Northumberland County Biographies
C

JESSE CABEL, farmer of Ralpho Township, belongs to a respected family of that section of Northumberland County. The Cabels are of German extraction. Joseph Cable, his grand-father, was extensively engaged in farming in Jackson Township, this County, and in his later years went West, where he died about 1865. His children were: Daniel, Abraham, Christian, Eliza, Wilhelimina and Elizabeth. Christian Cabel, son of Joseph, first followed farming, but he was a man of mechanical ability and learned the trades of shoemaker, stonemason and clock-maker, at all of which he worked. Coming to Ralpho Township he took up about twelve hundred acres of land, making his home near Weigh Scales, and following farming and clock-making. He sold one tract to Charles Snyder. He met his death in 1860, when about forty-nine years old, along the pike between Schuylkill Haven and Orwigsburg Landing, and is buried at the Blue church in Ralpho Township. His wife, Sarah (Hensyl), was a daughter of George Hensyl, who lived in Mahanoy Township, this county. They had a large family, namely: Harriet is unmarried; Caroline married Isaac Haas and (second) George Hartline; Eliza married Isaac Hill; Kate married John Hoffman; Sarah married Hugh Campbell; Mary married James Adams; Susan married Adolph Walbridge; Annie married Joseph Dunkelberger; John died in Mifflin County, Pa.; Albert is a resident of Pottsville, Pa., where he is engaged in business as a druggist; Jesse completes the family. Jesse Cabel was born in Ralpho Township April 1, 1848, and was reared to agricultural pursuits on the home place, working out among farmers for a time after commencing on his own account. He then found employment doing repair work for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and spent five years in the shops at Shamokin. In 1870 he located at Weigh Scales, buying a small tract of land there from Mrs. Mary J. Snyder, and there he has since followed farming, also doing considerable work for the Township. He is an honorable man, and highly respected in his neighborhood for his straightforward, industrious life. Mr. Cabel married Lucinda Adams, daughter of Benjamin and Mary M. (Pensyl) Adams, and they have had children as follows: Franklin E. and Edward E., twins, both deceased; William, who was accidentally killed at Irish Valley when fifteen years old, while hunting; Millard, a barber by trade, who lives at home; John, at home; and Caroline, who is engaged as a stenographer in Philadelphia. Mr. Cabel is a member of the Blue church, and he formerly belonged to the I.O.O.F. He votes independently, supporting the best candidates, regardless of party. Cabel station, on the Philadelphia & Reading railroad, was named after Christian Cabel, father of Jesse Cabel, and Cabel post office, at Weigh Scales, was also named for the family.( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 675 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

ALBERT CADWALLADER was born in Milton, Pennsylvania, October 11, 1841, was reared and educated in his native town, and was engaged in the grocery and provision business until 1879. October 20, 1868, he married Annie L., daughter of Andrew Supplec of Philadelphia, and by this union they have seven children: Gertrude H.; Austin S.; Seth Iredell; Mary Louisa; Kate E.; Bertha May, and Albert. During the Rebellion he volunteered in Company A, Third Pennsylvania Militia, and later in Company E, Twenty-eight Emergency Men, and was afterwards appointed agent for the United States sanitary commission to distribute supplies to the sick and wounded soldiers at the front. In politics he is a Republican, and was elected county treasurer in 1871, the first Republican ever elected to that office in this county. He served five terms as chief burgess of Milton, and has also been a member of the town council. He is secretary and treasurer in the Milton Knitting Factory, and has been a director of the Milton National Bank for several years. Mr. Cadwallader is a member of Henry Wilson Post, G.A.R., and served as quartermaster of the same four years. He and family attend the Presbyterian church. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 977 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

GEORGE B. CADWALLADER, ex-chief burgess of Sunbury, was born in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1830, son of Dr. Peter and Hannah (Magill) Cadwallader, natives of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and descendants of Scotch ancestry. Doctor Cadwallader died in 1832, and his widow lived to the advanced age of eighty years. Of his three sons and one daughter George B. is the only one living. The subject of this sketch was reared in Bucks county, received an academic education, and subsequently graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. Engaging in the drug business at Danville, he followed it altogether at various places about twenty-five years. When the war broke out he was in business at Shamokin, and in April, 1861, entered the army as first lieutenant of Company A, Eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served three months. Re-enlisting in August following he was made first lieutenant of Company K, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and thereafter served in about the following manner until September 10, 1866, at which time he was mustered out at Richmond, Virginia: September 17, 1861, he was first lieutenant and quartermaster of the Forty-sixth regiment; July, 1863, captain and assistant quartermaster U.S.A.; March, 1865, brevetted major and lieutenant colonel; for faithful and meritorious service during the war he was brevetted colonel, and in November, 1865, for faithful and efficient services in the quartermaster's department, he was brevetted brigadier general. During the period covered by the foregoing promotions, he was brigade quartermaster of William's brigade, Army of Virginia; quartermaster of the First brigade, Second corps, Army of Virginia, and of the First brigade, First division, Twelfth corps, Army of the Potomac; post quartermaster at Dechert, Tennessee, and Atlanta, Georgia; in charge of transportation on Sherman's march to the sea; in charge of marine and land transportation at Savannah, Georgia; in charge of quarter-master's depot at Cleveland, Ohio, and Richmond, Virginia, and finally in charge of the national cemeteries at Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, and Hollywood. Leaving the army, he came to Sunbury and for a short time was in the grain, flour, and feed business. From 1869 to 1884 he was engaged in the drug business, thence to the present time in the manufacture of nails, an enterprise with which he is now connected. General Cadwallader was married in this place in 1870 to Mrs. Georgiana (Markle) Wolverton. Mrs. Cadwallader died, May 9, 1885, leaving her husband and two daughters: Mary and Annie. The General is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Presbyterian church. He was first elected as chief burgess in 1887, on the Republican ticket, and reelected in 1889. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 846 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
COL. GEORGE B. CADWALLADER, now living retired in the borough of Sunbury, was long prominent in the affairs of that community, in his earlier years in various business relations, for a number of years before his retirement as superintendent of the Sunbury Water Company. and for several years in his official capacity of chief burgess. He attained the rank of colonel by brevet during the Civil war, entering the Union service as first lieutenant and rising by merit.
Colonel Cadwallader is a native of Bucks County, Pa., born Oct. 20, 1830, near Doylestown. His grandfather lived and died in that county. Dr. Peter Cadwallader, his father, was also born there, died in 1832 at Doylestown, where he was engaged in the practice of the medical profession, and is buried there, in Buckingham Township. He married Hannah M. Magill, like himself a native of Bucks County, and like him, also, of Scottish ancestry. She lived to the age of eighty. Dr. Peter Cadwallader and his wife had the following children: Peter died in infancy; John, who was a miller and a well known man in this section, lived in Montour County, but died in Sunbury and is buried in the old cemetery (he never married; he was a well known member of the Masonic fraternity here, belonging to Maclay Lodge and to the Knights Templars); George B. is mentioned below; Mary died young.
George B. Cadwallader spent his boyhood at his native place and there received his early education. He subsequently attended the academy at Danville, Pa., and having decided to become a druggist went to Philadelphia to take the course at the College of Pharmacy there. Having completed his preparation he established himself in the drug business at Danville, thence in 1857 removing to Shamokin, Northumberland County where he carried on business as a druggist until the outbreak of the Civil war. In April, 1861, he entered the Union army, and for over five years was engaged in the service of his country, his army record being a notable one. Becoming first lieutenant of Company A, 8th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, he served three months, in August, 1861, re-entering the service with the same rank in Company K, 46th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Promotions came rapidly. On Sept. 17, 1861, he became first lieutenant and quartermaster of his regiment serving thus until July, 1863, when he was advanced to captain and assistant quartermaster, U. S. A. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major and lieutenant colonel, and subsequently, for meritorious service throughout the war, was brevetted colonel, with which rank he was mustered out of the service, at Richmond, Va., Sept. 10, 1866. He served as quartermaster of Williams’s Brigade, Army of Virginia, of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 2d Corps, Army of Virginia, and of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac; as post quartermaster at Dechant, Tenn., and Atlanta, Ga., was in charge of transportation during Sherman’s memorable march; in charge of national cemeteries at Seven Pines (Fair Oaks) and Hollywood; in charge of quartermasters depots at Cleveland, Ohio, and Richmond, Virginia.
In 1867, soon after the close of his army service, Colonel Cadwallader came to Sunbury, where he has since made his home. He and his brother John embarked in the flour and feed business under the firm name of John Cadwallader & Co., and prospered from the start, operating three mills at different points in Northumberland County. The business developed to large and profitable proportions. In 1869 Colonel Cadwallader purchased a drug store in Sunbury from Dr. John G. Markle & Co., and continued to carry it on until 1884, at which time he became general superintendent of the Sunbury Nail, Bar and Guide Iron Company, manufacturers of considerable importance to this region. He retained that position until 1891, resigning to take the position of superintendent with the Sunbury Water Company, with which he was connected in such capacity until his resignation, over ten years ago. Though he has relinquished his more active responsibilities he is still associated with local interests as member of the official board of the Sunbury Safe Deposit & Trust Company, of which he was one of the original directors, having been a leading spirit in its organization. He is also president of the Sunbury Mutual Fire Insurance Company, of which he was a founder and the first vice president.
The Colonel has always held public-spirited ideas regarding the duties of citizens to protect the interests of the community, and in his position as an influential business man has been able to accomplish much of benefit to his fellow citizens. They have recognized his efforts by electing him to responsible public office, and his popularity has won him the support of the best class of citizens. In 1887 he was elected chief burgess, in which office he served two terms, having been re-elected in 1889. In other respects he has also been a leader. For several years he was foreman of No. 1 Fire Company. He was first commander of the G.A.R. post at Sunbury, is a prominent member of the Loyal Legion, and also holds membership in the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Lodge No. 22, F. & A.M., and Northumberland Chapter, No. 174, R.A.M. He is a Republican in political sentiment.
In 1870 Colonel Cadwallader married Mrs. Georgiana (Markle) Wolverton, who died May 9, 1885. Two daughters were born to this union: Mary C., who is unmarried and at home with her father; and Anna, who married Simon P. Wolverton Jr., son of S. P. Wolverton, and resides a Sunbury. Mrs. Cadwallader’s mother was Robins, a member of the first family to settle at Sunbury. The site of the Colonel’s beautiful home, which he erected in 1883 at the corner of Fifth and Market Streets, was taken up by the Robinses, and the property is one of the most attractive residences in Sunbury. The General has been active in building up the borough, having erected several residences. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 15 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
GENERAL GEORGE B. CADWALLADER, who made a brilliant and interesting record in the Civil War, is one of the most progressive and prominent business men of Sunbury, being superintendent of the Sunbury Water Company, one of the foremost industries of the borough. He is a son of Dr. Peter and Hannah (Magill) Cadwallader, and was born in Doylestown, Bucks County, Pa., October 20, 1830. Our subject's parents were both natives of Bucks County and were of Scotch ancestry. Dr. Peter Cadwallader died in 1832 and his wife survived him to the ripe age of eighty years. Their happy union resulted in the birth of four children, three sons and one daughter, our subject, George B., being the only one now living. George B. Gadwallader was reared in Bucks County and there received his preliminary educational training, but subsequently attended the Danville Academy in Danville, Montour County, Pa. He later decided to follow the profession of a druggist and, entering the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, graduated from that institution and engaged in the drug business at Danville. He followed that business there until 1857, when he established a drug-store at Shamokin and continued with much success until the outbreak of the Civil War. In April, 1861, he enlisted as 1st lieutenant of Company A, 8th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf. He served for three months and then re-enlisted, with the same rank, in Company K, 46th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf. He was ever a willing and conscientious soldier and his rise in the ranks was steady. On September 17, 1861, he was 1st lieutenant and quartermaster of his regiment, and served in that capacity until July, 1863, when he was advanced, to captain and assistant-quartermaster, U. S. A. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major and lieutenant-colonel, and afterwards was brevetted colonel for his meritorious services throughout the war. In November,1865, for faithful and efficient services in the quartermaster's department, he was brevetted brigadier-general, which rank he held until his discharge. During this period he was quartermaster of Williams' Brigade, Army of Virginia; quartermaster of the 1st Brigade. 2d Corps, Army of Virginia; quartermaster of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac; post-quartermaster at Dechert, Tenn., and Atlanta, Ga.; was in charge of transportation on Sherman's memorable march to the Atlantic Coast; in charge of the quartermaster's depots at Cleveland. Ohio, and Richmond, Va.; and in charge of the national cemeteries at Seven Pines, Fair Oaks, and Hollywood. He was finally mustered out of service, September 10, 1866, at Richmond, Va. After the close of the war Gen. Cadwallader located at Sunbury and entered the flour and feed business in association with his brother, John, the firm name being John M. Cadwallader & Company. They operated three mills in different sections of the county and did a large and paying business. In 1869 our subject purchased the drug-store conducted by Dr. John G. Markle & Company in Sunbury and followed that business with good results until 1884. He then became connected with the Sunbury Nail, Bar & Guide Iron Manufacturing Company, in the capacity of general superintendent, and faithfully served as such until 1891. In that year he accepted a position as superintendent of the Sunbury Water Company, and the success which has attended his efforts as such is clearly evidenced by the prosperous condition of •the company to-day. He is a man of keen intellect, a shrewd manager of business affairs, and is ever faithful to the best interests of the firm which he represents. In the private walks of life he is equally popular as in business circles, and his friends and acquaintances throughout the county are numerous. In 1870 Gen. Cadwallader was united in marriage with Mrs. Georgiana (Markle) Wolverton, and they became the parents of two daughters: Mary and Anna. He was bereaved of the companionship of his beloved wife by death on May 9, 1885. Socially our subject is a member of Sunbury Lodge, No. 22, F. & A. M.; Northumberland Chapter, No. 174, H. R. A.; the Loyal Legion of the United States; and is prominent in the G. A. R. He assisted in organizing the first G. A. R. post in Sunbury and was chosen its first commander. Religiously the General is a believer in the doctrines of the Presbyterian Church. (Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 120 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

SETH CADWALLADER was one of the pioneer merchants of Milton, in which town he settled about 1812. He was born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, October 11, 1796, and after coming to Milton engaged in clerking, but subsequently went into business and followed merchandising until 1854, when he retired. On the 3d of February, 1824, he married Elizabeth, daughter of George Hammond, and a native of Northumberland county. Her father was one of the first settlers of this part of the State, was captured by the Indians during the Revolutionary war and turned over to the Hessians, and was held a prisoner five years. Eleven children were born to Seth and Elizabeth Cadwallader, only three of whom are living: Hammond, of Juniata county; Albert, of Milton, and Kate, wife of James McConkey, of Philadelphia. The parents died, August 24, 1863, and June 3, 1880 respectively. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 977 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

