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Potter County PA Obituaries and Death Notices

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Martha A. Arnold
E. O. Austin
Gabriel Barnes
Edwin Bickford
Mrs. Lucy A. Blend
Mr. and Mrs. Chester Clark
James L. Dexter
Mrs. P.P. Erway
Owen Gardiner
Samuel George

James F. Gilbert
Thomas Glover
Mr. Graves
Mrs. Sara Harmon
Charles Hay
Timothy Ives
James W. Ladd
D. C. Larrabee
Fayette Lewis
Perry Lewis
Samuel Losey
James Martin
Philander Maynard
William M. Metzger

John C. Miller
L.F. Neefe
Mrs. Jacob Nevins
Ira Parmenter
Sons of Mr. Pye
Elizabeth Rice
Joseph Schwarzenbach
Gertrude Sherwood
Charles Turner
Vangeldee
Thomas Waters
John Zoerb




A

Martha A. Arnold

Newspaper: Western Reserve Chronicle, (Warren, OH.) Wednesday

Date: February 12, 1868

Submitters Name: Kathy McDaniel

Obit: DEATHS. --In Sharon, Pa., Jan. 31, 1868, of inflammatory rheumatism, Martha A. Arnold, wife of Edward H Arnold, and daughter to James and Mary Culbertson of this place, in the 37th year of her age.




E. O. Austin


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated August 4, 1909:

Founder of Austin Borough Dead

Special to The Inquirer
Coudersport, Pa., Aug. 3 – E.O. Austin, the founder of Austin borough, Potter county, who was stricken with paralysis three weeks ago, died on Sunday afternoon. He was stricken speechless and did not recover that faculty before his death. Mr. Austin had been an influential man in Potter county, clearing the first farm at Austin, built the roads from Costello and Keating’s Summit to Austin, laid out the town of Austin and served as Justice of the Peace at that place for fifty-five years. He was a member of the school board for a half century and served two terms as County Commissioner. The deceased was a writer of ability and prepared the history of Potter county for the Pennsylvania Historical Society. His funeral will be held on Tuesday.





B

Gabriel Barnes

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From The Press (Philadelphia, PA), dated November 5, 1857:

Mr. Gabriel Barnes, of Oswego township, Potter county, Pa., started out hunting the other day. Not returning for three days, his family became alarmed, and about two hundred neighbors went in search of him. They found his body near a creek. He had evidently died from exhaustion. He leaves a large family.



Edwin Bickford
Excerpt from the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated October 7, 1862:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
Deceased Pennsylvania Soldier
The following Pennsylvania soldier died in the Washington Hospital since my last report:
Edwin Bickford, Company K, 149th Pa.; Columbian College Hospital. Hebron, Potter county, Pa.



Mrs. Lucy A. Blend
From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated July 27, 1909:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
Blend - On July 25, 1909, Lucy A. Blend, wife of Stoughton A. Blend. Relatives and friends of family are invited to attend funeral services on Monday at 8 P.M. at her late residence, 1651 Howard st., Frankford. Interment at Odin, Potter county, Pa.





C

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Clark


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated June 6, 1911:

Murders Wife, Ends Own Life

Jealousy and Whisky Led to a Double Crime in Roalette, Potter County

Special to The Inquirer
Williamsport, Pa., June 5 – Jealousy and whisky led to a horrible murder and suicide in Roalette, Potter county. Chester Clark fired a bullet into his wife’s head and to make sure work of the crime pressed the revolver against the temple of the dying woman and fired two more shots.

With a dozen witnesses within a hundred feet of the scene of the crime, Clark knelt beside the woman and fired a bullet into his own head, dying instantly. Mrs. Clark died a couple of hours later.

Clark and his wife had separated last fall and she was keeping house for her father and a man named Smith. Clark believed his wife and Smith were too intimate and when under the influence of liquor went to the house, where his wife told him she wanted nothing to do with him. The murder and suicide followed.



