Awards of Distinguished Service Cross- Pennsylvania
Unknown Counties

Congressional Medal of Honor & Distinguished Service Cross & Distinguished Service Medal
Issued by the War Department, 1919

Contributed by Tammy Clark

* Indicates Posthumous Award


* Robert J. Eckweiler (Army serial No. 748073), private, Company C, 3d Ammunition Train. For extraordinary heroism in action near ???z?n?? and Chateau-Thierry, France, July 15, 1918. On the morning of the 15th of July Pvt. Eckweiler, with Pvt. McNamee, volunteered and brought up a truck for the purpose of saving the records of the 30th Infantry, which were in danger of capture. He was killed while attempting this mission. Emergency address: Mrs. John Eckweiler, mother, Notch, Pa. Residence at enlistment: Notch. Pa.


Daniel Erb, private, Company D, llth Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near the village of Dun-sur-Meuse, France, November 5, 1918. Having become separated from the remainder of his company, he discovered and captured, single-handed, a hostile machine-gun crew. Taking his prisoners to a dugout near by, he found 48 more Germans, whom he also disarmed. Residence at enlistment : Emans, Pa.


Daniel Russell Fox, sergeant. Company A, 5th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Etienne. France. October 4, 1918. He volunteered and carried an important message across a heavily shelled area, returning through a barrage to report the result of his mission. Later, after being wounded, he remained on duty for four hours, carrying messages across a field swept by machine-gun fire. Residence at enlistment: Shenkel, Pa.


*James M. McKibbin, captain, Medical Corps, attached to 306th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chevieres, France, October 14, 1918. During a very heavy artillery barrage, which lasted for approximately two hours, Capt. McKibbin displayed great coolness and courage in dressing and administering first aid to the wounded. Informed that a sergeant had been wounded and was lying between our lines and the enemy's line, he went to administer first aid to him. While in the performance of these duties under intense fire, he was wounded by machine-gun fire and later died from the effects of the wound. Emergency address: Mrs. Mary McKibbin. wife, 533 Reynolds Avenue. Hagerstown, Md. Residence at appointment: Beech Valley, Pa.


Elmer Zeiler, corporal, Company F, 9th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Médéah Farm, France, October 3, 1918. Corpl. Zeiler, together with four other men, charged a machine-gun nest containing three heavy machine guns and captured the three guns and 20 prisoners. Residence at enlistment: Fairhaven, Pa.


Alexander R. Bolling, second lieutenant, 4th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in Bois de Nesles, France, July 14-15, 1918. While in command of three widely separated platoons in the Bois de Nesles, on the night of July 14, 1918, Lieut. Boilling continually exposed himself to very heavy gas and shell fire by going from one platoon to another. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered military service from Pennsylvania.


Lewis H. Brereton, major, Air Service, pilot, Corps Observation Wing. For extraordinary heroism in action over Thiaucourt, France, September 12, 1918. He, together with an observer, voluntarily and pursuant to a request for a special mission, left his airdrome and crossed the enemy's lines over Lironville and proceeded to Thiaucourt. In spite of poor visibility, which forced them to fly at a very low altitude, and in spite of intense and accurate antiaircraft fire, they maintained their flight along their course and obtained valuable information. Over Thiaucourt they were suddenly attacked by four enemy monoplane Fokkers. Maneuvering his machine so that his observer could obtain a good field of fire, he entered into combat. His observer's guns becoming jammed, he withdrew until the jam was cleared, when he returned to the combat. His observer then becoming wounded, he coolly made a landing within friendly lines, although followed down by the enemy to within 25 meters of the ground. By this act he made himself an inspiration and example to all the members of his command. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered military service from Pennsylvania.


Charles A. Dravo, lieutenant colonel, 165th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Sedan, France, November 6-7, 1918. Leading the front-line battalion of his regiment throughout the entire attack, Col. Dravo was constantly under accurate machine-gun fire and incessant artillery fire. Having been ordered to advance, he personally formed his lines for attack, despite the fact that for 29 hours he had labored without rest or relief, and led his command forward, in the face of fiercest fire, encountering and subduing the enemy after a hand-to-hand struggle. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, P.C. Entered military service from Pennsylvania.


*Walter D. Fazier, second lieutenant, 40th Company, 5th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. Killed in action at Chateau-Thierry, France, June 6. 1918, he gave the supreme proof of that extraordinary heroism which will serve as an example to hitherto untried troops. Emergency address: Mrs. W. A. Frazier, mother, 5745 Ellsworth Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. Appointed from Pennsylvania.


Frederick Israel, second lieutenant, 5th Regiment. United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Etienne, France, October 4, 1918. He twice volunteered and carried messages to the front line along a road swept by machine-gun and shell fire. Address: Care of the Major General Commandant, United States Marine Corps, Washington, D. C. Appointed from Pennsylvania.


*Thomas H Miles, Jr., second lieutenant, 45th Company, 5th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. Killed in action at Chateau-Thierry, France, June 6, 1918, he gave the supreme proof of that extraordinary heroism which will serve as an example to hitherto untried troops. Emergency address: Thomas H. Miles, father. 610 West Upsal Street, Germantown, Pa. Appointed from Pennsylvania.


Francis K. Newcomer, lieutenant colonel, 4th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near Fismes, France, August 5, 1918. He made a reconnaissance along the south bank of the Vesle River in advance of the front lines for the purpose of selecting a bridge site. He then led a small party of Engineers, assisting in the work of removing the German entanglements and constructing a foot bridge across the Vesle River, completing this work in the face of fire of great intensity. His coolness and personal bravery afforded an inspiring example to the men of his command. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered Military Academy from Pennsylvania.


Carl Spatz, major, Air Service, pilot, 3d Aero Squadron, Air Service. For extraordinary heroism in action during the St. Mihiel offensive September 26, 1918. dinary heroism in action during the St. Mihiel offensive September 20, 1918. Although he had received orders to go to the United States, he begged for and received permission to serve with a pursuit squadron at the front. Subordinating himself to men of lower rank, he was attached to a squadron as a pilot and saw conditions and arduous service through the offensive. As a result of his efficient work he was promoted to the position of flight commander. Knowing that another attack was to take place in the vicinity of Verdun, be remained on duty in order to take part. On the day of the attack west of the Meuse, while with his patrol over enemy lines, a number of enemy aircraft were encountered. In the combat that followed he succeeded in bringing down two enemy planes. In his ardor and enthusiasm he became separated from his patrol while following another enemy far beyond the lines. His gasoline giving out, he was forced to land and managed to land within friendly territory. Through these acts he became an inspiration and example to all men with whom he was associated. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington. D. C. Entered Military Academy from Pennsylvania.


Clark O. Tayntor, first lieutenant, 47th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Sergy, France, July 29-30. 1918. Disregarding two wounds from shell fire, which he had suffered, Lieut. Tayntor continued in the advance with his platoon, keeping his men well organized, directing the consolidation of the line throughout the night, and refusing medical attention until all the wounded men in his platoon had received treatment. Address: Care of The Adjutant General of the Army, Washington, D. C. Entered military service from Pennsylvania.


Randolph T. Zane, deceased, captain, Company F, 6th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. While holding the town of Bouresches, France, on the night of June 7-8, 1918, he displayed such bravery as to inspire the garrison to resist successfully a heavy machine-gun and infantry attack by superior numbers. Emergency address: Commodore Abraham Van Hoy Zane, father, United States Navy, care of the Bureau of Navigation, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. Appointed from Pennsylvania.


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