JOHN ADAM CAKE, for whose father was named the hamlet of Caketown, a place yet familiarly known by that name though for years past forming a part of Sunbury, was born in Harrisburg, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1846. He was educated at Russell's military School, and at Yale and Princeton. With Benjamin H. Brewster as preceptor he read law for some time in Philadelphia, and in March, 1870, was admitted to the bar in Sunbury, after having pursued his studies one year with Messrs. Rockefeller and Rohrbach. Since coming to the bar he has had his office in Caketown, where he has large Property interests requiring much of his attention. During the years 1867 and 1868 he held the position of assistant cashier in the Philadelphia Custom House under his father, who was then the United States collector of that port. Becoming a convert to the Greenback idea then so prevalent, he was a delegate to the convention held at Toledo, Ohio, in 1878 for the purpose of organizing the National Greenback and Labor party and therein took an active part. He was subsequently the representative of that party from his district to the national conventions of 1880 and 1884. and in the ensuing campaigns labored hard for the success of the respective nominees, Weaver and Butler. In 1880 he was his party's nominee for Congress, and in 1882 their candidate for the Supreme court. Mr. Cake is now a Republican, but virtually withdrawn from active politics. He was married at Pottsville, Pennsylvania, February 27, 1868, to Minnie E., daughter of the late Captain Hugh McCullough, who fell at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and has four children: John A.; Minnie C.; Joseph W., and Edith. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 853 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
JOHN ADAM CAKE, Jr., M. D., is a young man who has built up a large practice in the short time he has been in Sunbury, Northumberland County, Pa., and he promises to be one of the most prominent and successful physicians of his time. The marvelous rapidity with which he has built up his present clientage is almost incredible to one not familiar with the Doctor's push and energy. Almost his entire time not given to his practice is devoted to study, and his admirers feel satisfied that he will yet win a name that will rank high in the world of science. Dr. Cake was born in Sunbury, January 19, 1869, is a son of John Adam and Minnie E. (McCullough) Cake, and a grandson of Joseph Cake. John Adam Cake, Sr., father of Dr. John Adam Cake, was born in Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pa., August 25, 1846, and is a' son of Joseph W. Cake, after whom the hamlet of Caketown, which is now part of Sunbury, was named. John Cake was educated at Russell's Military School and at Yale and Princeton, after which he read law for some time with Benjamin H. Brewster of Philadelphia; he subsequently pursued his studies one year with Rockefeller & Rohrbach of Sunbury, and then was admitted to the bar in Sunbury in March, 1870, where he has practiced ever since, and also looked after his large property interests. In 1867-68 he was assistant cashier in the Philadelphia Custom House under his father, who was then United States Collector at that port. In 1878 he was a delegate to the convention held at Toledo, O., for the purpose of organizing the Greenback and Labor party, and therein took an active part. Later he represented his district in the national conventions of 1880 and 1884, and in the ensuing campaigns worked hard for the success of the candidates, Weaver and Butler. In 1880 he was his party's nominee for Congress and in 1882 their candidate for judge of the Supreme Court. He is now a Republican, but has withdrawn from active participation in politics. On February 27, 1868, at Pottsville, Pa., Mr. Cake was married to Minnie E. McCullough, daughter of Capt. Hugh McCullough, who fell at Murfreesboro, Tenn., in the Civil War. Mr. and Mrs. Cake have four children: Dr. John Adam, the subject of this sketch; Minnie C.; Joseph W.; and Edith. Dr. John Adam Cake was educated in the Sunbury High School, graduating in 1887, after which he entered Lafayette College at Easton, where he studied three years. On His return to Sunbury he read medicine with the late Dr. F. B. Masser, subsequently entering the University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1893. He immediately began the practice of his profession at Sunbury. In February, 1894, Dr. Cake was joined in wedlock with Clara Jones, an accomplished young lady of Shamokin, Coal township, Pa. They have one daughter, Helen Marie. Our subject is a great lover of athletic sports, and while at college he spent much time in the gymnasium and athletic departments. He is an active and participating member of the Northumberland County Medical Society.(Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 654 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
JOHN ADAM CAKE, attorney, of Sunbury, has been engaged in the practice of law in that borough for a period of forty years and has extensive real estate holdings in that part of the borough formerly known as Caketown, the management of which occupies considerable of his time. For a number of years he was actively interested in politics, from which he withdrew, however, some years ago.
Joseph W. Cake, his father, laid out an extensive addition to the original town plat of Sunbury which was named Caketown in his honor, and which he had surveyed in September, 1863. He died Jan. 1, 1879, and his wife died Aug. 25, 1879. She is buried at Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., while Mr. Cake is buried in Pomfret Manor cemetery at Sunbury. They had children as follows: Alice, who married J. G. Lowery; Joseph; John Adam; Edith, who died young; and Amy, who married Joseph S. Adam.
John Adam Cake was born Aug. 25, 1846, in Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pa., and received his preparatory education at Russell’s Military School, taking his collegiate course at Yale and Princeton. He studied law under Benjamin H. Brewster, at Philadelphia, and was admitted to the Northumberland County bar at Sunbury in March, 1870, for a year previous to which event he had continued his law studies under Messrs. Rockefeller and Rohrbach, in that borough. He has ever since maintained a law office in Sunbury, in that part of the borough once known as Caketown, but which has for many years formed a part of the municipality.
Mr. Cake was quite active in political affairs for a number of years. In 1867 and 1868, during his father’s incumbency of the position of United States collector at the port of Philadelphia, he was assistant cashier at the custom house in that city. He was one of the early advocates of the Greenback movement, and was a delegate to the convention held at Toledo, Ohio, in 1878, for the organization of the National Greenback and labor party, taking an active part in the work of that convention. He represented his district in the national conventions of that party held in 1880 and 1884, working hard during the Weaver and Butler campaigns, and in 1880 was himself the nominee of his party for Congress, in 1882 for judge of the Supreme court. Since the disintegration of the Greenback party he has been a Republican, but he has not taken any direct part in public affairs or in promoting the success of the party beyond the regular casting of his vote. He is an intelligent and public-spirited citizen, and uses his influence in a quiet way for the promotion of all worthy objects which have in view the advancement of the general welfare.
On Feb. 27, 1868, Mr. Cake married, at Pottsville, Pa., Minnie E. McCullough, daughter of Capt. Hugh McCullough, who lost his life while serving in the Union army at the battle of Murfreesboro. Mrs. Cake died the mother of four children: (1) John Adam, born at Sunbury Jan. 19, 1869, died there. He graduated from the Sunbury high school in 1887, after which he was a student for three years at Lafayette College, Easton, Pa., and then returning to Sunbury read medicine with the late Dr. F. B. Masser, completing his preparation for the medical profession at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1893. He practiced at Sunbury from that time until his death, meeting with a degree of success which comes to few. He was a working member of the Northumberland County Medical Society. Dr. Cake spent much time at college in the gymnasium and athletic sports, for which he always retained a fondness. In February, 1894, he married Clara Jones, of Shamokin, and they had one daughter, Helen Marie. (2) Minnie C. is the wife of Mason Noble. (3) Joseph W. is engaged as a conductor on the Pennsylvania railroad. (4) Edith.
Mr. Cake was married (second) to Mrs. Dunkelberger. He is a Mason, holding membership in lodge No. 22, F. & A.M., of Sunbury.( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 713 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

COLONEL ALEXANDER CALDWELL was one of the bravest and most efficient soldiers that went out from this county in defense of the Union during the dark days of civil strife. He was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. February 19, 1840, son of Alexander and Martha Caldwell, early settlers of that town. Alexander grew up in his native place and received such education as the schools of that timer afforded. He taught school at intervals and attended academies at Millville and Tuscarora, Pennsylvania, several terms, was a well-read man, and possessed a very retentive memory. Returning from school to respond to the first call for troops, he enlisted in Company A, Eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served as a drummer boy in the three months' service. He re-enlisted, August 20, 1861, in Company K, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for three years, was mustered in as first sergeant, was promoted to second lieutenant, November 1, 1861, to first lieutenant on the battlefield of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862, and to captain of his company, November 1, 1562. He served in all the battles and campaigns of his regiment, and, veteranizing at the expiration of his three years' service, he took part in the closing scenes of the war, and participated in the grand review at Washington, D. C., May 24, 1865. He was mustered out of service with the rank of captain, July 16, 1865. Returning from the war he located in Shamokin, where he was married, September 11, 1867, to Mary L., eldest daughter of Richard B. Douty, of which union five children were born: Richard A.; Katherine; Grace, deceased; Frederick C., and Ralph M. Colonel Caldwell raised a company in Shamokin which was mustered into the National Guard, and he afterwards rose to the rank of colonel of the Seventh regiment, N.G.P. For several years he was the local agent of the Northern Central Railway Company at Shamokin, and afterwards filled the office of notary public and pension agent very successfully up to his death. Politically he was a stalwart Republican, and was a thorough soldier in thought and deed. He died, December 15, 1886, and a monument to his memory and gallant deeds has been erected in the Shamokin cemetery by his comrades of the G.A.R. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 900 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

SAMUEL CALDWELL was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1818, son of James and Nancy (Woods) Caldwell. Robert Caldwell, the grandfather of our subject, immigrated from Ireland to America about the year 1796 and located in what is now Montour county (then Northumberland), Pennsylvania. The eldest son, Samuel, died at Black Rock, while serving in the war of 1812. James Caldwell was born during the voyage across the Atlantic. He was a farmer, and reared a family of six children: Robert, deceased; John, deceased; Margaret, widow of John McWilliams; Samuel; James, of New Jersey, and Dr. L. T., deceased. Samuel Caldwell was educated in the common schools, and has followed farming all his life. In 1855 he took a contract on the construction of the Catawissa railroad, and after completing this he was engaged ten years in the tanning business. He was one of the charter members of the Watsontown Bank, and was active in securing stock for the same. He became the first president of this bank and continued as such four years. In 1884 he was a candidate for the legislature on the Republican ticket and was defeated by only one hundred sixty-four votes when the county gave a Democratic majority of over eight hundred. He was married, February 22, 1844, to Elizabeth A., daughter of Thomas and Nancy (Butler) Gillen, of Montour county, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born nine children: Thomas G., a merchant of Watsontown; Margaret; Martha A., wife of Ezra Weist, of Fairmount, Florida; Nora A.; James, who was one of the corps of engineers who surveyed the Nicaragua canal; Kate; Rhoda; Ida, and Pansy. Mrs. Caldwell died, March 20,1876, in the faith of the Baptist church. Mr. Caldwell is a member of the Reformed church, and one of the best known and most enterprising citizens of Watsontown. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1074 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

HENRY CAMERON, of No. 604 West Spruce Street, Shamokin, has lived in that borough for almost fifty years, and throughout that long period has been employed at the mines. For over twenty years he has been engaged at the Cameron mines. Mr. Cameron was born May 25, 1852, in Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Pa., where his father, Charles Cameron, a native of New Jersey, located before the Civil war. His paternal grandfather had a family of six children, those besides Charles being: Daniel, Eckbud F., John, Eliza and Lydia A. Charles Cameron was a plasterer and bricklayer by occupation, and followed his trade all his life. He lived for some time at Shamokin, but eventually returned to his native State, where he died. He married Mary A. Murkel, a native of Berks County, Pa., and a member of an old family of that county, and to them were born seven children: Emeline is the widow of David Reed; Mary E. married Henry Ressler; Henry is mentioned below; Charles lives in Shamokin; Simon is a resident of Jamestown, N.Y.; Wallace lives in Rochester, Pa.; Elizabeth married Emanuel Leiser. Henry Cameron commenced work at the breaker when a mere boy and has followed mining all his life. He has been a stationary engineer during the greater part of his forty-eight years at the mines, and commenced work with the Cameron colliery about twenty-five years ago, Sept. 15, 1886. He is now one of the trusted employees at the Cameron mines, bearing a deserved reputation for trustworthiness and reliability. He is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle and of the Shepherds of Bethlehem, in politics a Republican, and in religion an adherent of the Reformed faith. Mr. Cameron married June 21, 1873, Harriet Rhoads, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Kerstetter) Rhoads, of Northumberland County, and they have had four children: Sallie E. died at the age of thirty years, the wife of Charles Settelmoyer; Mary C. died in infancy; Jennie F. is the wife of John Young, of Shamokin, and has one child, Joseph Henry; Caroline M. died at the age of twenty-four years. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 958 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

COLONEL JAMES CAMERON, the first soldier from Northumberland county to lose his life in the war, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, March 1, 1801, and came to Sunbury with his parents in 1808. Thence the family removed to Lewisburg. After the death of his father he learned the trade of blacksmith; later he became a printer and editor, and published the Political Sentinel at Lancaster; he studied law, was admitted to the bar at Lancaster, and subsequently (August 4, 1851) to the bar of Northumberland county; at one time he was a superintendent on the Philadelphia and Columbia railroad; for some years he engaged in agricultural pursuits with profit and success, and operated several finely improved farms near Milton. He also filled several positions of trust and emolument. When the Civil war broke out he was stationed at Sunbury as superintendent of the Northern Central railway, but immediately resolved to enter the military service. He accepted the colonelcy of the Seventy-ninth regiment, Fourth brigade, First division, New York militia, popularly known as the Cameronian Highlanders, and fell at the head of his command while leading a charge at the first battle of Bull Run, July 21, 1861. He was the first officer of his rank in the Union army and the first officer from Pennsylvania soil who fell in battle in the civil war. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 443 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

