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History of  Sullivan County, Pennsylvania

Contributed by Nancy Piper

[Source: History of Sullivan County Pennsylvania by George Streby]


FOREWORD

DEDICATED TO GEORGE STREBY

Died November 19, 1921

Realizing that there was no complete history of Sullivan County in existence, my father spent his lifetime in collecting material for such a work. A few years ago he published such a history in the columns of his paper, the "Gazette and Herald," at the same time, printing it for a county history. He would have liked to express his thanks to F. W. Meylert for the papers of the late Michael Meylert, also for those of Judge Ingham. He also obtained much material from many people who have now passed beyond and secured very valuable data in this way which if not now preserved would be irretrievably lost.

So, as a memorial to his untiring devotion and the ambition of his life to preserve in a tangible form much of the early history of the county which he knew was being lost and for the many hours of toil and research spent in collecting this material, we dedicate this volume.

Clara A. Streby Ring


CONTENTS

History of Cherry Township

History of Cherry Township

Including Early Settlements

Together with Biographical Sketches and Statistics and Matters of General Interest.

By George Streby and Clara A. Streby

Dushore, PA. Sullivan Gazette Print 1903

Cherry Township was organized at the May session of the court of quarter sessions of Lycoming County in 3824. It was formed from Shrewsbury township and comprised all of what is now Cherry township, Dushore borough and Colley township and a portion of LaPorte township.

A very interesting story is told of the probable origin of the name Cherry. On the 4th of July, 1819, the settlers of this section, including seven women, all in the neighborhood, gathered at the home of Ezra Payne where a tall liberty pole was raised and the stars and stripes unfurled that all might evince their patriotism and honor the day that gave our -nation birth. Roswell Phelps read the Declaration of Independence, speeches were made and all sang a popular song commencing: "Come all ye gallant heroes, I'll have you lend an ear: I'll sing you a small ditty That will your spirits cheer."

From the raising of this pole, which was of cherry, they called the hill upon which Ezra Payne and Freeman Fairchild had built their homes, Cherry Hill, and it is very likely that this suggested the name, Cherry, for the township.

At the time of its organization, the taxables numbered forty eight as follows:

Joseph Batcheler

Henry W. Cooper

Thomas Davis

David E. Davis

Samuel Dill

Samuel Derby

David Dodge

Freeman Fairchild

Henry Graifly

William Graifly

David H. Goodwin

John Hartzig

Henry Huffmaster

Fredrick Huffmaster

George Hunsinger

Valentine Housewart

Jesse Hicks

John Hicks

Samuel Jackson

Jesse Kirkendall

Casper King

William King

John Lopez

John Miller

Jacob Miller

Shadrack Miller

Alteratus Miller

Samuel McNeal

John B. Maxwell

William Martin

John Mosier

Brookins Potter

Joseph Potter

Alden Potter

Henry Potter

William Potter

Nicholas Potter

Roswell Phelps

Ezra Payne

Jacob Payne

John Reeser

Samuel Sharp

Charles Scott

Andrew Shiner

Evan O. Shiner

Dennis Thall

John Thail

Henry Yonkin

In addition the following are said to have settled about this time:

Frederick Bartch

John G. Bartch

Wm. Colley

John Dieffenbach

Jacob Dieffenbach

Joseph Fulmer

Wm. Lawrence

F. X. Lusch

Cornelius Harrington

Elias Holcomb

Henry Payne

George Thrasher.

Cherry then comprised about ninety thousand acres or a little more than one-third of the county. In 1849, 37,000 acres were taken off to form Colley township and in 1859 about 17,000 acres included in LaPorte township, leaving within its present boundaries about 3'5,000 acres which also includes the borough of Dushore.

Cherry Township lies in the northern part of Sullivan county and is bounded on the north by Bradford county, on the east by Colley township, on the southwest by LaPorte township and on the west by Forks township.

Surface and Drainage

The surface of Cherry is quite diversified. The larger portion of the township is a part of the elevated plateau that forms the northern section of Sullivan and a part of Bradford and Wyoming counties. The regularity of the plateau is here broken by the numerous small valleys that traverse this section, and which have been formed by the tributaries of the Loyalsock, In the south-eastern section of the township rise spurs of the Alleghany mountains, which tower high above the surrounding plateau.

Three streams flow across Cherry township in a south-westerly direction. That draining the northern portion of the township is the Little Loyalsock which rises in the extreme north-eastern corner of Cherry and flows south-west until it enters the Big Loyalsock at Forksville. Its principal tributaries are Marsh Run which unites with it at Dushore, Lick Creek at Cherry Mills and Mill Creek near the western border.

Birch Creek drains the eastern and south-central portion of the township, rising in the eastern part and flowing south-west until it enters the Big Loyalsock at Ringdale in LaPorte Township.

The south-eastern portion is drained by the Big Loyalsock which rises in Colley Township and flows in a westerly direction through Cherry into LaPorte Township.

NATURAL RESOURCES

Very rich in its natural resources, Cherry is the wealthiest township in the county. On the gentle sloping hills and in the picturesque valleys of the north and central portions of the township lie many beautiful farms, the soil which is composed of red shale being among the most fertile in the county. On the mountains and tablelands of the south-eastern portion, much is not tillable, the soil here being of conglomerate rock formation.

The mineral wealth of the township is very extensive, coal being found in the mountains in great abundance. In the northern section, copper ore of very good quality has been discovered but is as yet undeveloped.

PRODUCTS AND INDUSTRIES.

Agriculture is one of the main industries of the township. The fertile farms yield an abundance of grain, and the raising of the cereals, wheat, corn, oats, rye and buckwheat is a very important industry in this section. Many portions of the township are particularly well adapted to grazing and stock-raising is very extensively carried on, particular attention being paid to dairying. May and apples are also important products of the farms of Cherry township.

Coal has been one of the leading exports of the county and in the future will lead any other product. It is a free-burning anthracite and is found in large quantities in the south-eastern section of the township, all but one of the collieries being located in Cherry. The output for the last year has been over a half-million tons, and with the addition of the new breakers to be erected within the coming year, will probably bring the output up to one million tons per year.

EARLY ROADS.

The first road built in Cherry was the Susquehanna and Tioga Turnpike. On the 28th of March, 1806, an act of Assembly was signed by the governor of the Commonwealth appointing Levi Hollingsworth, William Trumbull, Anthony Morris, Benjamin K. Morgan, Samuel M. Fox and Samuel Mifflin of the city of Philadelphia, Nathan Beach and Abel Fellows, of Luzerne county, and John Franklin, Stephen Tuttle and Reuben Hale, of Lycoming county, commissioners to open books and receive subscriptions for the Susquehanna and Tioga Turnpike company. The route described for the road in the act is as follows:

"By the best and nearest route from Berwick on the east branch of the Susquehanna or from the mouth of the Lower Whopehawley to the point in north line of the state which is nearest to Newton (Elmira) on the river Tioga, in the state of New York."

Books were opened for receiving subscriptions in Philadelphia, Sunbury, Northumberland and Berwick, said subscriptions being for shares of $100 each with an advance payment of one-tenth of the amount. We have no records of the organization of the company or of its first surveys and expenditures in building.

The road was built in 1809 from Berwick by way of the Long Pond to the Loyalsock which it crossed about a mile below Ringdale, it was extended to the county line in 1810, crossing the Little Loyalsock near Cherry Mills, and striking the county line near the Heverly settlement in Overton township. From thence it went over the Huckleberry mountain to Greenwood and Monroeton.

In 1812 and 1815 supplements to the act of 1806 were passed and Andrew Shiner took the job of building the road. The contract price was $1150 per mile with extra pay for bridges. Half of his pay was to be in land at $2 per acre. The sub contractors took jobs on the road at $800 per mile and were to take half their pay in land at $4 per acre. By this means many of the early settlers secured their lands. The new Turnpike was built as far as Birch Creek where Mildred is now located in 1818, and through what is now Dushore, Laddsburg, New Albany and Monroeton in 1819 and 1820.

A road was built in 1820 or 1821 leading from the Turnpike to the Lewis settlement, now EaglesMere. This became the mail route to the settlement on the Turnpike. The Payne road leading from Ezra Payne's on Bahr's hill to Wyalusing was built soon after the Turnpike. In 1825 the Williamsport road leading from the old Turnpike, between the Loyalsock Creeks to the Bird sawmill in Forks township and thence to Millview, was built.

People.

The building of the Susquehanna and Tioga Turnpike brought a large number of Germans from the lower counties of Pennsylvania to this neighborhood, the first settlements were made mainly by them, many of their descendants being now citizens of the township. Between 1840 and 1855, the settlements were made mainly by the Irish, many of whom had been employed on the construction of the North Branch canal and had thus become acquainted with the country, while others came direct from Ireland to Cherry township.

These two nationalities, which have always been prominently identified with the history of Pennsylvania, have here produced a class of citizens, patriotic, sturdy, staunch, upright and honest, whose progressiveness and industry has made Cherry the wealthiest district of the county.

The present population of Cherry is 2,703.

EARLY SETTLEMENTS.

The first settlement made within the present limits of Cherry township was that of Amos Ellis, who in 1816 built a shanty at the point, where the Susquehanna and Tioga Turnpike crosses the Loyalsock, in which to board the men who were working upon the Turnpike. Early maps made of this section show a town .plot at Ellis's called New Thurington, but the place never contained more than a half-dozen buildings. The town plot was undoubtedly gotten up for the purpose or inducing speculators to invest in the lands in that vicinity.

The second settlement was made in the vicinity of what is now Sugar Hill. About 1818 or 1820, Andrew Shiner who had the contract to build the new Turnpike, built a sawmill on Birch Creek near where it is crossed by the creek. John R. Lopez, a sub-contractor settled the Henley place in 1818. Samuel Dill settled here in 1819; Samuel Thomas in 1817 or 1818; Wm. Colley and Wm. Potter in 1820; Jesse, James and John Hicks in 1820; Charles Scott in 1817; all of these settled on Sugar Hill, taking land as part payment for their labor on the Turnpike while it was in the course of construction. Others who worked upon the Turnpike were Casper King, William Graifly. Alden Brookes, Josiah Potter, Charles Scott, Evan C. Shiner, Samuel McNeal and Roswell Phelps. In 1817 or 1818, Emanuel Hoover built at sawmill between the present site of Satterfield and Shinersville. John M. Kirkendall made the first improvement on the Pendergrass place in 1820.

About 1823 Andrew Shiner started the town of Shinersville, which was located on Sugar Hill. It was laid out in regular town lots which he sold for $35 each. John Hosier who afterward moved to Dushore settled here in 1824 and worked at his trade of blacksmith. John Hartzig was the wagon maker and David C. Dodge, the merchant and hotel-keeper. Both of these men were taxed in 1825. The second schoolhouse in the township was built here in 1825, and the second post-office located here with Henry W. Cooper as postmaster. Here occurred the first death in the township, that of Samuel Maston who came from Symesbury, Connecticut. He died in the summer of 1821 und was buried at Shinersville. For a time the place prospered and gave every promise of a growing village, but Andrew Shiner became involved and was sold out by the sheriff in 1829. After this the village declined much of the business being transferred to Cherry Hill.

Mr. Shiner returned to Columbia county where he secured a position as gatekeeper at the river bridge at Berwick and there he lived the few remaining years of his life. His two sons remained in Sullivan but a short time leaving only his two daughters, Mrs. Samuel Jackson and Mrs. Ellis in the township which he had been so much the means of improving.

Ezra Payne made a clearing in 1819 on lands now owned by Barney Hunsinger. His house, the first frame building in the township, was called the ''Yankee house." It was built by John Stowers in 1820, of hewed logs, had two good rooms, a chimney in .the center and a fireplace on either side. Here he opened a hotel, afterward renting it to Freeman Fairchild. Mr. Payne planted the first apple orchard in the township. He was the first postmaster and afterwards was justice of the peace.

John Stowers settled the Auman place, now occupied by Frank Hunsinger, in 1817. This improvement he sold to Samuel Jackson who came in 1819.

Samuel McNeal settled near the Auman place, afterward selling out to Samuel Jackson. His daughter Sally who became the wife of Elias Hahn was the first child born in the township.

In 1819 and 1820, Brookins Potter, Roswell Phelps, Louisa Holcomb and David E. Davis settled in this vicinity.

Freeman Fairchild came from Morris County, New Jersey to Berwick, Columbia County, in May 1814. He had married Hannah Ketcham, a native of Morris County, and they had three children, Stephen, Harriet and Caroline, when they left their New Jersey home. March 18, 1819 they came to Cherry Township living for a short time in a house in Headleyville, Dushore. Here their fourth child Daniel was born. Soon after, Mr. Fairchild leased the hotel on Cherry Hill of Ezra Payne, which he conducted until his death in 1834. It was kept by his widow until 1851. When for a time the county seat was located here and the sessions of the court held in the nearby church, she entertained judges, lawyers and jurors beside the many travelers that passed back and forth over the Turnpike.

Stephen Fairchild married Nancy Thomas and settled where his son William now lives. Their children were:

Caroline, died when 3 years old;

Hannah A., married Wm. H. Yonkin, of Cherry;

Charlotte, lives on the homestead;

Wm. P.

Harriet Fairchild married Wells Wilcox of New Albany. To them were born:

Catharine, now deceased, married Jesse Stalford;

Joseph, deceased;

Emily, married Jesse Barber of Albany;

Boyd, lives at New Albany.

Caroline Fairchild married J. W. Martin of Cherry. Daniel Fairchild married Elizabeth Richart and to them were born:

Hattie, deceased;

Freeman, deceased;

Kate, deceased;

Sally, married Fred Newell of Dushore.

David H. Goodwin came to Cherry in 1830. He was first employed as a surveyor by non-resident land owners, and in a few years became their agent for the sale of land. He was a well-educated man and during the winter months was employed as a schoolteacher, sometimes also conducting singing schools. He was active in church work and occasionally served as a local preacher.

John Persun settled in Cherry in 1836. The family were originally French and went from France to Germany during the Huguenot trouble. Later they emigrated to the American colonies, settling in New Jersey, where John Persun was born in 1806. When quite small, he came with his parents to Luzerne county, locating near WilkesBarre. After the Turnpike was built, he ran a four horse stage from Berwick to Ellis's tavern on the Loyalsock for several years. He learnt surveying of David Goodwin, and upon Mr. Goodwin's removal from the township, took up that business. In the winter, he also taught school. He first settled on the Stephen Fairchild farm in the horseshoe and later in East Cherry. He married Henrietta Klinetob and to them were born nine children:

Luretta, married Hiram Kisner of East Cherry;

John E., enlisted in 58th reg't P. V. I. and died in 1863 of typhoid pneumonia;

David Goodwin, died at Picture Rocks in 1903;

Christopher, died in infancy;

Nathan, lives at Dushore;

Daniel, lives at Wilmot;

Charles O., died in infancy;

Catharine M., married John S. Hoffa of Dushore;

Henrietta C., married David Abrams of Wilmot.

John Bahr came from Berks bounty in 1833 and purchased the improvements on the farm now owned by Barney Hunsinger. His grandfather was a native of Germany. He married Mary Magdalena Reeser, a sister of John Reeser of Cherry. They were the parents of fourteen children, seven sons and seven daughters all of whom came to Cherry with their parents except the eldest daughter who remained in Berks county.

John, settled near Cherry Mills;

Benjamin, settled where Patrick Murphy now lives and later moved west;

Samuel, commenced in Cherry, later went west;

William, now deceased, settled at New Albany;

Daniel, settled on old homestead, lives at Hollenback;

Jacob, settled in Oregon;

Solomon, settled on a part of the old homestead;

Magdalena, now Mrs. From falter of Berks county;

Mary, married Charles Kinsley of Cherry;

Rebecca, married Nicholas Kneller, of Cherry;

Catharine, married a Mr. Friedenburg, later Dan Sickles;

Sarah, married John Bachman of Cherry;

Elizabeth, lives in Berks county.

Mrs. Freeman Fairchild was the first person baptized in the township, the ceremony being performed in 1821 by Elder Solomon Dimmock of the Baptist faith. She united with the church at Huntingdon. Rev. Dimmock, who was from Huntingdon held services in the house of Ezra Payne once a month, afterward the services were held at Roswell Phelps' and Freeman Fairchild's. In November, 1828, Freeman Fairchild and Mrs. Brookins Potter were baptized and sometime later, Roswell Phelps and wife, Miss Salome Tompkins and Mrs. Alden Potter. Previous to these, there were only two Baptists in the settlement, Brookins Potter and Mrs. Nicholas Potter from Huntingdon, Visits were made to the settlement by Elders Joel Rogers, Elias Hudson and Griffith Lewis. Afterwards Elders Roger and Dodson and a licentiate, Samuel Chapin preached here alternately every four weeks. When the Cherry church was started only two members of the Huntingdon church remained Hannah Fairchild and Rachael Rogers, all the others having died or moved away.

