mr. Vaughn has always been identified with the Republican Party. He takes an intelligent interest in everything pertaining to local matters, and has served as school director, and as road supervisor. He is a member of two of the leading fraternal organizations of this part of the state, belonging to the Bay City Lodge, I. O. O. F., and to the Tillamook Lodge, W. O. W.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Shearer, Francis

FRANCIS M. SHEARER. The thriving little town of Garibaldi has a full quota of live, energetic and persevering business men, among whom Francis M. Shearer occupies a position of note. For nearly a score of years he was an active assistant in promoting the agricultural prosperity of Tillamook County, but is now prominently identified with its mercantile interests. A man of ability, integrity and true worth, he is widely known, and much esteemed as a man and a citizen. He was born in Page county, Iowa, February 28, 1833, a son of the late William Shearer.

    Born in North Carolina, February 13, 1830, William Shearer came of excellent Scotch ancestry. When a young man he located in Iowa as a pioneer, buying land in Page County, where he broke up and improved a farm. In 1864 he came with his family to Oregon, crossing the plains with oxen, and being five months and five days on the way. Locating in the Chehalem valley, Yamhill County, he remained there until the following spring. Removing to Forest Grove, Washington county, he bought land about one and one half miles from the village, and was there engaged in farming for several years. Trading his ranch for land in Klickitat County, Wash., he moved up there with his family, continuing his independent occupation in that locality until 1898. Returning to Oregon in that year, he settled in Multnomah County, and was a resident of Montavilla until his death, January 29, 1899. He married Nancy C. Johnson, who was born January 30, 1836, in Indiana, and they became the parents of five children, all boys, Francis M. being the eldest child.

    Spending the days of his boyhood and youth in Iowa, Francis M. Shearer obtained his early education in the pioneer district school, and while yet a lad assisted his father on the farm. Coming with his parents to Yamhill County, Ore., in 1864, then eleven years old, he still remembers many incidents of the memorable journey hither. Being strong and rugged, he helped clear and improve a homestead in Washington County, Ore., and in Klickitat County, Wash. At the age of seventeen years he began work as a wage earner, following any remunerative employment. Coming from Washington to Oregon in 1883, he located in Tillamook County, not far from the city of Tillamook. Purchasing a ranch of fifty acres, he built up an extensive and profitable dairy business, which he carried on until 1899. Selling out his dairy interests in that year, Mr. Shearer removed to Garibaldi, erected a store, and embarked in business as a general merchant. In this occupation he has met with undoubted success, his trade being large, and his patrons numerous.

    In 1883 Mr. Shearer married Sarah F. Latimer, who comes of substantial English ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. Shearer have three children living, all at home, namely: Otto, August M. and Christie. Mr. Shearer is an unswerving Democrat in politics, and has rendered good service to his adopted town as school director and as road supervisor. He is interested in fraternal and social circles, being a member of Goldendale Lodge. I. O. O. F., of Goldendale. Wash., and is a Patron of Husbandry, belonging to the grange at Greenville, Ore.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Cone, Winfield

WINFIELD SCOTT CONE. More than to any other man who has actively participated in its up building, Bay City owes its present prosperous condition to the business ability and resourcefulness of Winfield Scott Cone. This promoter and lumberman, whose active life has been principally spent within the sound of mills and falling trees, and who probably possesses as extensive a knowledge of the lumbering output of America as any other citizen in this part of the country, is the heir to sterling and rugged characteristics, inherited from an ancestry which never failed in courage in times of danger, and buckled on its armor in nearly all of the war crises in this country.

    The change of the original name of McCone to that of Cone is interesting, as illustrating the loyalty and patriotism of many of the first American settlers. The paternal grandfather participated in the Revolutionary War on the side of the colonies, but to his chagrin, two of his brothers aided the home government in further depressing the strivers after independence, and fought with the British throughout the war. The Scotch blood of the grandfather rebelled at this evidence of inhumanity, and to dissociate himself from those of his family who had thus tarnished its fair name, he was afterward known by the name of Cone, his legal right to that name being granted by act of congress. His son, Lemuel, the father of Winfield Scott, inherited his father's loyalty to the United States. He was born in Vermont, June 16, 1796, and died in Michigan in 1885. As a young man he removed from Vermont to Niagara County, N. Y., and from there to Ohio, where he married Sarah J. Rice, who was born near Dearborn, Ohio, of Irish descent. While in New York he enlisted in the war of 1812 as a Colonel waiter, and was discharged as a private under Gen. Winfield Scott. During the Mexican war he served under General Scott in the cavalry, and after removing to Ohio enlisted in the Black Hawk war, in which memorable struggle he was wounded five times. Lemuel Cone was an ambitious and fearless man, and one who was willing to take chances in order to attain his objects in life. Knowing well the desolation and deprivation which would be his portion in so unsettled a region, he moved with his family to Michigan at a very early day, settling in Shiawassee County, then the heart of the dense timberland. He was the first white settler in Richland and Saginaw townships, and in both of these places he established a name of which his children and friends were justly proud. The soldier was equally fearless in the wilderness, and under the impetus of his industry wild lands took on a semblance of habitation and became profitable and productive.

    Winfield Scott Cone was next to the youngest child and the only son in his father's family of five children, and he naturally became a woodsman, following the example of his sire. He became expert in locating claims and determining the lumbering possibilities of lands and from his fifteenth year up to the present time may be said to have devoted practically his entire time to this kind of work. He continued to engage in lumbering and land speculating in Michigan until 1887, and then, with a record of twenty-two years of steady effort at logging and lumbering, came to Tillamook County in the fall of 1888 and platted the town of Bay City. This has been his home ever since, and he has continued to deal in timber lands and lumber, at the same time promoting many important enterprises in the town and vicinity. He started the boom which resulted in the present population, and succeeded in bringing a thousand people here. He erected a handsome hotel building in 1891, and has also put up many residences, and in hundreds of ways has evidenced a forceful and determined spirit of enterprise and progress. Mr. Cone is the owner of four hundred and sixty acres of land adjoining Bay City, which is devoted principally to cattle and sheep raising, and which is one of the most finely improved and valuable farms in the county.