DAVID CAMP, merchant, was born in Elysburg, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, November 22, 1834, a son of Benjamin and Magdalena (Hinkle) Camp. His paternal grandfather, Henry Camp, and maternal grandfather, Abram Hinkle, were pioneer farmers near Elysburg; both died near Bear Gap and are buried in the Reed Church cemetery. Henry Camp had seven children: Benjamin; Samuel; David; Lambert; Mary, Mrs. John Long; Sarah, Mrs. Daniel Hill, and a daughter who married Daniel Bloom, all of whom are dead. Benjamin Camp, a carpenter and farmer, removed from Elysburg to Columbia county, Pennsylvania, in 1839 and died there in 1873. He had ten children who grew to maturity: Abraham; William, killed in a breaker, August 8, 1854; Samuel; Benjamin; Daniel; David; Lavinia, Mrs. David Everett; Mary, Mrs. Jacob Culp; Hannah, Mrs. Joseph Moyer, and Sarah, Mrs. Joel Cox, all living except William. The subject of this sketch was reared in Columbia county, received a limited education, learned the carpenter trade with his father, and at the age of twenty-one years started out for himself. He was a resident of Centralia, Pennsylvania, thirteen years, where he worked at his trade eight years, and conducted a drug store five years. In 1872 he settled in Mt. Carmel and in 1875 embarked in the lumber business, in which he continued thirteen years. In November, l886, he engaged in the general merchandise business, and still continues at that occupation. His first wife was Lavinia, daughter of Peter and Mary (Taylor) Persing of Columbia county, by whom he has two children: Edward A. and Robert E. His second wife was Phebe Persing, by whom he has seven children living: Ida, Mrs. Robert Davis; Joseph; Stella; George W.; May; Carrie, and Garfield. Mr. Camp is a member of the Lutheran church, and is connected with the F. & A.M., I.O.O.F., and K. of M. He has served as councilman and member of the school board of Mt. Carmel several terms. Politically he is a Republican, and in November, l890, he was a popular candidate of his party and borough for the legislature, but was defeated. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1024 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
DAVID CAMP, who is interested in several of the most important enterprises in Mount Carmel and formerly was a very prosperous merchant, is known as one of the most enterprising and public-spirited residents of Mount Carmel, this county. Mr. Camp is a son of Benjamin and Magdalena (Hinkle) Camp and was born November 22, 1834, in Elysburg, Northumberland County, Pa. His paternal grandfather, Henry Camp, and maternal grandfather, Abram Hinkle, were pioneers who were farmers near Elysburg. Both died near Bear Gap and were buried in the ReedChurch cemetery. Henry Camp and his wife reared a family of seven children: Benjamin, the father of our subject; Samuel; David; Lambert; Mary, who became Mrs. John Long; Sarah, who married Daniel Hill; and a daughter who was the wife of Daniel Bloom, all of whom are dead. The father of our subject, Benjamin Camp, was born in Northumberland County. He was a carpenter and builder by trade, also a farmer, combining both occupations very successfully. In 1837 he removed from his farm near Elysburg to the lower part of Columbia County, this state, where he died in 1870 at the age of seventy-two years. In politics the father was an ardent Republican, having formerly been a Whig, but he never sought office. He was an active and influential member of the Lutheran Church. To him and his beloved wife was born a family of twelve children, two of whom died in infancy, and the others were reared as follows: Abram; William, who was killed in a coal-breaker August 8, 1854, at Green Ridge, Pa.; Lavinia, widow of David Everett; Samuel, a farmer residing at New Media, Columbia County, Pa.; Benjamin, who is in the employ of the Dupont Powder Company, at Ashland, Pa.; Daniel, who resides in Mount Carmel; David, the subject of this sketch; Mary, the wife of Jacob Gulp of West Shamokin; Hannah, wife of Joseph Boyer of Mount Carmel; Sarah, who is Mrs. Joel Cox and resides near Millville, Columbia County, Pa. Our subject, David Camp, was reared in Columbia County and he received a meagre education. He attended a "subscription school" and up to the age of twenty-one years educated himself by reading and hard study, at the same time learning his trade as a carpenter with his father. When he reached his majority, in 1854, David set out on his own account and removed to Bear Gap, remaining there two years; then moved to Mount Carmel, where he resided one year; he then went to Centralia, in 1859, where he conducted a drugstore for five years, doing unusually well in that and in his trade, building many of the largest coal-breakers. In 1872 Mr. Camp removed to Mount Carmel and engaged in the lumber business, in addition to following his trade as a builder. For thirteen years he was so engaged, building as many as thirty houses in one year and putting up many of the most substantial and modern residences and stores erected in Mount Carmel during the period of time referred to. He later engaged in the real estate business and, being far-sighted and a good judge of values, was very successful. In November, 1866, he engaged in business as a general merchant and for several years conducted one of the largest and best general stores in Mount Carmel. In 1894 he practically retired from active business operations and has since devoted part of his time to the interests he holds in some of the principal corporations of Mount Carmel. Mr. Camp was one of the organizers and is president of the Mount Carmel Iron Works; he was one of the organizers of the Mount Carmel Banking Company and is its vice-president, which position he has faithfully and satisfactorily filled since the company began business; he has been president of the People's Building & Loan Association since its formation in 1894. In politics our subject is an enthusiastic and active Republican. In 1890 he was the nominee of his party for the legislature, but suffered defeat with the rest of the ticket of his party, making a run, however, which amply demonstrated his great popularity with the voters in the district. He has served as overseerof the poor for two terms, as a member of the school board for two or three terms and as a member of the borough council several terms. Mr. Camp is a prominent member of Mount Carmel Commandery No. 22, Knights of Malta; also of Mount Carmel Lodge No. 378, F. & A. M., and Mount Carmel Lodge No. 630, I. O. O. F. Twice has Mr. Camp been happily united in the marriage relation. His first marriage was to Lavinia Persing, daughter of Peter and Mary (Taylor) Persing of Columbia County, two children being born of the union: Edward A., who is engaged in business in the Michigan copper region; and Robert E., who resides in Mount Carmel. His second bride was Phoebe, sister of his first wife, by whom he has had a family of twelve children, seven of whom are living, as follows: Ida, wife of Robert Davis, a merchant who does a prosperous business in Mount Carmel; Joseph, a patternmaker, who resides in Mount Carmel; Stella, May, Garfield and Carrie, who are at home; and George W., who is in the employ of the Mount Carmel Iron Works. The other children died in their infancy.(Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 267 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

WILLIAM CAMP, outside foreman, Reliance colliery, was born in the town of Barey, Michigan, November 25, 1855, son of Abraham and Olive (Norwood) Camp. His father is a native of this State and has resided at Mt. Carmel thirty-four years. He is a carpenter by trade and the father of nine children, five of whom are living: William; Frank; Edward; Mary, Mrs. Albert Jefferson, and Lydia. William Camp received his education in the public schools at Mt. Carmel. He learned the carpenter trade, which he followed eighteen years. He has held his present position since 1889. January 19, 1882, he married Josephine, daughter of David J. and Amanda (Hill) Lewis. They are the parents of four children: Helen; Bertha; Stewart, and Walter. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and Mr. Camp is a Republican in politics. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1053 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

CAMPBELL. There is a numerous Campbell family in Northumberland County descended from Obadiah Campbell, a native of New Jersey who removed to this section in 1779 and located in Ralpho Township. He purchased a tract of 400 acres of what became valuable land (the south part of the village of Elysburg, being built on part of the tract) and built his own log cabin upon what later became the site of the residence of Davis Huff. This place continued to be the homestead of the Campbells for several generations. Obadiah Campbell was a tailor by trade, but never followed that vocation after settling in this county. He was a Presbyterian in religions faith and one of the organizers of the church of that denomination in his settlement, helping to build the old church between Snydertown and Elysburg; he served as elder in same many years. Politically he was a strong Democrat, the leader of the party in his locality. His children were: Benjamin, John, James, Robert, Obadiah, Albert, Jane (who married Caleb Ely), Joanna (wife of George Ely) and Elizabeth. All were good singers and sang at the memorial service held at Sunbury at the time of Washington’s death.
Robert Campbell, evidently son of Obadiah, above, born in New Jersey, was the first of the family to come to this county. He settled in Rush Township and became one of the prominent citizens of that locality. His children were: Christopher; Abraham, who lived in Rush Township and died in 1861 (he and his wife Jane had Robert, Duncan and David); Robert, who died young; James, who lived in Upper Augusta Township (he married Polly Kline and had children Harmon and Robert); Elenor, Mrs. John Kline; Jane, Mrs. John; and Maria, Mrs. Sanders, who moved with her husband to New York State about 1830.
Christopher Campbell, son of Robert, was born in 1795 in Rush Township, and died July 31, 1851, aged fifty-six years, six days. In 1823 he moved to Upper Augusta Township, settling on the farm now owned by his grandson, James H. Campbell, where he owned 100 acres. He was a lifelong farmer, and gave the rest of his life to the cultivation and improvement of this property, on which he built the house and barn. His death was caused by a fall from the top of the barn, and he was buried at Klinesgrove cemetery. He was a Methodist in religious faith. Mr. Campbell married Sarah Kline who died at her home in Upper Augusta Township, Feb. 26, 1841, aged forty-four years, eleven months, fourteen days, the mother of ten children: Isaac died on the homestead; Rhoda married Samuel Oberdorf; Abraham, who remained with his father died at the old home, of typhoid fever; Isabella married David Rockefeller; Catharine married Lewis Rockefeller; Elenore married Kelso Savidge and (second) George M. Forrester; Elizabeth J. married Bloomfield Carr and (second) Charles Haughawout and they live at Riverside, Pa.; Lemuel is a resident of Sunbury; Harmon K., born in 1837, died in 1870; Sallie (Sarah) M., born in 1839, married Charles P. Eckman.
Isaac Campbell, son of Christopher, was born May 9, 1816, in Rush Township, and died Dec. 26, 1896, on his farm in Upper Augusta Township. He received a common school education. In his early life he was employed on the construction of the Pennsylvania canal, and later became a boatman on that canal, later engaging in farming and for many years in merchandising at Klinesgrove. He was the silent partner in the store there for many years, and was afterward extensively engaged in the milling business, at both Klinesgrove and Sunbury, conducting two mills, and giving employment to a number of men in his milling and agricultural operations. Able and energetic in his business affairs, he was also a useful man in the general affairs of the community, was one of the organizers and builders of the Klinesgrove Methodist Church and took some part in public matters. Possessed of force and character, he was the man chiefly instrumental in the construction of the church and the collection of funds for that purpose. He and his brothers, Lemuel and Harmon K., gave the ground upon which the fine edifice was erected, and he burned the brick and gave time and effort to the successful completion of the building, in which he took much pride. During the Civil war he rendered service to the government; he was public-spirited in local matters; served on road views and often as juryman; and was a candidate for the nomination for sheriff of the County, but was defeated. He was a Republican in his political views.
In 1848 Mr. Campbell married Hannah C. Campbell, who was born in 1822 in Shamokin (now Ralpho) Township, near Elysburg, daughter of Joseph D. Campbell. Until her death, April 3, 1911, she made her home with her son, James H. Campbell. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell had children as follows: Dr. John Moore, born July 18, 1849, who died in July, 1893; Rebecca, who married Joseph Eckman and lives at Snydertown; Dr. Lemuel C., deceased, who was a veterinary surgeon of Philadelphia; James H.; and Flora H., who died when twenty-two years old. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 275 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

