Northumberland County Biographies
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C. H. BAILEY was a Virginian by birth, highly educated and considered a first-class physician. He located at Sunbury early in his professional career, but the length of his stay is not known. Thence he removed successively to Troy, Lincoln county, Missouri, and Smithland, Kentucky, after which he entered the United States Army as surgeon, and was stationed at Pensacola, Florida, in 1852; nothing is known regarding his personal history after that date. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 263 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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DR. FRANK W. BAILEY, who holds a high place among the dental practitioners of Northumberland County, and is a well known and popular citizen of the town of Milton, is a native of Center County, Pa., born there Jan. 16, 1871, son of John G. and Nannie (McWilliams) Bailey. He is of Scotch-Irish descent. John Bailey, his great-grandfather, went from Chester County, Pa., into Center County, and there became the founder of the small town Baileysville, named in his honor. He was a miller and merchant and became one of the very important men of his time. He was energetic and industrious and became very well-to-do. He and his wife had a family of fifteen children. John Bailey (2), son of John, followed farming in Center County, Pa. He married Nancy Goheen, and both are buried in Graysville cemetery. Their children were: Armstrong, who served in the Civil war; Joseph, also a soldier in the Civil war; Samuel; Jane A.; John G.; William; Mary; Scott; Washington Warren and Esther. John G. Bailey, son of John (2), was born in 1845, and died Dec. 26, 1909. He was a farmer, following that occupation in Ferguson Township, Center county. He was very active in public affairs as a stanch Republican, and for two years held the office of county commissioner; his funeral taking place the day his second term of office expired. He was a director of the Farmers’ Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Centerhall, and was very active in his work for the interest of his Company. He was an official member of the Presbyterian church. He married Nannie McWilliams, daughter of Henry McWilliams, and she now makes her home at Pine Grove, Center county. The children born of this union were: Frank W.; John, living on the old homestead; and Mary, who married Hammel Glenn, son of Samuel Glenn, and member of a prominent Center county family. Dr. Frank W. Bailey attended the local schools and Pennsylvania State College, and completed his education in the University of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in the class of 1900. He then bought the office and goodwill of the late Dr. E. E. Clark, at No. 34 Broadway, Milton, Pa., and he has through his skill and his pleasant manner won many friends and has a very large practice. He is a member of the Lycoming Dental Society. Fraternally he is a member of B.P.O.E., and in his political faith he is a Republican. His religious convictions are those of the Presbyterian denomination. He is a member of the Board of Trade. Dr. Bailey married Annie W. (Batdorf) Clark, widow of Dr. E. E. Clark, who died Feb. 25, 1900. She was born Nov. 28, 1868. Mrs. Bailey’s father, Adam Batdorf, is mentioned elsewhere in this work. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 386 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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WILLIAM H. M. BAILY, farmer and florist, was born near Red Lion, Chester county, Pennsylvania, August 15, 1843, son of Ezekiel and Margaret (Marshall) Baily, natives of Chester county. His father was a tailor by trade, and for many years was engaged in droving, and afterwards in the mercantile business four miles from West Chester; he also conducted a hotel at Centreville, Delaware county. He was twice married; by his first wife he had six children, and by his second marriage ten, five of whom are living: Marshall, of Chester county; Ezra, of Chester county; Agnes, of Camden, New Jersey; Ezekiel, of Chester county, and William H. M. He died in 1856 at Red Lion, Chester county; his wife died in 1851. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools of his native place, and in early life followed droving with his brother. In 1867 he removed to Shamokin and entered the employ of his uncle, the late William H. Marshall, and in the same year located upon his present farm of one hundred forty-five acres, where he has since resided. In 1887 he erected his hot-houses and is engaged, in connection with farming, in the cultivation of roses and carnations for the Philadelphia market. Mr. Baily married in 1863 Sarah, daughter of Elwood and Mary Lamborn, of Chester county, and by this union they are the parents of seven living children: Ella M., wife of Daniel Gerhart; Elwood; Ezekiel; William; John; Er, and Ida. Politically Mr. Baily is a Republican. He is a member of Elysburg Lodge, I.O.O.F., Fairmount Castle, K. of G.E. (of which order he is district grand chief), Washington Camp, P.O.S. of A., and Susquehanna Commandery, No. 9, of Sunbury. Mr. Baily is one of Shamokin township's progressive citizens, alive to all matters of public interest, and commands the respect and esteem of his neighbors. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1206 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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THOMOND BALL performed the duties of prothonotary of Northumberland county as deputy under David Harris. The latter was appointed, September 11, 1777; he entered the Continental army as third lieutenant in Colonel Thompson's battalion and rose to the rank of captain in the First Pennsylvania regiment, but resigned on the 20th of October, 1777, and engaged in mercantile pursuits at Baltimore. Mr. Ball was the first secretary of the Northumberland county Committee of Safety and acted as paymaster of Colonel Hartley's regiment while it was stationed on the frontier. He served as deputy prothonotary until his death in 1779. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 450 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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LEVI B. BARBER, who is engaged in farming about three miles east of Milton, in Turbut Township, was born Oct. 28, 1873, in Delaware Township, Northumberland County, son of Anthony A. Barber and grandson of David Barber. David Barber was bound out when a boy to Anthony Armstrong, of Turbut Township, to live, with him until he reached the age of twenty-one. He afterward continued to live in that Township, and did day’s work among farmers, being an industrious, respected man. He died in that part of Turbut Township now included in the borough of Milton, when sixty-eight years old. His wife was Mary Jones, daughter of William Jones, and they are buried in Harmony cemetery, Milton. Children as follows were born to them: Jane, who married William Falls; William, who died in Milton; Anthony A.; Margaret, Mrs. Robert Seiler; Isaac J.; Catharine, a resident of Milton; and Washington, who died in Milton. Of these, Isaac J. Barber, born in 1835, learned the boat building business and has resided in Milton for the past fifty years. By his first wife, Lucy A: Hester, he had a son Harry, and his second marriage was to Sarah J. Krisher. Anthony A. Barber, son of David, was born in Delaware Township in 1833, and there followed farming, retiring about four years before his death which occurred March 18, 1892. He is buried in Harmony cemetery, at Milton. In politics Mr. Barber was a Democrat, and he took quite an active part in local affairs, serving as tax collector and school director. He was a member of Mesiah Lutheran Church at McEwensville, and took an active part in its work. His widow, Maria (Bender or Binder), daughter of Jacob Bender, of Delaware Township, is living with her daughter Mrs. Greinly at Berwick, Pa. They had the following children: Anna is the widow of William C. Thomas and resides in Berwick; Cora married Lewis L. Follmer; Ida B. married William Tobias; Minnie M. married H. Greinly, of Berwick; Frances E. E. married David R. Eves and is living in Berwick; Charles A. married Mary Summers and is engaged in farming in Montour county; Levi B. is mentioned below; David F. married Emma Kreisher and is farming in White Deer Township, Union county; Maude M. married John E. Kurtz. Levi B. Barber attended the public schools of Delaware Township, and later worked with his father until he began farming for himself, in 1896. He was in Delaware Township for three years, and in Lycoming county for two years, returning to Northumberland County, where he farmed one year in Turbut Township, when he decided to removed to Jerseytown. Selling out his farm stock he made the change, but after six months he returned to this county and in 1902 bought the Lantz farm sixty-six acres in Turbut Township where he has since resided. This was at one time Abraham Follmer’s farm, it having belonged to him for fifty years, after which it passed into the possession of the Kase family and from them to the Lantzes. It is about three miles east of Milton. Mr. Barber has all the modern improvements on his place, and is one of the enterprising farmers of his locality. He was formerly a member of the Grange. In politics he is a Democrat, in religion a Lutheran. Mr. Barber married Rachel Gold, daughter of George Thomas Gold, of McEwensville, Pa., and they have two children, Helen May and George Anthony. David Gold, Mrs. Barber’s grandfather, was a native of Bushkill Township, Northampton Co., Pa., born about 1805, and died about 1878, aged seventy-three years. In the spring of 1841 he came to Northumberland County, locating at McEwensville, where he built the Gold gristmill, now owned and operated by Oliver Gold. He bought a tract of fifty acres, upon which be erected his mill and later three of his sons built homes upon the property; the McEwensville, high school also stands upon land he owned. Both the cemeteries of McEwensville were laid out from his land, and all but thirty-seven acres of his holdings have been cut up into building lots or turned to public use. During the fifties he was one of the organizers of the of McEwensville. In politics he was a Whig, and he served as school director and for many years as overseer of the poor in Delaware Township. In his earlier life Mr. Gold was a Moravian in religious connection, as were all his family in Northampton County, but he later became a Lutheran. His wife, Maria (Rissmiller), was the daughter of Daniel Rissmiller, who was earlier a resident of Berks County, Pa., and his first ancestor in America came hither as one of the Hessian army sent over to fight the Colonists in the Revolution. David Gold and his wife had children as follows: Rosanna married Charles Sensenbaugh, and they lived at Sunbury; Henry D., who was a merchant, died at Charlestown, Pa.; George Thomas settled in McEwensville; Edwin F. is mentioned below; Joseph died at Watsontown; Mary married Reuben Derr; Maria married Ellis Irwin; Charles was killed while serving in the Union army during the Civil war; David died in New Brighton, Pa.; Margaret, widow of E. Lewis Painter, lives at Lewisburg; Susan married Abram Redcay and they live in Milton; John L. is a resident of Newcastle, Pa. Of these, Rosanna, Henry D., Joseph, Mary, Maria, Charles and David are deceased. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 920 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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GEORGE BARNHART, deceased, was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1807, son of Adam Barnhart, a native of New Jersey, who died in Chillisquaque township in 1843. Our subject was a farmer and school teacher; about the year 1844 he removed to Upper Augusta township, where he died in 1866. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and the father of five children, three of whom are living: Rachel Jane, widow of Herman Campbell; D. W., and Mary C. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1161 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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HARRY C. BARNHART, farmer, who has a large property in Point Township, Northumberland County, located along the north branch of the Susquehanna river, was born Aug. 9, 1871, in Montour County, Pa., son of Martin Barnhart and grandson of Michael Barnhart. Michael Barnhart was born in Rush Township, Northumberland County, and died at Shamokin Creek, below Sunbury, when sixty-eight years old. He is buried at Snydertown. He was a farmer by occupation and a Lutheran in religion. His first marriage was to a Miss Keefer, his second to Sarah Elizabeth (Neidig) Fryling, widow of Stophel Fryling. The following named children were born to the first union: John settled in Ohio; David became a resident of Sunbury, Pa.; Benjamin, of Watsontown; Pa.; George, of Sacramento, Cal.; Martin was the father of Harry C. Barnhart; Mary married Jonas Hollenbach; Hannah married John Bowen; Sophia married Mr. Donavan; Elizabeth married Thomas Rogers. Martin Barnhart was born Jan. 4,1823, in Rush Township, was a lifelong farmer, and for many years owned and lived on the farm in Point Township now occupied by his son Harry C. He died June 3, 1898, and is buried at Northumberland. Like the members of his family generally, he was a Lutheran in religious matters. In 1845 he married Sarah Elizabeth Fryling, who was born in October, 1826, daughter of Stophel and Sarah Elisabeth (Crissinger) Fryling, and granddaughter of Christopher Fryling, who lived along the Shamokin creek in Northumberland County. Though now in her eighty-eighth year, Mrs. Barnhart is well preserved. She is the mother of ten children, born as follows: William, 1846; Mary Alice, 1849 (died in 1855); Anna D., 1852; Hannah J., 1854 (died in 1855); Sarah Elizabeth, 1857; Josephine Lee, 1860; Angeline, 1862; James McClellan, 1865; Emma, 1867; Harry C., 1871. Harry C. Barnhart was reared to farming, and when twenty-six years old began cultivating his father’s farm in Point Township on his own account. This place has remained in the family since the father’s death, in 1898, Harry C. Barnhart now owning it and he has operated it profitably, showing himself equal to the responsibility of so large a tract. The place contains 200 acres, located on the north branch, and its level, fertile fields, of productive river soil make it most valuable for general farming purposes. It was the old Joseph Bird homestead and has been occupied for several generations. A number of Indian relics have been found on the place. On May 6, 1908, Mr. Barnhart married Minnie Morgan, daughter of William Morgan, and they have two children, Elizabeth and William. Mr. and Mrs. Barnhart are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is a Democrat politically. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 414 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN W. BARR, of Watsontown, Northumberland County, has been connected with the Breon Table Company ever since his arrival at that place, having come there in the spring of 1903 to take charge of the plant, which he purchased four years later. It is one of the important local industries, and Mr. Barr has made a high reputation as a manufacturer and as a business manager during his comparatively brief residence in the borough. He has had a varied business career. Mr. Barr was born March 25, 1872, at Degraff, Logan Co., Ohio, son of Hugh H. Barr and grandson of William Barr. The latter lived in Illinois, where he followed farming, and died about 1880. He is buried in that state. He was of Scotch-Irish extraction and a Presbyterian in religious faith. Hugh H. Barr was born April 14, 1845, in Ohio where his parents were then living, and was reared in Logan County, that state. He was only sixteen when the Civil war broke out, and at that age entered the Union service, in which he remained three years, being a member of the 13th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In his young manhood he read law, but the legal profession did not appeal to him and he never completed the course. Immediately after the war he taught school, and through his own efforts has become a man of marked intellectual attainments, reading and study having always been his delight and a source of keen pleasure to him. He has for years been successfully engaged as a general contractor and builder, employing from ten to twenty men, as occasion requires, and has done considerable government work and built many bridges. He has continued to reside at Degraff, Logan Co., Ohio, and has long been an influential citizen of his community, having served a number of years as mayor of his town and several terms as county auditor. A Republican whose activity and influence in the party have made him widely known, he has served as delegate to a number of state conventions and once as a national delegate. Mr. Barr married Mary E. Stilwell, who was born in Logan County, Ohio, where her father, Stephen Stilwell, lived at the time; he subsequently moved to Kentucky, where his death occurred. John W. Barr received his common school education at Degraff, and took a technical course at Springfield, Ohio, leaving school to engage in the steel business at that place. After two years experience in that line he went to Baltimore, Md., in the fall of 1889, to take the position of assistant to the manager of the Whitley Harvesting Machine Company, continuing there about four years, until the eastern branch was removed. His next employment was at the photo engraving business in Baltimore, at which he was engaged for one year, at the end of that time selling out and moving to Philadelphia, where he became interested in architectural work. During the several years of his residence in that city he built nearly three thousand houses, doing a very successful business. In 1901 Mr. Barr removed to New York City, where he was engaged as consulting engineer on construction work, and during 1902-03 he built a considerable part of the Coney Island resort. In the spring of 1903 he came to Watsontown, Northumberland Co., Pa., where he has ever since resided. He immediately took charge of the works of the Breon Table Company, and after four years as manager of that concern bought it. The business is a large one, the manufacture of dining tables being its special feature, and the product finding a ready market all over the east, the demand being so extensive as to keep seventy men steadily employed. Mr. Barr devotes himself almost exclusively to business, and he has gained high standing in local circles, where the prosperity of his establishment is regarded as an important factor in the industrial situation. He is a Republican in political matters. Mr. Barr married Virginia M. Cover, daughter of William Cover, of Frederick County, Md., and they have had two children, Virginia H. and John S. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 408 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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AARON BARRELL, proprietor of the City Hotel, was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, August 29, 1829, son of John and Anna (Kroskopp) Barrell. He learned the milling trade, and was located in Allentown, Pennsylvania, four years previous to settling in Northumberland county. In 1851 he came to this county to accept a position in Jacob Leisenring's mill, at Bear Gap, which he filled four years. In 1856 he purchased a farm near Paxinos on which he resided seven years, and then engaged in merchandising at Paxinos, where he remained one year. He was subsequently engaged in mercantile business at Elysburg, Mt. Carmel, and Turbutville, successively, for about seven years, when he retired from that business and located upon his farm on the Centre turnpike near Paxinos, which he had purchased in 1868. He commenced purchasing and selling all grades of horses and mules, and conducted that business at his farm until increasing trade necessitated a more central location, and in November, 1888, he removed to Shamokin. In December, 1889, he leased the City Hotel and has since conducted that house in connection with his previous business. Mr. Barrell is also extensively engaged in farming, owning some three hundred fifty acres of land. He has been twice married; his first wife was Juliann, daughter of William Krigbaum. She died, February 8, 1885, leaving four children William; Francis F.; Annie, and Alice, wife of Fred Zeizer. He was again married, August 29, 1885, to Mrs. Jane Snyder, a daughter of Nicholas Campbell, of Elysburg. Mr. Barrell is a Democrat, and filled the office of overseer in Ralpho township three terms, also serving as school director for the same length of time. He was once the Democratic candidate for county commissioner. He is a member of Shamokin Lodge, No. 255, F. & A.M., and of St. Peter's Lutheran church, of Ralpho township. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 957 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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CHARLES A. BARRON, who has been engaged in the drug business at Shamokin since 1883, is one of the best known men in his line in that part of Northumberland County. His trade is large and well established and his reputation as a druggist and in a business way is of the highest. Mr. Barron was born June 22, 1855, at Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., son of Daniel Barron. His paternal grandfather brought his family from France to America and settled in Pine valley, near Hegins, Schuylkill County. There he died. Daniel Barron came to America with his parents. He became a blacksmith by trade, and while living at Pottsville engaged in wagonmaking, gaining considerable fame and success in that line. Later he settled at Elysburg, Northumberland County, where he followed farming as well as general blacksmithing, prospering by industry, continued to the end of his active days. He served as captain of a military company of Schuylkill County. Mr. Barron died at the age of eighty-four years, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Kelley, and his wife, Margaret, died Jan. 1, 1893, aged sixty-nine years, ten months, eight days; they are buried at Reed’s church. They had children as follows: Theodore F., who is in the insurance and real estate business at Ashland, Pa.; Curtis H., who went West when a young man and is now living in South Dakota, practicing as an attorney at law; Clara E., wife of William Krause; Charles A.; and Mrs. Kelley, wife of Dr. J. J. Kelley. Charles A. Barron attended public school at Elysburg and in 1872 came to Shamokin, where he has continued to make his home to the present time. He began work as a clerk in the employ of the late William R. Kutzner, with whom he remained eleven years, until he went into business for himself. In September, 1883, he formed a partnership with Dr. Robins and Dr. Weaver, the firm being known as C. A. Barron & Co. This association lasted for nine years, when the firm became Barron & Robbins, continuing as such until 1908, when Mr. Barron became sale proprietor. His well known store is at No. 610 North Shamokin Street. Mr. Barron is a director of the Shamokin Banking Company. On May 4, 1882, Mr. Barron married Mary E. Jones, daughter of the late Enoch Jones, and a member of a family widely and favorably known in Shamokin. Three children have been born to this union: Howard Curtis, an attorney at law, now located at Wheeling, W. Va.; Charles A., Jr., a druggist who is with his father; and Ruth Elizabeth., Mr. Barron is a member of Lodge No. 355, B.P.O. Elks, of Shamokin, and of the following Masonic bodies: Shamokin Lodge, No. 255, F. & A.M.; Shamokin Chapter, No. 264, R.A.M.; Shamokin Commandery, No. 77, K.T.; and Rajah Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., of Reading. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 591 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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B. F. BARTHO, physician, was born in Halifax, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania July 4, 1862, son of Gabriel and Magdalena (Kessler) Bartho, natives, respectively, of Berks and Schuylkill counties, Pennsylvania, and of German origin. His father is a miller by trade, and resides in Schuylkill county. John Bartho was the father of Gabriel Bartho; the father of Magdalena Bartho was Michael Kessler, a pioneer of Hegins township, Schuylkill county, where he owned and improved a tract of three hundred acres of land which acquired the name of Kessler's District It was with him that B. F. Bartho was reared, obtaining an elementary education at the public schools, after which he attended Berrysburg Academy and the Millersville State Normal School. He taught three terms of school in Schuylkill county. In 1882 he began the study of medicine with Professor H. R. Barnham, demonstrator of anatomy at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Baltimore, Maryland; he entered that institution in 1884, and was graduated with honors in 1886, receiving the gold medal in gynaecology. He was at once appointed resident physician to the Maryland Lying-in Asylum, Baltimore. Resigning this position in 1887 he came to Mt. Carmel, where he has since been engaged in the active duties of his profession. He is a member of the Schuylkill County and State Medical Societies, and while in Baltimore he belonged to the Medical Chirurgical Society. He is a member of the K. of M., and in politics is a Republican. Doctor Bartho was married, June 10, 1890, to Annie, daughter of Tobias Bickel of Mt. Carmel. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1037 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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BARTHOLOMEW. The Bartholomew family has been settled in what is now Rockefeller Township, this County, since the early days, the brothers James W. and John L. Bartholomew being members of the fourth generation of Bartholomews resident in Northumberland County. James W., senior member of the firm of Bartholomew & Jarrett, coal dealers of Sunbury, is also engaged in the marble and granite business at that point. John L. Bartholomew is in the stone cutting business and operates a quarry. William Bartholomew, great-grandfather of James W. Bartholomew, was born in Chester County, Pa., and married Elizabeth Miller, who was from the same section. Some of their children were born before their removal to Northumberland County. They settled in what is now Rockefeller Township, Mr. Bartholomew owning a farm in the Plum Creek district (the place later owned by Solomon S. Snyder), and he also followed his trade of wheelwright. He and his wife are buried at Augustaville. They had the following children: William; Jacob; John M.; Mary, who married Daniel Bloom; Elizabeth, who married William Bloom, brother of Daniel; Hannah, who married John Kreeger; Catharine, who married Jonathan Fasold; and Sarah, who married Dr. John Raker. William Bartholomew, son of William and Elizabeth (Miller) Bartholomew, was born in 1797 in Berks County, Pa., came to Northumberland County with his parents, and followed farming throughout his active years. He lived in Rockefeller Township, after his marriage settling near Emanuel church, in the Plum Creek section, where he died in 1860. He and his wife were Lutherans in religion, and he is buried at Lantz’s church there. His wife, who survived him many years, was Susan Elizabeth Wolf, and they were the parents of thirteen children: Mary (Polly), Mrs. William Taylor, of Shamokin Township, this county; Julian, Mrs. John Strasse; Anna Eliza, who married William Conrath and (second) Michael Smith, of Shamokin Township; Amanda, Mrs. Nathan Eister; Hester, Mrs. Ambrose Taylor, of Shamokin Township; Elizabeth, who died young; Henry, born Nov. 3, 1821, who married Mary M. Shipe; William; Charles; Joel, of Shamokin Township; Valentine; Harvey H., who lived at Kendall Creek, McKean Co., Pa.; and Rev. Edward F., of Illinois. Jacob Bartholomew, son of William and Elizabeth (Miller) Bartholomew, was the first of their family born in Northumberland County. He was a wheelwright and farmer, settling on his farm in the Plum Creek district in 1831, from which time until his death he farmed and worked at his trade. He was born Sept. 19, 1803, and died Feb. 11, 1877, and is buried at the Plum Creek church—the Eden Evangelical Lutheran Church. He married Catharine Bloom, of the same Township, born May 7, 1807, died April 7, 1870, and they were the parents of twelve children, viz.: Mary, born Nov. 7, 1826, who married Samuel Zimmerman; Peter, born Oct. 20, 1828, who died March 29, 1902 (he lived in Rockefeller Township); Maggie, Mrs. Henry Zimmerman; Jacob B.; Elizabeth, Mrs. Daniel Fasold; John, who died at Sunbury; Lot who lives in Upper Augusta Township; Sarah, who died young; Hulda, who has never married; William; Daniel; and one who died young. Four of this family survive, Mrs. Mary Zimmerman, Mrs. Elizabeth Fasold, Lot and Hulda. Miss Hulda Bartholomew attended to the wants of her parents faithfully in their declining years, nursing them both in their last illness, and she also nursed her sister Maggie, who was paralyzed. John M. Bartholomew, son of William and Elizabeth (Miller) Bartholomew, lived in the Plum Creek section of Rockefeller Township, in his early life working on the farm and teaching school. He then moved to Sunbury, where for some years he conducted a livery, later working in the railroad shops, where he met with an accident losing part of his hand. He married Eve Bennett, and they had four children: Emma is a school teacher in North Carolina; Harry, unmarried, lives in Sunbury; Rebecca married Harry Heil; Cora taught school in Sunbury for a number of years. Jacob B. Bartholomew, son of Jacob and grandson of William, was born in 1833 in Augusta (now Rockefeller) Township, and lived in Rockefeller Township until a few years after the Civil war. He was drafted for service in that conflict three times. Removing to Sunbury, he there passed the remainder of his life, dying on the evening of April 16, 1902, when sixty-nine years old. He is buried in Pomfret Manor cemetery. Mr. Bartholomew learned the trade of stonemason, and also followed stone cutting, and after his removal to Sunbury established himself in business there, laying pavements, etc. Ha gave employment to a number of man, and there are quite a few who learned the trade from him. A man who took an interest in affairs generally, he served as school director and tax collector in Rockefeller Township, and while living there was an active member of the Lutheran Church at Plum Greek (where he was confirmed;) which he served as deacon, later holding the same office in the church at Sunbury. Politically he was a Democrat. On Jan. 17, 1856, Mr. Bartholomew married Charlotte H. Lyon, daughter of George and Mary (Leonard) Lyon, of Sunbury, the latter formerly of Lancaster, Pa. Four children were born to this union: James W. is mentioned below; Mary C. married Albert J. Spinner and they live at St. Louis, Mo.; Hattie married Ira D. Hanna and they live at Philadelphia; John L. is a resident of Sunbury. Lot Bartholomew, son of Jacob and Catharine (Bloom) Bartholomew, was born on the homestead in Rockefeller Township Sept 17, 1844. He was educated in the local schools and learned the trade of stonemason, serving his full apprenticeship when twenty-one years of age. He followed his trade until 1895, for two years in partnership with Solomon Klase, and worked all through the coal regions at Williamsport and eastern Pennsylvania employing from three to twelve men. He bought his farm Nov. 29, 1899. It contains 100 acres and at one time was the Yost farm, later the Jonas Fry homestead. Before moving to his farm he resided in East Sunbury and was one of the first councilmen of the Eighth ward. He is a Democrat in politics and overseer of the poor, also fills the office of tax collector. Lot Bartholomew was married in 1867 to Beulah Fahrensworth, daughter of Robert Fahrensworth of Shamokin Township. Their children were: Elsie married Edward M. Noble and they live in Upper Augusta Township; Minnie E. died young; Sarah C. died in infancy; and Rose M. married J. P. Van Dyke, a druggist of Sunbury. Mrs. Bartholomew died Jan. 13, 1887, aged forty-one years, and she is buried in the old Sunbury cemetery. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 273 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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HENRY BARTHOLOMEW, farmer, was born in Rockefeller township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, November 3, 1821, son of William and Susan Elizabeth (Wolfe) Bartholomew. His father was born in Berks county in 1797, came to this county with his parents when a young man, and settled near Plum creek in Rockefeller township. Two children of the grandfather of our subject are still living: Catharine, wife of Jonathan Fausold, of Rockefeller township, and Julia Ann, wife of Jacob Bloom, of Rockefeller township. The father of Henry, after marriage, settled near Emanuel's church in this township, where he died in 1860. His wife survived him many years. They were members of the Lutheran church. They reared thirteen children, nine of whom are living: Charles; Valentine; Joel, of Shamokin township; Harry H., of Kendall Creek, McKean county; Rev. Edward E., of Illinois; Henry; Mary, wife of William Taylor, of Shamokin township; Hettie, wife of Ambrose Taylor, of Shamokin township, and Ann Eliza. wife of Michael Smith, of Washington township. Mr. Bartholomew married in 1849 Mary Magdalene, daughter of John F. Shipe, a native of Bucks county, and a settler of Rockefeller township, by whom he has six children: Elizabeth J., wife of Gaylon Bower, of Jordan township; John L., of Lower Augusta township; Rachel Annie, wife of Emanuel Gerringer, of Purdytown; David E., of Purdytown; Dennis Newton, and Norman Emerson. In 1862 Mr. Bartholomew enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Seventy-second Pennsylvania Militia, and served nine months, when he was honorably discharged. Politically he is a Democrat, and has filled the office of supervisor of the township; he is a member of the Lutheran church and has served in the offices of deacon and elder many years. His wife is a member of the German Reformed church. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1170 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JAMES W. BARTHOLOMEW was born Jan. 11, 1857, in Lower Augusta (now Rockefeller) Township, and there began his education in the local public schools. He was ten years old when his parents moved to Sunbury, settling in the East End, and he attended for several years the private school of Professor Brown, who then had four assistants. In April, 1873, he commenced to learn the trade of marble cutting, which he followed for a time as journeyman, and assisting his father, who was then doing an extensive building stone business. In 1881 he engaged in the marble and tombstone business on his own account, continuing same until 1892 when he gave it up because he found the marble dust injurious to his health. Meantime, from 1883 to 1888, he also ran a successful livery stable in Sunbury, and in 1889 he opened a first-class restaurant at No. 34 South Third Street having a hotel license. He carried this on for thirteen years, during which period, in 1900, he resumed his old line of business, establishing the marble and granite yard which he still conducts. In 1907, in partnership with his nephew, Charles F. Jarrett, he founded the firm of Bartholomew & Jarrett dealers in anthracite coal, who are located at Third and Court Streets. They are among the leading coal dealers in the city, and own the only coal elevator in Sunbury, having facilities for raising and depositing in bins forty tons of coal an hour. Their equipment is up to-date and complete in every respect their methods of doing business equally enterprising, and their standards gain and hold trade. Mr. Bartholomew has made a high reputation by a career of consistent integrity and fair dealing, and he occupies an enviable position among his business associates. He has not been particularly active in public affairs, though he served as a member of the borough council during the eighties. He is a Democrat in politics, a prominent member of No. 1 Fire Company and of the Americus Club, of which latter he is an official; he was a member of the governing board of the club for 1892, and is the only member of that organization who has twice been honored with election to the presidency. In 1883 Mr. Bartholomew married Margaret L. Garinger, daughter of Charles and Deborah (Haas) Garinger. They have no children of their own, but have reared two nephews, Charles F. and Clarence W. Jarrett sons of W. W. and Mary (Garinger) Jarrett of Sunbury, both Mr. and Mrs. Jarrett being deceased. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 274 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN L. BARTHOLOMEW, son of Jacob B., was born May 8, 1861. He came to Sunbury when a babe and has lived here all his life. He obtained his education in the Sunbury public schools and at the age of fifteen learned his trade of stonemason from his father with whom he worked until the latter’s retirement from business, and then worked with others in Sunbury. At the death of his father he became the owner of a flagstone quarry and other interests and now quarries flagstone from the quarry located in Upper Augusta Township, employing eight men. This quarry is located on the S. H. & W. railroad, a branch of the Pennsylvania line. Mr. Bartholomew owns his home where he resides, No. 989 North Eighth Street Sunbury, and also has other real estate. In politics he is a Socialist. He and his family are Lutherans. He is a member of the Friendship Hose Company, of Sunbury, of which he was the organizer on Feb. 11, 1895, and he became its first president, later foreman of the company and afterward secretary for two terms. The company has a membership of two hundred and is located at the corner of Tenth and Court Streets where it has fine quarters. On Jan. 17, 1901, Mr. Bartholomew married Alice Marks, daughter of Cyrus Marks, of Center Township, Snyder Co., Pa. They have three children, Mary Irene, Charlotte Florence and Margaret Rose. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 274 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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BENJAMIN F. BASTIAN, of Sunbury, who carries on an up-to-date bakery on Eckman Avenue, between Line and Race Streets, was born July 31, 1868, in Upper Augusta Township, Northumberland County, son of Matthias D. Bastian. He is a member of the fourth generation in that Township, being a great-grandson of George Michael Bastian, who founded the family there, and from whom we give the family record. George Michael Bastian was a native of Northampton County, Pa., born March 13, 1768, and died Feb. 18, 1845, in Upper Augusta Township, Northumberland County, where he had followed farming, having a 200-acre tract known (and so called in the deed) as “White Lily Garden Farm.” He and his wife died on that place, and they are buried in the old cemetery at Sunbury. Her maiden name was Susanna Bollender, and she was born Oct. 7, 1770, in Greenwich Township, Berks County. Their children were as follows: Jesse lived in Sunbury; Peter died at Milton, Pa.; Daniel is mentioned below; George died in Sunbury; Catharine married John Renn and they lived in Sunbury; Christianna married Henry Conrad and they lived in Rockefeller Township; Rachel married John Sinten and they lived at Alaska, this county; Elizabeth died unmarried, in Rockefeller; Lucy married Jeremiah Zimmerman and died in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. From public records in the courthouses at Sunbury and Lewisburg has been taken the following information, which is here given not only as being of interest in this connection, but also as it has considerable bearing upon the spelling of the name, which seems to have been written Bastian from the time the records begin, in 1791, with two exceptions. Both these times it was found written Bostion, but it must be noted that on one or these two occasions the signer made his mark. George Michael Bastian, Sr., came from Northampton County in the year 1791, and on June 16 1791, bought 500 acres of land from Richard Willings of Delaware county, Pa., about two miles below Sunbury, Pa on the west side of the Susquehanna river, and in the body of the deed the name is written George Michael Bastian. On June 11, 1798, George Michael Bastian, Sr., sold to George Michael Bastian Jr., 176 acres of the above tract of 500 acres and in the body of this deed the name is written George Michael Bostion; the deed is also signed George Michael Bostion. On May 10, 1819, George Michael Bastian, Jr., sold the above 176 acres to Lewis Dewart; he signed his name in German and it is written George Michael Bastian, and his wife