    So public spirited a man must needs be in touch with the educational advancement of the place he calls home, and Mr. Cone has never failed to realize the importance of this department of town development. He has been a school director for many years, and the school advantages of the town and vicinity are admittedly superior. Fraternally, he is identified with Tillamook Lodge, No. 57, A. F. & A. M. Mr. Cone was married in 1871 to Mary J. Hare, who was born near Rochester, N. Y., June 8, 1851. She is a daughter of Decatur and Jeannette (Brown) Hare, natives of New York state, who died in Midland county, Mich.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Thayer, Claude

CLAUDE THAYER. was born in the town of Tonawanda, Erie County, N. Y., December 16, 1854, a son of Hon. W. W. and Samantha C. Thayer. In 1862 W. W. Thayer crossed the plains, Claude riding a pony. In 1863 the family removed to Lewiston, Idaho, and remained there four years. During this time Claude Thayer contracted the disease which through the long years to come was to handicap him in all the sports of childhood, the pleasures of youth and the labors of maturity. Dr. Kiely of Lewiston speedily pronounced his complaint to be hip disease, and his father removed with him to East Portland, where Mr. Thayer resided until 1879.

    There being no schools in Lewiston Mr. Thayer's mother and Governor Thayer's law partner, John A. Anderson, a southerner of classical attainments, gave the boy practically the only book education he was ever destined to receive. He attempted, at the age of sixteen, to attend the college at Corvallis, living at the home of his uncle, A. J. Thayer. His physical trouble ended his attendance and he returned to East Portland, where he indulged in spasmodic efforts to acquire an education. To Dr. C. H. Raffety he owes the continuation of his perilous existence. To David Raffety, Professors Veatch, Pratt and Freeman, he is indebted for varied instruction. At this time he began to read law, greatly aided by W. H. Holmes of Salem, A. J. Newell of East Portland and other students who at times read law with Governor Thayer.

    On December 16, 1875, his twenty-first birthday, he was admitted to practice law, being a member of the same class in which Judge George H. Burnett and Hon. J. D. Fenton, among many others, stood their examination. Mr. Thayer essayed the practice of his profession in Portland in the office of Thayer & Williams, but the malaria which then existed continually sapped his health. In 1879 he removed to Salem, where he engaged in the law business as a partner of Hon. W. H. Holmes, a connection which was cemented by a personal friendship of the David and Jonathan type.

    In 1880, being employed to attend to some business in Tillamook County Mr. Thayer came to this county, where, in a sort of a Ponce de Leon quest for health, he finally located. He practiced law as occasion offered and engaged in ranching, dairying and dealing in cattle. In 1884 he and Miss Estelle Bush, of Salem, were married. This lady abandoned a luxurious home and has endured the privations of frontier life to share his enforced banishment. In 1888 Mr. Thayer engaged in an intended small exchange business, his wife being united with him under the firm name of C. & E. Thayer. Their first safe was a cigar box and the first counter a red cedar plank which had been picked up on the beach. The business grew into a banking business and now owns and occupies a sturdy little stone building, plain, solid, and as unpretentious as its owners.

    Mr. Thayer's efforts have done much toward the building up of the county and the city of Tillamook, and its institutions owe a great portion of their excellence to his wise forethought. His one child, Eugenia Thayer, was born January 3, 1897. To atone for their life of isolation, where theatres, operas, lectures and entertainments of literary character do not exist, Mr. and Mrs. Thayer keep their home supplied with abundant periodicals and books, covering scientific, political and literary subjects of high order. Mr. Thayer is a facile writer and speaker and while he has practically ceased the practice of the law, he yet possesses a modicum of legal ability inherited from his well known father. When asked as to his greatest pride he responds that it is the prosperity of the city and county he has helped to build up.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Rogers, Henry

HENRY ROGERS. The ancient art of cheese making, appreciated the world over by people who delight in gastronomic delicacies, has many followers in Tillamook County, but none who are better versed in the occupation than Henry Rogers. This very successful dairyman and cheese manufacturer has been a resident of the state since 1885, and prior to locating in Tillamook County exercised his skill as a cheese maker for Colonel Cornelius, in Washington County, for seven years. He also engaged in butter making at Fairview for about four years before building his present creamery and purchasing his present farm. There were but two creameries in the county when Mr. Rogers located in Tillamook; the Fairview was the first to be operated on the cooperative plan. He owns three hundred and twenty acres of splendidly improved land, five miles southeast of Tillamook, and milks fifty-three cows. His creamery is among the largest in the county, and while he is sole owner, it is operated on the cooperative plan, and is meeting with great success. Mr. Rogers is manufacturing large quantities of cheese and butter, and the large demand for his products is the best guarantee of their excellence. He has a farm of modern and progressive appointments, his home is modern and conveniently arranged, and his barns, outhouses, fences and agricultural implements indicate the painstaking, neat, and thrifty husbandman.

    For many years James and Mary (Durkin) Rogers have been among the best known farmers of Lewis county, N. Y., and the recent golden anniversary of their wedding day, December 26, 1902, attested the esteem in which they are held by the neighbors and friends among whom the greater part of their lives have been passed. They are still living on the old home place to the improvement of which the husband devoted so many years of his life, and whence, so many hundreds of times, he wended his way towards the nearby quarries, for he is a quarryman by trade. He is now eighty-five years of age, and his wife is seventy-six years old, both having come from Ireland in their youth and settled with their parents in Lewis County. N. Y. They reared eight children, four sons and four daughters, all of whom were educated in the public schools. Henry Rogers was the third child in the parental family and was born in Leyden, Lewis County N. Y. March 24, 1856. At the age of sixteen he left home, and engaged in farming by the month. At the age of twenty he served a two years apprenticeship to a cheese maker, and afterwards worked at his trade until coming to Oregon in 1885. In New York State Mr. Rogers married Georgia Parkhurst, and four of the six children born of this union are living: Arch J., Vida A., Beulah G. and Merle R. Since his first presidential vote Mr. Rogers has been a stanch Republican, and he served for several years on the school board. He is popular and well known fraternally, being a member of Tillamook Lodge, No. 57, A. F. & A. M., the Fairview Grange, and the Ancient Order of United Workmen of Tillamook. Mr. Rogers is the possessor of a firm and decided character, of progressive and liberal views, and of public spirited interest in the people and interests which comprise his environment. He is respected and honored by all who know him, and counts his friends among the prosperous and successful in many parts of the state.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Lowry, Henry

HENRY WILLIAM LOWRY. Before locating upon his well managed dairy ranch near Tillamook in 1889, Henry W. Lowry familiarized himself with the west in general, and selected his home with a clear idea of the advantages by which he would be surrounded. Two and a half miles from Tillamook he has the advantages of both town and country, and in coming and going travels over well kept roads, a distinct advantage to all who labor in the field of dairying. Mr. Lowry has thirty-five acres of land, which, though a comparatively small farm, makes up in the kind and extent of improvements, all of which are modern and the result of the enterprise and forethought of the present owner. He devotes himself to dairying exclusively, and milks about fourteen cows. A comfortable and homelike residence, well furnished and well kept, a dairy barn of large dimensions, convenient outhouses and good fences make up the equipment for work of one of the popular and highly esteemed residents of a highly prosperous agricultural community.