D

James L. Dexter


From the Patriot, dated January 4, 1918:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
James L. Dexter, aged 58, well known Potter County politician, yesterday slashed his throat and cut his wrists in a fit of melancholy following a long illness. He is in a Coudersport hospital, and is not expected to live, his knife having cut the jugular vein. Dexter was one of Potter's best known residents, having held office as register and recorder, county auditor and deputy county treasurer.





E

Mrs. P.P. Erway

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated October 9, 1877:

The house of Mrs. P.P. Erway, Potter county, was burned one night recently and she in it. Five or six others in the building escaped.



G

Owen Gardiner


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the National Gazette (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), dated August 17, 1830:

Melancholy Accident

On the morning of the 27th ult., as Mr. Owen Gardiner and another gentleman, residents of Harrison township, Potter county, Pa., were going out with their rifles, the rifle of Mr. Gardiner accidentally went off, lodging its contents in the right hip of his wife. Medical aid was immediately procured, but after lingering in agony until the ensuing Thursday, she died. Mrs. Gardiner was a young female of estimable character, and but recently married.




Samuel George


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated May 15, 1900:

Fire Fighter Burns Within Inch of Safety

Is Overcome by Forest Flames Just as He Reaches a Spring

Special to The Inquirer
Slate Run, Pa., May 14 – A sad story reached her today from the forest fire-ridden districts of Potter county. It is the story of the death of Samuel George, whose charred body, sitting at a spring, with one burned hand in the water, was found by searchers.

George refused to give up the fight when his fellow companions left the woods. Surrounded by flames, he crawled to the spring and died just as his hand touched the water this his parched throat craved.



James F. Gilbert
From the National Labor Tribune, dated February 9, 1899:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
James F. Gilbert, foreman of a logging camp at Harmony, Potter county, Pa., was killed by a log jumping out of the slide.




Thomas Glover

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated September 9, 1893:

Lively Shooting Match

One Man Killed and Two Others Injured in Potter County

Emporium, Pa., Sept. 21 – A fatal shooting affray occurred at Hulls, Potter County. Constable Williams, of Hulls, attempted to arrest Thomas Kennedy for selling liquor without a license. Kennedy tried to escape and was assisted by Thomas Glover. The Constable commenced to shoot and Kennedy returned the fire.

Glover was so badly wounded he died in a few hours. Williams was seriously and Kennedy slightly wounded. Kennedy is at large.



Mr. Graves

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated July 16, 1874:

Graves, who traded his wife for a razor, razor strap and a day’s work, to another man in Potter county, has made his last swap. He died last week.



H

Mrs. Sara Harmon


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated August 22, 1892:

Rattlers Kill Two Women
Awful Encounter With the Deadly Reptiles on Huckleberry Mountain

By Exclusive Wires to The Patriot
Coudersport, Aug. 21 – The details of a horrible encounter with rattlesnakes, in which two women were killed by the venomous reptiles, has been brought here by a commercial traveler from Gold, a village of Potter county. Several days ago Mrs. Jacob Nevins, Mrs. Sara Harmon and three or four other women and their husbands went up on the mountains to pick huckleberries. Mrs. Harmon sat down to pluck the fruit by the side of a rock. A large rattler, unseen by her, which lay on the rock, struck the woman on the jugular vein, causing a considerable rupture. She screamed, but bled to death in half an hour.

While assisting Mrs. Harmon, Mrs. Nevins was bitten twice on the leg and once on the hand by another rattlesnake and died five hours afterward. The men in the party came to the rescue from nearby, gave the women whisky, but to no purpose. They then killed seven huge rattlesnakes within a few yards of where the fated women were bitten and the whole party left the mountain in terror.



Charles Hay
Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated February 16, 1907:

Father Chopped Tree Away From Dead Son

Coudersport, Feb. 15 - While Charles Hay and his father were felling trees for heading bolts in the woods near Shinglehouse, Potter county, a tree fell in an opposite direction from which it was intended and before young Hay could get out of the way, he was caught and crushed and one leg severed from the body, while the other was nearly taken off.

The distracted father chopped the tree away and freed the suffering son and then summoned help, but life was extinct. Hay was married, and besides his wife leaves two small children.



