Genealogy Trails
Dauphin County Pennsylvania
Biographies

 

 

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A

ANDERSON, Samuel, a Representative from Pennsylvania; born in Middletown, Dauphin County, Pa., in 1773; completed preparatory studies; studied medicine; was admitted to practice in 1796; entered the United States Navy as assistant surgeon in 1799; promoted to the rank of surgeon in 1800; resigned his commission and in 1801 settled in Chester, Pa., where he practiced his profession; during the War of 1812, raised a body of volunteers known as the Mifflin Guards; commissioned captain on September 10, 1814; served in the Pennsylvania Militia and was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel in the One Hundredth Regiment, Second Brigade, Third Division, on August 3, 1821; member of the State house of representatives 1815-1818 and 1823-1825; sheriff of Delaware County 1819-1823; again entered the naval service in 1823 as special physician but was soon forced to resign because of ill health; elected as an Adams to the Twentieth Congress (March 4, 1827-March 3, 1829); again a member of the State house of representatives 1829-1835 and served as speaker in 1833; appointed inspector of customs in 1841; elected justice of the peace in 1846 and served until his death in Chester, Chester County, Pa., January 17, 1850; interment in Middletown Presbyterian Cemetery, near Media, Delaware County, Pa.

(Source: Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present; contributed by A. Newell)


B

HARVEY B. BOHNER, of the furniture firm of Heifrich & Bohner, is the son of Rev. Benjamin and Catherine (Kistler) Bohner, and was born at Harrisburg, Pa., January 10, 1871. After being graduated from the public schools of Bethlehem, Pa., in 1888, he was entered as a student in the American Business College in Allentown, from which institution he was graduated in 1890. He then entered the employ of the F. Hersh Hardware Company as a bookkeeper for several years, after which he became head bookkeeper for the C. A. Dorney Furniture Company. In 1901 he associated himself with M. A. Heifrich in the manufacture and sale of furniture at 734 Hamilton Street, where, under the name of Heifrich & Bohner, the firm conducts a large retail trade. Early in 1916 he purchased his partner's interest and continues in the business alone, although still holding the original firm name. Besides being a progressive business man, Mr. Bohner is actively interested in the civic, social and religious life of the community and is one of the leading spirits of the Chamber of Commerce. It was through his forceful and dynamic energy and force of character as chairman of the campaign committee that this civic body was materially strengthened and reorganized during 1916. In charity work he is among the leaders. He is president of the board of trustees of Salem Evangelical Church; trustee of the Public Library; treasurer of the Associated Charities, and. a charter member of Jordan Lodge, No. 678, F. and A. M. On December 1, 1893, he married Salome, daughter of Samuel and Cecilia Roth, of Allentown.   -- "Men of Allentown" Published by Fred L. Shankweiler 1917 - Contributed by Vicki Hartman



FREDERICK S. BRUNER.
Frederick S. Bruner, since 1900 the postmaster at Fruita, Mesa county, was born near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on March 26, 1847, and is the son of George and Maria C. (Smiley) Bruner, also natives of Pennsylvania, though of German ancestry. The father was a farmer throughout his life, and was killed by accident by a railroad train while crossing the tracks when he was seventy-nine years old. He was well known and highly respected in his section of the country, and held a number of local offices from time to time in his county. The children in the family numbered six, all of whom are living, the youngest at the age of fifty and the oldest at that of seventy, Frederick being the third born. He grew to manhood on the paternal homestead, receiving his education at the district schools and New Bloomfield Academy, which he attended two terms. After leaving school he learned the molders' trade and worked at it a few years in Ohio. He moved to Cedar county, Iowa, in 1871, and there engaged in farming. Four years later he returned to Pennsylvania, but moved to Iowa again in 1881, and engaged in the coal business at Greenfield, remaining there so occupied until 1891, when he came to Colorado and located on a fruit ranch which he bought half a mile north of Fruita. He made valuable improvements and developed thirteen acres to great productiveness in fruit of fine varieties and superior quality. Four years later he sold this and purchased of C. C. Post a grocery stock and consolidated the two stores. After three years of successful operation on the consolidation, in which he did a business of thirty thousand dollars a year, he sold out to the Fruita Mercantile Company. Soon afterward, he was appointed postmaster at Fruita, receiving his commission in 1900, and he has since filled this office with credit to himself and satisfaction to its patrons and the community in general. His wife held the position for three years previous to his appointment. He has taken an earnest interest in the business and public life of the town and county, and been of substantial service in promoting all the best interests of both. Among other enterprises to which he has given helpful attention is the Fruita Realty Company, of which he was one of the founders and which he now serves as vice-president, he being one of the leading stockholders. This company owns the townsite and has been energetic and enterprising in building up the town. He also owns other real
estate in the town and is the town treasurer. He was married in 1874 to Miss Myra Bushey, a native of Pennsylvania, who accompanied her parents to Missouri when she was young. She became the mother of four children, all living, Anna, wife of George Amsbary; Walter; and Bessie and George, twins. Mrs. Bruner died in 1900. In politics Mr. Bruner is a Republican, and in church membership a Methodist Episcopalian. He is a member of the church board of trustees.
(Source: Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Tracy McAllister)