AMBROSE S. CAMPBELL, of Rush Township, Northumberland County, engaged in farming, trucking and fruit growing, traces his ancestral line back to John Campbell, a native of the North of Ireland who came to America about 1775 and settled at Philadelphia, Pa. On March 4, 1786, he married Elizabeth Stauts, of Bucks county, Pa., who was born Nov. 25, 1768. They soon moved to Milton, Northumberland Co., Pa., where Mr. Campbell purchased the farm which he tilled until his death, which occurred Dec. 19, 1810. Mrs. Campbell survived him almost thirty-two years, meantime removing with some of her children to Owego, Tioga Co., N.Y., where she died March 10, 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell were stanch members of the Presbyterian Church. They were the parents of the following children:
(1) Mary born Jan. 5, 1787, married John Carpenter March 4, 1806, and died Aug. 6, 1847. She was the mother of eleven children, viz.: Eliza, born Dec. 29, 1806, married Andrew Marshall March 4, 1823, and had twelve children; David, born April 8, 1809, married Mary Ware Aug. 2, 1832, and had one child by that union, on Feb. 11, 1836, marrying (second) M. Mitcheltree, by whom he had five children; Priscilla, born May 6, 1811, married Jan. 24, 1828, John Pepperman, and had twelve children; Jesse B., born Oct. 10, 1813, married May 4, 1847, Phoebe Carpenter (no relative) and had four children; Nancy, born Nov. 14, 1815, died April 1, 1819; Susan A., born March 9, 1818, married Levi Tate July 29, 1838, and had nine children; Sophia, born April 16, 1820, married Jonas Newcomber Jan. 15, 1835, and had six children; Maria A., born Feb. 12, 1822, married Joseph L. Rank Jan. 15, 1839, and had ten children; John J., born May 1, 1824, married Mary Marshall Dec. 22, 1846, and had seven children; William, born April 6, 1826, died in infancy; Rebecca, born July 29, 1829, died Jan. 26, 1847. John Carpenter, the father of this family, died at Williamsport, Pa., July 3, 1865.
(2) Jane, born Dec. 5, 1789, was married March 17, 1807, to Philip Goodman, who for many years kept a hotel at Danville, Va. He was born Sept. 8, 1785, and died at Danville Sept. 1, 1837, Mrs. Goodman dying there Dec. 23, 1847. They had five children: Peter S., born Dec. 24, 1808, married Sarah Van De Mark July 20, 1828, and died Jan. 11, 1854 (he had two children); Ann Eliza, born Nov. 22, 1810, was married March 6, 1833, to Dr. Samuel G. Mans, of Danville, and died Dec. 6, 1882, in Chicago, Ill. (she had three children); John C., born Jan. 22, 1813, died young; Priscilla C., born Feb. 17, 1814, married Oct. 15, 1833, Isaac B. Ogden, and had nine children; Isaac C., born April 19, 1816, died in infancy.
(3) David, born Dec. 5, 1791, married Dec. 17, 1810, Elizabeth Wilson, and died April 24, 1821. His five children were: Jane, born May 16, 1813, married Daniel Bradshaw and had two children; Philip, born in 1815, died in 1855; Amy, born Dec. 24, 1817, married Willis Vertz, in August, 1838, and had thirteen children; John H., born in December, 1818, was married in August, 1838, to Sarah Wortz, and had thirteen children, Margaret (born Sept. 1, 1839, died April 5, 1843), Ambrose (born June 30, 1841), Mary (born Nov. 19, 1843, died June 30, 1844), Ireoni (born Aug. 25, 1845, married Hiram Carl, had four children, and died March 4, 1879), Sara (born in December, 1846, died March 28, 1865), Sabina (born Nov. 13, 1847, married Dan. B. Brown in 1869 and had four children), David (born Feb. 9, 1849, died in infancy), Jane (born April 17, 1850, died in infancy), George W. (born April 23, 1851, married Caroline Gearhart), Wilson (born April 18, 1852, died in infancy), Elizabeth (born Nov. 4, 1853, died in infancy), Lydia C. (born July 18, 1855, married Jacob R. McGeily and had three children) and John H. (born Nov. 5, 1859, married Elizabeth Logan and had one child); Isaac S., born Oct. 4, 1819, married April 20, 1848, Jane A. DeHaas, and died Oct. 29, 1864, at Fortress Monroe, the father of six children, Wilson (born Dec. 5, 1848, died Dec. 1, 1850), William R. (born Dec. 5, 1851, died Sept. 3, 1852), Luella (born Dec. 25, 1852, married Charles Baum Nov. 14, 1872, and had one child), Sara J. (born Jan. 1, 1855, married William E. Wise Jan. 1, 1872, and had three children), Mary E. (born Jan. 15, 1857, married William Cleinfelter Jan. 15, 1874, and had one child) and Elvira F. (born Dec. 25, 1858, married William C. King Sept. 15, 1881).
(4) Priscilla, born March 17, 1794, died Jan. 2, 1883.
(5) Robert, born April 1, 1796, married Ann Moore Nov. 3, 1818, and they had two children: Susan A., born Dec. 29, 1820, who married James M. Thompson March 30, 1841, had three children, and died Sept. 28, 1849; and Elizabeth, born May 17, 1822, who married John S. Thompson Dec. 30, 1843, and had seven children. On April 1, 1827, Robert Campbell married (second) Sara Brees, who was born May 31, 1808, in Sussex county, N.J., and died Dec. 16, 1853. He died Aug. 18, 1841, in Elmira, N.Y. To them were born the following children: Nancy, born June 30, 1828, who died young; John, born Sept. 20, 1829, who died young; Goodman, born Sept. 5, 1830, who married Ada J. Elston Jan. 9, 1857, and died March 16, 1864, while serving in the army (his four children were Edward, who died young; Frances A., born Aug. 15, 1859, who married George Randal March 15, 1880, and had one child; Sara Jane, born May 10, 1861, deceased; and Anna G., born May 10, 1863); Jeremiah, born Oct. 7, 1832, who died Aug. 8, 1842; Phoebea A., born Jan. 27, 1835, who married Koran J. Parker Jan. 24, 1866, and had one child; Gelena, born Dec. 26, 1836, who married Samuel W. Hunt; and Miranda, born March 3, 1839, who married Abram Elston Jan. 9, 1857, and had three children.
(6) Isaac, born May 12, 1798, married June 6, 1817, Sophia Garrison, and died June 1, 1854. They were the parents of nine children, viz.: Mary Ann, born April 7, 1818, married John Fortner May 4, 1848, and had two children; David S., born Aug. 5, 1821, married Eunice R. Smith Dec. 5, 1844, and had children, Freeman (born Sept. 20, 1845), Marilla J. (born Aug. 11, 1849, married Lorenzo D. Smith and had four children) David O. (born Dec. 13, 1851, married Elmira C. Water April 7, 1874), Isaac W. (born Aug. 11, 1855, married Mary J. Reed Nov. 24, 1878, and had two children), Clark F. (born Sept. 8, 1857, married Ida Smith Dec. 30, 1880), Sara A. T. (born Oct. 9, 1860), John J. (born Jan. 1, 1863) and George S. (born Feb. 12, 1868); Elizabeth, born Jan. 28, 1823, died March 28, 1825; Peter G. is fully mentioned later; Sophia, born July 25, 1827, married Edwin Fox March 12, 1845, and had four children; Evan O. J., born Jan. 27, 1830, married Mary F. Anderson Sept. 2, 185-, and had three children, of whom Mary Ellen, born July 5, 1860, married Montgomery Conners; John G. born March 2, 1832, married Emma Sharp Sept. 18, 1858, and died March 20, 1863 (they had three children); Isaac W., born Aug. 6, 1834, married Sara J. Hambert Oct. 30, 1862, and had four children; Sara F., born Dec. 31, 1837, married Everitt G. Pierce May 8, 1866, and had two Children.
(7) Elizabeth, born Oct. 18, 1802, was married March 18, 1824, to Evan O. Jackson. of Berwick Pa., and died March 12, 1871, in Philadelphia, Pa. Mr. Jackson was born July 1, 1801, and died July 24, 1869. They had a family of ten children namely: Mary died young; Elisha B., born Dec. 18, 1826, married Lavina W. Barstow, of Hoops Valley, N.Y., Dec. 26, 1861 (who died Feb. 18 1862), and (second) Emma L. Foulon, Dec. 5, 1864 (they had four children); Josiah C., born Dec. 13, 1828, married Elizabeth Cruise May 1, 1872; Rebecca, born July 29, 1832, died young; Evan O., born March 3, 1836, died Aug. 4, 1863; Joseph, born June 11, 1839, died May 13, 1856; Edwin F., born Feb. 13, 1842, married March 14, 1873, Elizabeth Flore and died Oct. 19, 1876; Clara P. and John C., born July 30, 1844, died in infancy; and William C., born Feb. 21, 1847 died July 3, 1847.
(8) Rachel, born March 22, 1807, died Aug. 22, 1807.
(9) Rebecca, born Nov. 7, 1808 married Oct. 15, 1833, Joseph C. Bell, of New York, and was the mother of six children: Charles O., born Aug. 8, 1835, died June 25, 1855, at Chicago, Ill.; Will. A., born Sept. 28, 183-, died Oct. 1, 1877; Fred R., born Feb. 1, 1839, died Oct. 25, 1845; Joseph T., born. Jan. 1, 1841, was married in June, 1869 to Nettie Larison, and died April 6, 1871; Elizabeth R., born June 4, 1843, married Henry F. Benson July 18, 1876; Josephine C., born Jan. 8 1845, married Fred W. Hovey Sept. 29, 1869, and had three children.
Peter G. Campbell, son of Isaac and Sophia (Garrison) Campbell, was born Feb. 16, 1825, and on May 20, 1850, married Susan Barlinger. To them were born nine children: Clarina J., born Aug. 6, 1851, married Jane Barr Dec. 20, 1874, and had three children, Emma, Harry and Pearl; Charles H., born June 24, 1853, married Mary Campbell and they have three children, Desda, Alma and Robert; Isaac, born Oct. 15, 1855, died in 1887; William, born May 22, 1858, died Aug. 28, 1860; Franklin, born Oct. 18, 1860, married Mary Reeder and has one child; Annie S., born May 20, 1863, married S. Yeager and has three children, Helen, Howard and Elizabeth; Mary M., born Sept. 27, 1864, married Hudson Savidge and has one daughter, Edna; Katie, born Nov. 19, 1866, died Nov. 9, 1877; Ambrose S. mentioned below.
Ambrose S. Campbell, born Nov. 18, 1868, received his education in the public schools of Northumberland County and at Fort Wayne, Ind. He now owns a farm of 103 acres in Rush Township, Northumberland County, and is successfully engaged in farming, trucking and fruit growing. He married Ella Savidge, and they are the parents of two children, Margaret and Russell. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat in politics.
The Savidge family, to which Mrs. Ambrose S. Campbell belongs, has long been settled in Northumberland County, Enos Savidge, the founder of the family in this region, coming hither from New Jersey between 1785 and 1790. He was the father of the following children: (1) John married a Miss McCloughan, and they had two children, Frederick S. and Caroline (Mrs. Minier). Frederick S. Savidge married Rachel Elizabeth Lamberson, daughter of Nicholas and Fannie (Kimbal) Lamberson, and their children are Frances Elma, who married Samuel Pretty; Caroline Rebecca, who married Joshua McDonnel (their children are Franklin, Ernest, Clayton C. and Elma); Ifa Eldora, wife of Samuel Cotner (they have one child, Charles C.); Rufus R., who married Laura Richie (they have children Ethel and Aldred); William, who married Sara Anderson (they had one child, who is deceased); Walter F., who married Lillian Haughawout (their children are Ellen and Harold); Hudson K.; Ralph, who married Ella Wyne (children, Russell and Martha); Anna wife of W. R. Burd (she has a son Samuel, daughter Elnora May and other children); Olive, Mrs. William Deibert; John H.; and Hattie, wife of Fred Snyder (three children, Paul; Rachel and John). (2) Henry married Sarah Teitz and had one child, Mary. (3) William married Mary Ann Vastine and had a son Jared. (4) Samuel K. married Ellen Campbell and had three children, Hon. Clinton R., Harmon C. and Lizzie A., the latter the wife of Willard Robinson. (5) Enos, Jr., died at the age of thirty-six. (6) Frederick died young. (7) Elizabeth married Valentine Hausworth and had children John and Eliza (8) Susan married William Hile and they had six children, Martha, George, Priscilla, John, Emma and Alfred. (9) Rachel married Solomon Hazel and had children Catherine and Isabella. (10) Mary married Philip Andrews and had children, Eliza, David and Amanda. (11) Isaac.
Isaac Savidge, son of Enos, was born in 1801, and died in 1862. He married Mary Campbell, who was born in 1803, and died in 1875, the mother of four children, as follows: (1) Rosetta married George Gonsar and had Emeline (who died young) and Mary C. (married Peter Statzell and had children Archie, Clyde, Frank and Harry). (2) Malissa married George Deibler and had two children, Emma (married D. Koder and had children, George and Ella) and Gertrude (unmarried). (3) William died single. (4) Henry T.
Henry T. Savidge, son of Isaac, born May 8, 1836, married Margaret Moore, daughter of Michael Moore, and they had two daughters: Anna M. married Percy Culp, and had children Sadie, Clyde and Nora; Ella married Ambrose S. Campbell.
Mrs. Mary (Campbell) Savidge; wife of Isaac Savidge, was a daughter of John Campbell and granddaughter of Obadiah Campbell, who came with his family from New Jersey to Rush Township, Northumberland County, and settled near Elysburg. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 746 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

AZARIAH CAMPBELL, a most respected resident of Shamokin, and a member of one of the oldest families in Northumberland County, is a son of John K. and Catherine(Wilhour) Campbell. He was born June 11, 1842, at the family homestead in the Irish Valley, where his grandfather settled when the section was wild and comparatively uninhabited country, and was only traversed by the Shamohokin tribe of Indians. The grandfather of our subject, Daniel Campbell, was a native of New Jersey in which state he was born in 1775. He removed to this state, making the journey from New Jersey by wagon-train enduring cheerfully the severe experiences of the early settlers of Pennsylvania who plunged through the woods, fought Indians and tediously, but hopefully, sought new and more inviting fields. Mr. Campbell settled on what is known as Shamokin Creek, purchasing a tract of land for which he paid sixty-two cents an acre and cleared a farm in the midst of the woods. He followed farming and also his trade as a wheelwright. He subsequently removed to a site opposite Trevorton, where he cleared a farm and also worked as a wheelwright. He died in 1862. Daniel Campbell was known as an enthusiastic and intrepid hunter, pursuit of game being his favorite pastime when he could relinquish his work. The section abounded in game and he delighted in trailing the panther and bear, facing the vicious wildcat, cornering the foxy wolf or entrapping the deer which were plentiful. It was on the homestead opposite Trevorton that the father of our subject, John K., was born. He obtained the limited education which was possible in the well-remembered "subscription school" which was then in vogue, consequently his educational resources were confined within narrow limits when he entered manhood and prepared to make his own way in life. He worked on the homestead farm until about thirty-one years old when he removed to Jefferson County where he remained five years, then returning to Shamokin, in April, 1855, where he since has resided, following various occupations, principally the building of coal-breakers in the mining regions. Mr. Campbell was united in matrimony to Catherine, a daughter of George and Elizabeth (Miller) Wilhour, and to them were born seven children, our subject being the eldest. Of these the second, Elizabeth, is the wife of E. P. Foulke of Shamokin; George W. was killed in 1873 while employed on the Pennsylvania Railroad; William R. is an engineer and resides at Van Wert, Ohio; Samuel B. is in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad in Shamokin and has been in the service of the company for thirteen years; Jane is the widow of Frank Bickert and resides in Shamokin; and Harriet, who is the wife of J. J. Gillespie of Shamokin. Our subject, Azariah Campbell, followed farming on the homestead practically all the time until August 13, 1862, when he responded to the nine-months' call and enlisted in Company C, 131st Reg., Penna. Vol. Inf. He re-enlisted in 1864 in Company C., 103d Reg., Penna. Vol. Inf., and served until the end of the Rebellion. Our subject participated in many of the most important and severe battles of the war, including Antietam and Chancellorsville, and at the battle of Fredericksburg he marvelously escaped death finding after the fight ended that thirteen bullets had passed through his uniform, leaving ragged holes as reminders that he had been in the thickest of the scrimmage. On his return to Shamokin at the close of the war Mr. Campbell was variously employed until 1880 when he engaged in the huckstering business and subsequently opened a store which he now conducts. Politically our subject is a consistent Prohibitionist and has served three years as a councilman and one year as assistant burgess. Possessing strong inclinations religiously, he is a valued member of the First Methodist Church. On December 23, 1866, Mr. Campbell married Amelia E. Hoover and to them have been born several children, including Amy, deceased; Bessie, who was the wife of J. J. Owen and who left a son, Wilfred C.; John J., deceased; and six others who died in their infancy.(Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 535 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

DANIEL CAMPBELL, a native of New Jersey, was one of the early settlers of Shamokin township, Northumberland county. He located on Shamokin creek near where Jacob F. Muench now lives. He married in New Jersey, and his children were as follows: William; Robert; Daniel; John; Benjamin; Mary, who married William Teitsworth, and Kate, all of whom are dead. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1204 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

DELMAR F. CAMPBELL, school teacher, was born in Lower Augusta township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, February 13, 1864, son of John and Mary (Fuller) Campbell, of that township. He was educated in the public schools, and Milton and Georgetown normal schools, and for six years has been engaged in teaching, this being his third year in his present school. June 23, 1889, he married Tomson, daughter of Anthony S. Speece, of Little Mahanoy township. Politically Mr. Campbell is a Democrat; he is a member of the Presbyterian church, has served in the office of treasurer four years, and has also filled all the offices connected with the Sabbath school. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1175 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 746 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
DELMER F. CAMPBELL was born Feb. 13, 1864, in Lower Augusta Township, son of John Campbell. He obtained his early education in the local schools, and later attended summer Normal sessions at Dalmatia and Milton, then taught by the county superintendent and one Professor Geho, both men of high education, the latter a graduate of Princeton. When twenty-one years old Mr. Campbell received a license to teach public school in the County, and has taught fourteen terms in all, eleven in his native Township—six years of this period in what is now Rockefeller Township, which was then a part of Lower Augusta; one term in the high school at Herndon; two terms in Lower Mahanoy. He is well remembered by pupils and fellow teachers as an educator of high repute, and he was always in demand while engaged in the profession. He has been a farmer from young manhood, and followed farming in the summer season while teaching. On Feb. 23, 1908, he came into possession of his father’s homestead, upon which he now resides, devoting himself to the cultivation of this large tract, which contains 175 acres. It is located between Fisher’s Ferry and Trevorton, in the southeast corner of Lower Augusta Township, along the Little Mountains. He is an enterprising and progressive man, and has found farming very profitable. Like his father Mr. Campbell is a Democrat in politics, but he has never cared for public preferment and has taken no part in public affairs. He is active in church life, however, being a prominent member of the Mountain Presbyterian Church, which he has served as elder since he was twenty-two years old; he was treasurer of the church four years, and has filled all the Sunday school offices. On June 23, 1890, Mr. Campbell married Thomson Speece, one of the seventeen children born to Anthony and Ann (Shipman) Speece, of Little Mahanoy Township, the latter a daughter of Abraham Shipman, who served as associate judge of Northumberland County. To Mr. and Mrs. Delmar F. Campbell have also been born seventeen children, and another daughter of Anthony S. and Ann (Shipman) Speece, Effie, wife of Ambrose DeWitt, also of Lower Augusta Township, has the same number. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are the parents of: Myrtle A., Ada V. (whose birthday is on Dec. 7th, her grandfather Campbell’s birthday), Don Lee, Grover, John Anthony (named after both his grandfathers), Goldie, Ora, Alvin, Fay, Vera (who died of measles when three years old), Russell, Ethel, Lloyd, Elsworth, Elwood, Marvin and Theodore A. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 279 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