    Of English Irish extraction, Mr. Lowry was born in Marshall County, October 1, 1844, and is the oldest of four children born to George and Lucretia A. Lowry, the former born in Connecticut, where he was reared and grew to manhood. George Lowry was a farmer during his entire active life, and was moderately successful from a financial standpoint. Henry remained at home until 1864, and by that time had developed a great deal of ambition and energy, which he determined should not become rusty on an Illinois farm. Accordingly, he set out across the plains for Nevada, which he reached without accident or hindrance and for a few months visited the mines and principal agricultural centers. The years 1865 and 1866 were spent in Placer County, Cal., to which state he journeyed overland from Nevada, and where he eventually engaged in farming on his own responsibility. He was successful in disposing of his crops at a profit, and remained in the land of flowers and sunshine until 1889, then coming direct to his present farm.

    In Sacramento, Cal., May 4, 1870, Mr. Lowry married Cora Carter, a native daughter of Wisconsin, born in Jefferson County, July 19, 1852. Mrs. Lowry crossed the plains with her parents in 1862, her father, John L. Carter, taking up a claim in Sacramento County, where she lived until her marriage. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lowry, the order of their birth being as follows: Dora, wife of Andrew Christensen, of Tillamook; Alice, wife of Henry Finch, of San Francisco, Cal.; Fred, a resident of Pleasant valley; Sydney, a farmer of Clatsop county; and Henry and Frances at home. Mr. Lowry is a Republican in politics but his farm and family claim his attention, and he has never found time nor had the inclination to seek for or accept office. He bears an honored name around Tillamook, and as a dairyman understands all that there is to know of his interesting calling.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Farmer, Axom

AXOM D. FARMER. A hero of both the Mexican and Civil wars, Axom D. Farmer is also one of the foremost farmers of the vicinity of Hebo, Tillamook County, where he still has a lease of the farm recently disposed of to his son, which has been his home for many years. When he first came to the farm, about 1876, Mr. Farmer had a sawmill in operation, but of late his land has been devoted principally to dairying, and in connection therewith he had engaged at coopering, the trade of his youth, learned from an industrious and worthy father. Ninety-five acres have been retained of the original grant of one hundred and sixty acres, and about fourteen cows supply milk to a number of steady customers. Mr. Farmer came to Oregon by rail, and from Yamhill county came over the old Harris trail to Tillamook, shipping his household goods down the river. He located first on a farm eight miles south of Tillamook, and five years later removed to his present farm. He has taken an active interest in Republican politics and has served as road supervisor and school director. He is also identified with the Grand Army of the Republic.

    Mr. Farmer is seventy-four years old and therefore entitled to the partial leisure which he is enjoying at the present time. He was born in Robertson County, Tenn., October 17, 1829, and his father, Benjamin, was presumably a native of the same state. The latter was a cooper by trade, an occupation followed in Tennessee until his removal to Wayne County, in 1838. As was the case with all tradesmen in the early days, one occupation did not suffice, and the mechanic was of necessity master of many departments of activity, including carpentering, mill wrighting and others equally useful. Benjamin Farmer lived only a year after his removal to Wayne county and died a comparatively young man. His wife, Kisira (Fly) Farmer, died in Williamson County, in 1901, having attained the age of ninety years. Her family comprised two sons and one daughter, of whom Axom is the oldest.

    As a youth of nine, Axom D. Farmer accompanied his parents to Wayne county, and he there grew to manhood on a farm, receiving a limited education in the nearby school. In time he moved to Union county, where he married Betsy Daniels, who bore him a daughter, now Mrs. W. T. West, of this county. He afterwards married, in Williamson County, Mrs. Eliza McGinnis, who was born in Illinois, and who died on the home place in Tillamook County in 1898. Of this second marriage there were born three sons, Frank, Lewis, deceased, and Otis, on the home farm. At the time of the breaking out of the Mexican war Mr. Farmer was making his home in Williamson County, and was engaged in farming and coopering. The youth and men of the neighborhood welcomed the opportunity as a chance to break the monotony of farming, and the exodus to serve the cause of the country was large and enthusiastic. Mr. Farmer went to war as a teamster, serving throughout the contest in that capacity. For a time he was under command of General Taylor at Vera Cruz, and during the service met with many adventures of which he still retains vivid recollections. Returning to Williamson County, he continued farming and coopering until 1862, when the Civil war presented another opportunity to show his mettle and patriotism. Strange to say, Mr. Farmer served throughout the Civil war also as a teamster, and was connected with the Seventeenth Army Corps under Generals Grant, Sherman and Logan. He enlisted at Cairo, in Company H, Thirty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served three years.

    Disposing of his Williamson county farm in the spring of 1871, Mr. Farmer came to Oregon, as heretofore stated, and has since made this state his home. He has won a host of friends through the exercise of many fine traits of character, and his uprightness and progressiveness place him among the sterling and highly respected citizens of a prosperous neighborhood.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Alderman, Henry

HENRY H. ALDERMAN. Through his wise administration of the duties of sheriff of Tillamook County, Henry H. Alderman is fulfilling the hopes and expectations of his fellow citizens. He is a son of Isaac W. Alderman, who came across the plains to California in 1850, and after two years of rather unsuccessful mining crossed the mountains to Oregon, locating first in Polk, and a year later in Tillamook County. He was born in New York State, January 5, 1815, his Holland Dutch ancestors having immigrated to this country many years before. In time he left New York and started out to earn his own living in La Porte County, Ind., where he met and married Harriet B. Young, a native of Wilkesbarre, Luzerne County, Pa., born February 7, 1822. Mrs. Alderman was of German descent, and when sixteen years old removed to La Porte county, Ind., with her parents. She joined her husband in Yamhill County. Ore., and came with him to Tillamook County, locating on the farm of three hundred and twenty acres three miles north of Tillamook. This was wild and unimproved property, yet through the industry of the pioneers it became a comfortable and even pleasant home, always producing sufficient to maintain the family of nine children, five sons and four daughters. Isaac W. Alderman died in February, 1877, and his wife, who afterward moved to LaFayette, Yamhill County, survived him until 1892.