C

Commodore David Conner

David Conner, the son of David and Abigail Connor was born at Harrisburg, Penna., in 1792. He was of Irish descent, his family emigrating to this country about 1700, settling at Philadelphia but previous to the Revolution removing to the Valley of Wyoming. There they narrowly escaped the massacre in 1778 and the parents took refuge at Harrisburg, where the father died in September 1792. In his fifteenth year young David went to Philadelphia, entered the counting house of Major Dennis and in the intervals of business found time to complete a course of liberal studies. He made considerable progress in French and mathematics and acquired those habits of industry, precision and attention to minute details that are perhaps nowhere better learned than in the mercantile profession. A voyage to the West Indies impressed him with a desire for a nautical life and he applied for and received an appointment in the U.S. Navy, January 16, 1809. The war of 1812-14 opening, afforded a fine field for American prowess and none became more conspicuous than Lieutenant Conner. Especially was he distinguished for his gallantry in the actions fought between the U.S. sloop of war Hornet and the British ship Peacock and the sloop of war Penguin, which terminated in the conquest and capture of the enemy in each case. He was eminently conspicuous in both for good conduct and intrepidity and in testimony of which his native State subsequently presented him a sword. After the war he held important commands on all the principal naval stations and exhibited on several occasions the diplomatic talent and extensive knowledge of international law which formerly was often required by the American naval officer in the exercise of his functions. For a number of years he filled the positions on shore of Naval Commissioner and Chief of the Bureau of Construction. In 1843 he succeeded Commodore Steward in command of the home squadron. During the war with Mexico, Commodore Conner's services were of the utmost importance in the conquest of that country and the preliminary measures taken for the capture of Vern Cruz and its fort were planned by him. However, his constitution naturally robust became impaired by the last effects of the wound he received in 1815 in the attack of the Penguin and the unhealthy climate and close confinement on shipboard was telling its fearful hold and so relinquishing his command he returned to the United States. In Philadelphia he passed the remainder of his life for a time in command of the navy yard there. His death occurred on the 20th day of March, 1856 and he was interred with military honors in Christ Church burial ground. Commodore Conner married in 1828, a daughter of the celebrated Dr. Physick, of Philadelphia and left two sons.

[Source: Notes and Queries Historical Biographical and Genealogical: Chiefly Relating to Interior Pennsylvania Edited by William Henry Egle, M.D., M.A. Third Series, Vol. I Harrisburg, PA., The Daily Telegraph Print 1887 Page 62 Biographical History - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


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GEORGE W DERFLER
DR. MORRIS EDWIN DERFLER



GEORGE W DERFLER-- son of Euhart and Catherine (Novinger) Derfler, was born January 09, 1881, in Harrisburg Pennsylvania. He was united in marriage to Bessie Andrews, daughter of John W. and Sue Andrews, January 01, 1905. Mr. Derfler came to Adair County {Mo} with his parents in 1881 and settled near Novinger. He attended the public school of that place and in 1900 and 1901 took a course at a business college at Quincy Illinois. For four years he was bookkeeper for the Miller Mercantile Company at Novinger, then accepted a position with the Rombauer Coal Company, first as bookkeeper, then as accountant and cashier, which position he held until 1910 when he resigned to accept a position with the Burk Bros. Meat and Provision Company, at Kirksville Missouri. He is also a stockholder in that company. He is Democrat in politics, and a member of the K. of P. Lodge.