I

Timothy Ives
Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated October 15, 1866:

Death of Hon. Timothy Ives
Hon. Timothy Ives, of Potter county, died at his residence in Potter county on the 8th inst., after a long and distressing illness. Judge Ives was a native of Potter county, and filled in succession the offices of member of Assembly, State Senator and Associate Judge, in all of which he acted with great honesty and fidelity. Judge Ives had a host of friends in Harrisburg who will revere his memory.





L

James W. Ladd

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated February 6, 1919:

James W. Ladd, aged 32, of Genesee Park, Potter County, a son-in-law of George W. Warden, of this city, died yesterday from pneumonia, following an attack of influenza. He is survived by his wife, who was Miss Blanch Warden, of this city, and three children, all of whom are also victims of influenza. Mr. Ladd and his wife are both graduates of Mt. Erie Seminary.



D. C. Larrabee
From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated March 15, 1889:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
State Representative D.C. Larrabee, of Potter county, died on a passenger train near Renovo yesterday of heart disease.



Fayette Lewis
From the Patriot, dated October 3, 1890:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
Fayette Lewis, of Bingham, Potter county, was fearfully mangled and instantly killed by being thrown on the large circular saw in hi mill, near Genesee Falls.



Perry Lewis

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the North American (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), dated April 28, 1877:

Perry Lewis, of Potter county, committed suicide by pouring kerosene oil over his person and setting it on fire.





Samuel Losey


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the National Labor Tribune (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), dated November 22, 1879:

At his residence in Pike township, Potter county, Pa., November 3d, 1879, Samuel Losey, aged 106 years, nine months and eleven days, died.




M

James Martin


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated March 1, 1905:

Death Beats Out Pardon

Special to The Inquirer
Pittsburg, Pa., Feb. 28 – Death won a race with Justice last night here, the goal being the Riverside Penitentiary, where James Martin, a prisoner doing seven years on an unjust sentence for burglary, died of consumption. Martin some time ago convinced the judge who sentenced him that he had not committed the crime, and application had been made by the courts of Potter county for a pardon, which would have arrived in a few days time.



Philander Maynard
From the Patriot, dated September 13, 1878:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
Fatally Kicked by a Horse
Renovo, Pa., September 12 - Philander Maynard, a resident of Kettle creek, Potter county, was kicked in the head by his horse this evening and killed.



William M. Metzger
From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated September 9, 1899:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
Fired Bullet Into His Head
Former District Attorney of Potter County Killed Himself
Special to The Inquirer
Coudersport, Sept. 8 - William M. Metzger, an ex-district attorney of Potter county, committed suicide today by shooting himself in the forehead with a small caliber rifle. He abandoned his practice of law some years ago and had been engaged in business here at which he was successful.
The death of his wife some two years ago and his own ill-health preyed on his mind until he had become despondent.




John C. Miller

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Philadelphia Inquirer, dated February 3, 1900:

John C. Miller, aged 84 years, of Cherry Springs Hill, Potter county, died as the result of blood poisoning, caused by having one of his toes slightly scratched by a nail in the heel of his boot.



N

L.F. Neefe

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated January 31, 1920:

L.F. Neefe, Active In State Kiwanis Clubs, Dies Here
Leading Business Man of City Succumbs to Pneumonia After Week's Illness - Former President of Local Club

Leon F. Neefe, a leading figure in business in this city died at 5:45 o'clock yesterday afternoon of pneumonia after a brief illness. Mr. Neefe had been in the insurance business here for the past seven years with offices at 317 Chestnut street.

He had been taken ill last Friday while at work and had not visited his office since. For the past three days he had been confined to his bed at his home, 1022 Green street.

Mr. Neefe was prominent in the Kiwanis movement. He was president of the local club last year and at the recent convention in Altoona, had been elected vice governor of the State Association of Kiwanis clubs. He was also a member of the local lodge of Elks.

He was born in Coudersport, Potter county thirty-nine years ago, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Neefe. His father and a brother, Donald survive, both residing in the Potter county town. Coming to this city eighteen years ago, he was given a post in the State Highway Department, where he served for years as chief clerk.