    Henry H. Alderman was born on the paternal farm three miles north of Tillamook, March 25, 1863, and in 1882 accompanied his mother to Yamhill County, thus receiving the educational advantages of both counties. He was variously employed until 1894, principally as a clerk in La Fayette, and then located in Tillamook County and engaged in farming for a short time. He had always taken an interest in local Republican politics, and in 1896 his zeal was rewarded by appointment to the position of deputy sheriff under Sheriff J. H. Jackson. In January, 1897, he was advanced to the office of first deputy, and in September of the same year succeeded to the office made vacant by the resignation of Sheriff Jackson. So admirably did Mr. Alderman fill the difficult and trying position that his election by a large majority followed in 1898. He was reelected in 1900 and 1902, thus ensuring to his native county a continuation of the hitherto satisfactory conditions.

    July 15. 1891, Mr. Alderman married Edith M. Kelty, who was born at LaFayette, Yamhill county. June 19. 1870. They have one daughter, Pauline, who is living with her parents. Mr. Alderman is well known and popular in fraternal circles, being identified with four of the foremost lodges of Tillamook: Tillamook Lodge, No. 57. A. F. & A. M. Woodmen of the World, Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the Knights of Pythias. With his family he worships at the Presbyterian Church, of which he has been a member and elder for several years. Mr. Alderman is credited with sincerity in the discharge of his official duties, and with intelligent handling of the difficult emergencies which he is called upon to adjust. He possesses great faith in, as well as knowledge of, human nature, and his position affords many opportunities for reformatory as well as corrective measures.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Marlof, John

JOHN MAROLF. While this country was in a ferment of excitement over the discovery of gold on the western coast, when caravans were starting over the plains and outgoing steamers almost sank beneath their load of gold crazed human freight, John Marolf, one of the prominent farmers and politicians of Tillamook County, was born in Switzerland, May 13, 1849. He was reared on the farm of his parents, Emert and Annie Marolf, both of whom were born in the Alps country, the former in October, 1821, and the latter in 1825. The paternal home was near the capital city of Berne, in one of the most fertile and desirable parts of the country, and here were born several of the seven sons and four daughters in the family, all of whom received a liberal education. In time the parents came to this country. The mother died in Tillamook in 1901, and the father is still living on a farm near the city. With equal readiness John Marolf speaks English, German and French, and his general education is correspondingly broad and liberal. In his native land he learned the art of cheese making, in which his countrymen particularly excel, and in 1871 he came to America, landing in New York City. Almost immediately he located in Muscatine County, Iowa, where he added to his knowledge of the trades by mastering the blacksmith's trade, thereafter working on the railroads in Iowa for a couple of years. In 1873 he removed to California and engaged in farming in Sacramento County for two months, and then spent a year in San Francisco in the hotel business. Yet another occupation was undertaken in 1875, when he shipped on a whaling vessel bound for the north Pacific and Arctic oceans, and after returning made his way to Victoria, British Columbia, and from there to Grant County. Ore. For about three years he engaged in placer mining in the eastern part of the state, coming then to the Willamette valley, where he engaged at farming in Linn County until 1879.

    Purchasing his present farm in the fall of 1879, Mr. Marolf has greatly improved his property, which consists of two hundred and thirty-four acres four and a half miles south of Tillamook. He is engaged in a general dairy business, and at present is milking about forty-five cows.

    For many years Mr. Marolf has taken an active interest in politics, being a firm believer in Republican principles and institutions. For three years he was postmaster of Nestocton, when the office was maintained at his home, and he has been a school director for many years. He was married in 1882, to Lula Daniel, who was born in Macon County. Mo., in 1860, and died in Tillamook county in 1900, leaving six children: Preston, Hattie, Arthur, Ethel, Claude and Widie, the two latter twins. Mrs. Marolf was one of the pioneer women of the state, and her family was one of the first to settle on this part of the coast. Mr. Marolf has been a member of the Reformed Church for many years, and has liberally subscribed towards its support. He is held in high esteem by his friends and associates, and is one of the versatile and capable men now responsible for the dairying supremacy of Tillamook County.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Owens, William

WILLIAM HENRY OWENS. There are few men in Tillamook County so expert in treating domestic animals as William Henry Owens. Since earliest childhood he has been associated with the various kinds of stock from which man derives profit and pleasure, and aside from skill acquired by years of experience, has brought to his humane and laudable work that genuine liking which has brought success within his ready grasp. Upon coming to the west Mr. Owens followed farming and veterinary work in Humboldt County, Cal., for a time, and in 1889 located upon his present farm, six miles southeast of Tillamook. He has eighty acres of well improved land, and while engaged in general farming and stock-raising, continues veterinary work to some extent. A model dairy constitutes an important part of the farm, which is fertile and well improved, and fifteen cows are milked for the accommodation of a paying and promising dairy trade.

    Of Welsh ancestry on both sides of his family, Mr. Owens was born near Scranton, Pa., June 22, 1837, and is the third of three sons and three daughters born to his parents, Robert and Winnifred (Thomas) Owens, natives of Wales, both of whom came to America with their parents. Robert Owens was twenty years old when he arrived in America and he located near Scranton, Pa., where he eventually married and reared his family of children. His home life was exceptionally happy, and the wife who contributed to his well being for so many years fortunately tarried with him almost to the last, her death occurring at the age of seventy-nine in Oneida county, N. Y., and his one month later, at the age of eighty. Robert Owens was a farmer and veterinary surgeon and early devoted his energies to a minute study of the diseases of animals. It thus happened that his son, William Henry, became interested in the same line of occupation, and while young in years, gained a fair knowledge of the anatomy and peculiar ailments of cows, horses, sheep and other four footed animals. He was twelve years old when the family moved near Delta. Oneida county, N. Y., and in the vicinity of the home farm he attended the public schools during the winter season, working hard in the harvest field during the summer time. In 1864 he married Margaret Gibson, who was born in Canada in January, 1836. Of this union there have been born two children, Nellie, the wife of F. H. Carey, of Rainier, Ore., and William, living with his father on the home farm. Mr. Owens remained in New York until his twenty-sixth year, and then located on a farm near Joliet, Will County, where he farmed and doctored sheep and cattle. A year later he removed to Iowa, and for a year and a half engaged in carpentering, removing then to a farm in Redwood County, Minn. In 1874 he removed to Walnut Grove, that county, where for twelve years he was engaged in the mercantile business. During that time he also served as county commissioner for three years. For eleven years, or during the terms of three treasurers, he was deputized to receive the taxes in the southern part of the county, thus handling many thousand dollars of public money. For eight years, during the spring and fall seasons, he bought and shipped cattle and hogs to Chicago, consigning his shipments principally to Captain Wilson, Tomlinson, Fuller & Co., and Harley Green, commission men. Subsequently disposing of his store, he went to California and from there to his present home, where he has entered into the race for wealth with the enthusiasm so typical of the adopted sons of the northwest. Mr. Owens is a Republican in politics, and has served three years as a member of the school board. For many years he has been identified with the Masons, coming to the Tillamook lodge from the lodge at Walnut Grove, Minn., and for two years was treasurer of his lodge.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