Source: "The History Of Adair County Missouri" by E.M. Violette (1911)



DR. MORRIS EDWIN DERFLER-- a native of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, was born May 27, 1872. He is a son of Euhart and Catherine Derfler. Euhart Derfler, the father, was born in *Stamback, Bavaria, Germany, February 02, 1845, and came to America when six months old. His parents settled in Pennsylvania. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War. On January 31, 1871 he was married to Catherine Novinger, daughter of Joseph Novinger, and niece of John Novinger, the founder of the town known as Novinger {Mo}. They had one daughter and three sons: Morris Edwin, Harry Darlington, George Walker, Anna Elizabeth. Dr. Derfler came from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania to Adair County Missouri with his parents in the spring of 1881. He attended the public schools of Missouri. He was principal of the Brashear School, Brashear Missouri, from 1896 to 1898; principal at Hurdland, Missouri, 1898 to 1901; Superintendent of the Gilliam public schools from 1902 to 1905. He then attended the Missouri State University, obtaining a Rollins Scholarship in medicine in 1908; graduated from the Medical School of Washington University, St. Louis, in 1909, and the same year located in Novinger Missouri, for the practice of his profession. In 1898 he was married to Odella May Moore. They have one daughter, Marion Kathryn. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.



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John H. Epler
Harrisburg Telegraph, Harrisburg, Pa, January 8, 1914
Mount Joy, Pa., Jan. 8. - John H. Epler of Elizabethtown, on Friday completed his eighth term as a justice of the peace, making forty year's service. He has had an unusual career as an office holder. He resided in both Dauphin and Lancaster counties and in each his neighbors honored him with elections. In Dauphin, where he was born, he was elected four times a justice and after twenty years in that office he moved to Elizabethtown in 1888. He had lived here but a short time when he was again elected a justice and has now completed his fourth term, or another twenty years. On account of his age he refused to run again at the last election and therefore retires after a faithful and honorable service of forty years.
Squire Epler, when he resided in Dauphin County, lived on the farm that his great-grandfather bought in 1757 and which is still in the Epler name. Mr. Epler cast his first vote for Fremont and has always been an ardent Republican.


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Rev. John Graham D.D.

John Graham, son of Henry Graham and Elizabeth Ferguson was born April 17, 1780 in Hanover township, Dauphin county, Pa. He was educated at the Philadelphia academy under Drs. Wylie and Gray and studied theology at the seminary in New York. In the spring of 1819 he was licensed by the Monongahela Presbytery and on the 30th of August 1820, was ordained by the same body. He was pastor of Cross Roads and Washington, Washington county, Pa., from August 30, 1820 to October 8, 1829, during a portion of which period from 1823 to 1828 he filled the position of professor of languages in Washington college. From 1830-1834 he was the stated minister of the congregations of Sycamore and Hopkinsville, Warren county, Ohio; of Green field and Fall Creek, Ohio from 1834 to 1839. From 1839 to 1840 he was principal of the academy at Chillicothe, Ohio, which position he resigned to accept a call to the churches of West Union and West Fork, Adams county, Ohio in 1841, in which field he ministered until his death which occurred July 13, 1849. Columbia college conferred upon him the degree of doctor of divinity. He was an able teacher and a faithful and conscientious minister of the Gospel. A sermon by him published in the second volume of the Pulpit of the Associate Reformed church, shows his deep theological learning.

