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Brady, Jasper E., lawyer, congressman, was born in New Jersey. In 1847-49 he was a representative from Pennsylvania to the thirtieth congress. He died Jan. 23, 1870, in Washington. D.C.

[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Broome, Jacob, congressman, was born July 25, 1808, in Baltimore, Md. In 1840 he was deputy auditor of Pennsylvania. In 1855-57 he was a representative from Pennsylvania to the thirty-fourth congress. He died in November, 1864, in Washington, D.C.

[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Burnett, Ward Benjamin, soldier, civil engineer, was born in 1811 in Pennsylvania. He was engaged with his regiment at the siege of Vera Cruz; and was in the battles of Cerro Gordo, Contreras and Churubuseo during the Mexican war. He received the thanks of the state legislature and a silver medal from the city of New York; and was brevetted brigadier-general. As a civil engineer he was engaged on dry-dock construction in 1849-55. He died June 24, 1884, in Washington, D.C.

[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

Frazer, Philip, lawyer, jurist, was born in Pennsylvania. He adopted the profession of the law and settled at Jacksonville, Fla.; and in 1862 was appointed United States district judge for the northern district of Florida. He died in Jacksonville, Fla.

[Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States, by William Herringshaw, 1909 – Transcribed by Therman Kellar]

J.V. GEIGER
J.V. Geiger, of Mesa county, with an attractive home on a productive and well cultivated ranch sixteen miles southeast of Grand Junction and in the vicinity of Whitewater, is a native of Pennsylvania, and was born on December 9, 1860. His parents were Andrew and Mary (Mott) Geiger, natives of Germany, where their forefathers had lived for generations before them. They emigrated to the United States not many years after their marriage and settled in Pennsylvania, where they passed the remainder of their days, the mother dying in 1886, at the age of fifty-five, and the father in 1887, at that of sixty-seven. Their son passed his boyhood at Williamsport in his native state, and was educated in the public schools of that progressive city. About the age of eighteen he started in life for himself, coming west to Missouri, and after remaining in that state about six months, moving to the neighborhood of Leavenworth, Kansas, and there engaging in farming for a year. He next came to Fort Collins in this state, and worked in the stone quarries there about six months, then went to New Mexico where he was employed for a year in railroad construction work. At the end of that time he returned to Colorado, and after spending about four years in prospecting, he bought the ranch on which he now resides and which has ever since been his home. To the cultivation and improvement of this property he has devoted himself with care and industry, and he has made his labor pay in the increased productiveness and value of his land and the greater comfort and attractiveness of his buildings. He is a progressive and far-seeing man and works with system toward his desired ends. In 1894 he was married to Miss Minnie Virden and they have four children, Frank, Mary, Gertrude and Annie. Born and reared in the East, and having lived for a number of years in the middle and farther West, Mr. Geiger has a comprehensive knowledge of the extent and wealth of our country, and to its interests he is earnestly devoted, giving especially to his own section his best aid in its advancement.
(Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)
HENRY LINTON
Harry Linton, an enterprising farmer and stock-grower of Gunnison county, with a fine ranch of two hundred and eighty acres located seven miles northeast of the county seat, was born in Pennsylvania in 1845, and was reared to the age of nine years amid the seething and intense activities of that great commonwealth. At that age he moved with his parents, George and Susan (Folk) Linton, to Iowa, where he grew to manhood and received a common school education. His parents were both natives of Pennsylvania, born just when the eighteenth century, glorious in its achievements for the elevation of mankind, was surrendering the scepter of power to its young and ambitious successor, and they passed their lives in that state, until 1854, prosperously engaged in lumber pursuits, then moved to Iowa where they ended their days, the father dying in 1863, aged sixty-one, and the mother in 1895, aged ninety-two. They were of old colonial stock of Revolutionary fame, the father of English and the mother of Welch ancestry. At the age of eighteen their son Harry began life for himself, learning the carpenter trade and working at that and farming until 1883, when he emigrated to Colorado and settled at Mount Carbon, Gunnison county. There for five years he worked at his trade, finding great demand for his mechanical skill amid the growing energies of the place, and prosperous in the use of it. In 1890 he moved to Denver and started a real estate business, which he carried on successfully for two years. He then returned to Iowa and settled at Des Moines, where he remained five or six years. Then coming back to Colorado, he settled on the beautiful and fertile ranch of two hundred and eighty acres which he now occupies on Gunnison river. This has since been his home, and here he has conducted an up-to-date and progressive ranching and stock industry, of good proportions and elevated character. Mr. Linton was married in 1889 to Miss Louisa Pennington, a native of Pennsylvania and at the time of her marriage a resident of Gunnison, where the marriage was solemnized. They have three children, George C., Helen H. and Edith Elnoria, who died on April 16, 1905. Mr. Linton is a Republican in politics, and is active in the service of his party at all times. He is also devotedly attached to the section in which he lives and zealous in promoting its welfare and advancement by all means at his command.
(Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Richard Ramos)
Vincent U. Rodgers