McIntosh, Peter

PETER MCINTOSH stands prominent among the thriving and prosperous business men of the city of Tillamook. The son of a farmer, he early became familiar with the various branches of agriculture, paying special attention to dairying, in course of time developing into a noted maker of butter and cheese.

    Locating in Tillamook in 1894, he began the manufacture of cheese. He has since so enlarged his operations that he has acquired, either by purchase or erection, eight cheese factories that are now in good running order. His productions are known throughout the northwest, and are of such quality and quantity that he well deserves the title of "Cheese King of the Coast” that is frequently bestowed upon him.

    A native of Canada, he was born May 5, 1861, in Carleton County, Ontario. Duncan McIntosh, his father, was born March 2, 1826, in Glengarry County, Ontario. His grandfather, Donald G. McIntosh was born in 1792, and his great grandfather, Gilbert McIntosh, was born in 1743, in Perthshire, the highlands of Scotland. Both served in the army, the former as colonel, and the latter as a commissioned officer. In 1765 he came to America and fought with the British army during the Revolutionary war, taking part in most of the principal battles, such as Brandywine, Bunker Hill, etc., fighting under General Cornwallis. He then went back to Scotland, and immigrated to Canada with his family in 1800. He received land grants from the crown in Glengarry County, where they spent the remaining years of their lives, the great grandfather dying in 1831, and Donald G. McIntosh dying in 1876 at a venerable age. In the war of 1812 he took part as colonel, and in the uprising in Canada in 1837 he served as colonel with the Eraser regiment.

    Born March 2, 1826, Duncan McIntosh grew to manhood in Glengarry County, being reared to agricultural pursuits. In 1848 he removed to Carleton County, settling on Crown lands, and is still living on the homestead which he has improved. He married Martha Porteous, who was born in Dumfries shire, Scotland, in 1830, and died in Russell County, Ontario, in 1896, aged sixty-six years. Her father, William L. Porteous, was born in 1793, and emigrated with his family from Scotland to Ontario, dying in 1837, at the ripe age of eighty-three years.

    The sixth child in a family of ten children, Peter McIntosh received a common school education in Carleton county, Ontario, and there learned the trade of a cheese maker, which he followed in his native land for a number of years. Migrating to Washington in 1888, he located first at Tacoma. Looking about for a favorable business opportunity, he leased two cheese factories in Cowlitz County one at Freeport, and one at Woodland and was in business there for about five years. Mr. McIntosh is interested in the general merchandise store of McIntosh & McNair and is secretary and treasurer if the Tillamook Lumber Company. He is also interested to some extent in timber lands.

    Mr. McIntosh was married at Freeport, Wash., in 1891, to Miss Emily Bogard, who was born in Canada in 1868, a daughter of Peter Bogard, a lifelong resident of Canada, and for many years a successful merchant of Chesterville. Mr. and Mrs. McIntosh are the parents of one son, Donald E., who was born July 19, 1897.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

McDermott, Henry

HENRY McDERMOTT. Worthy of mention among the industrious and public spirited citizens of Tillamook is Henry McDermott, a watchmaker by trade, a traveler in several states of the Union, and a resident of this town for twenty-four years. Born in Huntingdon county, Pa., February lo, 1840, Mr. McDermott is a son of Barnard and Ellen (O'Connor) McDermott, natives of County Roscommon, Ireland, and reared and married in the mother country. Barnard McDermott was a master iron worker, and after locating in Lockhaven, Clinton county. Pa., he was furnaceman in the ironworks at that place, later on following the same occupation in Huntingdon County, where he retired from active life in 1859, and died some years later. His wife also died in Huntingdon County, after rearing a family of three sons and two daughters, Henry being the third child.

    In his youth Henry McDermott learned the watchmaker’s trade, and thus fortified for the future he turned his attention temporarily to labor having more of the element of speculation, and in Allegheny and Lawrence counties, Pa., engaged in speculating in oil lands. In 1868, however, he developed an enthusiasm for the west, and made his way to Montana, spending a year at Helena and Deer Lodge. In the Puget Sound country he engaged in lumbering at the mouth of the Snohomish River, but not meeting with expected success went to California in 1871, and there contracted and got out ties for railway building. Mr. McDermott's liking for the west was of slow growth, else he would have hardly returned to the east as soon as he did, making the journey from California to Montana on horseback. At Grass Valley he stopped and ran a steam threshing machine for about four months, then went on his way, reaching Pennsylvania in 1873. After visiting all of his people he returned in the spring to Minnesota, and in Brainerd ran a steam pump for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company. In the meantime he suffered from impaired health, and in search for that which he had lost he made a trip to Florida, spending a winter in Orange City and along the Indian River.