[Source: Notes and Queries Historical Biographical and Genealogical: Chiefly Relating to Interior Pennsylvania Edited by William Henry Egle, M.D., M.A. Third Series, Vol. I Harrisburg, PA., The Daily Telegraph Print 1887 Page 62-63 Biographical History - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


H

Major Frederick Hummel

Frederick Hummel, son of the first settler of that name, was born in Derry township, Lancaster, now Dauphin county, Penna., on the 4th of October 1758. He followed the occupation of a farmer in his early years. When the struggle for independence came on, although a stripling of eighteen years he entered into the contest and served as a private in Capt. Jacob Fridley's company of Col. James Burd's Battalion of 1776; was at Trenton and Princeton and the year following was with the patriots at Brandywine and Germantown. At the close of the war he held the position of Major in the associated battalion. It may also be remarked that during the Revolution, he greatly assisted the cause, by partly superintending the manufacture of arms, which was then a prominent industry at Hummelstown. Major Hummel died on the 7th of December 1802 and his wife Rachel, b. march 14, 1757; d. Nov. 24, 1835 in her 79th year. [In this connection it may be stated that in the recent history of the county, the services of Major Frederick Hummel are credited to Col Frederick his nephew who was too young for military service - having only entered the infantry branch in 1782. The mistake arose from the stupidity of the printers who joined two sketches into one.]

[Source: Notes and Queries Historical Biographical and Genealogical: Chiefly Relating to Interior Pennsylvania Edited by William Henry Egle, M.D., M.A. Third Series, Vol. I Harrisburg, PA., The Daily Telegraph Print 1887 Page 63 Biographical History - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


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ANDREW K. JACKS, secretary and treasurer of the Allentown Crockery Company, was born at Rutherford, Dauphin County, Pa., in 1857, the son of Thomas and Antonnetta (DeWitt) Jacks. He received his primary education in the public schools and later attended the Indiana State Normal School. He then followed teaching as a vocation for seven years, after which he was engaged in the milling and grain business at Lickdale, Pa., for two years. In 1884 he came to Allentown and was employed as a bookkeeper until 1893, when he became one of the organizers of the Allentown Crockery Company, which has since become one of the cityís leading mercantile houses. Mr. Jacks, who is a Republican in politics and an active man of affairs, was a member of select council from the Eleventh Ward for four years. Prior to that time he was a member of the board of control of the Fourth Ward, and also served as secretary of the section board for several years. Mr. Jacks is prominently identified with the various Masonic bodies. He is also a member of the governing board of the Y. M. C. A. since 1886, and of St. Paulís Lutheran Church, of which he has been the financial secretary since 1888, as well as the teacher of the Young Menís Bible Class. He is also a member of the Chamber of Commerce and the Rotary Club. On April 20, 1883, he married Remeta T., daughter of Charles H. and Caroline Y. Shoemaker, of Hummelstown, Pa. -- "Men of Allentown" Published by Fred L. Shankweiler 1917 - Contributed by Vicki Hartman


M
Col. William Moorhead
NOAH MOTTER

Col. William Moorhead

William Moorhead was born in Lancaster county, Penna., about the year 1772. Little is known of his early history save that he received a good English and classical education. In April, 1806, he became the owner of the noted Lytle's Ferry, above Halifax, which he operated for a number of years. In 1807, he proposed the laying out of a town at that placed to be called Williamsville, but the project never amounted to anything and the contemplated town and future county seat remained a farm on whose fertile fields several generations have lived and labored. In December 1813, Mr. Moorhead was commissioned collector of U.S. revenue when he took up his residence at Harrisburg. In January following he was also appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury, collector of the direct tax for the Tenth district of Penna. He died at Harrisburg on Sunday, June 29, 1817. He left a wife Elizabeth and children, Elizabeth, Adaline, James Kennedy, William G., Joel Barlow and Henry C. One of his daughter married Mr. Montgomery, who conducted the old Ferry for a number of years, which was then known as Montgomery's Ferry. Mrs. Montgomery was a remarkable woman, and frequently during the illness of her husband or the want of hands, assisted in the operation of the boats or flats. Of Mr. Moorhead's sons, J. Kennedy Moorhead of Pittsburgh and J. B. Moorhead, of Philadelphia were men of mark in Pennsylvania. Mr. Moorhead, himself, was a gentleman of culture and much esteemed in private and public life.