Susanna Bastian signed by mark, her name being written the same way. On the same day and year Lewis Dewart sold to George Michael Bastian 300 acres in Augusta Township about three miles Southeast of Sunbury; in the body of this deed the name is written Bastian. On May 15, 1841, George Michael Bastian, Jr. sold to Henry Gass 76 acres of land in Augusta Township, and in the body of this deed the name is Bastian; it is also signed George Michael Bastian. In the year 1844 George Michael Bastian, Jr., made his last will and testament and in the body of the will we find the name Bostion; it is signed Bostion but by mark. In the year 1845 George Michael Bastian, Jr., died, and on the tombstone is inscribed Bastian. His son George, one of his executors, and all papers signed in settling up the estate show the spelling Bastian. In the year 1791 George Michael Bastian, Sr., gave a mortgage to Richard Willing, and he signed himself George Michael Bastian. In the year 1809 (George Michael Bastian, Jr., gave a mortgage to Lewis Dewart and it is signed George Michael Bastian. One Daniel Bastian had a lawsuit in 1797. Daniel Bastian, son of George Michael, Sr., was born Aug. 8, 1806, in what is now Snyder County, Pa., and was a young man when he came across the river into Upper Augusta Township. There he married Elizabeth Drayer, daughter of Matthias Drayer and they were Lutheran members of the Lantz Church in what is now Rockefeller Township, both being buried at that church. Mrs. Bastian died Jan. 21, 1869, aged fifty-nine years, three month twenty-seven days. Mr. Bastian died Dec. 29, 1879. He was a potter, and followed his trade in Sunbury and Upper Augusta Township for many years, in his later life also engaging to some extent in carpentering. Mr. and Mrs. Bastian had a large family, as follows: Sarah died in childhood; Joseph was killed while serving in the Civil war (he was married); George, a carpenter, died Feb. 3, 1897, aged sixty years, five months, ten days; Matthias D. is mentioned below; Henry died in young manhood, in Rockefeller Township; Polly married Jeremiah Cooper and they lived in Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; Landis is a farmer in Upper Augusta; Daniel died Sept. 25, 1878, aged thirty-one years, two months, twelve days; Mary Ellen married Samuel Fry and died Aug. 5, 1829, aged fifty-six years, ten months, twelve days; Jeremiah, of Sunbury, is a painter; Anna married Henry Nase and they live in Chicago. Matthias D. Bastian, son of Daniel, was born Oct. 11, 1838, in Northumberland County, and was brought up on the farm in what is now Rockefeller Township. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company B, 184th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving as a private one year and four days. He was wounded in action in front of Petersburg and as a result had his right arm amputated while a prisoner at Libby, where he was confined for eighty-two days. After the war, however, he resumed farming, engaging in general agriculture and trucking until about 1893, when he retired and settled in Sunbury. His home is at No. 803 Market Street in that borough. Mr. Bastian is a Republican in politics and has served as constable and as jury commissioner of Northumberland County. He is a member of Bruner Post No. 335, G.A.R., and of Lodge No. 203, I.O.O.F., both Sunbury organizations. On Aug. 19, 1862, Mr. Bastian married Lydia Poyer, daughter of Abitha and Rebecca (Mitchell) Poyer, of Sunbury, and twelve children have been born to their union: Charles E., Elizabeth (married to Abraham Roger), Maclay, Benjamin F., Daniel, William, Joseph, Cora, Alberta, Jennie, and two that died in infancy. Mr. Bastian and his family are members of the Reformed Church. Mrs. Bastian died March 30, 1900. Benjamin F. Bastian was educated in the public schools in the neighborhood of his early home. He was reared to farming, and followed agricultural work until he reached the age of eighteen wears, when he learned the trade of baker. In 1900 he came to Sunbury, embarking in business about that time, and he has built up an extensive trade, employing four men at present. His specialties are bread and pastry. In 1910 Mr. Bastian erected the modern establishment he now occupies, a store 22 by 64 feet on Eckman Avenue, equipped with the most modern facilities known to the trade. His oven cost $1,500, and the rest of the place is in keeping. Store and bakery are clean and sanitary, the entire place being a credit to the owner and to the community. On June 20, 1903, Mr. Bastion married Sue Broscious, daughter of Jared and Susan (Renn) Broscious, who died at Sunbury. Mr. and Mrs. Bastion have a large and comfortable home of their own at No. 144 North Fifth Street. He is a member of the United Evangelical Church of Sunbury, and holds office at present. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 840 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN E. BASTRESS, attorney at law, and president of the Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit Company, at Mount Carmel, Pa., was born in Shamokin Township, Northumberland County, Nov. 29, 1865, a son of Milton Bastress. His grandfather, Solomon Bastress, resided in Montgomery County, Pa. On April 6, 1830, he married Rachel Miller, of Bucks County, Pa., and they had one son, Milton, who was born April 16, 1833, in Montgomery County, where he spent his early life. Coming to Northumberland County he located in Rush Township, following his trade at Wolverton’s tannery, near Snydertown. He was also a rural mail carrier in Rush Township and became well known. He was a member of the Reformed Church and in polities a Republican. He married Catherine Brocious, of Schuylkill County, Pa., in 1857. Mrs. Bastress now makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. B. F. Culp, near Snydertown. Mr. Bastress died May 25, 1900. They had these children: Alinerva E., deceased wife of L. Parry; William, living in Shamokin Township; Samuel, living in Williamsport, Pa.; Alice, the wife of Benjamin F. Culp, and John E., whose name introduces this sketch. John E. Bastress attended the public schools of his native Township and Central Pennsylvania College, at New Berlin, Pa., thence going to the Ohio Normal University, at Ada, Ohio, and graduating from the latter institution in 1886. With this preparation he felt himself fitted for the duties of schoolmaster, and was employed as teacher at the Shipman school in Rockefeller Township, holding an engagement for one year. He was next in Union County, near Mifflinburg, teaching there one term; thence went to Point Township, where he taught four terms, concluding his career in the field of pedagogy as normal school instructor for four succeeding terms at Dalmatia, and making his final bow on retiring from his profession after three years engagement in the high schools of Mount Carmel. He then took up the study of law with Hon. Von Auten as preceptor and was admitted to the Northumberland County bar in 1892, and since 1895 has been located in the Samuel building at Mount Carmel, doing a general law practice in connection with his numerous and varied enterprises. He was one of the original directors of the Mount Carmel Guarantee Trust & Safe Deposit Company, which was established in 1902, he serving as president since 1906, and also as chairman of the finance committee. He is president of the Mount Carmel Gas Company, and was at one time president of the Mount Carmel Iron Works, of which he is still a director. He is solicitor and a director of the People’s and Central Building and Loan Associations of Mount Carmel. Upon the formation of the Bastress, Vought & Co. organization in Brooklyn real estate, in 1906, Mr. Bastress assumed the management. Since then the Bastress Vought Company have merged with another concern, forming the largest and strongest real estate concern within the limits of the Empire State, the management of which rests upon the shoulders of John B. Bastress. The light and power plant of Cambridge, Md., was built and personally owned by Mr. Bastress, who sold it in 1910. Socially Mr. Bastress belongs to the I.O.O.F., local lodge of Elks, K. of M. and P.O.S. of A. He is a member of the Lutheran Church. Politically Mr. Bastress is a Republican, served one year as county chairman, and for a time was one of the executive committee. For twelve years he was solicitor for the borough of Mount Carmel. His first wife, whom he married June 10, 1890, was Sarah Brocious. She died in 1897, leaving two children, Edgar R. and Clyde O. On Jan. 16, 1900, Mr. Bastress married Blanch M. Green, daughter of John Green, of Bainbridge, Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania. Mr. Bastress has had a busy life from boyhood till now, and in whatever office, whether as tutor or student, lawyer, banker or business man, his ambitions and capabilities have assigned him to high places. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 697 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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ADAM BATDORF, deceased, who was a dealer in paints, wall paper and window shades at Milton, Pa., with his place of business at No. 17 Broadway, was a resident of that town for nearly half a century, and in that time proved himself a loyal citizen and upright man. The name Batdorf was originally spelled Botdorf. Adam Batdorf’s grandfather came to America from Germany and settled in Lebanon County, Pa. Benjamin Batdorf, father of Adam, was a farmer in Lebanon County, and from there came to Milton, later moving to Chillisquaque Township, and there following farming and teaming. He died at Milton in 1887, and was buried in Harmony cemetery. He married Eva Stine, a native of Lebanon County, and their children were: John, Mary, Samuel, Amanda, Levi, Caroline, Adam, James, Catharine, Matilda and William. Adam Batdorf received his education in the common schools and was first employed at farm work. He next spent one summer working in a brick yard, and then went to learn the painting and paper hanging trade, in Milton, and this engaged him for ten years. He became expert in his work, and his time was fully occupied. In 1873 he opened his store as a dealer in paints, wall paper and window shades on Arch Street. Then after the great fire, in 1880, he built on Elm Street. His last location was on Broadway. Mr. Batdorf was a soldier during the Civil war. He enlisted first in Company K, 3d Pennsylvania militia, in 1862, and in 1863 he became a member of Company I, 37th regiment of Emergency men. In February, 1865, he enlisted in Company E, 74th Pa. Vol. Inf. for one year, and was sent to Virginia, where he was on guard duty most of the time. He was very active in G.A.R. circles, and in 1908 was elected treasurer of the Susquehanna District Association of the G.A.R., and re-elected in 1909. He was a past commander of Milton Post No. 129, G.A.R., having been elected to that office five times. He was a past officer in the I.O.O.F., and at the time of his death was captain of the Canton of that body. He married Sarah B. Kauffman, daughter of John W. Kauffman, of Milton. To this union were born: Maggie, who married W. E. Eckbert; Oliver J. O., manufacturer of the Good Samaritan ointment, for which a stock company has been formed and a large business being done; Clarence W., of Milton; Albert H., who died in Chicago; Annie W., wife of Frank W. Bailey, D.D.S., of Milton; Charles A., of Milton; Spencer, of Milton; and Harry A., who died, aged twenty-six years. Mr. Batdorf was a Republican in politics, and was unswerving in his allegiance to the party—an allegiance that began when he cast his first Presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. He died May 9, 1911, aged seventy-two years. John W. Kauffman, father of Mrs. Batdorf, was born in 1795, and died May 7, 1885. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. His wife Margaret was born in 1806, and died Sept. 5, 1882, and both are buried in Harmony cemetery, Milton. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 449 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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LEVI B. BATDORF, who for the last twenty years has been engaged in the grocery business at Shamokin, Pa., is a native of Northumberland County, born in Jackson Township Sept. 12, 1843, son of Joseph Batdorf and grandson of John Batdorf. John Batdorf came to Northumberland County from Berks County, Pa., where his home had been near the Lebanon county line. He made the journey by wagon, and located in Jackson Township where he was among the very early settlers. The Batdorfs had been located in Berks County for many years, in the tax list of 1759 there appearing the name of Christian Battort (name is variously spelled by different members of the family), who paid two pounds tax, showing him to be a man of some property in Bethel Township. John Batdorf owned a small farm, and devoted himself to farm work. He was a member of the United Evangelical Church at Mahanoy, where he is buried. He married Mary Grow, who died aged ninety years. They became the parents of two sons and eight daughters, namely: Joseph, John, Polly, Catharine, Sarah, Rebecca, Eliza, Harriet, Tillie and Lucy Ann, the last named, who is still living (1911), marrying Peter Kniss and having children, Rebecca Jane, Franklin, Hattie, Samuel and William. Joseph Batdorf, son of John, was born in Reading, Pa., and accompanied his father to Northumberland County. He learned the blacksmith’s trade, and followed it for some time, but later engaged in farming in Lower Mahanoy Township, and died at Hickory Corners. He married Sarah Bahner, and their children were: Isaac, of Lower Mahanoy Township; Jeremiah and William, deceased; Levi B.; Lovina, who married Elias Zartman; Hannah, who married Isaac Clemens; and Henrietta, who married John A. Long. Levi B. Batdorf attended the schools of Jackson Township, and at the age of seventeen began to learn the shoemaker’s trade, which he followed for several years. For sixteen years he was engaged in farming in Little Mahanoy Township, and in 1886 came to Shamokin. In 1890 he opened his present grocery store, in the operation of which he has met with deserved success. He carried a full line of groceries which he markets at reasonable prices, giving his customers the benefit of the best goods at the lowest possible cost. In 1864 Mr. Batdorf married Harriett Zartman, daughter of Adam and Susan (Forney) Zartman, and they have two children: Irvin J., who is engaged in the insurance business at Harrisburg, married Ellen Enterline, and has two children, Claude W. and Ethel M.; Emma P. married N. I. Raker, of Shamokin. Mr. Batdorf is a member of the United Evangelical Church, which he has served as class leader, steward and trustee for some time, and for ten years was superintendent of the Sunday school in Little Mahanoy Township. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 859 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN J. BATMAN, manufacturer and patentee of the Keystone Radial Drill Press and general manufacturer of engines, boilers, and machinery, was born near Hickory Corners, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, May 13, 1847, a son of Jacob and Matilda (Burrell) Batman. The senior Mr. Batman, a blacksmith in early life, and later a manufacturer of agricultural implements, was the son of one of the pioneers of this county. From here he moved to Dauphin county and at Uniontown manufactured grain drills and agricultural implements for some years. From thence he removed to Selinsgrove, where he now carries on a machinery repair shop. He has been the father of fourteen children, nine of whom are now living. John J., the eldest child, was educated at the common schools, and with his father learned the machinist trade. In 1866 he bought his father's shops at Uniontown and began business for himself. At the end of one year he and his father went into business at Selinsgrove, and he was there five years. In 1874 he came to Sunbury and began the manufacture of agricultural implements as the successor to Haupt & Youngman in Arch street. In 1880 he removed to his present site on East Market street, where his specialty is the manufacture of the Radial Drill Press, an ingenious device for drilling metal from a fixed center at any point within a given radius. In 1864 Mr. Batman entered the army at Harrisburg as a Private in Company A, Two Hundred and Eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served to the close of the war. He Is a member of the G.A.R. and of the Reformed church. His wife, to whom he was married near Uniontown in September, 1866, was Rebecca Romberger, and the children born to them are: Mary Minerva; Harry Oscar; Charles Albert, and Lillie May. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 852 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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OLIVER S. BARTO, who owns and conducts the “Farmers Hotel” at Watsontown, has been the owner of that establishment since 1901 and has managed it himself since 1902. Though he had no previous experience in the hotel business he has made a success of the enterprise, so that the place has not only been profitable to him, but a credit to the borough. Mr. Barto is a native of Turbutville, Northumberland County, born Feb. 19, 1874, and comes of a family which has long been established in Pennsylvania, Berks County having been the home of his ancestors for several generations. The Bartos are of French Huguenot extraction, the French form of the name being Perdeau. Three of the name came to America in the early days, one John Barto locating in Berks County, Pa., in 1730, Isaac Barto prior to 1750 and Nicholas Barto in 1773. The Isaac Barto mentioned was a large taxable in Oley Township, Berks County, in 1759, in which year he paid £14 tax. His descendants are still living in Washington Township, that county. Some time prior to 1735 Jean Peardeau located in Colebrookdale Township, Berks County, where he died at an advanced age in 1770, leaving a numerous progeny. Abraham Barto, great-grandfather of Oliver S. Barto, was a farmer of Colebrookdale Township, Berks County. His children were: Isaac, who lived in Oley Township, that county; Benjamin; and Susanna, who married Daniel Leinbach and lived at Friedensburg, in Oley Township (both are now deceased). Benjamin Barto, son of Abraham, was born in 1824, in Colebrookdale Township, Berks Co., Pa., and lived there until his removal to Northumberland County, in 1857. Here he settled on a farm of 162 acres in Lewis Township, one and a quarter miles from Turbutville, where he lived until his death, which occurred Jan. 29, 1898. He is buried in the cemetery at Turbutville. Mr. Barto was a member of the Reformed church and a Republican in politics. He was an intelligent man, and took an interest in public affairs, serving as supervisor and overseer of the poor in his district. His wife, Anna (Deysher), daughter of Jacob Deysher, of Pike Township, Berks County, died on the farm near Turbutville Jan. 29, 1863, at the age of thirty-six years. She was the mother of twelve children, of whom we have the following record: Abraham is a resident of Montgomery, Pa.; Augustus D. is the father of Oliver S. Barto; Benjamin lives at Erie, Pa.; Hon. James lives at Jetmore, Kans., where he has served as judge (he has suffered the loss of an arm); Morris died Oct. 30, 1862, aged seven years; Anna married Scott Levan and they live at Watsontown; Mary married Jacob Rovenalt and they live at Turbutville; Emma married George Williams, of Turbutville; Amanda married William Phillips and lives at Montgomery, Pennsylvania. Augustus F. Barto was born Jan. 13, 1846, in Oley Township, Berks Co., Pa., and received his early education in the local schools. He was reared on the farm, there and in Northumberland County, coming with his parents to Lewis Township April 4, 1857, when he was a boy of eleven. He worked for. his father up to the time of his enlistment, Nov. 16, 1863, at Reading, for service in the regular army, joining Company F, 2d Battalion, 15th United States Infantry, for five years. During the early part of his term he was in the Civil war, participating in Sherman’s famous march to the sea, from April, 1864, to Sept. 1, 1864. For the last eighteen months of his service he was a corporal, and he was honorably discharged Nov. 16, 1868. Returning home at the close of his military service, Mr. Barto engaged at laboring work and lime burning until 1879, after which he was employed on public works for a few years. From Sept. 3, 1883, to April 2, 1910, he worked for the Wagner Planing Mill Company at Watsontown, in which borough he is now living in retirement. He owns his home there and is comfortably situated. Mr. Barto is an independent voter, and in religious matters he and his family are identified with the Lutheran church. He is a member of Bryson Post, No. 225, G.A.R., of Watsontown. On June 14, 1870, Mr. Barto married Caroline E. Schook, daughter of Philip and Susan (Sandy) Schook, whose family consisted of thirteen children, namely: John, who is deceased; Benjamin, of Elmira, N.Y.; Lewis, of Horseheads, N.Y.; David, of Williamsport, Pa.; Philip, of Muncy, Pa.; William, of Watsontown; Rebecca, Mrs. William High; Matilda, Mrs. Sol. Stein; Sarah and Mary, who are unmarried and live together; Caroline E., Mrs. Barto; Susan, deceased; and Catherine, Mrs. Jacob Weaver. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Barto: Susan A. is the wife of Robert Merrell and they live at Watsontown; Sallie is married to Frank Leform and lives at Montgomery, Pa.; Oliver S. lives at Watsontown; Isaac is a resident of Williamsport, Pa.; Tillie is the wife of Henry Henshaw, of Newberry, Pa.; Harry is a resident of South Williamsport; Rachel married Fred Davis and they live at Plymouth, Pa.; Edward is a resident of Muncy, Pa.; Myrtle married George Hoff and lives at Milton, Pa.; Laura is unmarried. Oliver S. Barto was educated in the public and high schools of Watsontown, and when fifteen years old began working in the planing mill at Watsontown. He was thus engaged for about fourteen years in succession, and since 1902 has been engaged in conducting the “Farmers Hotel,” which he purchased in 1901 from the McNulty estate. The hotel is located on upper Main Street, and is an old-established stand. It contains twenty-three rooms, comfortably furnished and well equipped, and is run along modern lines, Mr. Barto taking a genuine interest in the welfare and comfort of his guests, who show their appreciation of his solicitude by continued patronage. He has done well in this venture, to which he has applied his best energies, and is widely acquainted, not only in a business way, but also socially, being a member of a number of organizations. He belongs to the Sons of Veterans, the Knights of the Golden Eagle, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and, in business, to the Liquor Dealers Association. Politically he is a Republican. On April 5, 1896, Mr. Barto married Carrie L. Evans, daughter of Thomas and Anna (Croft) Evans, late of Milton. Her father was a native of Wales. No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Barto. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 451 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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BENJAMIN A. BEALOR, M.D., who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Shamokin, Northumberland County, was born April 19, 1879, at Herndon, this County, and is the eldest son of a distinguished medical practitioner of this section, John W. Bealor. He is a member of an old Pennsylvania family long ago identified with Berks County and for several generations with Perry county. Mark Bealor, the first of this family of whom we have record, lived in Germany until his immigration to America. He first settled in Berks County, Pa., thence moving to Perry County, where he passed the remainder of his life, engaged in farming. He served in the Mexican war. John Bealor, son of Mark, and the next in the line of descent to Dr. Bealor, moved with his father from Berks County to Perry county. He was a farmer by occupation. Benjamin F. Bealor, son of John, was born in Perry County, and like his father and grand-father became a farmer. He followed agricultural work until his health failed, when he removed to Virginia in the hope of regaining his strength, but the change did not benefit him as he expected, and he returned to Pennsylvania, settling in Philadelphia. He lived retired there until his death, in the fall of 1897. He married Elizabeth Weibley, and they had a family of twelve children, five sons and seven daughters. Mr. Bealor was a Democrat and active in the politics of his locality, serving as overseer of the poor for two terms; in religion he was a member of the Reformed Church and a worker in the congregation, serving a number of years as deacon. John W. Bealor, son of Benjamin F., was born March 19, 1854, in Perry County, and there received his preparatory education in the public schools and at the New Bloomfield Academy, from which he was graduated in 1873. He then began to study medicine under Dr. G. A. Richardson, of Newport, Perry County, and took the course at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, at Baltimore, Md., graduating therefrom with high honors in 1876. His first location for practice was at Elliottsburg, Perry County, where he remained for years, after which he was at Locust Gap, Northumberland County, a year and a half before settling in Shamokin, in May, 1882. Here he at once entered into a most lucrative general practice, both medical and surgical, and in addition established a large drug store, for the accommodation of his own patrons and also for general prescription work and the sale of pure drugs and druggists sundries of all kinds. His reputation as a physician and druggist is second to none, and his high personal standing has been won by years of conscientious service to his fellow men. Dr. Bealor is a valued member of the Northumberland County Medical Society, and socially he is well known as a member of Shamokin Lodge, No. 664, I.O.O.F.; Washington Camp, P.O.S. of A.; and the B.P.O. Elks. He is a Democrat in political faith. Dr. Bealor married Mary C. Albert, daughter of George Albert, and six children were born to them, namely: Benjamin A., Florence E., Quilla E., Henry Mark, Helen Mary and John Watt the last named dying when two years old. Benjamin A. Bealor attended public school in Shamokin, including one year in high school, and graduated in 1893 from the Shamokin Business College. For three years he was a student at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Baltimore University School of Medicine, at Baltimore, Md., from which he was graduated in 1906, subsequently taking a post-graduate course at the Atlantic Medical College, at Baltimore, from which he was graduated in 1909. Returning to Shamokin at the completion of his course he located at No. 51 North Second Street. He is doing excellent work in his profession, and his patronage during his short period of actual practice has been most gratifying. Dr. Bealor is well known among the local fraternal bodies, belonging to the Elks, the Royal Arcanum, the Modern Woodmen and the Sons of Veterans. He is a member of the Reformed Church and a Republican in political sentiment. On July 30, 1908, Dr. Bealor married Mabel A. Roberts, only daughter of E. E. Roberts, of Sunbury, Pa., and they have a son, John Albert, born May 26, 1910. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 602 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN W. BEALOR, physician, was born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, March 19, 1854, son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Weibley) Bealor. He received his early education at the common schools, and later entered the New Bloomfield Academy, from which he graduated. He then commenced the study of medicine with Doctor Richardson of Newport, Perry county, Pennsylvania, and graduated from the Washington Medical College of Baltimore, Maryland, in 1870. He first located at Elliottsburg. Pennsylvania, where he practiced four years. after which he removed to Locust Gap, this county, where he remained one year and a half. In May 1882, he located in Shamokin, where he has since practiced his profession. He was married in 1879 to Mary, daughter of George Albert, and by this union they have three children: Benjamin F.; Florence E., and Quilla. Doctor Bealor is a member of Shamokin Lodge, No. 664, I.O.O.F., and of Camp No. 189. P.O.S. of A. Politically he is a Democrat. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 934 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