He is survived by his wife, Alma, daughter of J.S. Sible of this city. Two children, Leon Jr., and Dorothy also survive. Mr. Neefe was a member of the Grace Methodist church of this city. Funeral arrangements have not yet been completed.



Mrs. Jacob Nevins


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated August 22, 1892:

Rattlers Kill Two Women
Awful Encounter With the Deadly Reptiles on Huckleberry Mountain

By Exclusive Wires to The Patriot
Coudersport, Aug. 21 – The details of a horrible encounter with rattlesnakes, in which two women were killed by the venomous reptiles, has been brought here by a commercial traveler from Gold, a village of Potter county. Several days ago Mrs. Jacob Nevins, Mrs. Sara Harmon and three or four other women and their husbands went up on the mountains to pick huckleberries. Mrs. Harmon sat down to pluck the fruit by the side of a rock. A large rattler, unseen by her, which lay on the rock, struck the woman on the jugular vein, causing a considerable rupture. She screamed, but bled to death in half an hour.

While assisting Mrs. Harmon, Mrs. Nevins was bitten twice on the leg and once on the hand by another rattlesnake and died five hours afterward. The men in the party came to the rescue from nearby, gave the women whisky, but to no purpose. They then killed seven huge rattlesnakes within a few yards of where the fated women were bitten and the whole party left the mountain in terror.




P

Ira Parmenter


Contributed by Denise Hansen

A Mighty Hunter Dead
He Followed the Trail of the Last Pennsylvania Elk

It was in the Early Part of the Winter of 1867-8 That the Last Bull Elk was Tracked to His Deathy by the Tireless Sportsman of the Sinnamahoning

“The man who was in at the death of the last elk killed in Pennsylvania died a few days ago in Potter county,” said a former resident of the part of the Keystone State. “His name was Ira Parmenter, and he must have been ninety years of age. He was born near the forks of the Sinnamahoning, where his father, who came from Connecticut with his family before the close of the last century, was one of the first settlers. The old hunter just dead was the last of his race. He had followed the life of a hunter and trapper until three years ago, when he became partially blind and was forced to hang up his rifle. He had lived during the times when elk, wolves and panthers, all of them now extinct, were numerous for the Pennsylvania woods, and he, probably more than any of his contemporaneous woodsmen, aided in bringing about their extinction.

“For many years he insisted that he had killed the last panther ever known to be in Pennsylvania. But Jacob Bensley, an old Pike county hunter, finally brought such evidence to bear that he and not Parmenter was entitled to that honor, that the latter acknowledged Bensley’s claim. That he was in the hunt, though, which resulted in the killing of the one lone elk that clung to its native hills and fastnesses in the Pennsylvania wilds there is no doubt, although the elk was killed by another person, and an Indian at that. This elk hunt was Parmenter’s favorite reminiscence, among the hundreds of stirring stories of his life in the woods that he was always ready to relate, almost up to the day of his death.

On The Trail
“This elk hunt occurred as late as 1867, although it was supposed that the last of the Wapiti race in Pennsylvania had met its death twenty years before. Not any of the animals nor any sign of them had been seen since 1845, when Seth Nelson, of Elk county, shot what was supposed to be the last one, and its immense head and antlers for years were exhibited at Peale’s museum, in Philadelphia, as those of the last Pennsylvania elk. In the fall of 1867 this same Seth Nelson and Ira Parmenter were hunting along the headwaters of Bennett’s creek, in Play Swamp, from which water flows on one side to the sources of the Susquehanna, and from the other to the Alleghany feeders. They were on the trail of a deer, when suddenly they heard the peculiar whistle a bull elk sounds only at that time of the year, the whistle being the call for a mate. The two hunters got their hounds on the elk’s trail and followed it all day, when a heavy and prolonged rainstorm came up and the trail was lost.