On examination of the records kept by D. H. Goodwin, recording secretary of the school committee for Cherry Hill and vicinity, it is found that on Thursday evening, January 12, 1832, a meeting of the citizens was called at the house of Freeman Fairchild to discuss the building of a schoolhouse. Jacob Dieffenbach was elected president and Roswell Phelps, clerk. It was voted that a schoolhouse be built upon the land donated by Roswell Phelps for that purpose. It comprised 16 square rods of land and laid between the present site of Bahr's cemetery and the Turnpike. Freeman Fairchild, John G. Bartch and William Colley were appointed a committee to build the schoolhouse which was to be of plank, one story high, 26x22 feet, with a chimney and fireplace in one end. It was also voted that the schoolhouse should be considered free to all denominations that wished to hold religious service there.

Thirty-nine of the pioneers subscribed toward building this schoolhouse, some in money, some by work and some with material.

At a meeting held in August 1832, Roswell Phelps was elected chairman, David H. Goodwin, secretary and Roswell Phelps, David H. Goodwin and Kerry W. Cooper the school committee for the ensuing year.

At a meeting held April 3, 1841, it was "Resolved, that the right of pre-eminence to occupy the house shall stand as follows; 1st, the common day school; 2ud, preaching and prayer meeting; 3rd, Sunday school; 4th, singing school; 5th, debating school."

The first school in the settlement was taught by Salome Tompkins for $1 per week and board, the second by Roswell Phelps of Symsbury, Connecticut, and the third by Alma Potter of Huntingdon, Pa.

The first settlement made in the Thrasher Settlement in East Cherry was that of George Thrasher who was born in the city of Reading, Pennsylvania, in 1774. He married Catharine Fox of that city and moved to Luzerne county. Here he remained until 1828, when he purchased 800 acres of land, lying just north-east of what is now Dushore, from a Mr. Kittwolder and moved to Cherry township. He lived here until he died July 12,184'5. His wife was born July 18, 1773 and died May 8, 1854. To them were born ten children:

Elizabeth, who died unmarried;

Catharine, married Philip Heverly of Cherry;

Hannah, married George Rupert and later a Mr. Bendinger, she lived in Luzerne county;

George, lived on the homestead;

Benjamin, of Cherry;

Jonathan, of Indiana;

Samuel, of Cherry;

Adam, of Cherry;

Joseph, died in 1829;

Reuben, of Cherry.

George Thrasher remained in Luzerne county until after the death of his father in 1846 when he moved on the homestead. Two years later, March 18, 1849, he was accidentally killed. He was on his way to Dushore with a load of grain he was taking to mill when his team ran away and he was killed. He was married to Lydia Weaver, who was born July 13, 1812, a daughter of Christian and Maria Weaver of Luzerne county. She died June 13, 1887. Their children were:

Joseph, married Sally Moyer, lives in Cherry;

Stephen, now deceased, married Caroline Kinsley;

Phoebe, now deceased, married J. B. Lamberson:

Ransom, now deceased, married Celinda Yonkin;

Adam, lives on the homestead;

Rachael, married Benjamin Heiber late of Cherry;

Reuben, married Elizabeth Barber, lives in Colley;

Catharine A., deceased.

Benjamin Thrasher married Anna Hunsinger, a daughter of Barney Hunsinger of Luzerne county, and settled where his son Benjamin now lives. Their children were:

Catharine, married Wm. Kisner of Cherry;

Levi, of Cherry;

Samuel, of Colley;

Benjamin, lives on old homestead;

Noah, lives at Hunsinger's Corners in Cherry;

Bally Ann, married Fred Huff master of Cherry;

Christine, married Harvey Landback, of Colley;

Amanda, married Charles Hartzig, of Cherry;

Susan, deceased, married Benedict Ortleib of Dushore;

Samuel Thrasher married Rachael Persun and settled the farm now owned by John Biddle and to them were born three children Freeman and Hester Ann of Dushore and George.

Adam Thrasher married Hannah Dieffenbach and settled the farm now owned by Cyrus Connor. They had four children:

Elizabeth, married John Shaffer of Elimsport;

Lucinda, married Cyrus Connor;

George, died in 1863;

A child died in infancy.

Reuben Thrasher married Anna Suber and lived on the farm near Dushore now owned by his son Jacob. Their children were:

Hannah, born in 1840 and died in 1863;

George, born in 1846 and died in 1863;

Elizabeth, born in 1849, and died in 1863;

Catharine, born in 1844, and died in 1863;

Jacob, lives on the homestead.

Fredrick and Mary E. Bartch came to America from Germany about 1813, and settled in Cherry about 1824. A brother, John G. Bartch also settled here about the same time; the improvements made by the two brothers were upon lands now owned by D. E. and Charles Dieffenbach, in East Cherry. Fredrick Bartch had a Sod Gottleib who was three years old when his parents came to America. He married Sarah Suber, a daughter of Jacob Suber, of Cherry and to them were born six children;

Jacob J., of Wilmot, Bradford county;

Emeline. married Clark Fox, of Kansas;

Jesse, of Towanda, Bradford county;

Celinda, married Michael Brobst, of Montour county;

Caroline E., married Fred Swerer, of Bloomsburg, Pa.;

Delia C., now deceased, married Freeman Frye.

John Bartch married Caroline Moyer and their children were John, Fred, Gottleib, Margaret, Mrs. Eliza Albert, Mrs. Mary M. Hafer, Mrs. Barbara Mussel man and Mary Ann.

Henry Yonkin, Sr. was born May 4, 177-1 in the province of Hesse-Nassau, in or near Cassel, Germany. He married Elizabeth Haines and came to America in 1807. Prior to sailing on their long journey, as it seemed in those days, some trouble arose which caused them to be detained a year before starting. The Captain of the vessel upon which they sailed, one of those rascals that lie in wait for inexperienced travelers, defrauded them of the small capital they possessed, and upon landing they were sold to a farmer at Bethlehem to pay for their passage. They remained with this man a short time and then moved to Briar creek township, Columbia county. In 1823, they came to what was then Muncy township, Lycoming county, now Cherry township, Sullivan county. Mr. Yonkin died in June, 1851, aged seventy-seven years and his wife ten years later in 1801, aged eighty-six years. To them were born seven children:

Henry, married Barbre Hartzig;

John, married Mary Labenberg;

Elizabeth, married Henry Graifley of Cherry;

Catharine, married Christian Mosier;

Joseph, married Matilda Hoffa;

Jacob, married Elizabeth Meyer;

Peter, married Catherine Suber.

Henry Yonkin, Jr. was born at Havre, France, in 1806 and came with his parents to America. He remained with his parents in the different localities in which they lived coming to Cherry in 1824, where he purchased fifty acres of wild land of John Kunkle at $2 per acre. About 1827, he married Barbre Hartzig, a daughter of John Hartzig of Cherry. December 29, 1889, he died at the age of eighty-three years and Mrs. Yonkin died Oct. 7, 1891 aged eighty-nine years- To them were born twelve children:

John, married Loretta Bartch of Cherry;

Mary C., married William Smith now deceased.

Charles F., married Wealthy Merithew, lives in Forks;

George W., married Mary Sweeney;

Ellen, married Henry G. Huffmaster of Cherry;

William H., married Hannah Fairchild;

Jacob, died at the age of 16 years;

Emily, died at the age of 8 years;

Hannah, married Phaon Moyer of Lycoming county;

Almira, married R. C. R. Kshinka, of Cherry;

Peter J., married Elizabeth Kneller;

Edward, married Ellen Smith.

John Yonkin, 1st. was born in Briar Creek township, Columbia county in 1809. He was united in marriage to Mary Labenberg. November 26, 1891, he died aged eighty-two years and March 1, 1881, his wife died at the age of seventy-two years. They settled within the present limits of Dushore where James Cunningham now resides.

Joseph Yonkin was born in 1812 in Briar Creek township. He married Matilda Hoffa and to them was born one son Jacob H. now a furniture dealer and undertaker in Dushore, and one daughter, Matilda, married Michael Litzelman, of Sayre.

Jacob Yonkin was born Dec. 4, 1820 in Briar Creek township. He married Elizabeth Meyer and to them were born:

Jane, married J. H. Hunsinger;

Emily, married Edwin Moyer, of Dushore;

Ellen, married Thomas Schell, of Bernice;

Celinda, married Ransom Thrasher;

George, lives on the homestead in East Cherry;

Hannah, married Ralph Martin of Albany township. Peter Yonkin was born in Briar Creek township, Columbia county. He married Catharine Suber who still survives and lives with her son Joseph. To them were born six children:

Carrie, married J. K. Bird of Forks township;

Levi, of East Cherry, married Lorilla Wentcell;

Hannah, married Charles S. Sick of Cherry Mills;

Elizabeth, married Leo Sick, of Cherry;

Joseph, married Hannah Mosier;

Matilda, lives at Elmira.

Frederick Huffmaster and his son Henry came to Cherry township in 1820. Frederick Huff master and his wife Christina, were natives of Germany, coming to America in 1801. They first settled in New Jersey, and while the Turnpike was being built he and his son Henry worked upon its construction, receiving in part payment for their labor, the farm now owned by H. G. Huffmaster and a portion of the John Yonkin farm. To Frederick and Christina Huffmaster was born one son Henry and one daughter Charlotta who married a Mr. Thomas and settled at Satterfield on what is known as the Thomas lot. After her husband's death, she resided with her daughter Nancy who had married Stephen Fairchild.

Henry Huffmaster came to America with his parents when he was nine years old and while residing in New Jersey learnt the art of weaving. He married Barbara Bartch, a daughter of Frederick Bartch of Cherry. March 17, 1873, he died aged 77 years and August 3, 1868, his wife died at Mapleton, Illinois aged 70 years. To them were born:

Joseph, married Elizabeth Reeser, killed at the battle of Chancellorsville during the Civil War; Eliza, now deceased, married Rev. John Bolton, a minister of the Evangelical church; Magdalena, married Henry Stiff of Cherry;

Frederick, married Sally Thrasher;

John served in the Civil War, resides in Illinois;

Henry G., married Ellen Yonkin;

Nancy, married a Mr. Hawk;

Robinson, resides at Cold water, Kansas;

Caspar King and son William also worked on the Turnpike and received as payment for their labor the farm known as the King farm now owned by Pervical Wentzel, the Jackson estate

and Wendell Sick. They first settled at the foot of the hill on the LaPorte road on the lot now owned by the Geo. D. Jackson estate, in 1817.

John Hartzig came to Cherry in 1819 and kept a blacksmith shop for Andrew Shiner at Shinersville for some time. Later he settled on the farm now owned by Gabriel Litzelman. Both he and his wife, whose maiden name was Catharine Shiredecker, were natives of Berne, Switzerland. They came to America in 1818, and remained one year in New Jersey. Their children were

Barbre, married Henry Yonkin, of Cherry;

Caroline, married Philip Miller;

William, married Sarah Kester;

John, married Eliza Kester. To John and Eliza Hartzig were born: Charles, married Amanda Thrasher;

Catharine, married Chas. Bahr, of Cherry;

John S., married Susanna Bahr;

Hannah, married Peter Robe, of Forks township;

Louisa, deceased;

Lucinda of Cherry;

Mathias Litzelman came to America in 1828 from Elsets, France, now included in Germany. Landing at New York, he stayed there two years and then came to Berwick. While here he heard of the German settlement in Cherry, to which place he was induced to come, settling the farm now owned by his son Ralph. In 1820 while yet in Europe he married May Yenne and to them were born:

Mathias, lived at Cogan Valley, Lycoming county;

Mary, now deceased, married Joseph Ashey, of Illinois;

Elizabeth, married Wendall Richley of Cherry;

Christina, now deceased, married Nicholas Yonkin;

Lena, deceased, married Benedict Ortleib, of Dushore;

George, married Lavina Hollenback lives at Burlington;

Amelia, deceased, married Stephen Belle of Ly coming Co

Michael, married Libbie Yonkin, lives at Sayre;

Joseph, died at the age of six years;

Louisa, married Peter Mushno, of Jersey Shore;

Gabriel, married Mary White, later Eliza Bahr;

Adaline, married George Solinger, of Oregon;

Ralph, married Lydia Sick;

John, married Mary Sick.

Dennis Thall and his wife Magdaline came from Germany with their family to Philadelphia in 1816. With his sons Joseph and John he worked on the Turnpike, later purchasing and settling the farm now occupied by Levi Fulmer in Cherry in 1820. Their children were:

John, of Towanda;

Maria, married Joseph VanDeinaher of Baltimore;

Joseph, of Cherry;

Jacob, of Franklin, Bradford county;

Margaret, married a Mr. Geenig, of Philadelphia;

Mary, of Philadelphia;

James, of Cherry;

Rosa, married John Yanney, of Cherry;

Ann, married Joseph Dibling, of Dushore;

Elizabeth, married Daniel Chapman, of Evergreen;

Christina;

Amelia, married Charles Richlin of Forks township.

Joseph Thall married Margaret Shields of Cherry. To them were born four children:

John, died in the service during the Civil War;

Margaret, married Patrick Murphy;

Joseph, of Cherry;

Mary Ellen, now deceased, married Edward Walker;

James Thall married Caroline LaFavor who was of French descent. They were the parents of seven children:

Mary, married Wm. Shipman, of Oliphant, Pa.;

Caroline, known as Sister Joseph died in Oregon;

Louisa, married Michael Sullivan of Albany township;

Anna, a Sister of Charity in Kansas;

Edward, died in 1872;

Frank, of Cherry;

James, of Cherry.

Lewis Zaner came to Cherry in 1828 from Briar Creek township Columbia county, where he was born October 2, 1804, a son of Adam Zaner, 2nd, and a grandson of Adam Zaner, 1st, who came from Prussia, Germany to America about 1831 and settled in Schuykill county. He served seven years as a soldier in the Revolutionary War and lived to be nearly 100 years old. Lewis Zaner was a noted hunter killing much wild game and was elected the second sheriff of Sullivan county. He married Eve Crisher of Berks county. She died in 1883, aged 81 years, her husband surviving until 1887. To them were born nine children:

Elizabeth, married Jonathan Colley of Muncy;

Adam H., dec. married Fietta Wentzell lived at Dushore;

Elijah W., died in the service during the Civil War;

Rebecca, married Henry Whitmire of Muncy;

Hannah, married Amos Cox, of Dushore;

Levi, deceased, lived at Washingtonville, Montour Co.;

Loretta, married D. E. Dieffenbach, of Dushore;

Lewis M., killed in the Civil War;

Amanda, deceased.

Wm. Graifley came to Cherry in 1821 from Briar Creek township, Columbia county. With his sons Henry and William, he worked upon the Turnpike and took the farm now owned by the Henry Graifley estate in part payment for their labor. He came from Switzerland in 1805, settling first in Columbia county. He was the father of three children:

William, born in 1792;

Henry born in 1803;

Anna, lived at Bethlehem.

William Graifley married Rebecca, the widow of Wm. Martin, and lived on the Martin farm now owned by Lyman Baker. To them were born two daughters:

Elisabeth, married Lyman Baker;

Mary Add, now deceased, married Daniel Bahr.

Henry settled the homestead where his widow Dow resides. He married Elizabeth Yonkin and to them were born:

Catharine, died in 1896;

William, died in 1898;

Jacob, of Cherry;

Mary, lives on the homestead;

Emma, married Joseph Sick of Cherry Mills;

George D., lives on the homestead;

Lewis C., of Cherry;

Wellington C., of Cherry.

John Reeser was born in Berks county, Pa., in 1790. In 1821 he came to Cherry township, locating on the Loyalsock at Ellis's later known as the Seaman place. He was a miller by trade and in 1823, erected a gristmill on the Loyalsock creek about a half mile from Dushore on the farm now owned by Percival Wentzel. Later he settled on the farm now owned by Lewis and Wellington Graifley. The maiden name of his wife was Madeline Betts. He died Dec. 9, 1860, at the age of 70 years, and his wife January 8, 1869, at the age of 75 years. To them were born:

Daniel, now deceased, lived on the McMahon farm, later at Loyalsockville, Lycoming county;

William, became a minister of the Evangelical church;

Charles, died when small;

Jeremiah, deceased, lived at WilkesBarre;

Amos, deceased, lived at Dushore.;

John, lives in Lycoming county;

Benjamin, deceased;

Reuben, deceased, lived at Troy. Bradford county;

A. L., a merchant, of Lewisburg, Union county;

Elizabeth, married Joseph Huffmaster who was killed in the Civil War, later Eilas Smith, and later Barney Kast;

Susan, married Valentine Morter, of Bernice;

William Reeser, entered the ministry of the Evangelical church, and was engaged in that capacity, nine years, when he settled on his father's farm. Later he moved to Colley and now lives, at the age of 86 years, with his daughter, Mrs. Winfield Potter of Lopez. He married Sarah G. Martin, who was born in Columbia county in 1819, and to them were born:

Rebecca, married Chester Potter of Cameron county;

Hannah, married Alfred Hunsinger, of Colley;

Lewis, of Maryland;

Loretta, married Medes, of Maryland;

Emanuel, died in 1862;

Amanda, died in 1853;

Annie, married Winfield Potter, of Lopez;

M. W., of Colley;

Sara Jane, died in 1862.