    In 1881 Mr. McDermott traveled from Florida to Bentonville, Ark., and the following fall came to Oregon, visiting Jacksonville, Portland, Ore., and Stevens County, Wash., remaining in the latter place about nine months. He then located in Tillamook, which has since been his home, and after two years had elapsed, fitted up a little steamer called the "Minnie Miller," and ran the same during the summer time. Beginning with 1883, he engaged in a general merchandise business for ten years, and during that time served as county treasurer six years, elected thereto by his Republican constituents. In 1893 he sold out his merchandise business and turned his attention to his trade of watchmaker, which he has since followed. Mr. McDermott has in many ways indicated his preference for and faith in his adopted town, not the least forcible being the investing of his money unencumbered town property. He owns several store and residence lots, besides a large store building. Mr. McDermott has taken all of his travels alone, for he is still a bachelor, and devoted to his trade, his books, and his few intimate friends. He is not a member of any society or church, but this is not to be construed into want of sociability, for Mr. McDermott is both genial and entertaining, and during his travels from the extreme east, to the extreme north, south and west of the United States, he has picked up a valuable fund of information, with which he pleasantly regales those who drop in to have a little chat with him.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Elliott, Charles

CHARLES A. ELLIOTT. A native born son of Oregon and a representative of one of the early families of Tillamook County, Charles A. Elliott were reared on a farm, and following the occupation of his ancestors, he has since devoted his attention to the pursuit of agriculture. A man of enterprise, industry and thrift, he has not only been successful in his chosen occupation, but his personal character is such that he enjoys the esteem and confidence of the community in which he resides. He was born March 31, 1868, in Portland, Multnomah County, Ore., a son of Jacob S. Elliott.

    Of Scotch German descent, Jacob S. Elliott was born in Genesee County, N. Y., January 12, 1830, and died January 18, 1903, on his homestead, in Tillamook County, Ore. When a young man he served an apprenticeship at the machinist's trade, at which he subsequently worked in Tennessee, and in Adrian, Mich. coming across the plains to Oregon in 1861, he brought his family and all his household effects with horse teams, being six months in performing the journey. After working as a machinist in Portland for ten years he moved into Tillamook County in 1871. Taking up a homestead claim of two hundred and forty acres, lying four miles north of Tillamook, he improved a productive ranch, and was there engaged in general farming until ills death. One of the organizers of the Bay City Presbyterian Church, he was numbered among its most active members, for many years serving as an elder. He married, in Nashville, Tenn., Jennie S. Winters, who was born in Liverpool, England, came to New York state when twelve years old, and is now living with her son, Charles A. Elliott, in Tillamook, a smart, active woman of seventy-nine years. Of their union eight children were born, three sons and five daughters.

    The youngest child of the parental household, Charles A. Elliott grew to manhood on the home farm, receiving but limited educational advantages in the pioneer district school. Trained to agricultural pursuits by his father, he has become a systematic, skillful and thorough going farmer, and a capable business man. He has one hundred and eight acres of the old homestead, subject to his mother's life dowry, and is carrying on general farming, making a specialty of dairying. In this line of industry Mr. Elliott has been quite successful, his dairy containing cows of mixed breed.

    In 1891 Mr. Elliott married Mabel Brown, who was born in Yamhill County, Ore., November 15, 1878, and they have one child, Harry C. Politically Mr. Elliott is a sound Republican in his views, and though not an office seeker has served as school director. Fraternally he is one of the leading Odd Fellows of this section, belonging to the Bay City Lodge, in which he has passed through all the chairs, and having, in 1901, served as a representative to the Grand Lodge; and is a member of the Tillamook Lodge of the Woodmen of the World. Religiously he belongs to the Bay City Presbyterian Church, and Mrs. Elliott is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Tillamook.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Jones, John

JOHN L. JONES, who bears the reputation of a practical and honorable business man, has recently formed a partnership with his sister in law, Mrs. Mary Lindsey, in the millinery business in Tillamook. When Mr. Jones engaged in the livery business in 1891, he had practically nothing, and the competence which he later possessed was due to his own grit and determination. He was born March 16, 1865, in Trinity County, Cal., where a number of his earlier years were spent. Of an old New England family, he is a son of David and Mary (Cone) Jones, the latter of whom was born at Wagner. Ohio, and died in Mendocino county, Cal., at the age of forty-eight. David Jones was born in Peekskill. N. Y., and in 1838 started out upon a whaling career along the Atlantic coast, and up into Arctic waters. His was an adventurous life for several years, for he went on extremely long trips before the end of his nautical experiences, going around the Horn seven times, and around Cape of Good Hope twice. Many times he had marvelous escapes from death, but the sailers in which he shipped were always stanch craft, and manned by courageous crews. Sixteen years before the mast engendered a longing for a settled home life, so he came to Corvallis, Ore., bought land, and engaged in the nursery business for some time. In 1863 he located on land near Minersville, Trinity County, Cal., married there, and farmed until moving to Point Arena, Mendocino County, in 1867. This is still his home, although he has retired from farming to the quiet and peace of a well conditioned life.

    John L. Jones, the younger of two sons born to his parents, started out in life equipped with a practical common school education. In 1891 he engaged in a livery business in Tillamook, sold out in 1893, but re-bought in 1896, and again sold out in 1897. He then started a meat market in partnership with M. F. Leach, his half brother, whose biography appears elsewhere in this work. This association was amicably continued four and a half years, when Mr. Leach succeeded to the entire business, and Mr. Jones engaged in farming until 1902.

    In California, in 1891, Mr. Jones married Maud Lindsey, who, since coming from her native state of Missouri with her father, Robert Lindsey, lived on the home place at Point Arena. Of the three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Jones the oldest died in infancy: George died at the age of sixteen months; and Lloyd, the only child living, is five years old. Mr. Jones has lately returned from a trip of two months and a half to the old home in Mendocino County, Cal. He is a Republican in political affiliation, and has served as a member of the city council for a couple of terms. Fraternally he is connected with the Woodmen of the World. He is just and honorable in all his dealings, progressive in his tendencies, a stanch advocate of education, and is devoted to his family circle and his many friends.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Bodyfelt, George

GEORGE W. BODYFELT. A resume of the men whose energies have materially aided in the development of Tillamook County would be incomplete without due mention of George W. Bodyfelt, owner of a farm of one hundred and ten acres in the vicinity of Tillamook, and one of the progressive and modern exponents of practical, scientific dairying. The improvements on the farm are entirely due to the present occupant, who has cleared seventy-five acres, and has built his house, barns, and outbuildings out of hand split lumber, making then as substantial and weather defying as any which house the agricultural population of the west. Mr. Bodyfelt is essentially a dairyman, although hay and other farm produce swell his yearly income. He milks about twenty-two cows, and meets a read sale for his really fine daily products.