DUNCAN C. CAMPBELL,* a representative and leading farmer of Rush township, Northumberland County, was born June 15, 1826, on the place where he now lives, and is a son of Abraham and Jane (Cameron) Campbell, and grandson of Robert Campbell of New Jersey, who was a farmer and had a family of eight children. The Cameron and Campbell families are of Scotch descent. Abraham Campbell, our subject's father, was a native of New Jersey, but was brought when a lad of eight years to Rush township, where he grew to manhood and lived the remainder of his life, following the peaceful vocation of a farmer, until he died in October, 1861. His wife, Jane (Cameron) Campbell, who died in 1854, was a native of Fishing Creek, Pa. To them were born five children: Robert, who died in 1861, was a farmer and married Sarah Ann Vastine, now deceased, of Rush township; Margaret, and her husband, Joseph Hartman, are both deceased; Flora, who died at the age of four years; Duncan C., our subject; and Joseph L., deceased, whose wife was Ellen John of Danville, N. Y. Mr. Campbell was an active, stirring man, a Democrat in political views, in religious attachments a Methodist and served as trustee and steward in the church. Duncan C. Campbell, our subject, was married December 25, 1849, to Nancy Colket of Rush township, who died May 30, 1887. She was a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Vastine) Colket. John Vastine was a cooper by trade, and both he and his wife lived and died in Rush township. Our subject and wife became the parents of five children, namely: Arthur Monroe, born February 17, 1851, married Blanche Wood of Syracuse, N. Y., and manufactures corsets in that city; Flora J., who married Charles M. Vendevander, and lives in Northumberland, Pa., having one son, Forrest; Elizabeth, who married Obadiah Fox, a merchant of Mount Carmel, Pa., and has four children, Stella, Kimber K., Howard, and Ethel; Joseph B., who married Esther Leiby of Bear Gap, Pa., and has two children, Gertrude and Duncan; and James L., a carpenter for the Pennsylvania Railroad at Riverside, Pa., who married Mary Hurd, and they have four children, Blanche, Arthur, Duncan C, and Myrtle. Our subject has always lived on the old homestead, with the exception of three years, when he lived on an adjoining farm. He has 180 acres of land, upon which he has made many improvements; he built a very fine house in 1894, in which he has hot and cold water, bath, furnace heat, etc. He has operated a threshing machine for several years and also cut and sawed a great deal of lumber from his place. He keeps on the average about twenty cows and has run a milk route to Danville, Pa., for about fifteen years, the management of which is now in the hands of his son Joseph, who has always lived with him and is one of the prominent men of Rush township. Our subject's popularity among his friends has caused him to hold many offices, viz., school director, auditor, overseer of the poor, judge of elections and many other minor positions. He has always been a stanch Democrat. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Lodge No. 527, of Snydertown, Pa. He is also a member of the Grange. Inheriting all the love and respect of his Scotch ancestry for the Sabbath and divine worship, our subject has not confined his energies to secular work alone, but has devoted much of his time to church affairs, and has served as trustee and steward of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Kline's Grove. He has a rugged constitution, which has enabled him to labor hard and long, and his many friends regret that a bad accident which left him with a broken hip should cripple him for life and prevent him from enjoying some of the blessings which have come to him as the result of the toil of younger days.* The information contained in this biography was supplied by the subject of this sketch. A type-set copy of the biography was sent to the subject to be proof-read, but the subject did not edit and return the copy, so this biography may contain typographical errors.(Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 745 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

EDWIN M. CAMPBELL, of Milton, Northumberland County, was born Dec. 7, 1867, in Shamokin Township, and comes of an old family of that section, the Campbells having been settled in Rush Township for several generations.
Joseph Campbell, his great-grandfather, was born in Rush Township, where he lived and died, and is buried at the Rush Presbyterian church. He was a farmer by occupation. His wife, Lovina, is buried in the graveyard of the same church, of which they were early members. Their children were the following: Richard, who was drowned in the Susquehanna river, at Danville; William; Christopher, who died in Rush Township; Martha, Sallie and Charlie, all of whom died unmarried.
William Campbell, son of Joseph, was born Oct. 10, 1810, and died in 1884. He spent all his life in Rush Township, engaged in farming. In March, 1837, he married Catherine Johnson, who was born Dec. 15, 1814, daughter of William and Elizabeth Johnson, and died in 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are buried at the Rush Presbyterian church. They had a family of six children: Elizabeth, born Nov. 3, 1838, is the widow of Samuel Moore and makes her home at Snydertown; Joseph A., born April 10, 1840, lives at South Danville, Pa.; John P. is mentioned below; Matilda, born Feb. 15, 1845, married Philip Miller and is deceased; Martha A., born Dec. 11, 1847, married John Hendricks; Margaret, born April 11, 1852, married Daniel Acker and lives near Pottsgrove, Pennsylvania.
John P. Campbell, son of William, born Oct. 13, 1842, attended the schools of Rush Township and there passed his early life. He remained at home with his father until he reached the age of twenty-one years, when he bought the old Mahlon Boughner farm in Shamokin Township, upon which he made his home for almost a quarter of a century. It comprises 132 acres of excellent land, and there he carried on general farming, with continuous success, until his removal in 1887 to the borough of Snydertown. He built a fine residence at Snydertown, where he has since lived in retirement. He is a Democrat in politics, and since settling in Snydertown has served four years as roadmaster. In religion he is a Lutheran, holding membership in Reed’s church, of which he has been deacon Mr. Campbell married Mary Sholl, who was born March 18, 1843, and died in 1879. To this marriage was born one son, Edwin M. Mr. Campbell married for his second wife Emma Hile, daughter of William Hile, of Rush Township. There have been no children by this union.
Edwin M. Campbell received his education in the schools of his native Township and worked with his father until he attained his majority. At that time he commenced farming for himself, locating on his father’s farm at Snydertown, which contains 160 acres. After cultivating that place for five years he moved to his wifes farm at McEwensville, Northumberland County, on which he was located for two years, at the end of that time settling in Milton, where he has lived since March 17, 1896. He bought a fine residence on Walnut Street which he and his family still occupy, and since taking up his residence in the borough has been employed in the car shops, where he has an excellent reputation as an intelligent industrious worker. He is considered a substantial citizen, but he has never taken any part in public affairs. He is a member of the Woodmen of the World, belonging to the lodge at Milton.
On Dec. 20, 1888, Mr. Campbell married Ella V. Dreisbach, and they have had two children, Pearl Elizabeth and Emma Mae. Mr. Campbell and his family are members of Christ Lutheran church at Milton. In political faith he is a Democrat.
Daniel Dreisbach, ancestor of the Dreisbach family of Northumberland County to which Mrs. Campbell belongs, married Catharine Grodurbel, and they came to this county from Northampton County, where his father kept a hotel and farmed, at Dry Valley. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Dreisbach had the following children: (1) George Washington. (2) Daniel. (3) Susan married Charles Leon, son of Jonathan Leon and grandson of Dr. Leon, and they had two sons who died young, Elizabeth (who died young), Anna Maria, Catharine (married Levi Buch) and Fyetta (Mrs. Hagnour). (4) Elizabeth married Nicholas Hower and had five children, George, Alfred, William, Aaron and Caroline. (5) Kate married Daniel Balliet and they had three children, Kate, George and Caroline. (6) Mary married David Stahlnecker and had five children, George, Daniel, Mary (Mrs. Moye), Julia (Mrs. James Frederick) and Sarah C. (Mrs. Murray).George Washington Dreisbach, son of Daniel, married Sarah E. Acor, a descendant of Andrew Acor, who came to Pennsylvania from New Jersey and settled in Montour county; he was between forty and fifty years of age at the time. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 433 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

ELISHA M. CAMPBELL, a farmer of Rush Township, Northumberland County, was born in Shamokin Township in 1863, son of Elisha Campbell, Sr., and grandson of Henry Campbell, who lived in West Virginia and followed lumbering and farming. Elisha Campbell, Sr., was his only child.
Elisha Campbell, Sr., married Hannah Karchner, and they were the parents of six children, namely: Hannah married Harmon Snyder, and they had children, Calvin, William, Mary, Cora, Rachel, Jacob and Edith; Sarah married George A. Miller and had children, Elizabeth, Jesse, Albert and Orville; Ella married William Ford and had four children, all of whom are deceased but Hazel; Clara married John Snyder and had three children, Greda, Anna and John; Charles married Lillie Snyder and has two children, Raymond and Edward; Elisha M. is a resident of Rush Township.
Elisha M. Campbell has followed farming all his life. He married Sarah Catherine Vastine, daughter of Hugh Hughs Vastine, and to them was born one child, Elwood, who is now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell attend the Baptist Church. Abram Van De Weestyne, from which Mrs. Campbell is descended, came from Holland to America in the seventeenth century and settled in New Jersey. In 1698 John Vastine, his son, lived in Germantown, Pa. He soon purchased a tract of land in Hilltown Township, Bucks Co., Pa., from one Jeremiah Langhorn, and became one of the pioneers of that county. His wife Abigail, whom he married in New Jersey, survived him, his death occurring Feb. 9, 1738; he was buried at Hilltown, Bucks Co., Pa. Their children were as follows: (1) Abraham, born May 24, 1698, died in October, 1772. He married Sarah Ruckman and they had five children: Abigail married Andrew Armstrong; Ruth married James Armstrong; Mary married Robert Jameson; Rachel married Hugh Mears; Sarah married Samuel Wilson. (2) Jeremiah, born Dec. 24, 1701, died in 1769. He and his wife Deborah had children: Jeremiah, who died in 1778 in New Britain, Bucks Co., Pa. (his wife’s name was Elizabeth); Martha, Mrs. John Louder; Hannah, Mrs. Samuel Gresham. (3) Benjamin, born Jan. 9, 1703, was the next in line of descent to Mrs. Elisha Campbell. (4) John died Feb. 9 1765, in Hilltown, unmarried. (5) Mary, born March 1, 1699, married a Mr. Wilson and moved to South Carolina.
Benjamin Vastine, born Jan. 9, 1703, son of John; died in August 1749. He married Mary Griffith, and they were the parents of the following children: (1) Hannah married Emerson Kelly. (2), John married Rachel Morgan and had children Benjamin (married Mary Van Zant), Simon, Nancy and Margaret. Of these, Benjamin and Mary (Van Zant) Vastine had three sons: Benjamin, who married Elizabeth Hand and had Margaret (Mrs. William Savidge), Amanda, Harriet (Mrs. Alvin Hughs), Algernon and Thomas F.; Thomas, who married Sarah Ellis and had Ann (Mrs. George Pensyl), Lucinda (Mrs. John Adams), Mary, Samantha, Beneville, Grace Ella, John, Rufus, Thomas J., Jane and Sarah Matilda; and John, who married Sarah Scott and had Hannah (Mrs. Mahlon Huff), Ellen, Sarah Jane, Benjamin, Catherine and Isabella. Simon, son of John and Rachel, married and had a son John. (3) Abraham married Elizabeth Williams, and their children were John, William, Abraham, Nancy, Mary and Jeremiah. The family lived in York County, Pa., for a time, later moving to Kentucky. (4) Benjamin, who died in September, 1775, married Catherine Eaton, and their children were: Mary married Josiah Lunn, Peter married Hannah, daughter of Jonathan Vastine, and had children, Catherine (unmarried), Elizabeth (married John Colket), Benjamin (unmarried), Mary (married Henry Johnson), Ann (married H. Boone), Lydia (unmarried), Thomas Jefferson (married Harriet Paxton and had Peter, Margaret P., Charles, Joseph, Sarah and Hannah), Peter E. (married Mary Miller) and Jeremiah (unmarried). Benjamin married Dorothy, daughter of Amos Vastine, and they had children Martha (married Joel Miller) and Catherine (married Benjamin Miller). Elizabeth married Alem Morris. (5) Jonathan, who married Elizabeth Lewis, is next in the line of descent to Mrs. Elisha Campbell. (6) Isaac married Sarah Matthews. (7) Amos married Martha Thomas and they had two daughters; Dorothy who married Benjamin Vastine, son of Benjamin; Martha, who married Robert C. Shannon.
Jonathan Vastine, son of Benjamin and Mary (Griffith) Vastine married Elizabeth Lewis, and their children were: (1) Benjamin married Elizabeth Van Zant and their children were: Lewis V., who married Martha Boone and had Hannah (Mrs. Dudley Andrews), Margaret (Mrs. Jacob B. Gearhart), Rachel Jane, Elizabeth (Mrs. John H. Morrall), Matilda (Mrs. Abraham Gulick), Sarah, Martha, William B., Lewis B. and George; Mary, who married Samuel Boone; Ann, who married Isaac Wolverton; and Rachel, who married John M. Housel. (2) Ann married Thomas Robbins. (3) Hannah married Peter Vastine, son of Benjamin Vastine. (4) Mary married William Marsh. (5) John married Catherine Osmun and had William (married Elizabeth Hursch), Amos (married Susan Lerch), Margaret (married Charles Heffley), Sarah (married Robert Campbell), Thomas (married Lanah Vought) and John. (6) Jeremiah married E. Reeder, and their children were: Mary, who married C. Fisher; Margaret who married D. Robbins; Surrissa, who married William Leighaw; and Thomas, who married Eliza Reeder and had children Catherine and Elizabeth. (7) Thomas died unmarried. (8) Jonathan married Nancy Ann Hughs.
Jonathan and Nancy Ann (Hughs) Vastine had children as follows: Hugh Hughs; Lewis, who married Sarah Potts and had one daughter Ann, now the wife of Alfred Halberstattel and the mother of one child; and Benjamin, who died single.
Hugh Hughs Vastine, son of Jonathan and Nancy Ann (Hughs) Vastine, married Catherine Zimmerman, and to them were born the following children: Martha Ann died single; William L. married Alice Cardell and had children, Blanche, James, Mary and Cora; Oscar married Ada Gillaspy; Mary F. married John K. Erdman and had children, Hattie, Sarah, Nora, Alice, Bert John, Calvin, Kimber, and Frank; Jonathan married Cora Hess and had children, Charles, Katie and Chester; Jacob married M. Smith and had children, Ethel, Hatten and Grethel; Lewis married Mary Nunamaker; Sarah C. married Elisha Campbell, Jr.; Harriet married William Arnold and had children, Bessie and Annie; Ida married Charles Hoffman and had children, Vergie, Edwin, John, Mary, Wesley, William, Lillie and Frank. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 132 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

ISAAC CAMPBELL, farmer, was born in Rush township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1818, son of Christopher and Sarah (Kline) Campbell. Robert Campbell was the first of the family to come to this county. He settled in Rush township and became one of the prominent citizens thereof. The father of our subject was born in 1795, and died in 1851; his wife died in 1841; they had ten children, of whom five are living: Rhoda; Catharine; Elizabeth; Lemuel, and Isaac. The last named received a common school education; he was married in 1848 to Hannah Campbell, daughter of Joseph D. Campbell, and had five children: John; Rebecca; Lemuel C.; James, and Flora H. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1160 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to B Index


Back to Index

JAMES H. CAMPBELL, who is engaged in farming on the homestead in Upper Augusta Township, was born Aug. 22, 1858, and received his early education in the Township schools. Later he attended the academies at Freeburg and Elysburg and the State Normal school at Bloomsburg, and was only seventeen when he began teaching, which profession he followed for twelve years. He was in Shamokin one year, Upper Augusta Township, seven winters; Snydertown, two winters; Evert school, in Upper Augusta, one term; Hile school, in Rush Township, one term. Meantime, about 1884, he had become interested in the lumber business, and for a number of years after giving up teaching devoted his time principally to that line, being thus engaged in Center County, where he bought 887 acres of timber land. He had lumbered over about half of this acreage at the time of his father’s death, and had employed as many as thirty men at one time. From 1882 he has been interested in farming, which he continued during his lumbering operations on a farm adjoining the homestead, and after nine years of lumbering he decided to give all his attention to agriculture, which he carries on yet. Since 1897 he has owned the homestead, which consists of 172 acres, and he also has an adjoining tract of sixty-three acres, all of which is under cultivation, Mr. Campbell following general farming. He is an intelligent and prosperous agriculturist, energetic and up-to-date in his business affairs, which are in a thriving condition. Since 1902 he has served as assessor of Upper Augusta Township and still has four years to serve in that office, in which he has given general satisfaction. On Feb. 17, 1881, Mr. Campbell married Anna F. Van Zant, daughter of Kinkade and Sarah M. (Vastine) Van Zant and they have had two children: Verda died Jan. 6, 1902, of measles, after an illness of but two days (she was twenty years, one month, sixteen days old); Lessly I., born Dec. 25, 1882, lives at home with his parents; and Bessie A., who is an adopted daughter, is attending school. Mr. Campbell and his family support the Methodist Church. Joseph D. Campbell, father of Mrs. Hannah C. Campbell, was a farmer, and lived at Elysburg. He is buried at the Baptist Church in Shamokin Township. He and his wife Annie (Moore) had five children: Rebecca, Hannah C., Amos, Alma and Asenath. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 276 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