Amos Reeser was born at the Ellis farm in 1822. On reaching his majority he conducted a hotel at the Long Pond or Lake Ganoga, later the Ellis hotel on the Loyalsock where he was born. From this place he moved to Dushore where he conducted a hotel until 1886. In 1846 he married Rebecca Dieffenbach, a daughter of Jacob Dieffenbach. Of this union seven children were born:

Angeline, married Hiram Nichols of Sciota Vale;

Lyman, died when eighteen months old;

Valina, married George Honnetter, of Dushore;

Emeline, now deceased, married William Scureman;

Mary, married Barney Weiss, lives at Waverly, N. Y.;

Bernice, married William McHenry, of Dushore;

John D., of Dushore.

Joseph Litzelswope married Mary Ann Kania while they yet lived in Germany. In 1817, they came from Baden, Germany to America, settling first at Berwick. He worked on the Turnpike, taking in pay the farm now owned by his grandson, Joseph Litzelswope. Here they settled in 1820 and to them were born:

Mary Ann, deceased, married Cornelius Harrington;

Maria, married Anthony Borde, of Williamsport;

Catharine, married Daniel Reeser, of Williamsport;

Elizabeth, deceased, married Frederick Trunt;

Susanna, married George Baumgartner;

Anthony, married Catharine Bahl;

Caroline, married Peter Bahl.

Anthony married Catharine Bahl and settled on the homestead. Their children were:

Josephine, married Peter Haines of Williamsport;

Joseph, married Anna Weisbrod, lives on homestead;

Elizabeth, dec., married Charles Yetter of Williamsport

Emma, lives at Williamsport;

Anna, married Michael Rung of Philadelphia;

John, of Yellowstone Park, Colorado;

Ella, married Frank Lusch, of Dushore.

Joseph Baumgartner came from Baden, Germany in 1828, and settled the farm where Lewis Baumgartner now lives. While still in Germany, he married Urse Kania, a sister of Mrs. Joseph Litzelswope. To them were born:

George, killed at the battle of Chancellorsville;

Matilda, deceased, married Conrad Cook, of Cherry;

Frank, deceased, lived on the homestead;

Barbara, married Mathias Litzelman of Cogan Valley;

William, died when a young man;

Alexander, killed in the lumber woods at Greenwood;

Conrad, deceased, of Cogan House, Lycoming county;

Mary Ann, married a Mr. Smith, of Canton;

Daniel, killed in the Civil War;

Anthony, of Cogan House Lycoming county;

Adam;

Loretta. married a Mr. McCracken, of Lycoming county;

George married Susanna Litzelswope, of Cherry and settled the farm where Addison Yonkin now lives. He was killed at the battle of Chancellorsville. To them were born:

Loretta, married Henry Cobby of Iowa;

Joseph, of Williamsport;

Elizabeth, deceased;

Frank, of Iowa;

Edward, deceased;

George, of Illinois;

Maria, married Frank McHenry, of Waverly.

Frank Baumgartner, now deceased, married Phoebe Walburn, and settled on the homestead. To them were born:

Frank, of Towanda;

Adam, died in 1902;

Mary, deceased;

Edward, of Mildred;

Lewis, resides on the homestead;

Maurice, of Sunbury;

Nelson, of Sunbury.

John and Frederick Bahl came to America about 1829 from Elsets, France, now a province of Germany. They settled on the farm now owned by John Shaffer. Frederick never married. John served 12 years as a soldier in Napoleon's army, being a member of his body guard. He married Elena Fishwenger and to them were born:

Michael, deceased, of Forks township;

Catherine, married Anthony Litzelswope;

Peter, deceased, of Dushore.

Peter Bahl married Caroline Litzelswope and settled on a farm at Cherry Mills now owned by the estate. Later he moved to Dushore and purchased a lot on German Street where he erected a handsome residence. He died in 1893. To Mr. and Mrs. Bahl were born:

Ellen Mary, married Wm, Smith of Cherry Mills;

Joseph, of Nebraska;

Henrietta, lives with her mother;

Emma, married Joseph Kaufman, of Philadelphia;

John, of Denver City, Colorado;

Sophia, married Frank Cook, of Owego;

Charles, of Dushore;

Julius, of Dushore;

Fred, of Kent, Ohio.

Cornelius Harrington came from County Kerry, Ireland to America in 1824 and settled on the Fred Saxer farm in 1828. He married his first wife while yet in Ireland and to them was born one son Jerry of New York. He worked on the canal near Berwick and after settling in Cherry, he married Mary Litzelswope, a daughter of Joseph Litzelswope, of Cherry. Later, he purchased 400 acres of land at a tax sale in which was included the farm belonging to the C. J. Harrington estate. Their children were:

Mary Ann, married James Sheedy, of Overton;

Margaret, married Wm. Keefe of Troy, Bradford Co.;

Eliza, married John Farrell, of Dushore;

Catharine, deceased, married Joseph Ambs;

John, died in infancy;

Cornelius, deceased, married Eliza Gahan;

Susan, married Wm. O'Connell of Elmira;

Joseph, of Lestershire, N. Y.;

Ellen, married Joseph Brogan, of Dushore;

Hannah, died when young;

James H., of Dushore;

Emma, married Dennis Whalon of Colorado.

Joseph Solinger came to Cherry about 1829, and settled on the farm where Rush Huff master now lives. While fording the Loyalsock at Kingdale, he was accidentally drowned. He married Mary Borde and to them were born:

Mary, married Joseph Marshal of Cherry;

Frances, married Augustus Sick of Forks;

Elena, married Andrew Touschner;

Katie, married a Mr. Golden, of Elmira;

George, lives in the state of Washington;

Joseph, of South America;

Emma, married a Mr. Ward of WilkesBarre.

Jacob Kester was probably the first man to permanently settle in Cherry township. Family traditions claim that he and his wife whose maiden name was Katharine Knubaharin, came from Berwick to Cherry township in 1813 on the first Susquehanna and Tioga Turnpike and settled on lands now owned by Charles Bahr and Benjamin Kester. This is fully borne out by some of the early settlers who have said that Mr. Kester had a large farm cleared and fruit trees of considerable size growing thereon when they came to this section. To them were born two daughters, Eliza and Sarah who married John and Wm. Hartzig respectively and two sons, Joseph and Charles.

Joseph Kester married Catharine Miller and settled on the homestead. To them were born:

Twins, who died in infancy;

Josiah, lives in Bradford county;

Ellen, married John Nevil, of Forks township;

Joseph, of Cherry township;

Catharine, deceased, married Jonas Hunsinger;

Charles, of Forks township;

Sarah, married John Hibbard of Forks township;

Benjamin, lives on the homestead,

Charles Kinsley came from Germany about 1833 and settled where Wm. McHenry lives, now a part of Dushore borough. Their only child was Charles Kinsley, Jr., who settled in East Cherry where his son Jacob now lives. He married Mary Bahr, a daughter of John Bahr and their children were:

John, killed in the Civil War;

Charles, killed in the Civil War;

Jacob, of Cherry;

William, of Cherry;

Louis, of Cherry;

Mary, died at the age of 18 yeers;

Caroline, married Clinton Dieffenbach.

John S. Green, came from Tennessee to Cherry township in 1832. The Greens were related to the Craigs and were of Irish descent. They had been engaged in the merchant marine in which occupation they had amassed large fortunes. They had taken a very prominent part with the colonies in the Revolutionary War and also distinguished themselves m the War of 1812. After the death of Mr. Green's father, the estate was divided, about 30,000 acres of timber lands, in Sullivan, Lycoming and Northumberland counties being given to John S. Green. The Sullivan county lands were principally located in East Cherry except some tracts in the vicinity of Campbellsville, in Forks township. Mr. Green came to Cherry with the intention of starting a colony and that section of Cherry township has always been known as the Green settlement. His colony did not prove a success and ho realized very little out of the lands left him by the estate. The land he owned was very poor and the early settlers preferred more fertile soil; the taxes were heavy and much of the land was sold at tax sales. Mr. Green gave each of his children a tract of land for a farm. In 1855 Mr. Green was elected county treasurer and moved to LaPorte, where he lived until he died in 1876 at the age of 82 years, lie was married to Elizabeth Henley and their children were:

Margaret, married Lewis Holmes of Cherry;

Eliza E., married George McNeal of Cherry;

Edmund Craig, married Anna Heisz, of Cherry;

Walter C., married Marion Wolcott, lived in Bradford Co.

Virginia, married John T. Brewster of Susquehanna Co.;

John H , of LaPorte, died in 1899;

W. H. D. of Towanda, now of Philadelphia;

Esther, married Frank Lothrup of Bradford county;

Anna, married Frank B. Hill of LaPorte.

Lewis Holmes came from Massachusetts to the vicinity of Benton and from there to Cherry in 1847 when a young man and engaged in teaching school. He married Margaret Green and in 1848 located on the farm now owned by his son Carr Holmes. To them were born:John G. of Luzerne;

William, deceased lived at, Dushore;

Edmund, of Mildred;

Elizabeth married H. B. Vaughn, lives on the McNeal farm in the Green settlement;

Carr, of Cherry;

Henry, of Powell, Bradford county;

Martha, married George Schoonover of Binghamton:

Augusta, married Joseph O'Neil of Cherry.

Joseph Fulmer, a native of Frankfort, Germany came with his family to Lehigh county and from there to Cherry in 1825, locating on the James Drugan farm. His children were:

Henry, of Cherry;

Joseph, of Wisconsin;

Peter, of Owego, N. Y.

William, of Shrewsbury township;

Nathan, of Bradford county;

Catharine, deceased.

Henry Fulmer married Lydia Shaffer and located on the farm now owned by Thomas Fennel, east of Dushore. He lost his property through others, in the building of the Sullivan and State Line railroad. He then went to lumbering at Thorndale and later purchased the farm on which his son Levi now lives, He was born in 1817 and died in 1899. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Fulmer were:

William of Picture Rocks;

Ellen, died when 3 years old;

John, died when 1 year old;

Helen, died when 5 years of age;

Louisa, married Robert Taylor of California;

Mary Ann, married Allen Taylor of California;

Caroline, married Gabriel Bowman of Colley;

Emma, married George Hartzig, of Cherry Mills;

Levi, lives on the homestead;

Three other children died when quite young.

Joseph Bachman was a native of Bavaria, Germany, where he learned the miller's trade. When a young man he emigrated to America and secured employment on a mill at Dushore. He married Sarah Bahr, a native of Berks county and soon after settled on a farm he had purchased from a Mr. Heiber, and upon which he erected a two-story brick residence. To Mr. and Mrs. Bachman were born:

Jacob, who died in infancy;

John, died at the age of 27 years;

Loretta, married Nathan Persun, of Dushore;

Caroline C., married Jacob J. Suber of Cherry;

Jacob Suber and his wife whose maiden name was Mary Fraunfelder settled in Cherry at an early date on the farm now owned by John Utz. His father Jacob Suber was a soldier under General Washington in the Revolutionary War. With Jacob Suber and his wife came their young child, Benjamin who was born in Berks county in 1820. After Mr. Suber's death, his widow married Jacob Hoffa of Cherry. In 1844, Benjamin Suber married Caroline Hoffa, a daughter of Jacob Hoffa and to them were born nine children:

Mary M., deceased, married Benjamin Thrasher;

Jacob J., of Cherry married Caroline C. Bachman;

Catherine, deceased, married Jacob Kinsley of Cherry;

Hannah S., married Louis Saxe of Bradford county;

Elizabeth L., married Elisha Wilson of Bradford county;

George F., of Cherry, married Emma Hopkin?;

Adam R., died when young;

Daniel, married Emma Peterson, lives on homestead;

Benjamin L., died when young.

John Heiber who was born in Wurtemberg Germany in 1805, emigrated to America when young. In 1828 he was married to Margaret Steiner who was born at Wurtemberg in 1794. They made their home at Philadelphia until 1832 when they came to Cherry township and where for ten years they lived in a log cabin after which they erected a frame house. Mr. Heiber died in 1863 and his wife in 1878. To them were born six children:

Emanuel G., of Cherry;

John, died in infancy;

John, 2nd., married Mary Retthurg;

Lena, married Henry Ring of Bradford county;

H. Esther, married Goodwin Persun of Picture Rocks;

Benjamin, killed by lightning in 1895.

John Steiner of Wurtemberg, Germany came to America in 1818 and settled in Carbon county. While still in Germany, he married Margaret Stoltz, a native of Switzerland. In 1837, they came to Cherry township and to them were born:

Emma, who died in Germany;

John, married a Miss Stewart;

Catharine, married Baldwin Millheim;

Elizabeth, married a Mr. Von Buchwalts;

Mollie, married Philip Klunt;

Margaret, married John Heiber;

Susanna, married a Mr. Chiller;

Lena, married John Bartch;

Savilla, married a Mr. Arth;

Jacob, married Kate Gerhart;

Barnhart, married Sarah Shaffer.

Barnhart Steiner was married to Sarah Shaffer in 1839, a daughter of Jonathan Shaffer, who came to Cherry in 1839. Mrs. Steiner still lives with her son Emanuel. Their children were:

Matilda, died when 15 years old;

John, died in infancy;

Sarah, married John Meyers, of Elk county;

J. Emanuel, lives at home;

Susan, married Adam Nagle of Towanda;

Savilla, married Alexander Kanons of Columbia county;

Mary H., married and lives in Carbon county;

Barnhart, died at the age of 1-1 years;

Caroline, died at the age of 10 years.

Christian Weaver was a wheelwright by trade and came to Cherry township from Luzerne county April 1, 1847. To them were born seven children:

Lydia, married George Thrasher:

Rosanna, married Christian Benninger;

Anthony, married Mary Dieffenbach;

Barnhart, married Mary Thrasher;

George, married Margaret Eagly;

Jacob, married Eliza Conley;

Margaret, married George Eberling.

Barnhart Weaver settled on the farm now owned by Fred Saxer. To them were born nine children:

William, of Freidensville, Lehigh county;

Elmer, of Cherry;

George, of Elimsport, Lycoming county;

Nathan, of Cherry;

Fred, of Freidensville, Lehigh county;

Delilah, married Augustus Miller of Washington state:

Jane, married John Biddle, of Cherry;

Anna, married Fred Saxer, of Cherry;

Lydia, married Dell Tuttle of Potter county. Philip Heverly came from Auburn, Susquehanna county to Overton, Bradford county, in 1827, where his cousin had previously settled in what i8 known as the Heverly settlement. The Heverlys were of German descent and first settled in Lehigh county in the first quarter of the eighteenth century. Mr. Heverly remained at Overton a few years and then returned to Susquehanna county. Two years later, he again came to Overton after which in about 1835 he moved to Cherry township where he died in 1880 aged 77 years. He married Katie Thrasher and to them were born four children:

Solon, deceased, married Caroline Graff;

Reuben, married Elizabeth Graff;

Henry, died when about 15 years old;

Barbara, died when young.

Valentine Kneller came from Germany when 18 years of age, his brother Nicholas accompanying him and each settling a farm in East Cherry about 1833.

Wm. Lawrence was one of the first to settle the Turnpike north of Dushore, coming from Augusta township, Northumberland county, where he was born in 1805. In 1824 he married Eliza Ladd, a daughter of Horatio Ladd who with his father, Ephraim Ladd, settled in Albany township in 1800. Mr. Lawrence bought 48 acres of land and erected a house in 1825. He was one of the first school directors of Cherry township and one of the first county commissioners of the county. In 1847, his wife died and in 1854 he moved to Bradford county where he again married. To him and his first wife were born:

Ann, deceased, married Andrew Jackson of Dushore;

Celinda, married Freeman Wilcox of New Albany;

John H., of Dushore;

Fidelia, deceased.