[Source: Notes and Queries Historical Biographical and Genealogical: Chiefly Relating to Interior Pennsylvania Edited by William Henry Egle, M.D., M.A. Third Series, Vol. I Harrisburg, PA., The Daily Telegraph Print 1887 Page 63 Biographical History - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


NOAH MOTTER-- Born in 1825 in Dauphin County Pennsylvania; died at Fegley, Adair County {Mo}, July 11, 1904. He was brought to young manhood in his native county. In 1848 he was married to Miss Susan *Dubendorf, and in the same year he came to what was afterwards Nineveh Township in Adair County {Mo}. He was a very successful farmer and managed to amass a good deal of farming land. He was survived by five sons and two daughters. His wife died a few years before him.


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G.W. NOVINGER-
- Born in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, January 18, 1847; died near Novinger {Mo}, July 27, 1909. He came to this {Adair} county with his parents the same year in which he was born. He was married in 1867 to Miss Mary Motter, who with three sons, survived him. He was among those who organized the Mulberry *Comberland Presbyterian church southwest of Novinger {Mo}. He was a prominent Mason. He was elected {Adair} County Judge in 1882. He was fatally hurt in a runaway as he was coming home from church one Sunday afternoon and died before night.
[Source: The History of Adair County Missouri, by E.M. Violette (1911)]




R

Thomas Reed
Capt. Jeremiah Rees
Alexander Renick
Archibald Roane



Thomas Reed

Information Wanted

Thomas Reed an old Revolutionary soldier, at present a resident of Greene county, Pennsylvania, having lost the certificate of his discharge from the revolutionary army, and being desirous of renewing the application he has already made to Congress for a pension, requests such persons as can testify either directly or by circumstance, to his having been in the service of the United States, during the first war with Great Britain, to make a communication of it to him, directed to Jefferson, Greene county, Pennsylvania.

The subject of this advertisement was born near Rock Run, in Hartford county, Maryland. At an early age he married Mary Nut, of Middletown, Dauphin county, Pa., soon after which he removed to Indian Manor, near Harrisburg, Pa., where he lived on the land of Mr. Thomas Fisher, following the double business of a laborer and shoemaker. He lived there eight or nine years, including the period of his service in the army. He enlisted at Carlisle, Pa., under Capt. Nichols, in the ninth regiment of the Pennsylvania troops, commanded by Col. Noggle. The first Lieutenant of the company was Stephen Stevenson, of Monohan township, York Co., Pa. Thus Reed served five years in the American army and was at the Battles of Brandywine and Germantown. Sometime after thse battles were fought, he was placed in the baggage department.

Persons in Harford county, Md., and in York, Dauphin and Cumberland counties, Pa., are desired to institute an inquiry into this subject, among the older inhabitants and editors of papers generally, but particularly those of Maryland, Pennsylvania and the western country are requested to give publicity to this and thus, perhaps, assist one of the earliest defenders of our liberty, who is now suffering all the complicated evils of age and poverty.

[Source: Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania), June 6, 1827 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Capt. Jeremiah Rees

Jeremiah Rees was born at Oyster's Mill, in East Pennsboro township, Cumberland county, Penna., in the year 1776. Of his father's family little is known, save that of his brothers, Samuel and David Rees settled in the then Far West. Mr. Rees came to Harrisburg about the commencement of the century where having married the daughter of Casper Smith, then recently deceased, he continued the "Golden Swan," one of the oldest inns in the town. In this and other occupation, including many years a toll gatherer at the Harrisburg Bridge, Mr. Rees passed a long and eventful life. In the second war with England he commanded one of the companies which marched to the defense of Baltimore and was justly considered a good officer and brave soldier. He was one of the prominent men of the borough sixty years ago, served in the council and was held in high esteem by his fellow citizens. He died at Harrisburg on the 4th of January, 1861 at the advanced age of 84 years. Captain Rees was thrice married: first on May 2, 1808, Margaret Smith, daughter of Casper and Martha Smith, who died May 17, 1810 at the age of twenty-two years and their children were Cyrus J., who resides at Harrisburg and Casper, d.s.p. Married secondly June 26, 1810 Lydia Powders who died April 8, 1821 and their children were Maria, M. __ Cummings, removed to Davenport, Iowa; Lydia, m. Abraham Kendig of Missouri; Margaret, m. John Bigler of Easton, Pa. and Jeremiah, D. unm. Married thirdly, Elizabeth Johnson of Philadelphia and their children were Mary and James who died in service in the Mexican war.