JOHN CAMPBELL, fourth son of Daniel Campbell, was born in New Jersey in 1776. In 1809 he settled on the land where his son Simeon resides, and was extensively engaged in farming. He reared a family of four children: Samuel, deceased; Simeon; Susan, who married John Hooey, and Mary, who married Henry Haupt. Mr. Campbell was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church for many years. His wife died in 1836, and he survived her until l855. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1204 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

JOHN CAMPBELL, farmer, was born in Elysburg Northumberland county, Pennsylvania. December 7, 1823, son of Obadiah and Elizabeth (Shipman) Campbell. His grandfather came to this county in 1784 and settled in Elysburg, where he purchased several hundred acre of valley land. He was a tailor by trade, but was not engaged at that after his removal to this county. He helped build the old Presbyterian church between Snydertown and Elysburg, and was elder in the same for many years. His children were James; John; Albert; Obadiah; Joanna, and Elizabeth. They were all good singers, and sang at the memorial service held at Sunbury at the time of Washington's death. Obadiah, father of our subject, was born in New Jersey in 1777. He acquired a fair education, and engaged in farming, lumbering, and building saw mills. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Nicholas Shipman, a native of New Jersey, and located on the homestead farm, where he became one of the well known and active men of his day. He was captain of a military company thirteen years, a member of the Presbyterian church, and leader of the choir for many years. Politically he was a Democrat, and served in the various township offices. He died, July 27, 1866, and his wife May 27th of the same year. Twelve children were born to them, four of whom are living: Obadiah, of Elysburg; John; Jackson, of Columbia county, and Joanna, widow of John McMintry, residing at Elysburg. The subject of our sketch obtained a good education, after which he was engaged in teaching school and attending to his father's business. He purchased a farm in Shamokin township and lived upon the same three years, when he removed to Fulton county, Ohio, remaining there three years. In 1859 he returned to this county, and has since resided upon his present farm. He was married in 1853 to Mary Ann, daughter of John and Phebe (Mailey) Fuller, natives of Lancaster county. By this union they have seven children: Georgiana, wife of Henry Smith; Theodore Alvin, of Fisher's Ferry; Clara Jane, wife of Jared H. Yeager, of Bush township; Delmar F., of Seven Points; Charles W.; Warren L., and Miles H. Mr. Campbell has been an elder in the Hollowing Run Presbyterian church for many years; in politics he is a Democrat, and has served in the office of school director. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1162 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

LAWRENCE CAMPBELL, the first burgess of Northumberland, was a native of Ireland. He immigrated to Pennsylvania in 1784, located at Northumberland in 1792, and died at that place, November 8, 1834, at the age of sixty-eight years, several months after the conclusion of his sixth term as burgess. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 520 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

LEMUEL CAMPBELL, a well known citizen of the borough of Sunbury, now living retired, was born Jan. 9, 1834, son of Christopher and Sarah (Kline) Campbell. He received a common school education and was reared to farm life, remaining with his parents, as was customary, until he reached the age of twenty-one years, after which he began farming for himself, in Rush Township. There he resided four years, in 1860 becoming associated with his brother Harmon in the purchase of a mill at Klinesgrove, in the conduct of which he was engaged until 1866, meantime making his home at that place. Thence he moved to what is now the farm of Dr. Isaac Huff, who bought the place from Mr. Campbell, and in 1870 he bought a farm at Keefer station, in Upper Augusta Township, this County, upon which he resided until his removal to Sunbury, in 1882. He continued to own the property, however, until 1905, when he sold it to William Hoover. Since his removal from that place he has been a resident of Sunbury, where he was engaged in business continuously until the fall of 1910. His first venture was as a dealer in farm machinery, and he later added coal, being a retail coal dealer for twenty-six years before his retirement. He was the first agent to handle from the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company. For about five years he owned and operated a boat on the Pennsylvania canal, between Sunbury and Baltimore. Mr. Campbell has acquired a large amount of valuable property, owning a block 175 by 230 feet in the heart of the borough, lying between Fifth and Sixth Streets, bounded on the north by Woodland Avenue and on the south by Market Street. He has refused a high price for this block. Mr. Campbell devoted himself faithfully to the management of his business affairs throughout his active career, but he served one term as councilman of Sunbury from the Eighth ward, to which position he was elected on the Republican ticket. He is a substantial citizen, esteemed by all who have had dealings with him, and has made an honorable record during his long residence in Sunbury. Socially he is a member of Lodge No. 22, F. & A.M., of Sunbury. He and his family united with the Methodist Church.
In 1860 Mr. Campbell married Emma J. Smith, daughter of John and Eliza (Rockefeller) Smith, of Klinesgrove station, and they have had four children: Mary (married to J. C. Crawford), Dr. Charles F., Sarah Eliza (who died aged three years) and William Moore.
Charles Foster Campbell, M.D., of Sunbury, was born in Upper Augusta Township, Sept. 17, 1867. He received his early education in the common schools, later attending Bucknell University, from which he was graduated in 1891, with degree of A. M. He then entered the University of Pennsylvania taking the course in the medical department, and graduating in 1893. He specialized in diseases and treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat. After practicing three years in Philadelphia he came to Sunbury, in 1896, and has since been located there. He is physician at the Mary M. Packer Hospital of Sunbury. Dr. Campbell is a member of Lodge No. 22, F. & A.M., of Sunbury; of the County Medical Society, and of the State Medical Society, as well as the American Medical Association. He was married in 1896 to Lizzie Lee Enos, daughter of the late John M. Enos, of Delaware.
William Moore Campbell, son of Lemuel, was born in 1873 in Upper Augusta Township. He was given a public school education, graduating from the Sunbury high school when sixteen years old, after which he assisted his father in the conduct of his business affairs. During the Spanish-American war he enlisted, becoming a member of Company F, 12th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, with which command he served until his death, from the effects of typhoid fever, Sept. 20, 1898. He had become a corporal while in the service, and in the army, as everywhere else he was known, was recognized as a young man of bright mind and promising future. He was well known as a sharp-shooter, and had a medal of honor. As a bicyclist he enjoyed considerable local fame and had won a number of races; he made the round trip between Sunbury and Snydertown a distance of sixteen miles, in fifty to fifty-five minutes.
Obadiah Campbell, one of the sons of the Obadiah mentioned at the opening of this article, was born in New Jersey in 1776, and was a young boy when his parents came thence to Pennsylvania, in 1779. He was brought up on the farm in Ralpho Township, part of which is now embraced in the south end of Elysburg, and eventually came to own his father’s homestead, upon which he made his home for some years. He then made a settlement in Columbia County, upon a large tract of timber land which he had purchased; just three or four miles east of Elysburg, erected a sawmill and engaged in the lumber business which he continued all his life. He was a man of thrift and enterprise, and built up a business which kept his sawmill busy day and night, giving employment to a number of men. He had three hundred or more acres of land upon which there was good timber, his land extending to the creek which divides Columbia and Northumberland counties, and he cleared two farms there, both now owned by one of his grandsons, Ezra Yocom, whose mother was Jane Campbell. There Obadiah Campbell lived, worked and died, and he is buried upon that place, as is also his father, Obadiah, who brought the family out from New Jersey. They were Presbyterians, but many of the old Campbells are buried at the Sharp Ridge Church, which is a Methodist church. Obadiah Campbell was a man of note in his community in every way. He was, like his father, a strong Democrat, and wielded considerable influence in the local councils of the party, though he would not accept office. He was an active member of the Presbyterian Church, held offices in the church and led the choir for many years. He was captain of a military company for thirteen years. His death occurred July 27, 1865, and that of his wife May 27, 1866. Her maiden name was Elizabeth Shipman, and she was like her husband a native of New Jersey, coming to Pennsylvania when five years old with her father, Nicholas Shipman, who settled with his family in Rockefeller Township. Mr. and Mrs. Campbell had a family of ten children, namely: Nicholas settled in Elysburg; Mary married William Thompson; Hannah married James Hile; Jane married Elijah Yocom; Obadiah S. is mentioned below; Elizabeth married and is deceased; Joanna married a McMirtry (or McMurtrie), who was from New Jersey and returned to that State (they had a son John and a daughter Maggie); John is mentioned below; Sarah married Shultz Knittle; Jackson settled on one of the two farms into which his father’s 300-acre tract was divided, Elijah Yocom, his brother-in-law, coming into possession of the other.
Obadiah S. Campbell, son of Obadiah, was born Nov. 25, 1816, near Elysburg, was reared upon the homestead, and received his education in the local schools. He learned the trade of millwright, which he followed for the long period of thirty five years, until he was fifty-five years old, building saw and grist mills in Lycoming, Columbia, Montour, Northumberland and Schuylkill counties; he worked at his trade considerably in the eastern part of Northumberland County, putting up five or six gristmills on Roaring creek. During part of the time he was engaged at his trade he lived in Columbia county. After giving up millwrighting he farmed for about ten years, living one mile east of Elysburg, on a farm in Ralpho Township which he had purchased in 1852 in partnership with his brother-in-law, James Fox, removing there in 1856. The place contained 120 acres, now owned by Columbus Raup. Here Mr. Campbell carried on general farming until his retirement, in the spring of 1889, after which he made his home in Elysburg until his death, which occurred there in 1896. Mr. Campbell was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Sharp Ridge, where he is buried; he was active in the work of that church for a number of years, served many, years as class leader, and was faithful in all his religious duties. In politics he was a Democrat and quite active in the party, held various Township offices, and was specially interested in public education, serving on the school board and assisting in the advancement of the schools whenever possible. In 1865 he was elected a justice of the peace of what is now Ralpho (then Shamokin) Township, continuing to hold that office for a quarter of a century and giving eminent satisfaction in the discharge of its duties. Fraternally he was a member of the I.O.O.F. A public-spirited and intelligent citizen, ready to give his time and influence to all matters affecting the general welfare, he was respected and beloved by a large number of friends and acquaintances and left a name which will long be honored in the community.
On Jan. 9, 1840, Mr. Campbell married Eliza Teats, who was born at “Dark Corner,” daughter of John Teats, and is buried by her husband’s side at Sharp Ridge Church; she lived to be about ninety-six years old. They had children as follows: Oliver died in Michigan; Elmira (deceased) married Samuel Swank or Schwenk; John is a resident of Elysburg; Clement is a resident of St. Louis, Mo.; Edgar B. is mentioned later; Alvin died at Elysburg; Iva married Oliver Brady and they live at Elysburg; Lorin died young.
Edgar B. Campbell was born Feb. 14, 1855, at Elysburg, Northumberland County, and was reared to farm life, working for his parents until after he attained his majority. In 1889 he began work in the car shops at Sunbury, where he was employed as car repairman for twenty-one years, until his retirement, Feb. 26, 1910. Mr. Campbell has had his home in Sunbury since 1899, but he spends his summers upon his farm in Rockefeller Township, with the tenant on the place. The property consists of 110 acres situated on the Tulpehocken road, which he purchased from Isaac Lepley in 1904, and was formerly the George Conrad homestead, later owned by Elias Emrich. Mr. Campbell is a Democrat in politics, and he and his family are Lutherans in religion. He married Annie George, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Schuler) George, of Columbia County, Pa., three miles east of Elysburg. They have had one child, William Kimber.( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 277 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

OBADIAH CAMPBELL, a native of New Jersey, removed to Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1779, and located in Ralpho township. He purchased a tract of land containing four hundred acres, upon part of which the village of Elysburg is built. He built his log cabin upon the site of the present residence of Davis Huff, which was the homestead of the Campbells for several generations. His children were: Benjamin; John; James; Robert; Albert; Jane, who became the wife of Caleb Ely, and Joanna, who married George Ely. He was a Presbyterian in faith, and one of the organizers of a church in his new settlement. Politically he was a Democrat, and a zealous exponent of the principles of his party, of which he was a leader in his locality. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1179 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to B Index


Back to Index

OBADIAH CAMPBELL JR., fifth son of Obadiah, Sr., and father of the present member of the family of that name, was born in New Jersey, in 1776. He was reared upon the homestead in Ralpho township. He purchased a large tract of timber land in Columbia county, to which place he removed, erected a saw mill, and engaged in the lumber business, which he continued until his death in 1865. He inherited from his father strong Democratic principles, and while he would never hold office, he was a power in the local councils of his party. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and held official positions in the same. He married Elizabeth daughter of Nicholas Shipman, one of the pioneer families of New Jersey who settled in Rockefeller township, Northumberland county. She bore him four sons and six daughters: Nicholas; Mary, deceased wife of William Thompson; Hannah, deceased wife of James Hile; Jane, deceased wife of Elijah Yocum; Obadiah S.; Elizabeth, deceased wife of James Fox; Joanna, widow of John McMurtrie; John; Sarah, deceased wife of Shultz Knittle, and James J., of Columbia county. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1179 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

OBADIAH S. CAMPBELL, oldest son of Obadiah, Jr., was born, November 25, 1816. He was reared upon the homestead and educated in the township schools. He followed the occupation of a millwright, and was engaged in the building of grist and saw mills throughout Lycoming, Columbia, Montour, Northumberland, and Schuylkill counties thirty-five years. A part of this time Mr. Campbell was a resident of Columbia county. In 1856 he retired from active business life and settled upon his farm in Ralpho township, purchased in connection with his brother-in-law, James Fox, in 1852, and was engaged in farming until the spring of 1889, when he retired from all business, and is now living in Elysburg. In politics Mr. Campbell is a Democrat, and in 1865 was elected justice of the peace, in which office he served ten years. He has been a member of the school board and has served in the various township offices. In his religious faith he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has been a class leader ten years. He is connected with the I.O.O.F. Mr. Campbell was married, January 9, 1840, to Eliza, daughter of John Teats, and they are the parents of six children: Almira, wife of Samuel Swank; Oliver, of Michigan; John; Clemens M.; Edgar B., of Sunbury, and Iva, wife of Oliver Brady. Mr. Campbell is one of the township's oldest and most respected citizens, and is always ready to assist any enterprise that will tend to the public good, a warm friend of the cause of education, and a liberal contributor to religious and charitable purposes. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1179 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