Jacob Hoffa came from Schuykill county to Cherry Apr. 1,1827 and settled on the farm now owned by Frank Waples, He married Catharine Swallow, a cousin of 8. C. Swallow of State Prohibition fame. Their children were:

Elizabeth, married John Dieffenbach;

Matilda, married Joseph Yonkin;

Catharine, married Thomas Messersmith;

Caroline, married Benjamin Suber;

Mary, married John Meyer;

Daniel, settled on homestead, later moved to Lycoming;

Jacob, of Cherry, died July 31, 1903;

John, of Dushore, a veteran of the Civil War.

Jeremiah Darby Deegan came to Cherry township in 1833, settling on the farm afterward owned by his son Col. James Deegan now by the Cadden estate. He was born in county Kildare, Ireland, in 1783 and married Alicia Birmingham who was born in Dublin in 1799. They came to America in 1827 remaining for a time at Easton, Pa., and then removing to Kingston, Now Jersey from which place he came to Cherry township. He died in 1851 and his wife in 1886. Their children were:

Mary, deceased, married Patrick Mooney;

James, deceased;

Catharine, married John Groves, of Leadville, Colorado;

William, born in Easton, died in infancy;

John, deceased, served three years in the Civil War;

Jeremiah, of Dushore a Captain in the Civil War;

William, born in Cherry, died in infancy;

Thomas, died of wounds received at Fredericksburg;

William II., of Dushore, died in 1901.

James Deegan was born in Ireland in 1819 and came with his parents to America in 1827 and to Cherry in 1833. At the beginning of hostilities in the Civil War, he raised a volunteer compa. ny, receiving the rank of captain. For meritorious service during the war he was promoted to the rank of colonel. Returning to private life, he received many honors from his neighbors and friends, serving as justice of the peace, associate judge two terms and a member of the state legislature one term. He died at Hughesville Sept. 24, 1882.

James Dunn name to Cherry township in 1833 and located on the farm now owned by his son William. Mr. Dunn was a native of county Kildare, Ireland. He married Dorothy Gilmore, a Scotch Irish lady. They came to New Jersey in 1832 and from there to Cherry in 1833. Their children were:

Peter, deceased, of Forks;

Margaret, married Conrad Baumgartner;

Mary, married Joseph Harney of Albany township;

John, killed at the battle of Fort Harrison in Civil War;

William, lives on the homestead;

F. P., of Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania;

James, of Cameron county;

Mr. Dunn was married again after his wife died to the widow of Cornelius Harrington, and to them were born:

Ellen, of Philadelphia;

Maurice, of Dushore.

Hugh McMahon came with his family from Ireland to New Jersey and from that place to Cherry township in 1833 settling on the farm near Dushore now owned by Dr. M. E. Herrmann. His children were:

Rosa, of Ireland;

James, deceased, of New Jersey;

Robert, deceased, of Dushore;

Elizabeth, married John Collins of Bradford county;

Michael, deceased, of Cherry;

Mary Ann, married Patrick Brislin of Cherry;

Catharine, married a Mr. McMahon of Towanda.

Barnhart Middendorf was a native of Prussia, Germany. He came to America when a young man and after spending some time in various sections located on a farm about two miles north of Dushore in 1840 or soon after that time. He married Caroline Richley and to them were born eight children:

Anthony, of Cherry;

Joseph, of Wyalusing, Bradford county;

Mary, deceased;

John, lives on the homestead;

Anna, married John Waples, of Bet-nice;

Henry, of Wyalusing;

Frank, of Sayre;

Lena, married George Dohm of Sayre.

William Martin was born in Columbia county. He was a son of Roger Martin, a native of Wales, who toward the close of the eighteenth century came to America and settled in Columbia county, married and was the father of six children of whom William was the eldest. William married Rebecca Gortner a daughter of Jacob Gortner of Muncy Creek township. He came with his family to Cherry township in 1826, locating on the farm now owned by Lyman Baker. He died in 1826 and his widow later married William Graifley. The children of Mr. and Mrs. William Martin were:

Sarah, married William Reeser of Colley;

Lewis, deceased of Cherry;

John W. of Dushore;

William, deceased of Iowa;

Rebecca, who died in infancy.

Stephen Murphy came from county Wexford, Ireland, to Cherry township about 1840 and settled on the farm now owned by his son, Stephen Murphy. He married a Miss O'Neil in Ireland and their children were:

Thomas, of Cherry;

Adam, of Bradford county;

Stephen, of Albany township, Bradford county;

John, of New Albany;

Anastasia, married Anthony Prendegast;

Mary, married Daniel McCormick of Cherry;

Margaret, married Peter McCormick of Cherry.

Thomas Murphy was born in county Wexford, Ireland and accompanied his father, Stephen Murphy, to Cherry in 1840. He married Mary Parle and they settled on the farm now owned by their son, Stephen D. Murphy. To them were born:

Adam, died in I860;

Anastasia, of Athens;

Margaret, married George Kaier of Dushore;

John, of Leadville, Colorado;

Mary Ann, married Edward Farrell of Cherry;

Catharine, married William Murray of Cherry;

Dennis, of Pittsburg;

Stephen D., lives on the homestead.'

In 1840, Patrick Brislin, a native of Ireland, settled' on a farm near Cornelius Harrington's, which had previously been owned by a German named Trembler. In 1841 he married Mary Ann McMahon, a daughter of Hugh McMahon and their children were:

Hugh, of Cherry;

Anna, deceased, married Barney O'Hearn of Cherry;

John, of Cherry;

Eugene, died about 50 years ago;

Mary, deceased;

Rose, died in 1863;

Kate, deceased.

Miles Burns married Margaret Hanley in Ireland and they came from that country to Cherry township in 1844 with two children. They settled on the farm now owned by Matthew Burns and to them were born nine children:

Jane, married Benjamin Vandyke of Albany township;

Mary, married James Maccacy of Bradford county;

Patrick, of Punxsutawney;

Catharine, married James Collins of Williamsport;

Margaret, married Patrick Crossen of Scranton;

Matthew J., lives on the homestead;

Bridget, married Peter Deegan, of Dushore;

Miles, of Albany township, Bradford county;

Anna, married Joseph Thall.

Matthew Burns, a native of Ireland and a brother of Miles Burns, settled in Cherry in 1844 on the farm until recently owned by the estate of Miles A. Burns. He was married at Towanda to Mary Clarey and to them were born:

Patrick, of Cherry;

Jane, married Daniel Scanlin of Cherry;

Margaret, deceased of New York;

Miles A., deceased, of Cherry;

Thomas, died when a young man.

Thomas Scanlin came from Ireland and worked on the North Branch canal, after which he returned to Ireland and married Johanna Clancey. They settled in Cherry in 1842 on the farm now owned by the D. W. Scanlin heirs. Unto them were born:

Michael, deceased;

Mary, married D. O. Donovan of Sayre;

Daniel W., deceased, of Cherry;

Catharine, married Sylvester Spaulding of Elmira.

Sarah, Sister Mary Eugenia;

Lizzie, deceased, married Miles A. Burns;

Patrick, deceased;

Hannah, married John Pyne of Mildred;

John K. Farrell was a native of Ireland, and settled in Cherry in 1845 on the farm now owned by his son, W. L. Farrell. Previous to his settlement in Cherry he worked upon the construction of the North Branch canal where a large number of his countrymen were employed. He married Anna Dunn, a sister of James Dunn one of the early settlers of Cherry township and to them wore born:

James, deceased;

Margaret, married John Whitehead of Waverly, N. Y.;

Mary, married William Cook of Dushore;

John, of McKean county;

Peter, of Cross Forks, Potter county;

Patrick, of Elk county;

Anna, of Athens, Bradford county;

Thomas, of Cole Grove Pennsylvania;

Catharine, of Rochester, New York;

William L., of Cherry township.

James McMahon was born in county Down, Ireland. He came to America in 1844 and worked as a ship carpenter in the New England States and Florida until 1851 when he purchased the farm on which he now lives. He has been county commissioner two terms. In 1853 he married Ann Brogan and to them were born

John, lives on the homestead;

Mary, married Stephen Murphy of Albany township;

Francis, of Cherry.

James Fitzsimmons was born in the county Down Ireland, and came to America with his brother-in-law, James McMahon in 1844. He worked as ship carpenter in the New England states

and Florida until 1853 when he settled in Cherry township. He married Mary Ann McMahon. They had no children. He died in 1893 and his wife in 1896.

Lawrence Murray was a native of county Kildare, Ireland. He came To Now York in 1838 and while there married Esther McDermott, also a native of Ireland. In 1847 they settled in Cherry on the farm now owned by his son William Murray. He died in 1865, his wife still surviving aged 83 years. To Mr. and Mrs. Murray were born seven children:

Mary, married W. F. Holl, of Philadelphia;

Anna, married William Dunn of Cherry;

William, lives on the homestead;

Catherine, deceased;

Lawrence, of Pueblo, Colorado;

M. D., of Cripple Creek, Colorado;

James B., of Cripple Creek, Colorado.

Patrick Gahan was born in county Kerry, Ireland. He settled on the farm now owned by Thomas W. Gahan in 1835. He married Hannah Fitzgerald and to them were born:

Elizabeth, married Cornelius Harrington;

Thomas W., lives on homestead;

Morris, of Williamsport;

Mary, married John Reilly of Montana;

William, deceased.

Morris Gahan came with his brother Patrick and purchased 50 acres of land adjoining his brother's farm. The farm is now owned by Thomas W. Gahan. He married Ellen Lynch of Bradford county and to them were born:

Patrick, lives in one of the western states;

Thos. F., attorney and ex-county supt. of Williamsport;

Elizabeth, deceased;

Morris, of Elmira;

John, of Bradford county;

Margaret, married James Harrington of Dushore;

Catharine, married Thomas Pyne of Towanda.

Patrick Walsh was born in county Mayo, Ireland. When a young man he with three brothers went to Canada. Later he left his brothers and came to Pennsylvania, settling in Cherry about 1840. He married Mary Gilispie. He died in October 1894 and his wife in 1897, to them having been born eight children:

Mark, died in 1896 at Bet-nice;

Mary Ann, married Wm. Gilfoy of Bradford county;

Michael, died about 19 years ago;

Peter, died in 1901 in Cherry;

Bridget, married M, P. Gallagher;

James, lives on homestead;

William of Lopez, Pa.;

John, of Leadville, Colorado.

Anthony Lemmer was born at Elsets. Germany. He came to America and worked in the coal regions where he married Christiana Boyer. They moved to Cherry township in 1845 on the farm which he purchased from a Mr. Raburg and which is now owned by Anthony Rohey. Mr. and Mrs. Lemmer had two children:

Mary, deceased, married John Mosier;

Sarah, married Anthony Rohey.

James Murphy was born in county Kerry, Ireland. He came to America and settled in Cherry township in 1841. He married Ellen Minahan and their children were:

Mary, deceased;

Nora, married Hugh Powderly;

Catharine, deceased, married John Powderly;

Daniel, of Cherry;

Patrick, of Cherry.

James Gainer was born in county Longford, Ireland. He lived in Ireland until 1829 when he came to New York and married Bridget Fenner of that city. Three years later he returned to Ireland and about 1836 came to Philadelphia, afterward living in Berks and later in Bradford county. He came to Cherry Mills in 1841 and located on the farm later owned by his son Thomas He died in 1883 and his wife in 1869.

Thomas Gainer married Margaret Cullen of Bradford county in 1856. He died in 1898 and his wife in 1867. Their children were:

James S., lives on the homestead;

David, died in infancy;

Mary, died in infancy;

Mary Ann, died at the age of 26 years;

Peter, died at the age of 11 years;

Catharine, married Thomas Doyle:

Maggie, died at Buffalo, N. Y. aged 29 years. John Doyle was born in county Wexford Ireland in 1798. He came to America when a young man and located on the farm now owned by his son Thomas in 1846. He married Margaret (Conmey) Sweeney, the widow of Martin Sweeney. To them were born five children:

James, of Montana;

Thomas, lives on the homestead;

Andrew, died in 1866;

John, of Arizona;

Michael, died in 1882.

Conrad Weisbrod was born in Cohessa, Germany, June 1,1819. a son of Henry and Lena (Item) Weisbrod. He served five years in the German army and was a weaver by trade. While yet in his native land, he married Elizabeth Snyder who was born in Germany in 1821, and in 1842 they came to America, settling in Cherry, first on a farm which they rented of Philip Miller and a year later on the farm now owned by his son Edward. Their children were:

Margaret, deceased;

Edward, lives on the homestead;

Catharine, married Charles Weisbrod of Cherry;

John, of Cherry township;

Anna, married Joseph Litzelswope of Cherry;

Elizabeth, died at the age of 11 years;

Four children died in infancy.

Martin Barth was born in Hessen-Dramstradt, Germany in 1801. He married Catharine Tremner. a native of the same place and in 1831, they came to America, landing in Philadelphia. About 1839 he came to Cherry township locating on the farm now owned by Henry Stahl. In 1841 he sold his farm to Philip Stahl and purchased a tract of land now owned by John Litzelman. To Mr. and Mrs. Barth were born six children:

Elizabeth, deceased, of Philadelphia;

John, deceased, of Cherry, later of Bucks county. Pa.;

Mary, married John Ayer, of Philadelphia;

Charles, of Cherry Mills;

Elias, deceased;

Lewis M., of Dushore.

Henry Rinebold was born in Lehigh county and came from Mifflin county to Cherry in 1833. He married Mary Magdalena West of Coopersburg, Pa., and to them were born:

Lavina, married Samuel Fause of Picture Rocks;

William, lives on the homestead.

Anna, married George Bender of Forks township;

Mary, married Solomon Hess, later Edward Diggin;

Elias, of Dewart, Pennsylvania;

Henry, lives on the homestead;

Samuel, died in 1870;

Hannah, married Daniel Brobst of Proctor, Lycoming Co.

Charles Sick was born in Baden, Germany in 1315. He was a shoemaker by trade and came to America in 1836, locating first at Camden, New Jersey where he worked at his trade three years. In 1839 he came to Cherry township purchasing 71 acres of land, near Cherry Mills. Mr. Sick was a son of Joseph Sick of Prussia and his mother's maiden name was Rinebold. A sister of Charles Sick came to America and married a Mr. Seifred of Philadelphia, and a brother whose descendants are quite numerous settled in Steuben county, New York. In 1840 Charles Sick married Hannah Reinfred who was born in Germany and was brought to America by her parents when an infant. She died in 1863 and Mr. Sick in 1877. They had thirteen children:

Charles, of Cherry Mills;

Caroline, married Henry Stahl of Cherry Mills;

Joseph, of Cherry Mills;

Leo, deceased, of Cherry township;

Lydia, married Ralph Litzelman of Cherry township;

Wendell, of Dushore;

Mary, married John Litzelman, of Cherry township;

Hannah, married Joseph Cook, of Dushore;

Augustine, deceased, of Forks township;

Rosina, married Edward Weisbrod, of Cherry township;

Anna S., married John Weisbrod of Cherry township;

Julius, of Nordmont, Davidson township;

William, of Overton township, Bradford county.

Wendell Richley was born in Germany in 1818 and came to Cherry in 1840 settling on the farm near Cherry Mills now owned by his son Michael Richley. In 1848, he married Elizabeth Litzelswope and to them were born ten children:

Mary, married Fred Broschart, of Overton township;

Lizzie, married Leonard Broschart of Cherry township;

Gabriel, of Albany township, Bradford county;

Adaline, married Frank Ambs of Albany township;

Louisa, married James Murray of Ringdale, LaPorte twp.

Florence, married Chas. Cook of Cherry Mills;

Tilla, married Chas. McCarty of Ulster, Bradford county -T

Frank, of Albany township, Bradford county;

Michael, lives on the homestead;

Martha, lives at home.

Conrad Cook was born at Philadelphia and settled on the farm near Cherry Mills now occupied by his son John Cook about 184O. He married Matilda Baumgartner who died in 1900, Mr. Cook surviving his wife until 1902. To them were born ten children:

William, of Dushore;

Maria, deceased, married John Frenndal of Philadelphia;

Amanda, deceased, of Philadelphia;

Mary, lives at home;

Joseph, deceased, of Dushore;

Frank, of Owego, New York; . ,

Charles, of Cherry Mills;

John, lives on the homestead;

Two children died in infancy.

Philip Stahl was born May 1, 1797, near Kaisers-Lantern, New Bavaria, Germany, He married Elizabeth Hein who war, born at the same place August 25, 1802. While living in Germany, the two oldest daughters, Mary and Tetronilla were born. They emigrated to America in 1836 and while crossing the Atlantic between Havre, France and New York, the third child Wilhelmina was born. They landed at New York in the latter part of August and through the aid of an employment bureau, Mr. Stahl obtained work upon the Lehigh canal near Mauch Chunk. Here he remained one year and then moved with his employer to WilkesBarre, where he lived nearly four years and worked upon the construction of the WilkesBarre and White Haven railroad until its completion. While residing at WilkesBarre the fourth daughter, Catherine was born in March, 1839. In May, 1841, he with his family purchased the improvements of Martin Barth on the farm now owned by his son Henry Stahl. Here he resided until his death in February, 1864. his wife surviving him until November 14, 1867. They had eight children:

Mary, died May 1898, married David Mason of Monroeton;

Tetronilla, married Michael Struppler of Herricksville, Bradford county in 1865;

Wilhelmina, died in March, 1S64, married Michael Struppler of Herricksville in March, 1855;

Catharine, married Jonathan Shaffer, in March, 1858;

Henry, lives on the homestead;

Three children died in infancy.