    Mr. Bodyfelt was thirteen years old when he crossed the plains with his parents in 1862, having been born in Adams County, Ind., In February 9, 1849. His father, Daniel, was born in Somerset County, Pa., .March 19, 1813, and died at his home in Tillamook County, in 1882, from a cold contracted in the mines of California and Idaho. He was of Pennsylvania Dutch stock, while his wife, formerly Amy Jane Catterlin, was born in Butler County, Ohio, October 30, 1825, and is of English extraction. Mrs. Bodyfelt afterward married Peter Brant, and is at present living in the town of Tillamook. She is the mother of four sons and two daughters, of whom George W. is the oldest. The parents were married in Adams County, Ind., about 1846, and in September, 1857, located in Marion County, Iowa, where the father engaged in carpentering and millwrighting. In the meantime, in 1852, Daniel Bodyfelt crossed the plains in a train of gold seekers, and after fair success in the mines returned to his former home in Indiana by way of the Isthmus. Though for ten years he filled his life with honorable industry and home making achievements, he was never again satisfied with the east, feeling always a yearning for the west. His course in 1862 was dictated by the incessant promptings of his heart, and after disposing of his saw and grist mill he bought the necessary outfit for conveying across the plains the family and possessions for beginning life anew under newer and more favorable conditions. With two wagons and six yoke of oxen he made the start May 21, arriving at his destination in Yamhill county November 15, 1862. He was for a time captain of the train, which experienced scarcely any of the discomfort which rendered terrifying and dangerous the path of the earlier emigrants. The first winter was spent in Yamhill County, and thereafter Mr. Bodyfelt lived in and near the town of Lafayette until October, 1865, in the meantime working at his trade, and getting quite a start in the new country. From Yamhill he came to Tillamook County over the Harris trail, shipping his goods by boat, and taking up one hundred and twenty acres of land five miles east of Tillamook, where the balance of his life was spent. He saw much of the west during his sojourn here, and in 1863 took a trip to Idaho, but his experience in the mines was hardly satisfactory.

    Educated in the public schools of Iowa and Oregon and at the Lafayette Academy, George W. Bodyfelt remained on the home place until his twenty-third year, and in 1872 married Mary Butt, who was born near Greencastle, Ind., January 10. 1850. William Butt, who is now living with his daughter, was eighty-four years old May 16, 1903, and his wife was eighty-one on May 4, the same year. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bodyfelt, five of whom are living: William D., employed by W. N. Vaughn; Oscar, at home; James, living at Cloverdale; Clara, the wife of O. Kelso, of Hebo, Ore.; and Arthur, living on the home farm. In 1869 Mr. Bodyfelt went to the Smith River, Douglas County, and engaged in logging for eight months, and finally bought eighty acres of school land five miles northeast of town, where he lived for two years. He then took up his present homestead, which consisted at the time of one hundred and sixty acres, fifty acres of which have since been sold. Mr. Bodyfelt has taken an active interest in Republican politics, and has been a member of the school board for twenty years. He also served as constable of Tillamook, and in 1902 was elected county commissioner. He is a keen business man and practical farmer, and is regarded as one of the substantial, reliable and honorable up builders of a prosperous community.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Quick, Isaac

ISAAC C. QUICK. The dairy farm of Isaac C. Quick is located six and a half miles southeast of Tillamook, and consists of three hundred acres. It has been in the possession of the present owner for many years, and in its management and general improvements shows the judgment of a thoughtful and conscientious agriculturist and stock raiser. Mr. Quick's life has been one of toil and more or less conflict with discouraging obstacles, yet he has never been known to turn back or allow anything permanently to interfere with his progress. He was born in Holmes County, Ohio, April 8, 1832, his family having been established in the Buckeye state by his paternal grandfather in 1812, after his removal from his native state of Pennsylvania. With this sire came Benjamin Quick, the father of Isaac, who was reared on a Holmes county farm, and in time married Susan Clough, a native daughter of Pennsylvania, who died in the early 80s in Ohio. Benjamin Quick made a fair success of farming, and lived until 1842, his age being sixty-five years.

    When ten years of age Isaac C. Quick was left fatherless, and as he was the oldest of the four sons and one daughter in the family, he started out soon afterward to make his own way in the world. As a farm hand he remained in the state of Ohio until 1853, and then moved to Johnson County, Mo., remaining there on different farms until 1854. This year stands out in his life as presenting the greatest promise, for he secured the position of stock driver with a train of emigrants bound for the coast, and had charge of five hundred loose cattle. The west had long had a fascination for him, and he gladly assumed the burden of caring for the large herd, and arrived at the end of his six months journey with three hundred of the animals in trusted to his care. This was a good showing, considering the losses from disease, alkali water, drowning and Indian appropriation. Mr. Quick stopped first above Stockton, Cal., but soon afterward went to the mines of the Sacramento valley, and met with rather indifferent success. Later he turned his attention to ranching in the southern state, but not realizing his expectations came to Oregon over the mountains with teams, intending to mine on the Frazier River, British Columbia. Before getting that far his courage failed, and at Victoria he turned back and settled in Yamhill County. From August, 1858, until 1863 he worked on different farms in the county, and in May, 1863, married Frances A. Simmons, who was born in Wisconsin April 17, 1847. With his newly wedded wife he located on a rented farm near McMinnville, and two years later, in the fall of 1865, moved to Tillamook County and took up one hundred and sixty acres of land three and a half miles south of Tillamook. Here he lived and prospered for fifteen years, removing then to a farm on the Nestucca river, and two years later sold his claim near the town of Tillamook. His present place of three hundred acres was purchased after due investigation of the desirable properties in the county, and that his choice was a wise one has been demonstrated to the satisfaction of the fortunate owner. Mr. Quick raises a high grade of stock on his farm, and at present is a milking thirty-five cow in his dairy. He is independent in his political views, and has served as county commissioner, road supervisor and school director. Fraternally he is a member of Tillamook Lodge No. 57, A. F. & A. M. twelve children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Quick, namely: Susan C, born in Yamhill County, July 12, 1864, is now the wife of Emanuel Ericson of East Portland; Hester P., born October 31, 1866, in Tillamook county, is the wife of Charles Wells of Tillamook; Dick B., born November 10, 1868, resides in Washington county; Clara F., born July 6, 1870, is the wife of Jasper Buckles, of South Prairie, Tillamook county; Deroy C, born December 17, 1872, died in October, 1903; Thomas L., born April 8, 1875, is living in Clatsop county; William H., born April 9, 1879, is at home; Isaac F., born October 22, 1881, lives in Portland; Ivan C, born May 16, 1884, died in 1894; Addie D., born March 16, 1887; Ladd C, born April 22, 1890, and Rosa D., born January 25, 1893, are at home.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca

Donaldson, Joseph

JOSEPH G. DONALDSON. In August, 1864, Joseph G. Donaldson located in Tillamook County, Ore., coming from California, where he had emigrated in 1859. He was born in Lumpkin County, Ga., March 12, 1837, a son of John Donaldson, who was a miller and carpenter by occupation and one of the prominent men of Lumpkin County. As a boy he attended the public schools of Georgia, but owing to the fact that his parents had a large family it early in life fell to his lot to assist in the support of the family, and the greater part of his education was derived from practical pursuits, augmented from year to year by study and observation. From his earliest boyhood he had been reared upon a farm. In 1859, having heard of the opportunities for advancement in the far west, he decided to make the venture. Severing home ties, he went to New York City and embarked on a steamer for Panama, and after crossing the isthmus, again embarked for California, reaching the Golden Gate in the fall of 1859. He at once took up mining, and in Nevada County he followed that occupation four years, at the end of which time he moved to Oregon, settling in Tillamook County.

    December 15, 1860, he was united in marriage with Amanda L. Smith, who was born in Keokuk county, Iowa, December 9, 1848, and is the only one of the children now living born to Charles Wesley and Sarah (Bevins) Smith, the latter of whom was born in Iowa and died of smallpox in Nevada county, Cal., in March, 1854, at the age of twenty-three years. Charles Wesley Smith, a pioneer of California and also of Tillamook County, Ore., was born in Ohio December 6, 1823, a son of Samuel and Charlotte (Shintafer) Smith. The former was born March 21, 1781, and died November 21, 1854, and the latter died September 20, 1859, their marriage occurring March 10, 1803. They were the parents of fifteen children, of whom Charles Wesley was the thirteenth child and eleventh son. He made his home at various times in Ohio, Indiana Illinois and Iowa until his thirtieth year, when he crossed the plains with his wife and daughter, Amanda L., then but five years of age. They arrived in Nevada City, Cal., in the fall of 1853, and spent the first winter there. In February, 1854, the family removed to a place called Joiners Ranch, now Lake City, where the wife and mother died. From that time until coming to Oregon, Mr. Smith lived in Placer and Nevada counties, where he engaged in mining and working in the timber, logging, making shakes, shingles and mining timbers. In 1863 he made a visit to Oregon, having received an invitation from his brother, Hiram Smith, who had been a resident of Tillamook County since 1853. Here he remained and engaged in farming for many years. He died July 18, 1900, aged seventy-six years, seven months and twelve days. He was an indulgent parent, a sympathetic friend and a kind and obliging neighbor, charitable to all whom he found in trouble. He accumulated considerable property and was quoted as one of the successful citizens of the county where he had made his home for so many years. Mrs. Donaldson was left motherless at the age of six years, was educated in the public schools of California, and was taught to be a model farmer's wife, becoming an expert in household arts.

    Joseph G. Donaldson came to Oregon to better his condition which, indeed, was the hope and expectation of all the early settlers. Upon his arrival here his worldly possessions consisted of $60 and some bedclothes. He settled on a farm in Tillamook County, which he homesteaded, and which Mrs. Donaldson's father had held for them by the payment of $50. The land was in a wild state, and with indomitable courage Mr. and Mrs. Donaldson began to make a comfortable home. Their first taxes were between $10 and $15, and in 1903 were $312. They first began dairying on a small scale, milking two cows in 1867, and during May, June and July, 1903, the income from their cattle, which has always been the chief source of revenue, was $400 per month. From 1864 until 1889 the family resided upon the farm that was the original homestead, at this time paying $2,500 for two hundred acres of fine bottom land. Removing his family to this place he began making improvements that are seen today by visitors to the farm, where they will always find a welcome. In 1896 the old homestead was sold in order to make the final payment on the present farm, and upon the death of Mrs. Donaldson's father, who left her $2,000, she purchased the old place and now owns three hundred and twenty-seven acres of the finest farming land in the county.

    Mr. and Mrs. Donaldson had sixteen children, namely: Sarah Nancy, born in Nevada County, Cal., September 16, 1862, died in early infancy; Margaret Elizabeth, born June 13, 1864, in Nevada county, Cal., is the widow of M. H. Park hurst; Mary Emily, born June 20, 1866, is the wife of H. Herzinger, of Idaho county, Idaho; Charles Edwin, born April 26, 1868, resides in Tillamook county; Cordelia Florence, born October 5, 1869, married D. T. Edmonds, and they reside in Tillamook; Roxy Ann Grace, born June 20, 1871, married C. A. Smith, of Tillamook county; John Henry, born November 11, 1873, lives in Tillamook county; May, born February 25, 1876, is the wife of R. Y. Blalock, and they reside near Tillamook; Robert E. Lee, born January 1, 1878, is now at home; Lelia Olive, born October 17, 1879, married A. G. West, and resides at Seattle, Wash.; Dora Innocence, born September 13, 1881, married C. Nelson and lives in Pendleton, Ore.; Joseph Wesley, born September 20, 1883, was the next in order of birth; Grover Cleveland, born June 17, 1885, was killed by the accidental discharge of a gun May 4, 1898; Ivan, born May 19, 1887; Virgil, March 30, 1889, and Jessie Elvira, July 17, 1892, are at home. All of these children were born in Tillamook County except the two eldest. Mr. Donaldson died November 20, 1898, at his home, surrounded by his family and friends. He was an excellent farmer, a fair minded, honest and progressive and intelligent man, loyal to his family, his friends, and the occupation for which nature fitted him. The improvements on both of his farms were of his ideas, constructed on modern lines. The farms are among the most fertile in the county, located four miles east of Tillamook. Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Donaldson has carried on the farm work, assisted by her two sons and one grandson, and they are meeting with flattering success. Mrs. Donaldson has fifteen granddaughters and ten grandsons, the eldest of whom, a grandson, is sixteen years of age. All are living. Since her marriage in 1860 there have been forty-one births and five deaths within their immediate circle two sons in law, one son by accident, and the father and husband of Mrs. Donaldson. During the residence of twenty-five years on the homestead the services of a physician were needed but once. The families were reared in the doctrines of the Methodist church, south.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon
Containing Original Sketches of many well known Citizens of the Past and Present
Chapman Publishing Company; Chicago - 1904
Transcribed by Alona Planca



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