WILLIAM K. CAMPBELL, of Sunbury, who is regarded as the leader in musical matters in that borough, was born Oct. 21, 1880, and has lived in Sunbury from boyhood. He attended public school there, and began taking music lessons when twelve years old, in 1900 entering Combs’ Broad Street Conservatory of Music, Philadelphia, which he attended four years, graduating in 1904. Returning to Sunbury, he began teaching music, violin and piano, and has since devoted himself to teaching and orchestra work, usually having about fifty pupils in Sunbury. He plays in the Chestnut Street theatre and at Armory Hall, in Sunbury, and is the director of Campbell’s Orchestra, of Sunbury, which he organized in 1905 and has led ever since. This is an ambitious musical organization and very popular throughout this region. Mr. Campbell has been notably successful in his chosen work, to which he is enthusiastically devoted, and he has labored faithfully to establish and uphold the most worthy musical standards in his community. On Dec. 9, 1904, Mr. Campbell married Annie Ditty, and they have one child, S. Ruth. They occupy the comfortable home at No. 530 North Seventh Street, Sunbury, which Mr. Campbell erected in 1907. He and his family are members of Zion’s Lutheran Church.
The Ditty family located in Lower Mahanoy Township, this County, soon after the close of the Revolutionary war, its founder being one of the Hessian soldiers who decided to remain in America. He is buried at the Zion’s Union Church in Stone Valley, near Hickory Corners, where many of his descendants have also been interred. Members of this family still live in the neighborhood of Georgetown (Dalmatia), in that section of Northumberland County. Andrew Ditty, grandfather of Mrs. Campbell, married a Lenker, of Dalmatia, and his son Charles, Mrs. Campbell’s father, married Sarah Arndt. They live in Sunbury.
John Campbell, son of Obadiah and brother of Obadiah S., was born Dec. 7, 1823, at Elysburg, and died March 8, 1909. He received a good education, and taught school for a time, also assisting his father in his business affairs. Purchasing a farm in Shamokin Township, he lived thereon three years, and for three years was settled with his family near Waverly, Ohio, engaged in farming. Returning to Pennsylvania in 1859, he traded farm’s with his uncle, Caleb Ely, receiving a farm of 225 acres in Lower Augusta Township, which tract is still in the Campbell name, being now owned by his son Delmer. It was originally the homestead of William Shipman (brother of Elizabeth Shipman, who married Obadiah Campbell) and the house which this pioneer occupied stood between the present home of Delmer Campbell and his neighbor to the east, Lincoln Troutman, standing on the left side of a public road that passed through the land; some of the foundation is still intact, and sour cherry trees grow around the spot. Here Mr. Campbell lived and died. He was a prosperous farmer, and except for the springhouse built by Caleb Ely about a hundred years ago erected all the present buildings on the premises. He was a useful citizen and active in local affairs, serving as school director twelve years, as Township assessor and as overseer of the poor. In 1853 he married Mary A. Fuller, daughter of John and Phoebe (Maly) Fuller, natives of Lancaster county who came to Elysburg from Dauphin County, Pa. Mrs. Campbell died July 11, 1895, aged sixty-one years, eight months, ten days. She and her husband are buried at the Mountain (Hollowing Run) Presbyterian Church in Lower Augusta Township, of which he was a leading member and for many years an elder, filling this office until his death. Their children were as follows: Georgiana married Henry C. Smith, of Lower Augusta; Theodore Alvin married Katie Reitz and they live in Jackson, Mich.; Clara Jane married Hall Yeager and lives at Shamokin; Delmer F. is mentioned below; Charles W. died of diphtheria when seven years old; Warren L. married Stella Reitz, and they live at Rising Springs, Center Co., Pa; Miles H. died aged twenty-one year, 5. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 279 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

HENRY A. CARL, who has a fine farm one and a half miles south of Herndon, Northumberland County, was born March 23, 1850, at Mandata, this County, son of John and Julian (Klinger) Carl.
The Carl (Corl) family is first found in Longswamp Township, Berks Co., Pa., Theobald Carl, a pioneer of that Township, being the first ancestor of this family in America. He died in 1800, and his will, written in German, is on record in Will Book A, page 422, in the Berks County courthouse. The document mentions his mother and provides for her, and he also makes good provision for his wife, Anna Maria. He had a deceased daughter, Elizabeth, and his son George Carl and Samuel Butz were executors of the will, which disposed of a large estate.
The Federal Census Report of 1796 gives George Carl as the head of a family in Longswamp Township, Berks County, consisting of a wife, three sons under sixteen years of age, and two daughters.
The same Report records Dewalt Carl as a resident of the same Township and the head of a family consisting of two sons over sixteen, a wife and three daughters. As Dewalt was used as the English form of Theobald this may refer to the ancestor’s family.
The will of a John Carl, who died in Pike Township, Berks County, in 1837, was made April 9, 1836, and mentions the wife Hannah but no children.
Johan Jacob Carl, grandfather of Henry A. Carl, was born April 21, 1796, and was a descendant of one of the two heads of families mentioned above. He came from Longswamp Township, Berks County, to Northumberland County early in the nineteenth century, settling in Mahanoy Township, and lived on the farm now owned by Galen Bower (one George Wolf owned it earlier). He was a farmer by occupation, and is described as a slim, medium-sized man, with light hair. He died in May, 1862, aged sixty-six years, ten days, and is buried at Urban Church. His wife’s maiden name was Schaffer, and their children were John, William and several daughters.
John Carl, father of Henry A. Carl, was born Feb. 18, 1818, and died July 21, 1854; he was a member of the Mahanoy Church, where he is buried. For some years he kept store at Mandata, later keeping a store where Daniel Peiffer is now located, and there he died. His wife Julian (Klinger,) bore him three sons, William, John and Henry A. After his death she married Jacob Freymoyer and moved with him out to Iowa, where he died at the age of eighty-one years. She died March 19, 1904. She was the mother of four children by her second marriage, Jane, James, Alice, and one daughter that died young.
Henry A. Carl began working at an early age, finding his first employment at what was known a as the Albert sawmill on Fidler’s run, in Jackson Township, and there he was engaged for the long a period of thirty-six years. After Christopher Albert gave up the mill he worked under Mr. Brower and later with Mr. Rickert and during this time he made his home in Lower Mahanoy Township with the exception of two and a half years during which the family resided at Herndon. About 1873 he built a house in Lower Mahanoy Township which he occupied until the spring of 1896, at which time he commenced farming in the same Township, on the place where he has since had his home. It is a tract of 164 acres one and one half miles south of Herndon, formerly the property of Sebastian Stepp. The land is in a good state of cultivation, and the buildings are substantial. Mr. Carl has been industrious and thrifty, and he is making a good living. He is a Democrat, has held local office, and is a member of the Lutheran congregation of the Herndon Church, with which his family also unite.
On May 29, 1870, Mr. Carl married Rebecca Kobel, daughter of George and Catharine (Snyder) Kobel, of Pitman; Schuylkill Co., Pa., and they have had a family of thirteen children: William G. E., who is now in Iowa; S. Calvin, of Carrizozo, N. M.; Charles H., of Illinois; Minnie M., who married Harry Kramer; Katie A., who married George Hoover; Monroe, who died in infancy; John W., Clarence E. and Quincy J., all of Stillwater, N.Y.; Clyde A. and James F., at home; Mary F. R., who is married to Howard Lenker, son of Adam Lenker; and Violet, who died in infancy.
The Kobel Family is one of the earliest settled families of lower Northumberland County, the tax list of Mahanoy Township for 1778 containing the names of Abraham, Casper, Henry and Daniel Kobel, whose relationship is uncertain. Their descendants still live in Jackson, Washington and Little Mahanoy Townships. They were members of the Reformed Church, and a number of the name are buried at St. Peters (Mahanoy) Church in Jackson Township.
Frederick, Simon and Peter Kobel were brothers, and the first named was the grandfather of Mrs. Henry A. Carl.
Frederick Kobel, born June 8, 1761, lived and died in Jackson Township, where he was a farmer and land owner. His wife Sostern (the name is not really legible on the tombstone), was born April 9, 1765, and died Dec. 14, 1848. He died May 11, 1834 (age given as seventy two), and they are buried at St. Peter’s Church before mentioned. Among their children were: Mary Tailor, William, Rebecca Snyder, Catharine Miller, George and Henry.
George Kobel, son of Frederick, married Catharine Snyder, and they lived at Pitman, Schuylkill County, where they were farming people. They are buried at the Haas Church, at Hepler, that county. Their children were: Elias, Isaac, Frank, Sarah, Rebecca (Mrs. Carl) and Harriet.
Simon Kobel, brother of Frederick, was born in the territory now embraced in Washington Township, Northumberland County, the farm where he was born and which belonged to his father, being still pointed out as the old Kobel homestead. It is now owned by Samuel Kieffer. The place comprises 100 acres, originally taken up by a member of the Kobel family in pioneer days. Simon Kobel followed farming. His wife, Sarah (Sally) Engel, daughter of Felix Engel, was like himself a member of the Reformed congregation at St. Peter’s Church. They had children as follows: John, who settled in Jefferson County, Pa.; Daniel and Joseph, Lena, who married Adam Drumheller; Polly, who married John Lebo; and Elizabeth, who married Henry Latsha.
Daniel Kobel, son of Simon, was born in 1829 and was a lifelong farmer. Until 1887 he lived near the homestead, his son Elias succeeding him to its ownership in that year. He died in September, 1903, and is buried at St Peter’s Church, of which he was a Reformed member. Politically he was a Democrat. To him and his wife Elizabeth Kerstetter, who was born Jan. 11, 1838, were born four children: Louisa, who married John Daniel; Abby, who died young; Cassie, who married Samuel Reed; and Elias K.
Elias K. Kobel, son of Daniel, was born in 1865 in Washington Township, and in 1904 commenced farming for himself in that Township, where he lived until 1910. In the fall of 1901 he sold his farm of eighty acres, which was formerly the Samuel Malick farm; a large stone house was built on the place in 1818. He married Sarah C. Hoffman, and they have had eight children, five of whom died young: A daughter that died in infancy, Charles, Harvey, Eva May, Carrie E., Frederick, a son that died in infancy, and William B.
Joseph Kobel, son of Simon, was born June 13, 1837 (or 1838), and died March 19, 1889. He was a prosperous farmer and miller, owning 240 acres of land, and for nine years operated the Dornsife mill, his son Henry W. succeeding him in the milling business after his death. In politics he was a Democrat, served as tax collector, and was an active member of the Reformed congregation of St. Peter’s Church, which he served as deacon and elder. His wife Wilhelmina (Eister), born Oct. 2, 1834, died Nov. 15, 1903. They had five children: Sarah married Oliver Buchner; James R. is a resident of Washington Township; John died when eighteen years old; Edwin S. is of Mahanoy; Henry W., born in Washington Township Aug. 25, 1867, is a farmer, owning 113 acres of land, and has been a deacon and an elder of Himmel’s Church (in 1889 he married Lovina Treon, and they have had two children, Jennie and Samuel, the latter dying when three years old) ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg.205 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

JOHN CARL, superintendent of collieries, Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, was born in Prussia, October 2, 1835, son of Henry and Catharine (Kline) Carl, who emigrated to America in 1853, and settled at St. Clair, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania. There the father pursued the occupation of weaver (although a farmer in Germany) until 1881, when he removed to Shenandoah, where he now resides at the advanced age of eighty-four. Seven children were born to Henry and Catharine Carl: Philopena, Mrs. Peter Bauer; John; Frederick; Anna, Mrs. Adam Bonnesbough; Conrad; Peter, and Henry. John Carl was reared and educated in his native country, and came to America with his parents in 1853. He began work in the mines, continuing at that until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted (April 27, 1861) in Company A, Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers. In the following August he entered the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry and served until the close of the war, experiencing the hardships of a protracted military service. He then returned to Schuylkill county and was employed as a miner from 1865 to 1867. In the latter year he became colliery superintendent; three years later he was sent by the company to Berks county to take charge of ore mines, remaining there seven months. The following seven years he was superintendent of a colliery in Schuylkill county, and was then appointed to his present position with seven collieries under his supervision. In March, 1879, he took up his residence at Mt. Carmel, where he has been a member of the local school board. September 26, 1865, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Leonard and Lena (Best) Kline, of Bavaria, Germany, by whom he has eight children: John; Peter; Mary; Joseph; Lizzie; Millie; George, and Alice. Mr. Carl is a Republican in politics; he is connected with the Lutheran church, the F. & A.M., I.O.O.F., and G.A.R. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1051 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)
JOHN CARL, who by reason of his years of experience in connection with the mining interests, is widely known throughout the vicinity of Mount Carmel, Northumberland County, Pa., is superintendent of the collieries of the Philadelphia & Reading Coal & Iron Company. He is a son of Henry and Catharine (Kline) Carl, and was born in Prussia, October 2, 1835. Henry Carl; the father of our subject, was born in Germany, in which country he followed the occupation of a farmer, also that of a weaver for some time. In 1853 he immigrated to America and located at St. Clair, Schuylkill County, Pa., where he took up the trade of a weaver. He continued at that until 1881, when he removed to Shenandoah and there spent the remaining years of his life, dying in 1893, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. He was joined in Hymen's bonds with Catharine Kline, to whom were born the following offspring: Philopena, the wife of Peter Bauer; John, the subject of this personal history; Frederick; Anna, the wife of Adam Bonnersborough; Conrad; Peter; and Henry. In religious attachments Mr. Carl and his family were members of the Lutheran Church. John Carl, our subject, was reared in his native country and there obtained his intellectual training in the public schools, after which, at the age of eighteen years, he came to this country with his parents. He began work in the mines and continued at that until the outbreak of the Civil War when he took up arms for the cause of the Union. On April 27, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, 9th Reg., Pa. Vol. Inf., but in the following August, he re-enlisted in the 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry. He remained in the service until the termination of the terrible struggle. He served with credit to himself and his regiment, was cool and collected at critical moments, and was ever eager to discharge his full duty. After the close of the war he returned to Schuylkill County and was employed in the capacity of a miner from 1865 to 1867, when he became a superintendent in the colliery. He was three years later sent to Berks County by the company by which he was employed to look after ore mines in that section, but he remained but seven months. Returning to Schuylkill County he again became colliery superintendent and served as such for seven years, when he was appointed to his present position with supervision over seven collieries. He moved to Mount Carmel, Northumberland County, in March, 1879, where he has since been one of the most active and enterprising citizens. He is a man of high character, thoroughly conversant with the ways of the world, and is highly respected by his fellow-men. Politically he is a Republican and is a member of the local school board. On September 26, 1865, Mr. Carl was united in marriage with Elizabeth Kline, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, and was a daughter of Leonard and Lena (Best) Kline. Leonard Kline, a native of Germany came to America with his family and located at St. Clair, Schuylkill County, Pa., where he was an ore-worker in the mines. His union with Lena Best resulted in the birth of the following children: Mary, who died in Germany; Peter, who died in St. Clair; Christina, the wife of John Schaffer of Delaware, Schuylkill County; Helen, the wife of Frank Erb of Mahanoy City; Mary, the wife of Michael Hilbert, deceased, who resides in Mount Carmel; Lena, the widow of Joseph Tabold; John of Mount Carmel; Nicholas, a resident of Mahanoy City; and Elizabeth. Our subject and his worthy wife are the parents of eight children, as follows: John, who married Polinda Kramer, and is a superintendent of collieries at Mount Carmel; Peter, who married Carrie Philip, is also engaged in the same line of business; Mary, the wife of Charles Miller, who is engaged in the hotel business at Fountain Springs; Joseph; Lizzie; Millie; George; and Alice. Socially our subject is a member of the Masonic Order, the Odd Fellows, and the Grand Army of the Republic. Religiously he is connected with the Lutheran Church.(Book of Biographies of the Seventeenth Congressional District Published by Biographical Publishing Company of Chicago, Ill. and Buffalo, NY, 1899 , pg. 288 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