Joseph Weisbrod came from Germany to Philadelphia in 1830 where he married Elizabeth Reinfred. They came to Cherry township in 1839 settling the farm now owned by Valentine Rohe. Their children were: .

Mary, married William Snipp of Bridgeport, Pa.;

Rosanna, dec., married; Michael Walker of Philadelphia;

Joseph, of Cherry township;

Louisa, married Valentine Rohe, of Cherry;

Charles, of Cherry township;

Catharine, married John Rahm of Cherry township;

Alex., of Cherry;

Julia, married S. Mull of Bridgeport, Pennsylvania.

Valentine Rohe came from Germany to Pottsville in 1832 or 1833, accompanied by his wife whose maiden name was Elizabeth Wagner arid their two oldest children, Catharine and Margaret. They remained at Pottsville four or five years during which time Peter and Magdalena were born. In 1837 they came to Cherry and settled where Andrew Rohe now lives. Their children were:

Catharine, married Christopher Rahm of Cherry;

Margaret, married Nicholas Ambs of Cherry;

Peter, of Forks township;

Magdalena, married George Saxer of Dushore;

Hannah, married Henry Knavely;

Valentine, of Cherry township;

Andrew, lives on the homestead;

Mary, married John Evetts.

Philip Miller came from Germany to Cherry in 1837 and located on the farm now owned by Anthony Middendorf. He died in 1871. He was married to Mary Salina Hartzig, a daughter of John Hartzig, an early settler of Cherry. To them were born:

Anna, married Percival Wentzel of Cherry township;

Louisa, married Lewis Snider of Towanda;

Augustus, of Washington state;

Henry, died in Washington;

Louis P., of Washington;

Lavina, married Washington Hunsinger later S. Lewis;

Julietta, married W. W. Jenn of Washington;

Guilford, of Washington;

Albert, of Montana. .

Jonathan Shaffer was born in Northumberland county in 1788 and came to Cherry in 1839, settling on the farm now owned by his son George. In 1816, he married Sarah Gable who was born in 1794 at Tamaqua, Pennsylvania, and to them were born:

Catharine, married Peter Parr of Lee settlement;

Joseph, died in the Civil War;

Sarah, married Barney Steiven of Cherry;

Mary, married Henry Shrimp of Forks township;

Christena, deceased, married Frank Noles of Wilmot;

Lydia, married Henry Fulmer, of Cherry;

Charles, of Forks township, died in the Civil War;

George, lives on the homestead;

Jonathan, of Forks, died July 20, 1903.

Patrick Farrell, of county Longford, Ireland, came to America about 1834. He was married in Ireland to Bridget Kinsley and they came with their two oldest children to America about 1834. He was married in Ireland to Bridget Kinsley and they came to America with their two oldest children landing at Quebec, Canada. In 1840 they came to Cherry purchasing of a Mr. Lyon the improvements on the farm near Dushore now owned by his son. James K. Mr. Farrell died in 1865 aged 64 years. To Mr. and Mrs. Farrell were born seven boys:

Thomas, deceased, of Cherry;

John H., of Dushore;

James K., of Cherry;

Francis, of Corning, New York;

Andrew, deceased, of California;

Peter, of Corning, New York;

Ambrose, deceased, of Lopez.

Jacob Wentzel, a native of Berks county, is a member of the large family of Went/els which are numerous in the south eastern part of Pennsylvania. He came to Cherry in 1836 and settled on the farm near Dushore which he purchased from John Reeser and which is now owned by his son Percival. He married Susanna Bahr, a daughter of John Bahr of Cherry and to them were born three children:

Benneville, deceased, of Cherry;

Fietta, married Adam Zaner, of Dushore;

Percival, lives on the homestead.

Patrick Devanney was born in county Sligo, Ireland about 1801 or 1802. When a young man, he came with his family to Berwick, having been married in Ireland to Mary Boland. In 1849f he came to Cherry township and settled on the farm near Cherry Mills now owned by his son Owen. Mr. Devanney died in 1879 aged 75 years and Mrs. Devanney died in 1880 aged about 75 years. Their children were:

Alice, died in 1869;

Owen, lives on the homestead;

John, died in infancy.

Michael Sweeney was born in July, 1802, in county Sligo, Ireland, a son of Owen and Catharine (Hebren) Sweeney. He married Catharine Sweeney who was also born in county Sligo, but who was not related to him. In 1830, they came to America landing at Montreal, Canada, He spent a year in Maine and some time in New Jersey. Later he moved to Greene, Chenango county, New York and in 1836, came to Bradford county. He owas employed upon the building of the Chenango and North Branch canals. In 1842, he came to Cherry, settling on Ringer Hill. He died February 14, 1895, his wife having died June 24, 1877. To them were born seven children:

Mary;

Owen, lives near Cherry Mills;

Martin, of Cherry;

Ann, died at the age of 18 months;

Michael, of Cherry;

Patrick, of Jefferson county;

Ellen, married Thomas Lavell, of Walla Walla, Wash.

George Hunsinger came to Cherry township and settled on Ringer Hill in 181i>. He had previously lived at Berwick and from there bad moved to the Genesee country in New York but finding the fever and ague prevalent there, he returned and came to Sullivan county. As is stated in the history of Colley township, there is some dispute about the origin of the family as to whether they are of French or German descent. In 1823, Mr. Hunsinger contracted for 400 acres of land at 13 per acre, payable in seven years. His family consisted of two daughters who married Thrashers and six sons, Christian of Cherry; George, Charles and Samuel of Forks; Jacob of Lycoming county; Solomon of Bradford county.

Christian Hunsinger married Susanna Sherman, a daughter of Jacob Sherman, of Forks township who had previously made a clearing on the Turnpike near Seeman's known as the Sherman. clearing. He settled on the farm now owned by Joseph Dohm. To Mr. and Mrs. Hunsinger were born five children:

Eliza, deceased, married Peter Jacoby of LaPorte twp.;

Fred, deceased, of Cherry;

Mary, married Daniel Faust of Lycoming county;

Catharine, married Valentine Dohm, of Cherry.

Martin Donahoe married Mary Walsh, both natives of county Mayo, Ireland and they came to America in 1842, settling first at. Honesdale. Later they came to Cherry and settled on Ringer Hill. Their children were

Patrick, died in Ireland when about two years old;

Catherine, dec., married P. Sweeney, later Edw. Noland;

Nora, died aged about 35 years;

Owen, of Cherry;

Mary Ann, married Michal Walls, of Cherry;

Martin, died in 1891.

Martin Walsh was born at county Mayo, Ireland. He came to Cherry about 1840 and settled on the farm now owned by Anthony Walsh. He married Catherine Gallagher, a daughter of Michael Gallagher, and to them were born:

Mary Ann, married Patrick Walsh of Lopez;

John, of Ringdale;

Anthony, of Ringdale;

James J., of Satterfield;

Sarah, married Michael Gilfoy of Lopez;

Ellen, of Lopez.

Michael Gallagher came from county Mayo, Ireland, in 1835, settling first in Bradford county. In 1840, he came to Cherry township settling on the farm now owned by Thomas Gallagher. He married Sarah Dougherty and their children were:

Michael, 2nd., of Cherry;

Mary, married John Walsh of Cherry;

Catherine, deceased, married Martin Walsh, of Cherry;

James, of Cherry;

Ellen, deceased, married John H. McGee of Cherry;

Bridget, married Henry Cook of Forks township;

Anthony, died at the age of 11 years;

Sarah, married John Hassen of LaPorte.

James Wright came from county Mayo, Ireland where he had married Bridget Dougherty. They came to America in 1845, settling on Ringer Hill in Cherry township and to them were born:

Martin, of Sayre;

Julia, married Martin Sweeney, of Cherry;

John, of Forks township.

Francis X. Lusch was born at Baden, Germany and married Magdalena Schuch of the same place. They came to America in 1836, settling first at Philadelphia. In 1839 they came to Cherry settling on the farm now owned by Frank Dohm. To them were born:

Francis X., deceased of Cherry;

Teckla, married Geo. Ambs of Alban y twp. Bradford Co.:

George, drowned at Philadelphia;

Christena, deceased, married Andrew Kani of Indiana;

George 2nd., deceased, of Indiana;

Helen, deceased, married Mr. Schraker of Indiana;

Anthony, of Indiana;

Ruphina. deceased, married and lived in Indiana.

Stephen Windhaeuser was born at Seltz, Germany in 1797 and while living in Germany married Regenia Sheffmacher. They came to America, locating at Bloomfield, near Philadelphia and in 1843 came to Cherry township settling on Ringer Hill. Windhaeuser died in 1873 and his wife in 1878. Their children were:

Mary Ann, married Michael Bahl of Forks township;

Magdalena, dec,, married Peter Kaufman of Manayunk;

Louise, married John Tourscher, of Cherry.

Peter Dohm came from Bavaria, Germany about 1846 and set. tied in LaPorte township. About ten years later he settled in Cherry at Satterfield which was formerly known as Dohm's Summit. He married Katharine Kokensparger of LaPorte and to them were born:

Elizabeth, married Michael Hoffman, of Carbondale;

Mary, died aged 22 years;

Harriet, married James Wood of Bernice;

Julia, died aged 18 years;

Frank, of Satterfield;

Carrie, married Edward Borton of Satterfield;

Hannah, married George Karge of LaPorte township;

Emma, married Chas. Jennings of Bradford county.

Valentine Dohm, a brother of Peter Dohm came from Bavaria Germany in 1850 settling first in LaPorte township and in 1860 moving to the Christian Hunsinger farm in Cherry. He married Catherine Hunsinger and to them were born:

Valentine, died in 1892;

Elizabeth, at home;

Joseph, at home;

Peter, at home;

George, of Athens;

Andrew, died in 1876;

Mary, married John Fulmer, of Towanda;

Catherine, at home.

Patrick McGee was born in county Antrim, Ireland in 1801. He was married in New York about 1&33 to Sarah Quinn who was born in county Antrim in 1813. They live 1 for a time at Montrose, Pennsylvania, Binghamton, New York and Towanda, Pennsylvania, coming to Cherry and settling on the present site of Satterfield in 1845. Mr. McGee died August 31, 1863 and his wife June 14, 1860. Their children were:

Mary A., deceased, married Michael Quinn of Cherry;

Enos, of Mildred;

Jane, deceased;

John P., of Lopez;

Sarah, deceased, married Michael Foley, of Cherry;

James, lives in Bradford county;

Catherine, married Edward McCarty:

Peter, deceased;

Henry, deceased;

Ellen, deceased, married John McGraw;

Robert, of Dushore.

John Schaad was born in canton Schaffhausen, Switzerland, March 11, 1834. In 1858, he came to America living in New Jersey and later in Philadelphia. In 1861, he enlisted in Company L, 68th reg't. P. V. I., where he served seven months and then was discharged on account of ill-health resulting from typhoid fever contracted in the army. In 1865 he opened a restaurant and butchered at Dushore and in 1870 moved to Mildred where he engaged in butchering and conducted a restaurant for twelve years, later being engaged in the hotel business. In 1865, he married Elizabeth Mosier and their children are:

John C., of Mildred;

William J.;

Katherine, dec., married Frank Scouton of Wilkes-Barre;

Henry J., of Mildred;

George C., of Parsons, Pennsylvania;

Frank F., of Mildred;

Anna L., at home.

Martin Curry of county Cavan, Ireland, married Margaret Flynn, of county Mayo, Ireland at WilkesBarre and in 1842 came to Cherry settling on the farm now owned by Thomas Gahan. Their children were:

Mary, deceased, married Thomas McCale;

Edward, deceased, of Wilmot, Bradford county;

Charles, of Garfield county, Colorado;

Michael J., died aged two years;

Bridget, married Thomas W. Gahan;

Cecelia, married Michael O'Toole of Garfield Co., Colorado;

James, deceased;

Margaret A., deceased.

Patrick and Catharine (Burns) McDonald came from Ireland and located on the Hannaway farm in Cherry. Mr. McDonald died in 1865. To them were born:

John, of Bradford county;

William, of Reynoldsville, Pennsylvania;

Miles, of Cripple Creek, Colorado;

Charles, of Cripple Creek, Colorado;

Thomas, of Cripple Creek, Colorado;

Ellen, married a Mr. Dudley of Bradford county;

George, of Cherry township;

Daniel, died at Cripple Creek, Colorado;

James, drowned at Big Rock, Sullivan county;

Two children died in infancy.

Henry and Elizabeth Houser were natives of Germany and came to Cherry in 1842. Mr. Houser was drowned that year while working on the canal at Wyalusing, aged 24 years. Their children were:

Catharine, died aged 18 years;

Maria, married Emanuel Heiber of Cherry township.

Mrs. Houser afterward married John L. Heilman who died in 1859 aged 59 years. Mrs. Heilman died in 1891 aged 70 years. To them were born four children:

John, lives at Dushore;

Barbara A., married Charles Biddle of Dushore;

Mollie, deceased;

George, deceased.

Edward Sharp was born in Ireland and upon coming to America settled first in Vermont. About 1838, he came to Cherry township, settling in East Cherry. His children were:

Helen, married William Sharp of Mildred;

Mary Ann, a missionary in Africa;

Katharine, married Michael Cowley, lives at Dushore;

Susan, married Mannis Cannon of Dushore;

Rachael, married Lyman Garey of Dushore.

Cornelius Donahoe came to Sullivan county about 1843 from Schuylkill county and settled in East Cherry on the farm now owned by Rev. Donahoe. Both he and his wife were natives of Ireland and came to America in 1837. In 1878, they moved to Dushore where they spent their remaining years. Their children were:

Hanora, of Philadelphia;

Timothy J., a Catholic priest at Plymouth, Pa.;

Ellen, deceased;

James, deceased;

Margaret, deceased;

Florence, deceased.

John Walsh was born in 1810 in county Kilkenny, Ireland. In 1840 he came to America and settled first in Canada. Soon after he came to the United States and lived for some time at Albany, N. T., and Pottsville, Pa. In 1856, he purchased a farm in East oCherry and there lived until his death, October 19,1886. He married Anna Burke, a native of Ireland and to them were born:

Catherine, deceased, a Sister of Charity;

Ella, deceased;

Masy, deceased;

James, deceased;

Anna, deceased;

Alphonsus, of Dushore;

Teresa, deceased;

Michael, died on the eve of being ordained as a priest;

Agnes, deceased.

George Albert, a son of John Albert was born at Wehrden, Prussia, in 1842 and came to America when twenty years old living in Schuylkill county. In 1867, he came to Cherry township where he purchased 66 acres of land in East Cherry. He died September 23, 1890, aged 58 years. His children were:

Eugene, who died in infancy;

Maternus, of Payette, Idaho;

Peter, of Payette, Idaho;

Lena M., married A. L. Tuttle of New Plymouth, Idaho;

George W. H., of Payette, Idaho.

John Meyer was born in Lehigh county and came to Cherry with his father Jacob Meyer in 1853 settling in Cherry .He married Mary Hoffa. Mr. Meyer died in 1894; his wife still survives and lives at Mildred. To them were born:

Frank, of Mildred;

Matilda, married Chauncey Lilley, of Dushore;

Henry, of Beach Tree, Jefferson county;

Cora, married Charles Heverly of Dushore.

Carl Erie was born in 1805, at Munden. Hanover, Germany. He came to New York in 1831 and to Sullivan county in 1834. In 1836 he married Esther Hunsinger a daughter of John Hunsinger and lived near the Thrasher church in Cherry until 1849 when he moved to Colley on a farm where he remained until his death. He was a Lutheran minister and labored in that capacity for 51 years. He was pastor of the Lutheran charge of Cherry, preaching in the Germany, Thrasher's and Wilmot churches for many years. He also had a congregation at Overton for some time. He died in August, 1890 at the age of 85 years. The children of Rev. and Mrs. Erie were:

Maria, deceased;

Fredrick, deceased;

Ludwick, deceased;

Tobias, deceased;

Luther, lives at Colley;

Emanuel, of Overton;

D. L., of Colley;

One child died in infancy.