“The hunters roamed the woods for weeks trying to strike the lost trail, but did not succeed. The news that there was still another elk left in the Sinnamahoning woods spread throughout the region and clear to the Indian reservations over the New York state line. Among these was a hunter and trapper famous on the Cattaraugus reservation, known to the whites as Jim Jacobs. One day in the latter part of November, Ira Parmenter and Seth Nelson started out to try again to find the trail of the lone bull elk of the Sinnamahoning. There was a good tracking snow, and on the south edge of Flag Swamp they discovered tracks in the snow that they recognized at once as an elk’s, and at the same time they were surprised and by no means pleased to see the Indian hunter, Jim Jacobs, appear on the scene.

The Indian’s Prize
“Jacob was an old man even then, although he lived and hunted for ten years longer, when he was killed by the cats in Salamanca, N.Y. He had hunted elk for fifty years, and knew all their habits and instincts perfectly. Parmenter and Nelson objected to the Indian joining them in the chase of the elk, and he was forced to leave the trail. The two white men followed the elk for four days, and it led them through the almost unbroken wilderness of western Pennsylvania clear down to the head waters of the Clarion river, in Clarion county. There was a blinding snowstorm came up, but they kept on, knowing that the elk would not travel in the storm. At last they discovered that the elk had taken refuge in a laurel thicket, and they felt that the prize was almost within their grasp, when a rifle shot rang out upon the snowy air from the thicket. They made their way into the thicket, and in a opening in the center stood the Indian, Jim Jacobs, one foot on the dead body of the elk, and his rifle held threateningly as he faced the white hunters creeping through the laurels.

“The wily Indian had read the course of the elk by his knowledge of the animal’s instincts, and had followed it as surely as if he had been on its track in the snow, and had actually reached the laurel swamp where the animal took refuge before the elk reached there itself. The two white hunters, although disappointed and chagrined over their failure to capture the prize they had followed for a hundred miles, were forced to acknowledge the wonderful skill and unerring judgment of the old Indian, and aided him in carrying his prize home. The head and antlers of the elk were in Jacobs’ house at Salamanca at the time of his death, and are probably in that place yet.” - New York Sun



Sons of Mr. Pye

Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Harrisburg Daily Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated July 26, 1878:

In Ellisburg, Potter county, the lightening on Saturday night struck the residence of Mr. Pye, killing two of his boys. Three brothers were sleeping in one bed, and the lightening killed the two on the outside, while the one in the middle escaped unhurt.



R

Elizabeth Rice

From the Wilkes-Barre Times, dated August 13, 1908:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
Novels Lured This Girl To Suicide
Girl Who Read Love Stories Believed To Have Drowned Herself
Williamsport, Pa., Aug. 13 - Some mystery attaches to the death, presumably by suicide, of 16-year-old Elizabeth Rice, of Germania, Potter County. Her body was found in West Branch Creek, at the edge of town.
Miss Rice was the leader of her social circle, a teacher in the village Sunday School and accounted on of the handsomest girls in the village. This morning her bedroom was found to be locked and a boy who entered it through a window found Miss Rice gone. Her hat ribbons and combs were lying on a chair. An hour later, lying face downward, her body was found in the creek.
She had evidently stolen from the house during the night, as she had been dead for some hours. Her mother says if Bessie really killed herself, it was due to dissatisfaction over her station of life, caused by reading of love stories.




S

Joseph Schwarzenbach


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated December 10, 1891:

A German Town
Its Founder, Joseph Schwarzenbach, Dies, Leaving a Valuable Estate

The founder of the quaint German village of Germania, situated in the wilderness section of Potter county, died there a few days ago at the age of sixty-nine years. He was Joseph Schwarzenbach, a native of Bavaria, and a man of vigorous mind and sterling virtues. He came to this country forty years ago. In 1857 he bought a tract of 3,000 acres of wild land in Potter county, and removed to it with his family.

He cleared up a home eighteen miles from the nearest settlements. Kindred and friends fresh from the fatherland joined in founding a village, which is called Germania, and which is a perfect reproduction, in so far as the novel conditions will permit, of a German village, in the dress, manners and language of its inhabitants, in its village government, in the architecture of its buildings, in its churches and schools and societies, and in the little brewery which makes honest beer by primitive methods. This old-country village, planted in an American wilderness, is one of the curiosities of Northern Pennsylvania. The founder left a large and valuable estate to be shared by his widow and seven children. In accordance with his last instructions, his body was taken to Buffalo and reduced to ashes at the crematory there.