REV. M. J. CAROTHEBS, presiding elder in the Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Evangelical Association, was born near Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, August 14, 1825, and is a son of William M. and Fannie (Clark) Carothers, also natives of Cumberland county, and of Scotch-Irish extraction. Their ancestors were among the very early settlers of that county. The subject of this sketch was reared on the farm until the age of twenty-one years. His literary education was obtained in the common schools and the Union Academy in his native county. Before reaching his majority he began preaching, having been appointed to the Bedford charge in Bedford and Somerset counties, this State, which position he filled creditably for one year, and was then transferred to the Somerset charge in Somerset and Westmoreland counties for one year. Following this was a service of two years in the Perry charge, two years in Cumberland county, and two years in Shrewsbury, York county, this State. He was then two years at Hagerstown, Maryland, and from there went to the Cumberland charge two years. On account of failing health he was granted a vacation of one year, after which he was on the Leesburg charge, Cumberland county, and then transferred back to Shrewsbury, thence to Lock Haven and New Berlin. In 1867 he was elected presiding elder and stationed in the Centre district, and at the end of four years was re-elected and stationed in the Lewisburg district, which he also served four years. He was again elected and stationed in the Williamsport district and after this in the city of Williamsport for one year. He was then elected conference agent to raise money to pay off the mission church debts, after which he was again elected elder and stationed in the York district. In 1872 he came to Milton, where he has since resided in charge of the Lewisburg district. He has been a member of the General Conference since 1854 and of the Board of Missions since 1870. In 1848 be was married to Elizabeth Weller, a daughter of Ludwig Weller, of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, by whom he has five children: Carrie Belle; Amanda Elizabeth, wife of Bishop R. Dubs, D. D., of Cleveland, Ohio; James Moran, of Albany, New York, special agent of the Phoenix Fire Insurance Company; Flora Jane, wife of James M. Taggert, of Milton, and John Weller, M.D., of Somerset, Somerset county, this State. Mr. Carothers is a Democrat, and has served as president of the Milton school board three years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also of the I.O.O.F. He is president of the board of trustees of the Central Pennsylvania College at New Berlin, this State. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1004 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

JOHN P. CARPENTER, present solicitor for the municipality of Sunbury, and formerly justice of the peace of that borough, is an attorney who has risen steadily in his profession since he commenced practice, in 1893. He has been a hard worker, zealous in the discharge of his public duties and successful in the conduct of his private cases. Mr. Carpenter is a native of Snyder County, Pa., born Oct. 18, 1867, at Beavertown, son of Alvin M. Carpenter and grandson of Giles Carpenter.
Giles Carpenter was a native of Germany and was one of three brothers who emigrated to America. He was a wheelwright and miller by occupation, and for a number of years conducted a mill at Ephrata, Lancaster Co., Pa., where he reared his family. He married Jane E. McClintick, who was born and brought up in Mifflin County, Pa., and they became the parents of thirteen children, only four of whom survive, namely: Amanda (deceased), Martha (deceased), Margaret (wife of Philip Lash; they live in Michigan), James (deceased), Belinda (wife of Amos E. Sellers and living in Lancaster, Pa.), Hiram (who died young), Sylvester (deceased), Arabella (deceased), Cincanna (who died young), Louisa (who died young), Alvin M., Samuel L. (of Lancaster, Pa.), and one that died young. Two of the children died of scarlet fever while the family lived at Ephrata.
Alvin M. Carpenter, son of Giles, was born Aug. 21, 1841, in Lancaster County, Pa., and was reared principally on the farm. When sixteen years old he commenced to learn the trade of cabinetmaker, which he continued to follow for fifteen years, meantime locating in Adamsburg, Snyder County. He then began farming in that County, being thus engaged in Beaver Township for a period of thirty years, and in connection with agricultural work he follows huckstering, buying and selling produce, in which line he has established a profitable trade. Occasionally he does carpenter work and painting, being an excellent mechanic and an all-around thrifty man. For eighteen years Mr. Carpenter taught singing classes, and in that connection is widely known to young and old in his locality.
On July 29, 1866, Mr. Carpenter married Ellen Feese, daughter of Reuben and Eliza (Middlewerth) Feese, of Beavertown, Pa., and they have had a family of eight children: John P. is mentioned fully below; Gertie May is deceased; Charles E. lives in West Virginia; Rev. Sanford is a well known minister of the Evangelical Lutheran denomination, at present located at Carthage, Ill.; Elsie married George C. Walker, and they are farming people at Beavertown; Harry M. is deceased; Ira J., of Sunbury, is engaged in railroading; Bessie E. is the wife of Roy E. Eisenhour, of Sunbury. Mr. Carpenter and his family are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, in which he has long been a prominent worker, having served as elder and trustee, and for a number of years as superintendent of the Sunday school.
John P. Carpenter received his early education in the public schools, later attending the State normal school at Bloomsburg and Susquehanna University, at Selinsgrove, from which latter institution he was graduated in the class of 1891. During the next two years he taught school in Rockefeller Township, Northumberland County, meanwhile reading law in the office of C. B. Witmer. In fact he gained most of his advanced education while supporting himself by teaching, having taught a number of terms before his graduation from the university, two in Lower Mahanoy Township, this county. In 1893 he was admitted to practice before the Northumberland County bar, and he is now qualified to practice before the Supreme court (to which he was admitted in 1898), the Superior court (since 1909) and the Superior and Circuit courts of the United States. His public honors came to him unusually early in his practice. In 1899 he became justice of the peace for the borough of Sunbury, continuing to hold that office for two successive terms until 1909, and he is the present solicitor for the borough of Sunbury, having held that position since 1907; in March, 1911, he was reelected to succeed himself for another term of three years. In that capacity he defended the borough in the case of Cake versus the borough of Sunbury, in which a new principle of law was involved, and had the case decided in favor of the borough. His professional work is above reproach, and his patronage comes from a substantial class of clients, whose confidence is a gratifying recognition of ability.
From young manhood Mr. Carpenter has been an active member of the Republican party, in whose councils he is quite influential. He was a delegate to the district convention that nominated Dr. E. W. Samuel, of Mount Carmel, for Congress.
In 1894 Mr. Carpenter married Hannah Minerva Witmer, daughter of Isaac L. Witmer, of Lower Mahanoy Township, and they have two children, Anna Ellen and Alvin Witmer. The family are active in church work in affiliation with Zion’s Lutheran Church, in which Mr. Carpenter holds membership; he has been a member of the church choir since 1891. Fraternally he is a member of Lodge No. 167, B.P.O. Elks, of Sunbury, and of Col. James Cameron Camp, Sons of Veterans, also of Sunbury. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 568 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

JAMES H. CATHCART, farmer, was born on the homestead where he now resides, in Delaware township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, August 11,1809, and is a son of John and Mary (Gifford) Cathcart. John Cathcart was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, and removed to Northumberland county prior to the Revolutionary war. He subsequently returned to his native county and from there entered the service as a drummer boy in the American army, after which he came back to Dauphin county, and later located on the farm in Delaware township, this county, where his son, James H., now resides, and there died in 1832. His wife died in 1810; she was the mother of seven children, only one of whom is now living, James H. The latter was educated in the subscription schools, and has devoted his whole life to farming. He was married, February 22, 1849, to Margaret, a daughter of John Wortman of this county, and to this union one child was born, John G., who married Maggie, a daughter of Samuel Russel of this county. Mr. Cathcart and wife are consistent members of the Presbyterian church. During his younger days he took a deep interest in politics, and has always been an ardent supporter of the principles and measures of the Democratic party. (History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, edited by Herbert C. Bell, Published by Brown, Runk & Co. of Chicago, Ill, 1891 pg. 1155 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

JOHN HARRISON CAWLEY, late of Chillisquaque Township, Northumberland County, was a farmer in the eastern part of that Township throughout his active years, and was prominent in the life of the community as a holder of local offices and as an elder in the church. He was a creditable citizen in all respects, and left a name which will be honored as long as any with whom he had dealings survive.
Mr. Cawley was a native of Union County, Pa., born Nov. 14, 1838. The family is of English descent and was resident in Cheshire, England, two brothers, Thomas and James, coming to America in the early part of the eighteenth century. James settled near Berwick, Pa., while Thomas took up land in Northampton County, Pa., where he died in 1806. From a letter written by his son John, which is remarkable for its beautiful English, to his Aunt Anna, wife of Charles Babbington, we learn that the father’s name was also Thomas, and that the family were property owners in Winsford, near Middlewich, Cheshire, England. Thomas Cawley, Jr., had one son, John, who lived at Springtown, Bucks Co., Pa., and who was the father of five children: John, Thomas, Jesse, and two daughters.
Jesse Cawley, son of John, born in 1786, died Sept. 25, 1840, aged fifty-four years. He married Margaret Rowley (born in 1782, died Sept. 27, 1840, aged fifty-eight years), and in 1836 they moved to Union County, Pa., purchasing a farm of three hundred acres near Winfield. There he continued to follow farming during his active years. He and his wife are buried at Lewisburg, that county. They were the parents of the following children: James (1808-1841), Benjamin (1811-1887), Dubious, John, Charles (1827-1871), Elizabeth (182-1862) and Mary A. (1818-1888).
James Cawley, eldest son of Jesse, was born in 1808 in Bucks County, and died at the comparatively early age of thirty-three years, in 1841. He lived near Lewisburg, Union County, where he followed farming. He married Eva Campbell, also of Bucks County, and they were the parents of five children: Elizabeth married Wilson Hoover; Margaret married Henry H. Stout; William C.; John Harrison is mentioned below; Mary died in infancy.
John Harrison Cawley came to Northumberland County in his young manhood and purchased a farm of fifty acres in the eastern part of Chillisquaque Township. He erected buildings on this property and followed farming there to the end of his active days. Being a progressive and intelligent man, he also took an interest in the welfare of the community, served as school director, supervisor and overseer of the poor. He was an in the Chillisquaque Presbyterian Church for about thirty years, up to the time of his death, which occurred July 19, 1903.
On Jan. 12, 1863, Mr. Cawley married Elizabeth Koch, daughter of Jonas and Leah (Bachman) Koch, and they had two children, James Benjamin and Florence Jeanette. The latter received her education in the public schools of the home neighborhood and at Bloomsburg State normal school, also attending the Williamsport commercial college. She is now a very successful teacher.
James Benjamin Cawley, only son of John Harrison and Elizabeth (Koch) Cawley, was born in 1866. He received his early education in the public schools of his native Township, Chillisquaque, and later attended Pottsgrove Academy and Bucknell University, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1887. He then taught in the Chambersburg (Pa.) Academy and read law with William H. Hackenberg, of Milton, but what promised to be a most useful and successful career was cut short by his early death, July 21, 1891.
After the death of her husband Mrs. Cawley left the farm and moved with her daughter to Milton, where they occupy the house built by Mr. Cawley, on East Mahoning Street. Mrs. Cawley is honored and beloved by the many who know her.
Jonas Koch, father of Mrs. Cawley, was born in Northampton County Dec. 26, 1807, son of Adam Koch, who lived at Petersville, Northampton Co., Pa., where for many years he served as a justice of the peace. Adam Koch married Elizabeth Strauss, and their union was blessed with the following children: Christianna, Susan, Mary, Elizabeth, Reuben, William, Henry, Jacob and Jonas.
In 1828 Jonas Koch moved from Northampton to Northumberland County, purchasing a farm in the eastern part of Chillisquaque Township, where he spent the remainder of his life. He died Feb. 29, 1872, near Pottsgrove, Pa. He married Leah Bachman, who was born Aug. 23, 1814, in Northampton County, daughter of John Frederick and Catherine (Cole) Bachman, the former born Nov. 3, 1783, died Jan. 2, 1845; the latter, born Feb. 22, 1788, died July 16, 1852. Mrs. Leah (Bachman) Koch died Feb. 16, 1899, and she and her husband are buried in Harmony cemetery, at Milton, Northumberland County. They had a family of three children: Elizabeth married John Harrison Cawley; Mary A. married Charles Rissel; William H. is a resident of Pottsgrove, Pennsylvania. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 390 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index

L.J. CHAMBERLAIN, of Shamokin, represents in his business interests the new order of amusements—a phase of the life of the community which has come into existence but recently, and made possible only by the wonderful advances in the science of photography accomplished within the last few years. He has the distinction of being the pioneer in the motion picture business in this section, and is at present the proprietor of two motion picture shows in Northumberland County, one at Mount Carmel and one at Shamokin. By enterprising methods and up-to-date service he has gained a large circle of regular patrons in both places, where his appeal to the best popular taste has likewise established him firmly in the good will of the citizens generally.
Mr. Chamberlain was born in 1874 at Lock Haven, Clinton Co., Pa., son of William and Mary (Bottorf) Chamberlain, both of whom are deceased. His father was also a native of that place, and lived and died there. At the age of seventeen William Chamberlain enlisted for service in the Civil war; becoming a member of Company F, 1st Regiment of Pennsylvania Light Artillery, Volunteers, with which he served faithfully. Mr. and Mrs. William Chamberlain had a family of five children, Harry, Bert, Nora, Floy and L. J.
L. J. Chamberlain attended school at Lock Haven and was particularly well educated in music, to which he has devoted his principle attention. He entered the amusement business at the age of eighteen in the capacity of musician with traveling organizations, and within a few years was at the head of his own band, known as “Chamberlain’s All American Band,” acting as director and general manager. This organization toured the country successfully with the stellar attractions, also traveled for a while in company with his brothers, under the name of Chamberlain Brothers, whose “Railroad Shows” exhibited for a number of years in vaudeville houses and under canvas. At that time the motion picture business was in its infancy. With keen foresight of the possibilities of motion photography Mr. Chamberlain turned his attention to the new field, and for a number of years exploited traveling organizations of that character. On Aug. 28, 1907, in company with Capt. J. M. Shindel, he opened the first successful motion picture theater at Mount Carmel, known as The Theatorium, which is still in operation, standing high in the local public favor. On April 28, 1908, under the firm name of Chamberlain & Shindel, they opened the Theatoriurn motion picture house at Independence and Ninth Streets, Shamokin, which has been in successful operation since, and which, indeed, was the first place of the kind to meet with success in the borough. It has the reputation of being the most popular and best patronized show of the kind there, and the latest and most ingeniously arranged films are shown, the entertainments being varied and so well up to high standards that the audiences are of profitable proportions and high class. Chamberlain & Shindel acquired extensive amusement interests, including park, vaudeville and motion picture theaters, and they were associated until June, 1910, when Captain Shindel retired from the firm, his interests being purchased by Mr. Chamberlain, who has since been sole owner of the business. In April, 1911, he was instrumental in organizing the General Amusement Company, Incorporated, of which he is president and general manager, which has now in preparation the establishing of a chain of theaters throughout the country. The first theater to be operated by the new company will be opened at Sunbury Nov. 1st of this year; it will have a capacity of one thousand, is modern in every particular, and considered to be one of the finest houses of the kind in the State.
Mr. Chamberlain is engaged as dealer and agent for moving picture and electrical supplies as well as promoter and operator of amusement enterprises, maintaining his main office at No. 819 Washington Street in the borough of Shamokin. Thoroughly experienced in all branches of the business, he has catered successfully to the wants of the amusement loving public, and has made a permanent place for himself and his enterprises in his home community and among his fellow citizens at large.
Mr. Chamberlain married Blanche Custard, of Lock Haven, and they have one son, Boyd D. The family are Methodists in religious connection. Mr. Chamberlain is a member of Shamokin Lodge of Elks, No. 355; of Aerie No. 560, F.O.E., of Lock Haven; of Lodge No. 144, K. of P., and of the Maccabees. ( Genealogical and Biographical Annals of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, by J. L. Floyd Published Chicago, Ill., 1911. pg. 764 Transcribed by Tammy L. Clark)

Back to C Index


Back to Index


Copyright © 2008 Genealogy Trails All Rights Reserved with Full Rights Reserved for Original Contributor