Michael Quinn came from Leinster, Ireland, in 1850 with his mother and four brothers, James, Daniel, John and Patrick. John and Daniel settled in Bradford county, Patrick went west and James and Michael settled on Ringer Hill in Cherry township. Michael Quinn married Mary Ann McGee, a daughter of Patrick McGee and to them were born 12 children:

Daniel, died aged 4 years;

Sadie, died aged 2 years;

James, died aged 37 years;

Mary, married George Potter, of Cleveland, Ohio;

Katie, died aged 14 years;

Peter, of Murray town;

Patrick, lives on the homestead;

John, died aged 29 years;

Anna, married John Rush, lives on the homestead;

Lilla, married Joseph Lang of Murray town;

Maggie, of Waverly, New York;

William, of Murray town.

Jacob Messersmith came to America landing at Philadelphia and soon after came to Cherry township, settling in East Cherry on the farm now owned by James Drugan. Reserved 12 years as a soldier under Napoleon Bonaparte. His children were: Thomas, of Colley; Adam, of Colley; Jacob, of Cherry; George, of Colley.

Barnhart Huntzinger came from France to America. His son Barney who married Barbara Feller lived in Luzerne county and their children were John, Joseph who settled in Albany township, Mary, Catherine and Anna who married Benjamin Thrasher, Eap, Levi B. who settled in Cherry township, Jessie, Rebecca, David, Paul who settled in Wilmot and Caroline.

Levi B. Huntzinger married Esther Frye and settled at Huntzinger's Corners about a mile from Dushore. Their children are:

Fiann, married Wm Shaffer of Hollenback Bradford Co:

George W.;

P. W., of Cherry township;

Esther Ann, married Victor Ortleib of Hollenback.

EARLY CHURCHES.

Almost as soon as they arrived the pioneers of Cherry erected houses in which to worship their God. Built of logs and as unpretentious as their dwellings, they here assembled for religious teaching and to hear the Word of God expounded by the occasional minister to reach the new settlement. Already among the early settlements has been mentioned the start of the Baptist church among the pioneers of Cherry Hill.

The Germans who came soon after the Turnpike was built also wanted a place to worship God, so as early as 1825, a log church was built and called Friedens or Peace church. Lutherans, German Reformeds and Catholics all assisted in building this church Yonkin, Thall, Litzelswope and Graifley being very instrument, al in its erection. The first record of baptism is that of Caroline Hoffa, a daughter of Jacob Hoffa, who was baptized in June 1827. The congregation was served at various times by Reformed and Lutheran ministers but all preached more or less irregularly until 1839 when Rev. Carl Erie assumed the pastorate. Some years later a frame church was erected and is known as the Germany church. Services are still occasionally held here by the Lutheran minister of Dushore.

The settlers of East Cherry were not without religious service as Rev. Erie held services in his house. The cornerstone for a frame church was laid in 1851 upon ground that had been donated for church and burial purposes by George Thrasher. It was dedicated September 1, 1853, Rev. Erie being assisted in the dedicatory services by Revs. Bahl and Boyer. This church is still standing but no regular services have been held here for several years, the people going to Dushore to worship.

The United Evangelical church in Cherry began by camp meetings held at various places throughout the township, and later services were held in the homes of different members of the church. Two of the early ministers to serve this charge were Bishops Seibert and Long. The circuit was called the Cherry circuit and extended to Muncy at which place the minister resided. There were 31 preaching points, among them being Muncy, Hughesville, Penn township, Unityville, Warren, Greenwood Sonestown, Nordmont and Cherry. The minister preached every day traveling from place to place on horseback and studying his Bible as he rode. Later the old church and parsonage, still standing near Bahr's cemetery, were built, the parsonage being now owned by Ralston Hunsinger. Here the people worshiped until the building of the Evangelical church at Dushore in 1870.

The history of the Roman Catholic church dates from 1836. In that year, at the suggestion of Freeman Fairchild who knew the name of the bishop of the diocese of Philadelphia to which this section belonged, James Dunn wrote to the Bishop, Rt. Rev, Francis Patrick Kanerick, of Philadelphia, who came and baptized the children of the families belonging to the Catholic faith. He also made arrangements to build a small frame church at Dushore and located the present cemetery. The church was built within a year and in 1837, he again came from Philadelphia, accompanied by his brother. Rev. Peter Richard Kanerick who had been ordained a priest in Dublin the year previous and who afterward became the noted Archbishop Kanerick of St. Louis who died about 10 years ago over 90 years of age. On this trip arrangements were made with Fr. O'Reilly of Susquehanna county to come once in three months and hold services in the church in the English language, Fr. Steinbacher of Nippenose Valley, Lycoming county was also to come once in three months and hold services in the German language. These priests had to travel over sixty miles to reach this church and these arrangements continued until 1846 when the Roman Catholic population had grown to such an extent that a priest was stationed at Towanda and he conducted services at Dushore.

RAILROADS.

In the spring of 1849 the question of building a railroad through Sullivan county had reached the point where it was deemed advisable to take some definite action on the question and a petition bearing date of April 6, 1859 was circulated to procure money to make a preliminary survey. In 1851 Michael Meylert of LaPorte, George D. Jackson of Dushore and M. C. Mercur of Towanda on the knowledge of previous surveys made by Mr. Meylert and Mr. Mason of LaPorte, engaged Major E. McNeal to make a survey. The survey was made in November and during the following winter, Mr. Meylert who was then a member of the Legislature procured the passage of an act, supplementary to the original act, authorizing the building of the Towanda and Catawissa railroad by which the company could make such connections with other roads and have full authority over any part as though they had completed the whole road. This subsequently became the basis for other legislation by which the charters for the Muncy Creek Railway Company and the State Line & Sullivan or Sullivan & Erie as it was originally called, obtained their charters. About this time a survey of the Bernice coal fields was made by Prof. P. W. Shaffer and William A. Mason. They found nothing but the underlying small vein of coal and reported that there was not sufficient coal to warrant the building of a railroad. From 1855 to 1859 little was accomplished. In 1859 the upper vein was discovered and opened up. George D. Jackson and his father Dr. Josiah Jackson purchased a portion of the coal lands. These gentlemen with Mr. Meylert, M. C. Mercur of Towanda and C. F. Welles, Jr. of Athens took measures to develop the coal and build a railroad from Towanda to Bernice to market the coal. The State Line. & Sullivan railroad was commenced in 1867 and completed to Bernice in 1871. Arrangements were made with the Barclay railroad company to use the Barclay tracks from Towanda to Monroeton and the road was built from Monroeton to Bernice. In 1886 the Lehigh Valley railroad company, which had previously leased the State Line & Sullivan railroad, extended the road from Bernice to Lopez and later to Harvey's Lake connecting with the Harvey's Lake Branch of the .Lehigh Valley and making an eastern outlet from Lopez.

In 1893 the Williamsport and North Branch railroad was extended from Nordmont to Satterfield connecting at this point with the Lehigh Valley.

Bernice.

Bernice was named in honor of Mrs. Bernice Jackson, wife of Hon. George D. Jackson, one of the leading men in promoting the State Line and Sullivan railroad. The road was completed to Bernice in 1871, and upon its completion the railroad company commenced to develop the coal on a large scale and build the town. Previous to this coal had been mined on a small scale for

the local trade. About three hundred men have been employed in and about the mines. In 1902 the Connell Anthracite Mining Company purchased the improvements and leased the coal lands of the State Line & Sullivan Railroad company. V new breaker has been erected and another will be built in 1904. The improvements now in progress will greatly increase the output of coal. The town of Bernice is owned by the mining company except the I. O. O. F. hall, church, parsonage and a fine two story < school house. A saw mill cuts the lumber the company needs, and the store and meat market are leased at present to a firm known as the Bernice Store Company. The United Evangelical church holds regular services, Rev. J. T. Hower, of Lopez, is the pastor. The Presbyterians have an organization and hold services.

GUNTON COLLIERY.

To W alter B. Gunton belongs the credit of proving that coal mining in Sullivan County can be made a very profitable business, producing a new epoch in the history of mining in the county. In 1898 Mr. Gunton leased 102 acres of land from the executors of Josiah Jackson and others and erected a coal a breaker. In the spring of 1899 he commenced operations. A number of houses were erected in the vicinity of the breakers, but as most of the miners live at Mildred and surrounding localities no attempt has been made to build a town at this point.

MILDRED.

Mildred, including the Sugar Hill settlement adjoining, is a very important and thriving town. The business is derived from the mining of coal in the collieries near by, where most of the men end boys are employed. The old town of Shinersville, whim was started when the Turnpike was built, was located at this point, but only the ruins of a few houses marked the place w*en the town of Mildred, formerly called Birch Creek was commenced in 1870. Most of the families own substantial homes, giving it a very desirable population. John Schaad was the pioneer business man in the place, he established a restaurant and meat market in 1870. About 1885 he built a large hotel and in 1890 he erected a distillery. In 1898 Mr. Schaad leased his hotel and distillery to his sons and retired from business. The town has five hotels, Schaad Bros.; Dailey's Hotel, conducted by John Daily for about eleven years; the Connor House, conducted by John Connor for a number of years; C. E. Jackson built his hotel in 1894; in 1902 John Luksie purchased the Guye House. There are five stores, Frank Meyer has been conducting a general mercantile business since 1898, C. P. Hope has been doing a grocery business for ten or more years, E. D. Sutliff purchased the mercantile business of Julius Vogle in the spring of 1903, John Sick is postmaster and conducts a shoe store, Simon Fromburg runs a clothing store. Henry J. Schaad is proprietor of the meat market, Schaad Bros, conduct a distillery. Dr. John A. Campbell is the physician. The Roman Catholics built a handsome church and parsonage in 1896, the church was named St. Francis and was dedicated, August 2, 1896. Rev. J. A. Enright has been the resident priest since the parish was struck off from Dushore in 1894.

SATTERFIELD

Satterfield, formerly called Dohm's Summit, was named in honor of John Satterfield, of Buffalo, N. Y., one of the principal stock holders of the Williamsport & North Branch Railroad. The town is small containing not more than 20 buildings. It derives its importance from being located at the junction of the W. & N. B. and the State Line & Sullivan railroads. M. P. Gallagher conducts a boarding house, John Jacoby a blacksmith shop, P. F. McGee a restaurant and E. J. Borton has the post office.

CHERRY MILLS.

Cherry Mills derives its name from the township in which it is situated and its two mills. It is located on the Little Loyalsock Creek four miles from Dushore. In 1846 a 20 horse water power grist mill was erected at this point and a saw mill was built farther down the stream. A Mr. Coganhogan owned the grist mill at an early date and the place was known as Coganhogan Mill. The late B. M. Sylvara, of Dushore, owned the mills at one time. In 1866 the grist mill was purchased by C. S. Sick and it is now owned by his brother Joseph Sick. C. S. Sick embarked in the mercantile business in 1878 and holds the post office which was established a little later when the place was named Cherry Mills. The saw mill is owned and operated by George J. Hartzig, he purchased the mill of Wm. Smith who purchased it of Joseph Sick. J. G. Gross is the proprietor of the hotel, J. M. Dempsey is the village blacksmith.

Huntsinger's Corners.

This hamlet is located about one mile East of Dushore on the Little Loyalsock Creek. P. W. Hunsinger has a saw mill and store at this place, R. C. R. Kshinka conducts a blacksmith shop. These industries with a small number of Residences constitute the town.

THE SOLDIERS

Cherry furnished a large number of soldiers. Colonel James Deegan organized a company which did gallant Service during the Civil war. The following are the names of the "Roys in Blue" who responded to the call to arms, from Cherry and Dushore:

James Deegan, Jeremiah Deegan, William Deegan, R. C. R. Kshinka, George Baumgartner, Anthony Baumgartner, Adam M. Baumgartner, Lewis M Zaner, Wm Graul, Joseph Huffmaster, John Dunn, John Kinsley, John Hartzig, Joseph Cick, Samuel Bahr, Charles Arey, Hiram Kisner, William Burke, John Huff master, Joseph T. Hested, Wm. Scott, Jefferson Colley, Felix Timmons, Ira Bently, John Henley, Green Henley, Daniel Prichard, John S. Dieffenbach, George W. Thrasher, Ellis Persun, John McCracken, Thomas McCracken, John McCracken Jr,, Francis Bennett, Miles McDonnald, John Thall, Charles Kneller, Samuel McNeal, Alfred Cole, John J. Hoffa, Charles Murnna, J. Harrington, Henry Stahl, Jeremiah Mooney, Henry Hileman, Nathan Persun, John Mooney, George Harlacher, Thomas Deegan, Lewis Otton, Henry Dieffenbach, H. H. Hartman.

ADAM THRASHER

Was born in 1838, in Sugarloaf township, Luzerne county. He is a son of George Thrasher, who came from Luzerne county in 1846, and a grandson of George Thrasher, a native of Reading, Pa., who came from Luzerne county to Cherry in 1828. His mother was Lydia Weaver, a daughter of Christian Weaver who came to Cherry from Luzerne county in 1847. Mr. Thrasher is a single man and owns that portion of the original 800 acre tract, known as the Thrasher homestead, which he and his brother Ransom Thrasher owned in partnership for several years. Mr. Thrasher purchased his brothers interest of the widow shortly after Ransom Thrasher's death in 1993.

JOSEPH THRASHER.

Was born in Sugarloaf township, Luzerne county, in 1831. He is a son of George and Lydia (Weaver) Thrasher, and a grandson of George Thrasher, the pioneer of the Thrasher settlement, who came to Cherry in 1828. Mr. Thrasher was married to Sally Ann Meyer , of Cherry, who was born in Lehigh county in 1831, and died in 1892. To them were born five children: Milton W., John, Henry R., Malinda A., Lydney E., Milton and Henry died in 1863 during the epidemic of diphtheria, which caused the death of many children in Cherry township.

KANSOM THRASHER.

Was born in 1839 in Luzerne county. He was a son of George Thrasher of Cherry Mr. Thrasher in partnership with his brother Adam purchased the interest of the other heirs in the homestead and did a very successful farming business. In 1899 he married Celinda J. Yonkin, H daughter of Jacob Yonkin of Cherry. Mr. Thrasher was elected tax collector in 1882, and to the office of county treasurer in 1896 tin died in 1903.

BENJAMINE THRASHER.

Was born in Cherry township in 1840. He was a son of Benjamin Thrasher and a grandson of the pioneer, George Thrasher. He purchased his father's farm at Hunsinger's Corners. He was married twice, his first wife being Mary M. Suber, a daughter of Jacob Suber. She died in 1893. He afterward married Hannah Molyneux, widow of Albert Molyneux, of Overton, and a daughter of Charles Bahr, of Cherry. Mrs. Thrasher had one child, Addie Molyneux, by her first husband, Mr. Thrasher died in August, 1903.

S. F. THRASHBR.

Was born in Wilmot township, Bradford county, in 1896. He is a son of S. B. Thrasher, of Colley, who is a son of Benjamin Thrasher and a grandson of George Thrasher the pioneer. Mr. Thrasher is a farmer and owns a farm in east Cherry. He married Jennie Moyer, in 1896, a daughter of Edward Moyer, of Dushore. Of this union two children have been born, Mabel and Francis.

HIRAM KISNER.

Was born in 1830 in Columbia county. He is a son of William Kisner, who came from Columbia county to Cherry about 1840. Mr. Kisner is by occupation a farmer and carpenter, he was married twice, his first wife was Elizabeth Kokensparger of LaPorte. She died leaving four children, Mary, Matilda, Levi and George W.; his second wife was Mrs. Loretta (Persun) Arey, a daughter of John Persun, of Cherry. Mrs. Kisner had three children by her first husband, George L., Anna I. and James L. In 1S62 Mr. Kisner enlisted in Co. K 141 regiment and was in the army nearly three years. He is a member of the G. A. R.

GEORGE AREY

Is a son of Charles and Loretta (Persun) Arey. He owns a farm in East Cherry which he tills. He married Edna Huff master a daughter of Fred Huffmaster of Cherry. To them have been born two children, Charles and Robert.

JACOB H. KINSLEY

Was born in Cherry in 1843. He is a son of Charles Kinsley of Cherry and a grandson of Charles Kinsley who came from Germany to Dushore about 1833. He is a farmer and owns the Kinsley estate in East Cherry. His first wife was Catharine Suber, a daughter of Jacob Suber, of Cherry, by her he had one daughter, Bernice who married Nathan Weaver. Mr. Kinsley's second wife was Mrs. Isabel (Shields) Brown, a daughter of one of the pioneer families of Colley township.

