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Crawford County Pennsylvania
History and Genealogy
Biographies

 

Charles H. Andrews

C. H. AKENS

Christopher Bolard

Jennie (Burchfield) Bush

Mrs. Corresta T. Canfield

Millie Jane Chapman

Mrs. Lydia (Evans) Hogue

 Charles H. Andrews, prothonotary of Lawrence County, to which important office he was elected in November, 1905, is one of the most popular public officials in this section of the State. He was born June 21, 1870, in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, and is a son of John A. and Charlotte H. (Palmer) Andrews. The parents reared five children. The father lives retired at No. 132 North Ray Street, New Castle.

Charles H. Andrews was educated in the public schools. Upon leaving school he became employed in a wire nail factory for seven years. He then engaged in mercantile pursuits and so continued thirteen years, until elected to his present office. He has taken an active interest in public affairs and is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party. His fraternal connections include membership in the Knights of Pythias, the Odd Fellows, the Sons of Veterans and the Woodmen. Mr. Andrews married, October 15, 1895, Jennie E. Sweet, who is a daughter of William L. Sweet, and they have one child, Charlotte K. The pleasant family home is situated on Court Street, New Castle.

Source: 20th Century History of New Castle and Lawrence County Pennsylvania And Representative Citizens (1908) - Contributed by Jeanne Hall



C. H. AKENS, one of New Castle's most prominent attorneys, senior member of the law firm of Akens, Wilkison, Lockhart & Chambers, was bom in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, September 13, 1855, and is a son of Hamilton J. and Hannah (Sweeting) Akens.

The Akens family is one of the oldest in Lawrence County. The father of C. H. Akens was born in Lawrence County, but after his marriage moved to Crawford County, where he was engaged in the lumber business. He returned to Lawrence County in 1866 and resided on a fann in Shenango Township, where he lived until he moved to New Castle a few years before his death.
C. H. Akens was eleven years of age when his parents removed to Shenango Township, and he was primarily educated in the old McKee School in that township, later attending the public school at New Castle for one year; then attending the One Study College, as it was called, conducted by Prof. John R. Steeves, in the McCready Block, on Pittsburg Street, New Castle, and afterwards entering the State Normal School at Edinboro, where he graduated in 1880. Mr. Akens worked his way through school by helping on the farm in summer and teaching in the winter. while attending the One Study College he rode back and forward, six miles, to attend recitations and assisted mornings and evenings on the farm.

In April, 1884, he was admitted to the bar, having prepared for the law under John G. McConahy and "B. A. Wintemitz, and on May 4, 1884, he opened his office at New Castle. He continued alone in practice until April, 1907, when he became associated with the other attorneys of his present firm, Hamilton A. Wilkison, John P. Lockhart and James A. Chambers, the firm being one of much legal strength and one which is recognized both individually and collectively in the important litigation in this section. Mr. Akens is a member of the Superior and Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and also of the Supreme Court of the United States. He was one of the charter members of the Lawrence County Bar Association.

On December 25, 1884, Mr. Akens was married to Miss Eva E. Quigley, who is a daughter of James and Mary A. Quigley, of Lawrence County. Mr. Akens is a member of the Order of the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is a Democrat.

Source: 20th Century History of New Castle and Lawrence County Pennsylvania And Representative Citizens (1908) - Contributed by Jeanne Hall

Christopher Bolard

Christopher Bolard, son of Frederick and Margaret Elizabeth (North) Bolard, or Bolar, was born near Conneautville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania, July 16, 1809, died January 7, 1872. He was a farmer, also a contractor and hotelkeeper. In politics he was a Democrat, and he belonged to the Methodist church. On September 29, 1836, he married Mary Ann Gray, born July 29, 1813, died May 5, 1872. Children Frederick David, Mary E., born February 20, 1839, died February 27,1847 infant son, born and died October 17, 1842.

[Source: Take From the Genealogical and Personal History of Western Pennsylvania "Volumn 3", Editor; John W. Jordan, New York, copied at Pittsburg Carnegie Library 1975~, pg.1699 printed 1915. - Donated by Betty Patterson]


Jennie (Burchfield) Bush

BUSH, Mrs. Jennie Burchfield, author, born in Meadville, Pa., 28th of April, 1858. She is of Scotch, English and Irish descent. Her father was James Burchfield, a prominent journalist of Meadville and a brilliant writer. Her mother, Sarah M. Coburn, also a journalist, was a woman of poetic temperament. The daughter was placed in the State Normal School in Edinburgh, Pa., at the age of six years, and remained there until she was sixteen years old. In 1875 she went to Augusta, Kans., where her mother was living, and she has been since then a resident of that State. She became the wife, on the 21st October, 1877, of A. T. Bush, a well-known stockman, of Louisville, Ky. Her family consists of two sons. Mrs. Bush was unconscious of her poetical powers until a few years ago. Since writing her first poem she has made a thorough study of the art of poetic expression. She has published extensively in newspapers and periodicals. Her literary work, while mainly poetical, includes a number of short stories and several serials. Her home in Wichita is an ideal one.