DR. JOHN W. BEALOR, a successful practitioner of Shamokin, Coal township, who has reached the pinnacle of fame in his profession, is the distinguished subject of this personal history. He was born March 19, 1854, in Perry County, Pa., and is a son of Benjamin F. and Elizabeth (Weibley) Bealor, and grandson of John Beator of Berks County, whose sole vocation was farming, and who removed to Perry County with his father, Mark Bealor, great-grandfather of our subject. Mark Bealor was formerly a resident of Germany, but immigrated to America and located in Berks County, afterward in Perry County, where he spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits. He is credited with having rendered valuable service to our country in the Mexican War. Benjamin F. Bealor, father of our subject, was born in Perry County, Pa., and the greater part of his life was spent in pursuing the same occupation followed by his father and grandfather before him, but his health failed and caused him to quit farming and remove to Virginia in the hope of benefiting his health by the change. This change, however, did not restore his health, and later on he returned to Philadelphia, where he lived a retired life until the autumn of 1897, when he laid down the burden of life and entered into eternal rest. He was a firm believer in the doctrines of the Reformed Church and took an active interest in all church affairs, serving as a deacon of the church for a number of years. He advocated the principles of Democracy and took an active part in local politics; was deeply interested in all work of his party, and served as overseer of the poor for two terms. Our subject is one of a family of twelve children, seven girls and five boys; he was educated in the public schools and in the Bloomfield Academy, from which he graduated in 1873. He then began the study of medicine under G. A. Richardson, as preceptor, in Newport, Perry County, after which he entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, from which he graduated with high honors in 1876, and at once proceeded to Elliottsburg, Perry County, where he opened an office and entered into the practice of his profession. He soon was enjoying a lucrative practice, which he continued for four years, when he removed to Shamokin, where he is engaged in active and successful practice. In connection with his office he owns a large drug-store and handles not only his own- drugs, but sells pure drugs to the public and fills prescriptions for other less fortunate physicians. His years of medicinal and surgical experience have made him cool, collected and practical in treating critical cases, and have given him an enviable record as one of the leading physicians of the town. Dr. Bealor was united in marriage with Mary C. Albert and six children have been added to their home, namely: Benjamin; Florence E.; Quilla E.; Henry Mark; Helen Mary; and John Watt, who died when only two years old. Our subject is a valued member of the Northumberland Medical Society; also belongs to Washington Camp, No. 178, P. O. S. of America, and to the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. (Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 222 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN P. BEARD was born, April 12, 1822, son of James and Nancy (Moore) Beard. His grandfather, John Beard, was a native of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, who removed to this county in 1789, and located on a farm in Delaware township. James Beard, his oldest son, and the father of our subject, served in the war of 1812 under Captain William Fulkerson. After the war he was engaged at farming in this township until 1859, when he removed to McEwensville and lived a retired life. He died, December 7, 1869, aged seventy-eight years; his widow died, July 27, 1876, aged eighty years. They reared a family of seven children: Jane; Eleanor, deceased; John P.; Sarah, deceased; Agnes; William, deceased, and Mary. The subject of our sketch received a common school education, and followed the occupation of farming until 1859, when he engaged in the mercantile business at McEwensville, where he remained until he enlisted in Company L, Sixteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, as first lieutenant, and served until April 9, 1863. Since 1874 he has been engaged in the fruit tree business. He was married, June 12, 1861, to Sarah, daughter of Charles Allen, of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and to this union were born five children: James C., who married Emily L. McCullough, of Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, and died, September 15, 1886; Rachel A., Mrs. J. Bruce Oakes; Agnes J.; Sarah, deceased, and Georgetta. Mr. Beard is a member of Warrior Run Presbyterian church; his wife died in 1864. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1157 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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SIMON P. BEAVER, of Milton, who is engaged in the manufacture of cement building blocks, was born in 1857 in Snyder County, Pa., where the Beaver family has long been settled. George Beaver, his grandfather, lived and died in Snyder County, and was a farmer by occupation. His death occurred in 1860, and he is buried at Kratzerville. To him and his first wife were born the following children: George, Ellis and Michael, all of whom lived in Snyder County; John, who lived in Northumberland County; Nathan, who went west when a young man; and Matthias, father of Simon P. Beaver. He married (second) Anna Hoffman, and they had one son, Henry J. Matthias Beaver married Salome Conkel, and they were the parents of eleven children, namely: George, who went west; Absalom, of Snyder County; Daniel, of New Berlin, Pa.; Edwin, who married Elizabeth McCracken, and lives near Milton; John, deceased; Charles, deceased; Emanuel, who died in the army; Catherine, who married Jacob Parks, of Montandon, Pa.; Sarah, who married Jacob Bower; Salome, who married. Noah Ulrich; and Simon P. Five of the sons served in the Civil war. Simon P. Beaver received his education in the public schools of his native county and spent his early life on a farm. When a young man he learned the trade of pump-making, which he followed until his removal to Milton, in 1902. In Milton he learned the heating business at Shimers mills, but he gave up that line for manufacturing in 1907, when be commenced his present business, the making of cement blocks. There is a growing demand for his product, and his enterprise and judicious management have combined to popularize it and to keep the trade alive. He has shown excellent ability in the upbuilding of his establishment, which has been started upon a substantial basis. On July 4, 1880, Mr. Beaver married Anna Catherine Solomon, daughter of Benjamin F. and Susan (Beaver) Solomon, of New Berlin, Pa., and they have had six children: Maude (who married Elmer Burkey and has one child, Mildred), Mabel (who married Cyrus DeHart and has one child, Harry W.), Cora (at home), Edward, Ernest and Rolliff. Mr. Beaver and his family are members of the United Evangelical church. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 401 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN A. BECK, son of Benjamin and brother of William H., was born May 11, 1858, in Montour County, Pa. He received his education in the public schools, but his father dying when he was very young he has had to make his own way from an early age, and his education has been mostly of the practical kind. For several years after commencing to work steadily he was employed on farms in his own county and in Northumberland County, in 1876 locating in the borough of Milton, where he has since made his home. In 1879 he entered the employ of S. J. Shimer & Sons, as clerk, and has served in such position ever since, his long experience in this capacity making his services most valuable. However, he has also had other business interests, having for almost twenty years, since 1891, been conducting a greenhouse at No. 319 Hepburn Street, where he also has his home. He makes a specialty of cut flowers and floral designs, and his taste for the work, combined with industry and good management has made his venture profitable. Mr. Beck married Ella Hill, daughter of Charles and Kate (Hause) Hill, and they have one son, Charles L. The family are Lutherans in religious connection. Mr. Beck has been quite active in borough affairs, having served eleven years as member of the council. He is a Republican in political affiliation, and socially is a member of the Royal Arcanum and the Knights of the Golden Eagle. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 333 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN H. BECK, a prominent farmer of Rockefeller township, Northumberland County, was born in Fraley township, Schuylkill County, Pa., August 30, 1850. He is a son of John Jacob and Elizabeth (Shadel) Beck, of Lykens Valley, Dauphin County, Pa. John H. Beck, our subject's paternal grandfather, was born in Northampton County, Pa., and settled in Lykens Valley, Pa., where he made a life-work of farming. He married Susan Greenswicht of Northampton County and the following children blessed their union: Daniel; John and David, twins; Jonathan; George; John Jacob, our subject's father; Polly; Harriet; Susanna; and Christianna. David Shadel, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of Northumberland County. He married Polly Hoffey of Lykens Valley and to them were born six children: Elizabeth, our subject's mother; Henry; Caroline; Sarah; Catherine; and Eve. He was engaged in the lucrative business of hat manufacturing and lived most of his life in Lykens Valley. John Jacob Beck, our subject's father, was born June 24, 1820, and died May 15, 1883. He lived in Audenried, Pa., for several years and was a coal miner; he resided near Hazleton, Pa., three years. He was married in the spring of 1848 to Elizabeth Shadel, who was born in Schuylkill County, August 24, 1822, and after his marriage he moved to Rockefeller (then Lower Augusta) township, Northumberland County, and bought a farm of eighty acres of David Shipe, and there he lived until his death. He carried on general farming and later invested in more land and added to his farm. He was a Republican in politics, but preferred to advance his friends in office rather than himself. He was an active member of the Lutheran Church. Three children were born to our subject's parents, namely: John H.; David, who died at the age of seven years; and Louisa, who married W. B. Eister, Esq., a merchant and postmaster of Seven Points, Pa. John H. and Louisa were educated in the common schools of the neighborhood and have lived all their lives in Rockefeller township. Our subject bought the old homestead and has since added to it so that he has now 260 acres of valuable land upon which he has raised a great deal of stock, but is now engaged in general farming. He was united in marriage January 2, 1868, to Abbie R. Zostman of Lower Augusta, a daughter of Daniel and Esther (Raker) Zostman, both of that township. Daniel Zostman, after the death of his first wife, was married the second time to Susanna Conrad of Lower Augusta. He was a tanner by trade and died in 1890. The children by his first union were: Sarah Ann; one, who died in infancy; Alexander; Harriet; William; Mary Jane; Rebecca; Catherine; Abbie R., our subject's wife; one, who died in infancy; Daniel; and Esther. Our subject and wife have had thirteen children, and do not consider the number unlucky, as follows: William Edward, born January 13, 1868, died April 21, 1872; David Albert, born May 6, 1871, married Alberta Dunkelberger, and is a dairyman at Irish Valley, Shamokin township, Northumberland County; Mary Alice, born August 26, 1872, married Harvey E. Miller, a butcher, at Sunbury, Pa.; Daniel J., a farmer of Rockefeller township, born December 13, 1873, married Emma J. Maurer, and has two children, Laura V., and Lloyd E.; George W., born June 18, 1875, and works on a pipe line at Buffalo Valley, Pa.; Harry Luther, born July 18, 1877, married Susanna Dunkelberger, and lives in Shamokin township; John Norman, born June 26, 1881; Susan Elizabeth, born October 12, 1883, and married Theodore P. Bennett of Columbia County; Franklin W., born January 20, 1886; Abbie M., born September 30, 1888; Kate F., born May 30, 1890; Esther N., born September 13, 1892; and Orville E., born July 23, 1895. The seven younger children live at home. Mr. and Mrs. Beck are members of the Lutheran Church. He has held many township offices; is a stanch Republican; is a member of Lodge No. 414, F. & A. M., at Elysburg, Pa., of which he is past master; a member of Camp No. 139, P. O. S. of A., of Seven Points. Our subject is a good musician and has contributed to his own and others' enjoyment by playing the B-flat cornet for seven years in the Seven Points Band and tenor horn for five years in the same band. His hard work and sterling business qualities have brought the success which he deserves, the improvement of his property, and the respect and favor of the community in which he lives. (Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 297 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