Gertrude Sherwood
From the Wilkes-Barre Times, January 2, 1917:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
Horse Falls Over Bank, Carrying Child To Death
Oswayo, Pa., Jan. 2 - The holiday season has brought sorrow to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sherwood, of Hebron, Potter county, near hear, their daughter Gertrude, 5 years old, having been killed in an accident.
The family was driving here to enjoy festivities when their horse stumbled and carried its load over a thirty-foot embankment. The little girl's neck was broken. Mrs. Sherwood escaped with slight injuries. Mr. Sherwood, who carried a baby in his arm, was unhurt, as also was the infant.




T

Charles Turner


Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Wilkes-Barre Times, dated March 28, 1905:

Convict Stabbed To Death In Pittsburg Penitentiary

Pittsburg, Pa., March 28 – Charles Turner, aged 30 years, from Potter county, and a convict at the penitentiary, was murdered at that institution this morning by Paul Kruger, from Allegheny county. The men got into a dispute while at work. Kruger stabbed Turner with a knife, death ensuing in thirty minutes. Turner, Kruger and three other convicts were, on account of their good behavior, allowed to work in the bake house, the most trusted position for convicts at the institution.

Tragedy Occurred In Bakery
Captain Thomas Hill has charge of the men until 8 o’clock. At 5 o’clock he set Kruger and Turner to kneading dough at adjoining troughs. He left them at work while he went after the other members of the gang and had placed William Stevenson, another trusted prisoner, in charge during his absence. He was gone only about seven or eight minutes, but during that short period Turner was stabbed to death. As far as can be ascertained by Warden C.C. Johnston, the two men were kneading the dough, when Turner, in a playful spirit, threw some dry flour into the trough at which Kruger was working. Kruger, who was not in good humor this morning, stopped work and said: “What do you mean by that trick?”

“I did not go for to do it as a trick,” was the response of Turner.

More words followed, after which Kruger pulled from his pocket a knife with a blade four inches long. With this he stabbed Turner in the stomach, the blade penetrating the liver. Turner fell unconscious and bled to death, life being extinct in about thirty minutes from the time he was stabbed.

Where Did Kruger Get Knife?
Kruger is confined in the dungeon. The officials at the penitentiary are unable to explain how such a murderous weapon came to be in the possession of Kruger and how it was not detected on him during the almost daily searchings that take place.

How the knife happened to be in Kruger’s possession is being made the subject of vigorous investigation, as well as all the incidents leading to the murder. The office of the coroner was notified as soon as it was ascertained that Turner had died and it is expected that the coroner will conduct another investigation as to the manner in which Kruger came into possession of the knife without detection.

Men Were Model Prisoners
Both Turner and Kruger were regarded as almost model prisoners. Turner had been sentenced to confinement for one year and one month for larceny. Kruger had been sentenced by a local court to a period of five years and six months for entering a building to commit a felony and had served two years of his sentence. He is 32 years old.



V

Vangeldee

From the Patriot, dated November 11, 1868:
Contributed by Denise Hansen
A boy of about thirteen years of age, named Vangeldee, was killed by a horse, in Ulysses township, Potter county, on the 11th inst.



W

Thomas Waters
Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated October 7, 1882:

During a fight between Geo. Chisholm and Thomas Waters, of Hector, Potter county, a few days since concerning a load of bark, Waters received severe injuries of which he died yesterday.



Z

John Zoerb
Contributed by Denise Hansen

From the Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), dated June 2, 1877:

John Zoerb, of Potter county, a few days ago went to his bedroom, after having knocked his son down with a piece of iron, placed the muzzle of a rifle to his mouth, pulled the trigger with his fingers and blew himself into eternity. It is thought he was partially insane, domestic trouble having preyed on his mind. He was sixty-four years old.





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