(American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies Vol 1 Publ. 1897 Transcribed by Marla Snow)

Mrs. Corresta T. Canfield

CANFIELD, Mrs. Corresta T., physician, born in Chardon, Ohio, 6th March, 1833. The Canfields, for meritorious service, received from the king of England, in 1350, a grant of land on the river Cam, in Yorkshire, and settled thereon. After occupying that grant for three-hundred years, they came to America, shortly after the arrival of the Plymouth Pilgrims, and were among the first settlers of New Haven, Conn. Dr. Canfield is descended from French Huguenots and New England Presbyterians. Her mother, reared at a time when it was thought a sin for a man to kiss his wife or babe on Sunday, did not neglect the moral training of her children. Intellectual, well-read, in advance of her time, the daughter has inherited energy, will power and executive ability. Corresta entered the seminary of Chardon at an early age, but she was soon married. Though a wife and mother, reading and study were kept up. From her childhood she was ambitious to be a physician. Left alone without resources, at the close of the Civil War, the ambitions of early youth revived. In 1869 she entered the Woman's Homeopathic College of Cleveland, Ohio. With the help of a half-year's scholarship Mrs. Canfield finished the first college year. In the second year she became an assistant of the president, Dr. Myra K. Merrick, and gained means to continue in college. She was graduated with first honors in 1871, having served for some time as demonstrator of anatomy. During the following summer she practiced in Fort Wayne, Ind., earning enough to enable her to enter the Men's Homeopathic College of Cleveland. While there, she was demonstrator of anatomy in the woman's department, and practiced enough, visiting patients mornings and evenings, to defray expenses. She attended all the lectures, passed through the whole curriculum and was graduated third in the men's course, the faculty acknowledging that she was entitled to a prize, but would not establish a precedent by awarding it to a practicing physician. A full-fledged M. D., she settled in Titusville, Pa. Having but fifteen dollars capital, she borrowed enough to buy out a resident physician, and under great opposition so won public patronage as to pay all her debts the first year. There she remained nearly ten years and amassed a snug sum. She next spent a year in traveling. In 1882 she settled in Chicago, where she has built up a large practice and served in many public offices. She is at present a member of the board of censors of the American Institute of Homeopathy, having been elected for the second time. She was the first woman who served in that capacity. One was elected the previous year but was not allowed to serve on the board of censors. Three years before her admission women were not permitted to join that society, and much opprobrium was still attached to those "hybrids" who did. Even women shared in that feeling. After a time, seeing none of her sex actively represented in the society, she felt that, to enjoy its privileges, one should assume its duties. She therefore prepared a paper and read it before the institute. She has served as president, vice-president and secretary of the Woman's Medical Association of Chicago, vice-president of the Hahnemann Clinical for two years, and has been appointed on the woman's committee for a homeopathic congress to be held during the World's Columbian Exposition in 1893.

(American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies Vol 1 Publ. 1897 Transcribed by Marla Snow)


Millie Jane Chapman

CHAPMAN, Miss Millie Jane, doctor of medicine, born in Beaver, Crawford county, Pa., 23rd July, 1845. She is the daughter of Lewis K. and Robey Ormsbee Chapman. She had a happy early childhood, but reverses came to the family, and at the age of ten years she was not bound down by any weight or handicapped by wealth which might have prevented the development of the resources within herself. From that age she was self-supporting. The industrious spirit, perseverance, strong judgment, sympathy and kindness possessed by both parents were transmitted to her. Her education was obtained in the public schools and in the State Normal, supplemented by studies at night. She taught school twelve years and was recognized as an efficient instructor. Beginning when "boarding round" was the custom and five dollars per month was the salary, she gradually advanced to schools where higher attainments insured greater compensation. She studied medicine in the Homeopathic College of Cleveland, Ohio. She was graduated in February, 1874 and located at once in Pittsburgh, Pa., where she still resides. She found it a conservative city, unaccustomed to woman doctors and not realizing a demand for them. It required a great struggle to become established. The pioneer efforts and all influence connected therewith were borne as a necessary ordeal to one entering upon an unusual work. She labored with a firm determination to maintain true professional dignity and general courtesy to all deserving associates, cognizant of the fact that hard study and patient perseverance would be necessary to reach the goal. Her true womanly character in the profession has been endorsed by many exalted positions in local, district, State and national medical organizations. Her faith in God and in the brotherhood of mankind has induced her to make extensive efforts for humanity, for the relief of their physical distress and for their education and reformation.

(American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies Vol. 1, by Frances Elizabeth Willard & Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Publ. 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)

Mrs. Lydia (Evans) Hogue

HOGUE, Mrs. Lydia Evans, educator, born in Crawford county, Pa., near Meadville, 14th April, 1856. Her maiden name was Evans. Mrs. Hogue's mother, Mary Kemble Evans, was a native of East Liverpool, Ohio, of English descent and a relative of Mad Anthony Wayne. At eleven years of age she was sent to Cattaraugus county, N. Y., where she was graduated in gymnastics at the age of thirteen, and pursued piano music and literary and scientific studies, and afterward entered the Pennsylvania State Normal School in Edinburgh, where she was graduated in 1875. After graduation she began to teach in Grandintown. The next year she was called to the high school of Tidioute, Pa., where she taught for eight years. In 1885 she was elected preceptress of the high school of Oil City, which place she resigned in 1886 to become the wife of Prof. S. F. Hogue and the preceptress of Defiance College, with Dr. Hogue as president. In 1888 and 1889 they laid the foundation of Redstone Academy, in Uniontown, Pa. In 1890 they accepted the presidency and preceptorship of Monongahela College, in Jefferson, Pa. Mrs. Hogue was graduated in the first class of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle, in 1882, and attended the lectures, and has taken the degrees B. E. D., M. E. D. and A. M.

(Source: American Women, by Frances Elizabeth Willard, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Vol 1, 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)

 

 

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