JOHN H. BECK, of Rockefeller Township has long been considered one of the most progressive farmers of his section of Northumberland County. He was born Aug. 30, 1850, in Frailey Township, Schuylkill Co., Pa., and belongs to a family which has been settled in Pennsylvania since Provincial times, being a descendant of John Martin Beck, who was born in Europe in the year 1724, and died Sept. 29, 1785. His wife, Catharine, was born May 1, 1726, and died Oct. 19, 1804. Among their children were sons Daniel, John and Jacob. A Catharine Beck, born June 27, 1766, who died July 2, 1846, was probably a daughter of John Martin and Catharine Beck, who were the grand-parents of Gottlieben Hoeckly. John H. Beck, the grandfather of John H. Beck, was a grandson of John Martin Beck, the immigrant ancestor. He was born Feb. 11, 1786, in Northampton County, Pa., and settled in Lykens valley, in Dauphin County, where he followed farming throughout his active years. He died June 20, 1855, aged sixty-nine years, four months, nine days, and is buried at Uniontown, Dauphin Co., Pa. He gave considerable land to the cemetery. He married Susan Greenswicht, of Northampton County, and to them were born the following children: Daniel; John and David, twins; Jonathan; George; John Jacob; Polly, Mrs. Benneville Ossman; Harriet Mrs. Wolf (she and her husband moved to Ohio); Susanna, Mrs. Heater; and Christianna, Mrs. Charles Drumm. John Jacob Beck, son of John H., was born June 24, 1820, and died May 15, 1883. He is buried at the Wolfs Cross Road Church. For a number of years he was a coal miner, living in Audenried, Pa., for several years, and for three years at Hazleton. After his marriage he moved to Lower Augusta (now Rockefeller) Township, Northumberland County, where he bought from David Shipe the farm of eighty acres upon which he made his home to the close of his life. He carried on general farming, in which he prospered so well that he was able to buy more land, adding materially to his original acreage. He was a Republican in politics and a Lutheran in religion. In the spring of 1848 he married Elizabeth Shadel, who was born in Schuylkill County Aug. 24, 1822, daughter of David Shadel, a native of Northumberland County, who married Polly Hoffey, of Lykens valley, Dauphin County. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Shadel: Elizabeth, Henry, Caroline, Sarah, Catharine, and Eve. Mr. Shadel passed most of his life in the Lykens valley, and was a hat manufacturer by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. Beck had three children: John H.; David, who died when seven years old; and Louisa, who married W. B. Eister, Esq., a merchant and postmaster at Seven Points, this county. John H. Beck was reared and educated in Rockefeller Township, where he has passed all his life. He was reared to farm work and eventually bought the old homestead, to which he has added until he now has a tract of 260 acres, where he carries on general farming. He has raised considerable stock, and for many years was engaged in the dairy business, running a milk team daily to Sunbury. He kept as many as thirty-two cows, which were cared for in the most approved hygienic fashion, his barn being a model modern establishment, supplied with running water and various other facilities for keeping it cleanly and attractive. He has also made a number of improvements in his residence, which is supplied with running water and is a comfortable home, kept up with the same care, which characterizes all Mr. Beck’s possessions. He has shown excellent business ability in every branch of his work, which has thriven under his management until he is justly regarded as one of the leading agriculturists of his section. He has interested himself in the local welfare, taking part in such movements as affect the entire community, and has been particularly active in local educational matters, having served six years as school director, as supervisor, to which office he was appointed by the court and from 1903 to 1906 as county commissioner; he was secretary of the board three years. Politically he is a Republican. Mr. Beck’s hobby has been music, and he is a fine performer on the B-flat cornet, which he has played as member of the Seven Points band; he has also played the tenor horn with that organization. Socially he is a member and past master of Lodge No. 414, F. & A.M., of Elysburg, and a member of Camp No. 139, P.O.S. of A., of Seven Points. He and his wife belong to the Lutheran Church. On Jan. 2, 1868, Mr. Beck married Abbie R. Zostman, of Lower Augusta Township, daughters of Daniel and Esther (Raker) Zostman, both of that Township, whose children were: Sarah Ann, one that died in infancy, Alexander, Harriet, William, Mary Jane, Rebecca, Catharine, Abbie, one that died in infancy, Daniel and Esther. For his second wife Mr. Zostman married Susanna Conrad, of Lower Augusta. He was a tanner by trade, and died in 1890. Mr. and Mrs. Beck have had a large family, namely: William Edward who died April 21, 1872; David Albert, born May 6, 1871, a dairyman in the Irish valley, in Shamokin Township, who married Alberta Dunkelberger; Mary Alice, born Aug. 26, 1872, wife of Harvey E. Miller, a butcher, of Sunbury; Daniel J., born Dec. 13, 1873, a farmer of Rockefeller Township, who married Emma J. Maurer and had children, Laura V. and Lloyd E.; George W., born June 18, 1875; Harry Luther, born July 18, 1877, who married Susanna Dunkelberger and lives in Shamokin Township; John Norman, born June 26, 1881; Susan Elizabeth, born Oct. 12, 1883, who married Theodore P. Bennett of Columbia county; Franklin W., born Jan. 20, 1886; Abbie M., born Sept. 30, 1888; Kate F., born May 30, 1890; Esther N., born Sept. 13, 1892; and Orville E., born July 23, 1895. Among the family traditions preserved by the Becks are stories of the trouble these pioneers had with the Indians during the early days in Northampton County. It is said that they suffered from several attacks of the savages, from whom they were in such danger that they had a place of refuge constructed under the floor of their house, where they would secrete themselves when the outlook was threatening. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 97 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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WILLIAM H. BECK was born April 9, 1852, in Liberty Township, Montour County, and there received his early education in the public schools, also attending the Franklin select school for one term, during the period it was taught by Charles Lesher. He was also a student at the Milton high school. For a time he was employed as clerk in the general store of Heinen & Schreyer, after which he took a course at the Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and on his return to Milton entered the employ of the Adams Express Company. He was engaged by that company as driver four years, at the end of that time being promoted to the agency, which he held for five years. In 1881 he resigned to accept a position as bookkeeper in the establishment of S. J. Shimer & Sons, with which concern, one of the most important in Milton, he has since been associated. A year after entering the employ of the firm he was sent upon the death of the father of George and Samuel J. Shimer, to Northampton County to superintend the construction of a new plant, remaining there one year. Upon the completion of the plant he returned to Milton, where he took charge of the order department, in this capacity traveling widely for the firm. In 1903, when a corporation was formed without change of name, Mr. Beck was elected secretary, which position he has since filled. He has proved a valuable member of the corporation, the condition of whose business was a material bearing on the well-being of the borough. In various relations outside of business Mr. Beck has proved a useful citizen, his aid and influence counting for much in the promotion of many desirable local enterprises. For six years he was a member of the Milton borough council, and as an active worker in the councils of his party, the Republican, he has assisted in securing creditable candidates for local offices, having served is committeeman and as borough chairman. For years he was a prominent member of the Lutheran Church, which he served as deacon, trustee and financial secretary, superintendent of the Sunday school and teacher of the Bible class, extending his Sunday school work to activity in the County Sunday School Association, of which he was recording and corresponding secretary, and is still a member of the executive committee. He now attends the Presbyterian Church, where he teaches the men’s Bible class. For a number of years Mr. Beck was district president of the Y.M.C.A., his district embracing Northumberland, Union, Snyder, Lycoming, Montour and Colombia counties, and he was also president of the local organization. Fraternally he unites with the Royal Arcanum and for six years was district deputy grand regent. Mr. Beck married Anna M. Angstadt, who was born Nov. 28, 1850, daughter of Joseph and Eliza (Eckbert) Angstadt, and died Aug. 23, 1891; she is interred in Harmony cemetery, at Milton. Three daughters were born to this union: Lottie, who is married to Walter J. Nail and has one son, William; Lulu J., who is at home; and Elenora E., now a student at Wilson Seminary. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 332 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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H. M. BECKER, M.D., has throughout his practice made a specialty of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, in which line he has a reputation that extends all over the State of Pennsylvania and a patronage which takes him over a wide territory. He has made his home at Sunbury, Northumberland County, since 1899. Dr. Becker is the only son of George F. Becker and grandson of Curtis A. Becker, a native of New Baltimore, York Co., Pa., who died there about 1889, at the age of seventy-three years. He is buried at Bear’s meetinghouse, though he was a Lutheran in religious connection. He was a wheelwright and blacksmith of the old-fashioned type of tradesman, being able to make every part of a wagon as well as build the wagon itself. His wife was Mary Fisher, and their children were: Elias, George F., John, Simon (living at New Baltimore, Pa.) and Mrs. Shue. The daughter lives with her husband in Adams county, Pennsylvania. George F. Becker was born May 29, 1835, at New Baltimore, Pa., where he continued to make his home until, 1892. Like his father he was a Carriage builder, and he made the first buggies turned out in his section of the State. This was during Civil war times. He prospered in this business, employing from twelve to twenty-five men, and he also had a farm. From 1892 until his death he lived at Hanover, Pa. He died Nov. 19, 1903, and is buried at Bear’s meetinghouse. He was a Lutheran in religions faith. He married Lucy Ann Myers, daughter of Conrad Myers, of Codorus Township, at what is called Seven Valleys. Mrs. Becker is now living at Hanover, York county. Two children were born to her and her husband: Annie M. (wife of Levi Bowman) and H. M. H. M. Becker was born May 3, 1873, at New Baltimore, and received his early education in the schools of New Baltimore, later becoming a student at the Cumberland Valley State normal school, from which he was graduated in 1892. From 1892 to 1894 he continued his studies at Gettysburg College, after which he took a course in the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania. Graduating in 1898, he took a post-graduate course at the Polyclinic hospital, in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat subsequently, in 1903, taking a similar course in the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and in the New York Polyclinic Hospital and Post Graduate School of Medicine. On Dec. 20, 1899, he settled at Sunbury, where he has since practiced, though his work is by no means confined to that borough or section. He is now engaged in dispensary work at the Wills Eye hospital in Philadelphia. Dr. Becker has numerous professional associations and has been active in medical organizations. He is a member of the Sunbury Medical Club, organized for sociability as well as study; a member of the Northumberland County Medical Society, of the Pennsylvania State Medical Society, of the American Medical Association, of the American Ophthalmological Society, and of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity of Gettysburg College. He is a past president of his county medical society and has been district censor since 1904. He is a Mason, holding membership in MaClay Lodge, No. 632, F. & A.M., of Sunbury, and in the Temple Club. Dr. Becker is a member of the surgical staff of the Mary M. Packer hospital at Sunbury, having charge of all the eye and ear work at that institution. He is medical examiner for various life insurance companies and insurance fraternities. On Nov. 23, 1994, Dr. Becker married Maud O. Keefer, daughter of John S. Keefer of Sunbury. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 715 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOHN PHILIP JACOB BECKER was born at Bornich, (Rheinfels), Germany. By the financial assistance of his oldest brother he was enabled to obtain a thorough medical education, and after completing his professional preparation he entered the German army as field surgeon under General Munchausen, from whom he received an honorable discharge at the expiration of seven years and six months' continuous service. Subsequently he sailed for America, landing at Brooklyn, New York, in 1783. He practiced at Allentown, Lehigh county, and Kutztown, Berks county, Pennsylvania, until May, 1807, when he removed to Upper Augusta township, Northumberland county, and located on the farm now (1890) occupied by Alfred Beckley, two miles east of Sunbury. Here he resumed the practice of his profession, and is remembered as a successful physician, widely known and well liked. He died on the 30th of April, 1813, at the age of sixty-four years, and was buried with Masonic honors in the old Sunbury cemetery. He married Elizabeth Dimmick of the vicinity of Philadelphia in 1795 and they were the parents of eight children, three sons and five daughters; two of the latter still survive: Mrs. Harriet Martin, one of the oldest residents of Sunbury, and Miss Louisa Becker, of Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 263 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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DANIEL BECKLEY, court crier, was born, February 2,1802, in Berks county, Pennsylvania, son of Daniel and Hannah (Eyster) Beckley. The parents came to Northumberland county about the year 1812 and settled near Milton, in which town they both died, respected citizens and consistent members of the German Reformed church. Our subject received a common school education and was brought up at farm labor. He clerked in stores at Sunbury, Milton, Selinsgrove, and Trevorton. He was elected by the Democratic party to the offices of Prothonotary and sheriff and served a term in each with credit. At the beginning of his term of office Judge Rockefeller appointed Mr. Beckley court crier, which position he has continued to fill to the present time. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and is one of the most upright and respected citizens of the county. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 836 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JULIUS BEHRENT, farmer of Shamokin Township, has not been a resident of that region as long as most of his neighbors, but he has made a place for himself among its substantial and respected citizens. He was born June 28, 1851, in eastern Germany, son of Louis and Augusta (Raher) Behrent. The father was a miller, and followed that occupation in Germany until his death, at the age of seventy-four years. The mother subsequently came to America, passing the remainder of her days at the home of her son Julius, and dying June 19, 1900, at the age of seventy-eight. She was buried at Shamokin. Louis and Augusta Behrent had the following children: Amelia, Adelina, Annie, Leo, August, Lupold and Julius. Julius Behrent learned the trade of miller and followed it while he lived in his native land. In 1873 he came to America, landing at New York City June 9th of that year, and he spent two and a half years there, in the employ of a railroad company. From there he came to Shamokin, Pa., where he was engaged at mining for eleven years, at the end of that time buying his present farm, in Shamokin Township, from M. H. Kulp. This place consists of 190 acres, and Mr. Behrent has since devoted all his time to its cultivation, in which he has been very successful. His produce is disposed of at the Shamokin markets, which he attends. Mr. Behrent has not taken any part in the public affairs of his adopted community, although he is interested in the general welfare and ready to support any measures for the universal good. He is a Republican on political questions, and in religion a member of the Reformed Church, holding membership at Shamokin. Mr. Behrent married Wilhelmina Krum, also a native of Germany, daughter of Edward Krum. They have eight children, namely: Louis, at present living in Jersey City; Susan, married to Charles Dunkelberger; Annie, married to George Bodsoskie; Frank, living in Jersey City; Minnie, at home; Edward; Martha, and Adeline. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 666 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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ISAAC BEIDELSPACH was born at Mohringen, Wurtemberg, Germany, October 21, 1822, and came to America in 1832. He was a farmer, and resided in Point township. In 1866 he was elected associate judge, serving until his death, July 15, 1869. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 239 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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JOSEPH BEIERSCHMITT, inside foreman of Merriam colliery, was born at Wartenburg, Germany, May 7, 1843, son of Michael and Catherine (Herman) Beierschmitt, who came to this country in 1846. They first located at Pottsville, Schuylkill county; three months later they removed to St. Clair, where the father was employed in the mines until his death in 1864. His first wife died in Germany; his children by her are: Mary, Mrs. Matthias Kline, and Peter, who was killed in a mine at St. Clair. Those by his second wife are: Katherine Rosa; Josephine; Joseph; John; Lizzie; Lena, and Margaret. The subject of this sketch was reared at St. Clair, where he began work in the breaker at the age of eight years, and when thirteen years old began work in the mines, at which he continued fourteen years. In 1870 he located at Locust Gap, this county, where he was assistant foreman at the mine two years. He was then appointed inside foreman of the Monitor colliery, which position he held seventeen years. In 1889 he was appointed to the same position in the Merriam colliery, and removed to Mt. Carmel. He was married, May 19, 1868, to Mary, daughter of Frank and Magdalena Frey, of St. Clair, a native of Germany. They are the parents of eight children: Lizzie; Mary; Frank; Josephine; Joseph; John; Henry, and Albert. The family are adherents of the Catholic faith, and in politics Mr. Beierschmitt is a Democrat. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1056 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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HUGH BELLAS, deceased, was descended in the third generation from Hugh Bellas, of Liswatly, Ireland, who married a Miss Hunter about 1740; they had issue as follows: George; James; Hugh; Thomas, and a daughter who married a Mr. Sloan and immigrated to America prior to the close of the last century. George Bellas was born at Liswatly about 1750, immigrated to America, and settled in Fishing Creek township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania; he married a Miss Royce and they had issue as follows: Hugh; Agnes; Sarah; Samuel; George; John; James; Thomas, and Elizabeth. James Belles was born in 1752, settled at Ballyarton, and died in April, 1842; he married Sarah Huey and they had issue as follows: Jane, who was born in 1796 and died in 1819; Hugh, who was born in 1798 and died in 1868; James, who was born in 1800 and died in 1828; Rev. George, who was born in 1802 and died in 1885; Stewart, who was born in 1804 and died in 1815; Sarah, who was born in 1805; Thomas H., who was born in 1807 and died in 1883, and William, who was born in 1809 and died in 1817. Hugh Bellas was born about 1755, and died at Liswatly in 1825; he married a Miss King and they had issue as follows: Mrs. Mary Ann Warden; Mrs. Jane Caskey; Mrs. Sarah Williamson; Thomas, who located at Philadelphia; Rev. Joseph, who died in 1872; Hugh, who located at Port Stewart, married a Miss Elder, and died in 1885; James, who located at Philadelphia; Samuel, who died at Liswatly in 1832, and Elizabeth, who died at Port Stewart in 1876. Thomas Bellas was born between 1755 and 1760, immigrated to America, returned in bad health, and died at Liswatly before the close of the last century. Hugh Bellas, deceased, attorney at law, was born near Belfast, Ireland, April 26, 1780, son of George Bellas. He began the practice of law in Sunbury in 1803 and resided at that place until his death, October 26, 1863. He married Esther Anthony and they had three children: Eliza P.; Ann Caroline, and Amelia S. Eliza P. Bellas married Charles Pleasants, resided at Sunbury, and had the following children: Israel, an officer in the United States Army, who was killed at the battle of the Wilderness in 1863; Eliza F. Pleasants, who married W. K. Lineweaver and had the following children: Charles P.; James, and Florence. Ann Caroline Bellas married Aristide Rodrigue and had the following children: Andrew J.; Esther Aline, who married J. K. Gilbert; Hugh B., who married Elizabeth Dougherty; Ann Caroline, deceased; Aristide, deceased; Clara V., who married James A. Ruthven, and William, deceased; Henrietta, deceased; and Florence V., who married FitzGerald Tisdall. Amelia S. Bellas married James Brisbin and had the following children: Esther, who married Franklin B. Gowen and has one child, Esther B. Gowen; Hugh B.; Horace, and William. A sketch of the personal career of Hugh Bellas appears in this work in the chapter on the Bench and Bar. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 807 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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DR. GEORGE BENNETT, a highly respected citizen and successful business man of Shamokin, Northumberland County, Pa., was born January 31, 1837, in Warwickshire, England. He is a son of George and Harriet (Lane) Bennett, of England. He received his early education in the schools of England but was thrown upon his own resources at an early age. At the age of thirteen or fourteen years he left the home of his father, who was a wood-sawyer by trade, and became apprenticed to a shoemaker, which trade he mastered in about three years. Soon after reaching his majority, Mr. Bennett was united in marriage with Martha Edwards, on January n, 1859. Their home was blessed by one daughter, Martha Elizabeth, who was born June 1, 1860. Our subject came to America in 1865. He first located at Cumbola, Pa., where he remained for about nine years, a portion of which time he was engaged in mining; but subsequently, at the urgent request of a number of his friends, principally miners, he changed his business plans and worked at his trade. He made shoe-making his sole vocation thereafter, and soon enjoyed an excellent trade, supplying not only miners and their families with footwear, but also many others who heard of the excellence of his work and the material he used, and traveled from miles around to patronize him. At first he carried on business on a very small scale, but, as his patronage increased and the demand for his goods became greater, he improved and enlarged his place of business, and made ready to meet all demands for shoes. At the end of eight or nine years, by careful management and strict economy, he had accumulated the neat sum of three thousand dollars. Wishing to still further enlarge and extend his business he felt the necessity of going to a larger place, where the demand for footwear would be greater; accordingly he removed to the borough of Shamokin in 1873, leased a house, and continued the same business on a larger scale. Again success crowned his efforts, and in 1878 he purchased the grounds adjoining his place of business and erected thereon a handsome and commodious brick building three stories high, 24 by 150 feet, which has a large basement, upper floor, hall, and middle floor. This elegant structure is on North Market street, and in this building Mr. Bennett has enjoyed a successful business for the past twenty years. Mr. Bennett carries a large and well-assorted stock, not only of shoes, but of general merchandise. In another part of the city, on Shamokin street, he also has a branch shoe store. By industry and frugality, he has built up a large and exceedingly profitable business, the fruits of which he is now enjoying. Martha Elizabeth Bennett, daughter of our subject, was first united in marriage with Rev. Thomas Philip, a Methodist minister now deceased, and a native of Cornwall, England. Mrs. Philip was deeply attached to her first husband and mourned his demise for seven years when she entered a second union with Rev. William Opie, also of Cornwall, England. Again death deprived her of her companion. Rev. Opie died in July, 1897, having led an exemplary and useful life as a Methodist minister for a period of thirty-five years. Mr. Bennett enjoys the confidence of the people of Shamokin and occupies several positions of trust. He is treasurer of the Anglo-American Building & Loan Association; also treasurer of the Guarantee Building & Loan Association of Philadelphia, for the Shamokin district. He has executed the trusts that have devolved upon him faithfully and efficiently, and is deserving of the high reputation he enjoys for uprightness and fair dealing-He is a devout Episcopalian. Fraternally he is a member of Black Diamond Lodge, I. O. O. F.; also a member of the Knights of the Mystic Chain. (Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 164 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

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