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Crawford County Pennsylvania
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 Meadville in 1805

The Centinel (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania)
January 29 1806 Page 1

Extract of a letter from a gentleman in Meadville, Crawford county, to his friend in this place, dated Dec. 12, 1805.

"I will beg leave to subjoin the following answers to the several queries, contained in your last letter.

"Ist query. What are the number of houses in Meadville; and its population and trade?

"There are in Meadville about sixty houses. I presume the population is about two hundred souls. The town in situated on the east branch of French creek, about 22 miles by land from its contlience with the Allegheny river. The creek is navigable 60 miles above the town. This week 14 flat bottomed boats, and fix keel boats, descended the creek, carrying about 2600 barrels of salt, each barrel containing five bushels - which will sell in Pittsburgh, and the neighbouring towns for twelve dollars per barrel. The smallest of the flat bottomed boats was 50 feet by 10 feet. The trade of Meadville is not yet so matured as to enable me to give a sufficient account of it; but the staple commodity of the country will be cattle and flour.

"2d query. What is the quality of the soil at the several distances of 3, 5 and 10 miles from Meadville?

"Ans. The soil in the neighborhood of Meadville is very good, and when well cultivated produces fine crops. The farmers in the neighborhood of the town say that they have raised forty five bushels of wheat to the acre; but this is by no means general; though it shews that by good cultivation the ground will produce large crops. The foil, at the several distances which you mention, is nearly of the same quality.

"3d query. What is the medium price of land at those several distances from town?

"Ans. The land at the several distances which you mention, sells at various prices, from two dollars and fifty cents to twelve dollars. Men who have got good farms, and who have improved them, ask what the land and improvements are really worth; but the Holland Company, who are the owners of a great deal of the land, sell very reasonable, and in fact for much less that the land is reasonably worth, because their object is to turn their property into money as soon as possible.

"4th query. Are the lands at the head waters of Sugar creek mountainous, or fit for cultivation, and what price do they bear?

"Ans. The lands on the head waters of Sugar creek are not mountainous, and all the lands lying on the head waters of Little Sugar creek are of the first quality. But there are two Sugar creeks in this country, the head waters of which include a tract of country nearly thirty miles wide. Little Sugar creek empties into French creek about ten miles below Meadville and Big Sugar creek empties into it about three miles from its mouth. Big Sugar creek has three branches, which meet together about ten miles from its mouth. I am not able to say what kind of land is on the head waters of the middle branch but the east and west branches take their sources on good land. I am not able to say at what price those lands would sell, for the price of lands in this country are so multitarious that it is impossible to fix a medium; but I should suppose that about two dollars would be the standard to regulate them by. The medium in the neighborhood of Meadville would be from three to four dollars."

Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania)
December 20 1820

A Fine Roaster

John Reynolds Esq. of this place, killed a Hog on the 30th ult. which, when dressed, weighed 582 lbs. besides the gut fat. - Crawford Messenger

Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania)
January 29 1823

Meadville, Pa, Jan. 14

Good Roads

We begin to feel many of the benefits arising from good roads. Iron, which a year or two since, retailed here from 12 ½ to 14 cents, may now be had for 6 and 7 cents per lb. Sleding is now excellent - we have noticed numerous sleds pass within a day or two past laden with pork, butter and cheese, flax, linen, &c. for Phillipsburg and Bellefonte to barter for that articles. - MESSEN.

Wilmingtonian And Delaware Advertiser (Wilmington, Delaware)
July 5 1827

A land Tortoise was lately found on the farm of Mr. Randolph near Meadville, Pa., with the letters "F. H." cut on the lower shell, said to have been done by Frederick Haymaker, in 1794, being 68 years ago. It was found on the same farm about 20 and again about 14 years ago. The letters "T. A. 1827," have been added.

Co. Magaw's Paper Mill
Republican Compiler, Gettysburg, PA, March 12, 1828
We have on our table a slip of paper manufactured from straw at the Mill of Col. Magaw, near Meadville. The specimen before us, though without sizing, may be written upon without the ink spreading in the least; it is somewhat rough, but being the first that was made, great improvement may be expected to be made upon it.

New Meadville Gazette
Republican Compiler, Gettysburg, PA, April 2, 1828
Meadville, March 20.
The first number of the Meadville Gazette by Mr. Jacob Williamson, made its appearance on Tuesday last. Although no express avowal is made by its editor as the course he proposes to take in the pending Presidential question, we are led to infer from the character of its matter that the Gazette will prove an able and efficient auxiliary to the cause of General Jackson. - Messenger



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