[Source: Notes and Queries Historical Biographical and Genealogical: Chiefly Relating to Interior Pennsylvania Edited by William Henry Egle, M.D., M.A. Third Series, Vol. I Harrisburg, PA., The Daily Telegraph Print 1887 Page 63-64 Biographical History - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Alexander Renick.

A wide awake, brainy man, possessing a natural aptitude for dealing with matters of finance, Alexander Renick, a prominent businessman of Chillicothe, holds a conspicuous position among the leading financiers of Ross county, his official connection with numerous moneyed institutions bearing testimony not only to his ability in sound judgment, but to his integrity and honesty of purpose. He was born in Chillicothe, a son of the late Alexander Renick, Sr., and grandson of George Renick, a pioneer settler of this section of Ohio. There is a well established tradition in the family that their early ancestors of the Renicks lived in Scotland, where the name was spelled "Renwick." Moving to Holland and finally settling in Ireland, the family name assumed its present spelling. The emigrant ancestor of Mr. Renick was George Renick, who came to America in about 1720, Enniskillen, County of Fermanagh, Ireland. In 1738, he located in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. From there a part of his family went to Augusta County, Virginia, and a part to Hardy County, Virginia, on the south branch of the Potomac. George Renick, the grandfather of the subject of the sketch, was born and Hardy County, Virginia, July 7, 1776. Attracted by the glowing descriptions of his brother, Felix Renick, who had made several visits to the western country, he came in early manhood to the Northwest Territory, on a prospecting tour, and after spending some time seeking a suitable location he returned to Virginia. He was married in 1802 Dorothy Harness, and came with his bride to Ohio, journeying on horseback to Chillicothe, where he started in business as a merchant. He bought a tract of land west of this city, and having erected a stone house thereon, assumed its occupancy in 1807. He subsequently devoted his energies entirely to the improvement of his property, and in addition to carrying on a general farming business, he made a specialty of raising blooded stock, being among the first to introduce Short horned cattle into this part of the state. He was the owner of the noted shorthorned cow, Rose of Sharon, which, with her calf, he sold to Abraham Renick, of Kentucky, who thus started his famous heard of short horns. George Renick, with the exception of two years spent in Kentucky, remained on his home farm until his death, which occurred in September, 1863. His wife, Dorothy Harness, also in native of Hardy County, Virginia, died in September, 1820, leaving nine children, namely: William, Josiah, Harness, Mortimer, Elizabeth Ann, Alexander, Lavina, George and Dorothy. Subsequently, Mr. Renick married Mrs. Sarah Boggs, who survived him. Alexander Renick, Sr., was born at the homestead, 1 mile west of Chillicothe, February 11, 1815, and was reared to agricultural pursuits. Being presented, soon after attaining his majority, by his father, with a tract of land lying two miles southeast of Chillicothe, he was there successfully engaged in farming and stock raising until 1864, when he removed to Chillicothe. Previous to that time, in November, 1863, the First National Bank was organized, and he was made a director. After taking up his residence in Chillicothe, he devoted his entire life to the bank and his own private affairs, remaining here until his death, in September, 1875. That maiden name of the wife of Alexander Renick, Sr., was Jane Osborn. She was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, in 1817. Her father of Ralph Osborn, whose emigrant ancestor came to New England in the good ship Speedwell, which followed the Mayflower, was a pioneer settler of Chillicothe, and when the state of Ohio was organized, if he was elected state auditor, and held the position for many years, spending his last days in Columbus. Mr. Osborn married Catherine Renick, a daughter of John Renick, who was a brother of William Renick, of Hardy County, Virginia. Mrs. Jane (Osborn) Renick died in October, 1886, leaving for children, namely: Ralph Osborn, Dorothy Harness, Henry Turner, and Alexander, one son George, having died a few years previous. Having acquired his rudimentary education in the Chillicothe schools, Alexander Renick attended the military school at West Chester, Pennsylvania, and in 1865 entered the scientific Dept of Yale University, from which he was graduated in 1868. Returning home, Mr. Renick operated the home farm until the death of his father, in 1875, when he succeeded to his father's position as a director of the First National Bank. In 1887 Mr. Renick was made vice president of the institution, and since 1892 has served ably and faithfully as its president. In 1888, Mr. Renick assisted in organizing the Mutual Loan and Savings Association, of which he has ever since been one of the directors, and the president. In 1907, with George Hunter Smith and John H. Blacker, he organized the Valley Savings Bank and Trust Company, which he has since served as a director and vice president. Mr. Renick still owns and operates the old farm, which was improved by his father, and takes an active and intelligent interest in agriculture and stock raising. Mr. Renick has always been a republican and takes an active part in politics, but has never sought or held any political office, except that of trustee for the Ohio Hospital for a Epileptics, located in Gallipolis, Ohio, having been appointed to this position by Governor Herrick in 1904, and holding it until 1911, when the board of trustees of all benevolent institutions of the state were legislated out of office. Mr. Renick married, December 29, 1874 Elizabeth Waddle, a daughter of Dr. William and Jane S. Waddle, of whom further account may be found on another page of this volume. Mr. and Mrs. Renick have one son, Alexander Mortimer Renick, who married Edith Henrietta, daughter of Charles A. Smith, and has two sons, Charles Alexander and Ralph Osborn. Mr. and Mrs. Renick are true to the religious faith in which they were reared, their parents having been consistent members of the Presbyterian Church.