WILLIAM F. KINSLEY

Was born in Cherry in 1845. He was a son of Charles Kinsley of Cherry. He owns two farms in East Cherry which he and his son conduct. He was road commissioner six years. He married Sarah Gansel, a daughter of Obert Gansel, who came from Berwick to Cherry in 1857 and moved to Kansas about 1870. To Mr. and Mrs. Kinsley have been born four children, Emma C., who married Frank Cox of Cherry; Mary A, married Charles Dieffenbach, of Cherry; Allie C. married William Stiff, of Cherry and Morris B. who lives on his father's farms

R. C. R. KSHINKA

Is a native of Zerkwitz, in the province of Bradenburg, Prussia, where he was born in 1845. He is a son of Mathew Kshinka, who was for thirty years a teacher in the schools of Prussia, and came with his family to New York in I8.il, and the next year settled in Albany township, Bradford county. In 1801 Mr. Kshinka enlisted in Co. I 50th N. Y, engineers, and served until the close of the war. Mr. Kshinka's grandfather on both his father and his mother's side, fought under Napoleon, being pressed into the service in the famous expedition to Russia, the grandfather Kaltz was an officer under Napoleon, and his sword is now in possession of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Kshinka is a blacksmith and conducts a shop at Huntsingers' Corners. He married Almira Yonkin a daughter of Henry Yonkin Jr., one of the pioneers of Cherry township. To them have been born six children, Lewellyn died at the age of six years, Theodore U., Maggie B. died in 1873, Albert died in infancy, William and Charles R.

SOLOMON BAHR

Was born in Berks county in 1858, and came with his father's family to Cherry in 18o3. He owns a part of the John Bahr, his father's farm near Dushore. His first wife was Hanna Hunsinger a daughter of Joseph Hunsinger, of Cherry. Of this union four Children were born, Alfred B., Clinton, Edward S. and Hannah, who married Goe. W. Bender of Forks. His present wife is Ceceilia Snyder a daughter of Jacob Snyder deceased of Cherry. To them have been born, five children, Louis F., John L., Emma M. married George W. Potter of Dushore, Jennie C. married Frank Cast of Cherry and Oliver. Alfred, Clinton, Edward and Lewis are deceased.

.FRANK THALL

Was born in 1855 in Cherry township. He is a son of James Thall and a grandson of Dennis Thall, who came from Germany settling in Cherry in 1820. Mr. Thall's mother was Caroline LaFavor, who was of French descent. Mr. Thall owns a farm about two miles from Satterfield where he runs a fine dairy. He was married twice, his first wife being Ella Johnson, and his present wife Katie Marshall, a daughter of Joseph Marshall deceased, of Cherry. Mr. Thall's children are, Annie M., Louisa died in infancy, Francis P. Joseph deceased, Mildred, Charles and Hellen.

JAMES J. THALL

Was born in Cherry in 1858. He is a son of James Thall and a grandson of Dennis Thall, one of the first settlers of Cherry township. Mr. Thall owns a farm about two miles from Satterfield. Mr. Thall's first wife was Matilda Tousehner, of Cherry, and his present wife was the widow of George Detrick. She had three children by her first husband, Minnie married Henry Touscher, of Cherry, George and Earnest Detrick. Mr. Thall has two children. Mary and John. Mr. Thall was road commissioner one term.

JOSEPH THALL

Was born in Cherry in 1838. He is a son of Joseph Thall and a grandson of the pioneer, Dennis Thall. His mother was Margaret Shields. Mr. Thall married Anna Burns in 1875. She was a daughter of Miles Burns a native of Ireland, who came to Sullivan county in 1646. Mr. Thall owns a farm about two miles from Dushore. To Mr. and Mrs. Thall have been born eight children, Mary G., Joseph E., John M., Mathew L., Anna T., Margaret T., J. Harry and Irene.

WILLIAM DUNN

Was born in Cherry in 1840. He is a son of James Dunn, who came to America in 1832, and to Cherry in 1833. His mother was Dorthy Gilmore, a Scotch-Irish lady. Wm. Dunn lives on the Dunn homestead near Dushore. He married Anna Murray in 1869. She was a daughter of Lawrence and Esther (McDermott) Murray, who was born in New York in 1844 To Mr. and Mrs. Dunn have been born seven children, Catharine died at the age of two years; Anna Dora, deceased; Lawrence, of Lopez; John, Mary Esther, William H. and Anna Josephine.

EDMUND HOLMES

Was born in Cherry in 1854. He is a son of Lewis Holmes, who came from Massachusetts to Cherry in 1847, and married Margaret Green a daughter of John Green, who established what is known as Green Settlement. Mr. Holmes was engaged in lumbering for a number of years, and for the last year has had charge of the Randall & Meylert coal mines near Bernice. He owns a fine residence at Mildred. He married Bernice C. Vought a daughter of J. O. and Cynthia (Decker) Vought, of Colley township.

S. A. DIEFFENBACH

Was born in Cherry in 1864. He is a son of D. E. Dieffenbach, of Dushore, and a grandson of John Dieffenbach, who came with his father Jocob Dieffenbach, to Dushore in 1S28. Conrad Dieffenbach, great, great, grandfather of Mr. Dieffenbach was a native of Baden, Germany, and came to America in 1764. Mr. Dieffenbach's mother, Loretta C. is a daughter of Lewis Zaner one of the early sellers of Cherry. Mr. Dieffenbach is a carpenter and owns a fine residence at Mildred. Remarried Margaret, Eldora Brown in 1886. She was born in Colley in 1865, and is a daughter of Nathan L. Brown, a descendant of one of the early settlers of Albany township, Bradford county. Mr. Brown was a veteran of the Civil war. Mrs. Dieffenbach's mother was a daughter of William Bartley, of Los Angeles, Cal., who was killed in a railroad wreck. To Mr. and Mrs. Dieffenbach have been born five children, Louis M., Winnie M., Daniel H , Ellen L., Laura Madaline, who died in 1898.

EDMUND S. HENLEY

Was born in 1851. lie is a son of Robert Henley, who came from South Carolina, to Cherry township with the first settlers and married the only daughter of John R. Lopez, a contractor, who built, a portion of the Turnpike, in 181'J and 1820. Mr. Lopez was of Scotch descent. Mr. Henley married Sarah Tubbs in 1870. She is a daughter of Russel Tubbs, of Corning, N. Y. Mr. Henley owns a farm near Mildred. To Mr. and Mrs. Henley have been born fifteen children, Etta A., married Thomas Flick of North Mountain, Sarah D., married Charles Dunlap, of Dushore; Walter J.; Mary, married Charles Bahl of Dushore; John S., Freeman, Lloyd, Bernice, Levilla, Ellen, Charles, Delbert, Willard, Robert and Emery.

GEORGE D. GRAIFLY

Belongs to one of the oldest families of Cherry, where he was born in 18£0. He is a son of Henry Graifly, who was born in Switzerland is 1SC3, His father William Graifly came to America in 1805, and to Cherry Township on the farm now occupied by the subject of this sketch, in 1821. The family now living on the homestead is composed of George D. and Mary, both single, with their mother, who is over eighty years of age and is the only surviving member of the family of seven Children of Henry Yonkin Sr. Two brothers of George D., Lewis and W. C. purchased the Amos Cox farm joining the homestead and occupy it. They are both single men.

JACOB GRAIFLY

Was born in Cherry in 1841. He is son of Henry Graifly a native of Switzerland, who located in Cherry in 1821. Mr. Graifly purchased the John Powderly farm near Dushore and is engaged in farming. Mr. Graifly married Mrs. Elizabeth Henshaw in 1888. She was born in 1861 at Wostershire, England. Her maiden name was Mills. She came to America when a young woman and married Thomas Henshaw, who died about two years later, leaving the widow with one daughter, Ada, who is now living with her mother. To Mr. and Mrs. Graifly have been born two daughters, Blanche who died in 1890, and Mary Elizabeth.

LYMAN BAKER

Was born at New Columbus, Pa., in 1834. He is a son of Hiram Baker, who was born at Rochester, N. Y., where his father who came from England with two brothers had moved. Later the family moved to New Columbus, and from there to the McGovern farm in Overton township. From Overton he moved to the Wanck farm near Campbellsville. Mr. Baker married Elizabeth Graifly in 1857. She was a daughter of William Graifly, who was a son of William Graifly, who was one of the pioneers of Cherry. Her mother was Rebecca Gortner, a daughter of Jacob Gortner, of Lycoming county. Mrs. Graifly was married twice. her first husband being William Martin and the second, William Graifly. Mr. and Mrs. Baker occupy the farm formerly owned by Martin and Graifly. They also own a farm in the state of New York where they have lived a portion of the time since their marriage. To Mr. and Mrs. Baker were born, Lloyd W. and Frank W., who both died in 1863; Guy of Terrytown, Pa., Jennie R., married Nelson Cox, of Dushore; Bernice A , Fred L., Lizzie D: and Ira C.

LEWIS MARTIN

Was born in Columbia county, in 1821. He was a son of William and Rebecca (Gortner) Martin, and a grandson of Roger Martin, a native of Wales, who came to America over a centaury ago and settled in Columbia county, Pa. William Martin settled on the farm now owned by Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Baker, where he died in 1726. Lewis Martin purchased the farm now owned by his estate in 1838 and 1840. He married Susan L Jackson in 1843, She was born in 1826, and was a daughter of Samuel Jackson of Dushore. To Mr. and Mrs. Martin ten children were born, John, of Cherry; Ralph, of Albany township: Roland, of Cherry; Hanna, died in 1896; Freeman, of Albany township; Howard, of Chicago; Leonard, of Eureka; Michigan: Libbie married Bert Green of Eureka. Mich.; Emma married Wesley Nye, of Clinton county, Mich. Lewis Martin spent some years in Michigan. He died in 1891.

ENOS MCGEE

Was born at Binghamton, N. Y. in 1836. He is a son of Patrick and Sarah (Quinn) McGee, natives of Ireland, who were married in New York about 1833. Then moved to Binghamton, and to Cherry township in 1845. Mr. McGee is a car repairer and during the Bernice strike in 1901 moved from Bernice where be had lived for years, to Mildred. He married Mary Donagan in 1864. She was born m Ireland in 1845, and was a daughter of Patrick and Margaret (O'Brian) Donagan. To this union have been born, Sarah, Mrs. Parr, of Bernice; Cathrine, Mrs. Donavan, of Cherry; Patrick, of Murray town; Margaret, married A. H. Roberts, of Lopez; Robert, Enos Jr., and William.

WILLIAM MURRAY

Was born in Cherry in 1850. He is a son of Lawrence and Esther (McDermott) Murray, who came from Ireland and settled on the farm Bow owned by Mr. Murray. He also owns another farm joining. He was elected county treasurer in 1890, serving one term, and has also held numerous township offices. Mr. Murray was married in 1872 to Catharine Murphy, who was born in Cherry. She was a daughter of Thomas Murphy. To Mr., and Mrs. Murray have been born eleven children, Lawrence J. and William T., of New York; H. E., of Cripple Creek, Colorado; James W., of New York; Mary, deceased; Catharine, Richard, Esther, Frank, Joseph and Ida.

JOHN MCMAHON

Was born in Cherry in 1855. He is a son of James McMahon,. who came from Ireland to America in 1844 and to Cherry township in 1853. Mr. McMahon's mother was Ann Bergan. He lives with his father on the homestead. Mr. McMahon was elected tax collector, and has held other important township offices. In 1883 he married Anna Murphy, a daughter of Adam Murphy of Albany township, Bradford County, and a grand daughter of Stephen Murphy, who came to Cherry, from the county of Wexford, Ireland, about 1840. To Mr. and Mrs. McMahon have been born nine sons, John L , James A., Joseph, Arthur, Edward, Leonard, Frank, Charles and Paul.

FRANK MCMAHON

Was born in 1862 in Cherry. He is a son of James McMahon, one of the most prominent farmers of Cherry township. He purchased and lives on the O'Brian homestead in the western section of Cherry township. In 1889 he married Margaret Donivan, who was born in Cherry in 1867. She is a daughter of James Donivan of Bernice. Mr. Donivan was a native of Ireland and came to America with his parents when four years of age. At the opening of the Bernice mines he moved there, his family being the first to locate at that place. To Mr. and Mrs. McMahon have been born three children, Mary A., James and Eugene.

EDWARD BERGAN

Was born in Cherry in 1843. He is a single man. His father, Timothy Bergan, who is still living, was a native of Queens county, Ireland, and came to America in 1833, locating in Cherry in 1835. Edward, the subject of this sketch, was the oldest of the family. He has two brothers living, James H. and W. F.; two sisters, Catharine, who married Michael Corcoran; Mary, married Ambrose Farrell and one brother, John C , who are deceased. Mr. Bergan owns the homestead located near Dushore, In 1878 he was elected county treasurer and sheriff in 1883 serving three years in each office.

JAMES BERGAN

Was born in Cherry in 1854. He is a son of Timothy Bergan one of the pioneers of Cherry township, settling near Dushore in 1835. Mr. Bergan purchased the farm formerly owned by Frank Dunn located near Dushore. In 1881 he married Anna Cadden, who was born at Philadelphia in 1861. She is a daughter of Thomas Cadden, who came to Cherry in 1880 and purchased the James Deegan farm. Her mother was Margaret Walsh, who was born in county Sligo, Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Bergan are the parents of seven children, John C., Edward C., Thomas, Martin, Anna, Harry and Ambrose.

FREDERICK KRAUS

Was born at Philadelphia in 1881. He is a son of Conrad Kraus, who was born at Tamaqua, Pa , and come to Sullivan county in 1881. His grandfather Henry Kraus was a native of Hesse Cassel, Germany, who came to America in 1849, and for many years made frequent trips to Sullivan county to buy stock. Mr. Kraus' mother was Kate Hecker a native of Philadelphia In 1901 Mr. Kraus married Jennie F. Hartzig a daughter of the late Charles S. Hartzig, of Cherry, a descendent of one of the pioneer families of the township. Mr. Kraus lives near Cherry Mills on the Hartzig homestead. To Mr. and Mrs. Kraus one daughter Esther has been born.

ANTHONY MIDDENDORF

Was born in Cherry in 1851. He was a son of Barnhart Middendorf a native of Prussia, Germany, who came to America when a young man, and later located in Cherry about 1840. Mr. Middendorf married Mary Lusch, a daughter of X. F. Lusch, a native of Baden, Germany, who came to America in 1836 and to Cherry township in 1839. Mr. Middendorf purchased the Miller farm and has recently added two more farms to his possessions. Mr. and Mrs. Middendorf have three children, Raymond, Agatha and Clement.

RALPH LITZELMAN

Was born in Cherry in 1844. He was a son of Mathias Litzelman, who came to New York from Elsets, France, now Germany, in 1828, and in 1830 moved to Cherry on the farm now owned by the subject of this sketch, which is one of the best equipped farms in the county. Mr. Litzelman has held numerous township offices, tax collector, school director and road commissioner. In 1868 he married Lydia Sick, who was born in 1848, in Cherry. She was a daughter of Charles Sick, who came from Baden, Germany, to America, in 1836. To Mr. and Mrs. Litzelman have been born three children,

Mathias, married Josephine Marshall;

Anna S., who married Fred R. Saxer, of Cherry;

Hannah M.

GABRIEL LITZELMAN

Was born in Cherry in 1839. He was a son of Mathias Litzelman, a native of Germany, who settled in Cherry in 1830. Mr. Litzelman purchased a fine large farm in the Germany settlement. His first wife was Mary White, a daughter of Mathias and Catharine (Ambs) White. She died in 1877. He married his present wife, Eliza Bahr, in 1873, She is a daughter of Charles Bahr, of Cherry. Mr. Litzelman was elected county commissioner in 1893, serving one term. He is at present a member of the Cherry school board. He is the father of five children,

George, died in 1886;

Emily, married Henry Kraus, of La Force;

Minerva, married John Bahr;

Joseph of Cherry;

Lorena, married A. Rose, of La Porte.

JOHN LITZELMAN

Was born in Cherry in 1867. He was a son of Mathias Litzelman, one of the early settlers of Cherry. Mr. Litzelman has been extensively engaged as contractor and builder. He purchased the Barth homestead, of 279 acres, on which he lives. He married Mary Sick, a daughter of Charles Sick, a native of Germany, who located in Cherry in 1839. Mr. Litzelman has held numerous township offices. He is at present a member of the board of road commissioners. To Mr. and Mrs. Litzelman have been born twelve children, Samuel, deceased; Agnes, deceased, married John H. Yonkin, of Lopez; Stephen, Windsor, Clara, Amelia, Charles, Thada, Mary, William, Jennie and Elizabeth.