Vincent U. Rodgers occupies two important positions in the public life of San Miguel county, being clerk of the district court and city treasurer of Telluride, and has risen to the consequence and high standing that he enjoys through the exhibition of business capacity, good character and a diligent and intelligent attention to duty. He is a native of Pennsylvania, where he was born on May 6, 1869, and the son of D. s. and Eleanor (McLaughlin) Rodgers, also natives of that stat. In his home state he grew to man hood and received his education. After completing the public school course in the vicinity of his home he attended the Bryant & Stratton Business College at Buffalo, New York. In 1887 the family moved to Colorado and located at Durango, where the father engaged in mining and the son in newspaper work, he having previously learned the trade of a printer. He moved to Telluride in 1894 and became bookkeeper and stenographer for the Tomboy Mining Company, remaining in its employ two years. He then entered the employ of Mr. Painter in the insurance business at which he continued until he was appointed clerk of the district court in 1898. He then established an insurance and real estate business of his own, and this he has built up to good proportions and made very profitable. In 1903 he was elected city treasurer of Telluride, and re-elected in 1905, and since then he has performed his dual official functions with the same diligence and conscientious attention that he gives to his private business. He also owns valuable ranch property and stock and has a one-half interest in the lease on the San Bernardo mine. He is prominent in the Masonic order, belonging to lodge, chapter commandery and consistory, and serves a secretary of each of the local bodies. He also belongs to the order of Elks and is secretary of his lodge at Telluride. His success in life is the legitimate result of his enterprise and public spirit and he has honestly earned the general esteem in which he is held throughout the county. Young, active and capable, with vigorous physical health and worthy ambitions, he may confidently look forward to a career of usefulness and honor.
(Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Nancy Overlander)
JOHN W. TRITES
Men who make themselves felt in the world avail themselves of a certain fate in their constitution, which they know how to use. In the case of John W. Trites, of Saguache county, whose fine ranch of one thousand and forty acres is located about eight miles southwest of the town of Saguache, a section of the county in which he and John Davey were the first settlers, this fate or native force if the readiness to see and the ability to seize and make the most of every opportunity that presents itself, and the willingness to do whatever that opportunity demands as the price of success. He has foresight, resourcefulness and energy, with a determined self-reliance that shrinks from no difficulty and cowers before no danger. And these are qualities which are not only at high premium but are essential to any success of magnitude in the ordinary conditions of life in this western world, where nature is provident, but will not unmask her treasures to the timid, the halting or the doubtful. Mr. Trites was born on November 30, 1842, in Pennsylvania, that great field of labor wherein every line of human activity is worked and all are profitable. He is the son of John and Jane (Robinson) Trites, natives of Germany who emigrated to this country and located in Pennsylvania in early life. They afterward moved to Maine, and still later to New Brunswick, Canada, there they ended their days. The father was a successful farmer and also conducted a profitable butchering business in New Brunswick. He was a Freemason of high degree, and both parents were Baptists in church connection. Three children survive them, John, Amelia and James. The first named received a common-school education, and impelled by the irrepressible spirit of energy inherited from long lines of thrifty ancestors, started out at the age of sixteen to make his own way in the world, asking no favors of fortune, and relying on his own capabilities in the effort. He served an apprenticeship of three years in a carriage manufactory in New Brunswick, and then another as a joiner in the shipyards. In 1866 he moved to Kansas City, Missouri, and during the summer of that year worked as a joiner in a carpenter shop, also helping to build the first bridge over the Missouri from the Wyandotte Bottoms to Kansas City. In 1867 he took the western fever, and started to work his way to the goal of his desires on what is now the Union Pacific Railroad, helping to build the bridges on the line between Fort Wallace and Denver. After reaching the city last named, he rested there four months, then took a position to aid in building the bridges on the narrow gauge road between there and Canon City, devoting two years to this work. Afterward he made a visit of inspection into the San Luis valley, but not being pleased with the outlook, went to Colorado Springs in 1872. He soon moved back into the valley, however, and bought a ranch which after improving it to some extent he sold in 1874. He then purchased a portion of his present ranch, and by subsequent purchases he has increased this to one thousand and forty acres, four hundred of which are devoted to grain and the rest to hay and pasturage. He is extensively engaged in raising cattle and horses, being one of the leading men in the business in his county, and his ranching operations are also large and profitable. The place is well watered from nine artesian wells bored on it by his own enterprise, and the greater part of it is under good fencing. It is much to his credit, that having settled here when there was no other family in the neighborhood, by his influence and example the region is now filling up with thrifty and enterprising citizens and its undeveloped wealth is gradually flowing into the channels of commerce and adding to the importance and consequence of the county. His only neighbor at first was John Davey, who settled here about the same time as he did, and the opening of the country by these two progressive and hardy men has resulted in its present state of advancement and development. Mr. Trites's ranch is well improved with a good dwelling and other buildings, and every interest on it or growing out of its operation has the benefit of his close attention and skillful management. He is earnest in the public life of the county as a Democrat, zealous in its fraternal life as an Odd Fellow and serviceable to all its local interests as a progressive, far-seeing and energetic citizen.
(Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Richard Ramos)
MILTON K. WYCKOFF was born in Pennsylvania December 22, 1854, and went west with his father and to Dakota with him. He settled on the southeast quarter of section 4 in Walburg township, Cass county, where he has since resided and is one of the prosperous farmers of his community. Mr. Wyckoff was married, in Minnesota, in 1880, to Miss Mary Combs, a native of Minnesota. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wyckoff, as follows: Mable M., Carrie E. and Walter W. Mr. Wyckoff is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Knights of the Maccabees. He is a Republican in political faith, but does not seek public preferment, and is highly esteemed.
[Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Kim Mohler]

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