Source: A Standard History of Ross County, Ohio: An Authentic Narrative of the Past, with Particular Attention to the Modern Era in the Commercial, Insustrial, Civic and Social Development. By: Lyle S. Evans.
Transcribed by Carla Mascara




Archibald Roane, second governor of Tennessee, who succeeded John Sevier in 1801 and served for two years, was born in what is now Dauphin county, Pa., in 1760, his parents being Andrew and Margaret (Walker) Roane. Andrew Roane came with his brother, Rev. John Roane, from Ireland in 1736 and settled in that part of Pennsylvania known as Donegal and Derry, afterward called Lancaster, and still later Dauphin county. He died in 1768, leaving four children, of whom Archibald was the eldest, to the guardianship of his brother. A clause in John Roane's will some years later provided a legacy of twenty pounds for his nephew, Archibald Roane, towards completing his college education. The young man became a student at Lancaster, but left college to join the Continental army, with which he fought valiantly until the close of the war, being present at the surrender of Cornwallis. After the government of the United States was established he studied law and removed to Tennessee, where he was admitted to the bar and soon became one of the most noted of the pioneer attorneys. Shortly after his admission he was appointed district attorney-general and was a member of the convention that framed the constitution in 1796. In 1801 he was elected governor, served two years and was a candidate for re-election, but was defeated by Governor Sevier, whom he had succeeded two years before. While he was governor he cast the deciding vote that elected Andrew Jackson major-general of the Tennessee militia. After retiring from the governor's office he engaged in teaching for a time. Hugh Lawson White, who was afterward a candidate for president of the United States, having been one of his pupils. In 1811 he was appointed one of the superior court judges of law and equity, which is the last record of his appearance in any official capacity. He married Ann Campbell, daughter of David and Mary (Hamilton) Campbell, of Campbell's Station. To this marriage there were born six children. Governor Roane died at his home near Campbell's Station, in 1817. His wife died in 1831. He was an able lawyer, a conscientious statesman and an influential citizen. The county of Roane was named in his honor.
[Notable Men of Tennessee, Vol. I, Publ. 1905. Transcribed by Richard Ramos]


 


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