EDWARD J. WEISBROD

Was born in Cherry in 1848. He was a son of Conrad and Elizabeth (Snyder) Weisbrod, of Cohessa, Germany, who came to America, settling in Cherry township in 1842, on the farm now owned and occupied by Mr. Weisbrod, the subject of this sketch. In 1876 be married Rose Sick, a daughter of Charles Sick, who was born in Baden. Germany, in 1815, and came to Cherry township in 1839. To Mr. and Mrs. Weisbrod have been born three daughters, Eudorah A., who died while at the State Normal school at Lock Haven in June, 1895; Hilda P. and Ada A.

JOHN WEISBROD

Was born in Cherry in 1855. He was a son of Conrad Weisbrod, who was born at Cohessa, Germany, in June, 1819. His grandfather was Henry Weisbrod, of the same place. He married Anna Sick, a daughter of Charles Sick, one of the early settlers of Cherry, and a grand-daughter of Joseph Sick, of Prussia. Mr. and Mrs. Weisbrod have added to their farm from time to time until they own 205 acres in the valley of Black Creek. They are the parents of eight children, Coleman, twins who died in infancy, Cynthia, Walter, Herbert H., Lewis and Stephen.

JOSEPH YONKIN

Was born in Cherry in 1850. He was a son of Peter Yonkin, who died in 1897, and a grandson of Henry Yonkin, Sr., who was born in Hesse-Nassau, Germany, in 1774, and came to America in 1807. He settled on the farm now owned by Joseph Yonkin, the subject of this sketch, in 1833, moving from Briar Creek township, Columbia county, to Cherry. Peter Yonkin was born in Briar Creek township and came to Cherry with his father, occupying the homestead. He married Catharine Suber, who still survives and lives with her son, Joseph. Mr. Yonkin is engaged in farming and is surveyor for the tire insurance company of Western Sullivan county. He married Hannah Mosier, who was born at Dushore, in 1852. She was a daughter of Peter J. Mosier, and a grand-daughter of John Mosier, one of the pioneers of Dushore. To Mr. and Mrs. Yonkin have been born one son, Howard P., who live1* with his parents on the homestead.

G. B. YONKIN

Was born in Cherry township in 1866. His father, Peter Yonkin, was for many years identified with the business affairs of Cherry township, where he came with his father, Henry Yonkin, St., in 1823. Mr. Yonkin's mother was Catharine Suber, a daughter of Jacob Suber, one of the pioneers of Cherry township. Mr. Yonkin purchased a fine farm in East Cherry, to which he recently added 40 acres. He married Aurilla Wentzel, who was born in Cherry in 1868. She is a daughter of Percival and Anna (Miller) Wentzel, and a grand-daughter of Jacob Wentzel, who settled in Cherry in 1836. To Mr. and Mrs. Yonkin have been born one son, Earnest.

EDWARD YONKIN

Was born in Cherry in 1847. He is a son of Henry Yonkin, Jr., who was born in Havre, France, in 1806, and came with his parents to America in 1807, and to Cherry in 1823. In 1824 he purchased the farm now owned by P. J. Yonkin. Mr. Yonkin's mother was Barbra Hartzig, who was a daughter of John Hart zig, who came to Cherry in 1819. Mr. Yonkin married Ella Smith, who was a daughter of Daniel Smith, of Centre county, Pa. Her mother was Hanna Kunes, who was a daughter of John Kunes, and whose father Daniel, was one of the early settlers of Centre county. Mr. Yonkin purchased from his brother John, one of the finest farms in the western section of the township, which he is engaged in tilling. To Mr. and Mrs. Yonkin have been born six children, Frank E , of Cherry; Lewis W., of Dushore; Bertha M., Hattie F., Emma E.. Winifred M.

JOHN YONKIN

Was born in Cherry in 1829. He was a son of Henry Yonkin, Jr., and a grandson of Henry Yonkin, Sr., who came to America with his wife, Elizabeth (Hains) Yonkin in 1807, and after living at various places, came to Cherry in 1823. Mr. Yonkin married Loretta A. Barge, a daughter of Gotleib Barge, one of the early settlers of Cherry. Mr. Yonkin purchased a large tract of timber land in the western section of the township, which he cleared up and then sold to his brother, Edward, and then purchased the Huffmaster homestead near Dushore, which he has converted into one of the best farms in the county. In 1878 he was elected county commissioner, and in 1891 associate judge. H" was school director three terms. To Mr. and Mrs. Yonkin have been born one son, Ira B., who lives with his father.

BENJAMIN KESTER

Was born in Cherry in 1850. He was a son of Joseph and Catharine (Miller) Kester. His grand father, Jacob Kester, was probably the first permanent settler in Cherry township, locating on the lands now owned by Charles Bahr and Benjamin Kester, the subject of this sketch, about 1813. Mr. Kester married Angaline Sayman, a daughter of Benjamin and Sallie (Hartzig) Kester, deceased, of Forks. Mr. and Mrs. Kester are both of German descent. To them one son, Walter, was born, who died in infancy.

J. L. MESSERSMITH

Was born in Cherry in 1853. He was a son of Jacob Messersmith, of Cherry, whose father, Jacob Messersmith, came from Germany at an early date. Mr. Messersmith married Ina N. Kline, a daughter of Dunham Kline, formerly of Dushore, now of Towanda. Mr. Messersmith works for Trexler & Turrell. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., of Dushore. To Mr. and Mrs. Messersmith have been born four children, Blanche, William, Hazel and Kline.

SAMUEL L. BENDER

Was born in Cherry township in 1871. He is a son of George and Ann (Rinebold) Bender. George Bender came to Cherry township from Columbia county about 55 years ago, and purchased a tract of timber land in the western section of Cherry township, clearing up a farm, which is now owned by S. L. Bender, the subject of this sketch, Mr., Bender married Ida Lam

bert, a daughter of John Lambert, of Forks. To Mr. and Mrs. Bender three children have been born, Clarence, Howard L., and the baby.

JOHN J. CONNOR

Was born in county Sligo, Ireland, in 1844. His father, John Connor, came to New York, in 1848, and later moved to Georgia, where he died in 1859. In 1865, John J. Connor came 10 Cherry township, in 1884 he married Ellen Lostus, who was born in 1865 in Ireland, and came to Scranton, Pa , in 1882. Mr. Connor owns a farm in Green Settlement, and is a farmer and miner by occupation. To Mr. and Mrs. Connor seven children have been born, Bridget, Ellen, John, Margaret, Patrick, Winifred and Mary.

CHARLES E. JACKSON

Was born at Ithaca, N. Y., in 1865. He is a son of Cornelius W. and Elanora (Stevens) Jackson, both natives of New York state. Mr. Jackson was manager of the coal office for W. H. Blight at Elmira, when a young man, and in 1834 came to Bernice, where he worked for the same employer as book-keeper and assistant postmaster. In 1894 he built Hotel Jackson, of which he has since been proprietor. In 1886, Mr. Jackson married Emaline E. Utz, a daughter of John Utz, of Dushore. Mr. and Mrs Jackson are the parents of three children, Charles U., Robert E. and Richard W.

FRANK MEYER

Was born in Cherry in 1857, He was a son of John Meyer, who was a native of Lehigh county, and came to Cherry in 1853. Mr. Meyer's mother was Mary Hoffa, a daughter of Jacob Hoffa, of Cherry. Mr. Meyer's ancestors were of German descent. In 1878, Mr. Meyer married Emma Vogel, who was born in Germany in 1857 and came to America when 16 years of age. Mr. Meyer has been engaged in mining and lumbering and in 1893 went into the coal business at Hughesville, where he remained only a short time. In 1898 he entered into the mercantile business at Mildred, where he owns a fine store and residence. To Mr. and Mrs. Meyer' have been born four children, Raymond, Ruth, Julius and Henry.

CHARLES F. MCINTIRE

Was born at New Albany in 18fi3. His father, Alvin McIntire, was a native of Owego, N. Y., and came to Sullivan county in 1864, settling in Forks township, in 1S86. Mr. McIntire married Dora Warburton, a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Hottenstein) Warburton, of Forks township. Joseph Warburton's father, John Warburton, married a Miss Clark. They were of English descent and were among the early settlers of Forks township. Mr. McIntire is foreman in the Gunton coal breaker at Bernice. To Mr. and Mrs. McIntire have been born five children, Alvah J., Julia M., Mary E., Grace M. and Nellie B.

WILLIAM STIFF

Was born in Cherry in 1865. He was a son of Henry Stiff, a native of England, who came to America in 1848. Ten years later he came to Cherry township, where he cleared up a farm. He married Lena Huffmaster. Mr. Stiff married Alice Kinsley, in 1895. She is a daughter of William Kinsley, and was born in Cherry in 1874. Mr. Stiff owns a farm in East Cherry, which he tills. To Mr. and Mrs. Stiff four children have been born, Rebecca E., Ada M., Lena A. and Zora S.

FRANK DOHM

Was born in La Porte township, in 1858. His father, Peter Dohm. was a native of Germany, and came to America, being one of the early settlers of La Porte township. Mr. Dohm owns a farm near Saiterfield, and is engaged in farming and dairying. In 1885 Mr. Dohm married Augusta Rinebold, who was born in Germany in 1847. She was a daughter of Anthony Kinebold, who came from Germany and settled on the farm now owned by Mr. Dohm. To Mr. and Mrs. Dohm have been born one daughter, Bessie.

STEFATHER BROTHERS

Sylvester Stefather came from Germany to America in 1834, landing at Philadelphia, in 1837. He settled in Colley, and moved from there to Dushore, on the farm now owned by Stefather Brothers, in 1842. Mr. Stefather married Elizabeth Martin. Edward and John, sons of Sylvester Stefather, both single men, are the members of the firm of Stefather Brothers. Their aged mother lives with them on their farm near Dushore, where they have a shingle mill and a chop mill, run by water power. They had an older bother. Lucas Stefather, who died recently at Lopez.

PRESTON CRAWFORD

Was born in Tunkhannock township, Wyoming county, in 1862. He is a eon of George Crawford, who was born at Philadelphia, and located in Sullivan county, N. Y., later in Wyoming county. The Crawfords are of English and German descent. Mr. Crawford came to Sullivan county to lumber in 1881. He married Mary Thrasher in 1882. She was born in 1864 in Forks township. She is a daughter of Levi Thrasher, who married a daughter of Samuel Hunsinger, of Forks. Mr. Crawford lives on a farm in East Cherry, and is also engaged in mining. To Mr. and Mrs. Crawford seven children have been born, Maud, Levi, William, Lloyd, Ellen, Marvin and Warren.

EZRA HUNSINGER

Was born in Forks township in 1875. He is a son of Barney Hunsinger, whose father, Samuel Hunsinger, settled in Forks at an early date. Mr. Hunsinger's great-grand father, George Hunsinger, was one of the first settlers of Cherry township. Mr. Hunsinger's mother, Emma (Rowe) Hunsinger, was a daughter of Richard Rowe, one of the early settlers of Forks township. Mr. Hunsinger married Emma Bleiler in 1900, who was born fn Forks township in 1880. She is a daughter of A K. Bleiler, whose father, Isaac Bleiler, moved from Lehigh county to Forks in 1851. To Mr. and Mrs. Hunsinger one son Clyde, has been born,

P. W. HUNSINGER

Was born in Cherry in 1854. He was a son of Levi Hunsinger, whose father, Barney Hunsinger, was a son of Barnhart Hunsinger, who came from France. Levi Hunsinger was born in Sugarloaf township, Luzerne county, in 1815, and was married in 1846, to Esther Frye. P. W. Hunsinger married Irene May nard, who was born in Cherry in 1855. She was a daughter of Davis Maynard, of Towanda. Her mother was Eva (Graves) Maynard. The Graves' came from Germany and were among the early settlers of Cherry. Mr. Hunsinger owns a small farm and has a saw mill and store about one mile from Dushore. To Mr. and Mrs. Hunsinger have been born four children, Merton L., Walter J., Charles L and Blanche L.

E D. SUTLIFF

Was born at Bloomingdale, Luzerne county, in 1877. He is a son of A. W. Sutliff, of Bloomingdale, Pa. The Sutliff's came from Connecticut to the Wyoming Valley at an early date. Mr. Sutliff married Mary Goss in 1899. She was a daughter of R. G. Goss. She was born at Rittenhouse, Luzerne county, in 1877. Her ancestors were among the early settlers of Luzerne county. Mr. Sutliff purchased the general mercantile business of Julius Vogle at Mildred, in the spring of 1903, and is continuing the business. To Mr. and Mrs. Sutliff one son, Richard, has been born.

WILLIAM H. YONKIN

Was born in Cherry in 1838. He was a son of Henry Yonkin, Jr., who came to Sullivan county in 1823. Mr. Yonkin owns a fine farm of 100 acres joining the farm on which he was reared. In 1874 he was elected sheriff of Sullivan county, which office he held for three years. He served as tax collector of Cherry township two years, constable five years, town clerk four years and township treasurer two years. At present he is store keeper and guager at the Schaad distillery at Mildred. In 1869 Mr. Yonkin married Hannah A. Fairchild, who was born in Cherry township in 1847. She was a daughter of Stephen and Nancy (Thomas) Fairchild. Mr. Fairchild was born in New Jersey and came to Sullivan county with his parents, who were among the early settlers of Cherry. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas, the parents of Mrs. Fairchild, were also early settlers in Cherry township. To Mr. and Mrs. Yonkin have been born two children, Otis F. and Mina Claire.

GEORGE W. YONKIN

Was born in 1836. He was a son of Henry and Barbara (Hartzig) Yonkin, the father a native of France, having- been born while his parents were on their way from Germany to America, and the mother a native of Switzerland. Mr. Yonkin purchased a tract of timber land near Cherry Mills and cleared up a fine farm. In 1861 he married Mary J. Sweeney, who was born in county Clare, Ireland, in 1844. She came to America with her parents in 1852, settling at Canton, Pa., where her father followed his trade, as shoemaker, and died in 1875. Her mother lived until 1888. To Mr. and Mrs. Yonkin three children have been born, Emily, who married Lloyd McCarty, of Dushore; G. Adison, of Cherry and John H., of Lopez.

JAMES S. GAINER

Was born in Cherry in 1856. He was a son of Thomas Gainer, who was born in the county of Longford, Ireland, in 1835, and came to Philadelphia, with his parents when one year old. Later the family moved to Berks county and then to Bradford county and from there to Sullivan, on the farm near Cherry Mills, where Mr. Gainer now lives, settling on that farm in 1841. Mr. Gainer married Bridget Farley in 18H1. She was born in 1867 in county Caven, Ireland. She was a daughter of Cornelius and Margaret Farley. When 16 years of age she came to America with her brother, Patrick Farley, of Wilmot township, Bradford county. Mr. and Mrs. Gainer have adopted two boys, Edward and Augustus.

CHARLES S. SICK

Was born in Cherry township in 1841. He was a son of Charles Sick, who was born in Baden, Germany, in 1815, and came to Camden, N. J., in 1836. Three years later he moved to Cherry township, near Cherry Mills, where he followed shoe-making and farming. Charles S. Sick purchased a farm at Cherry Mills; where he conducts a store and post office. For a number of years he owned the gristmill at that place and was engaged in manufacturing flour and feed. In 1866 he married Hanna Yonkin, who was born in Cherry township in 1846. She was a daughter of Peter und Catharine (Suber) Yonkin. To Mr. and Mrs. Sick four children were born,

Clara, who married John Gross, of Cherry Mills;

Allie. who married Morris Baumgartner, of Sunbury:

Blanche, who married John M. Dempsey, of Cherry Mills,

Edna, who married Fred Eichenlaub, of Sunbury.

JOHN M. DEMPSEY

Was born at Olyphant, Lackawanna county, Pa., in 1874. He is a son of Anthony Dempsey, of Cherry township, who was a native of Ireland, and came to America when a young man, and settled at Olyphant, where he married Ellen Carden, a native of that county, who was a daughter of James Carden. Anthony Dempsey came to Cherry township in 1877, settling on a farm near Cherry Mills. John M. Dempsey, the subject of this sketch, is a blacksmith by trade and owns a blacksmith shop and residence at Cherry Mills, where be resides. In 1889 he married Blanche Sick, a daughter of Charles S. Sick, of Cherry Mills. She was born at Cherry Mills in 1879. To Mr. and Mrs. Dempsey two children have been born, Geraldine and Harold.

T. V. MCLAUGHLIN

Was born at Minersville. Schuylkill county, in 1859. His father, Patrick McLaughlin was a native of Ireland. In 1883, Mr. McLaughlin married Mary Brennen, who was born in Schuylkill county in 1855. She is a daughter of James E. Brennen, an ex-member of the Legislature and an extensive coal operator. Mr. McLaughlin commenced life as a slate picker, then learned the machinist's trade, later became mining engineer, and for the last 14 years has been superintendent of mines. At present he is outside superintendent at the Bernice mines. To Mr. and Mrs. McLaughlin three children have been born, Harry P., Eugene and Mary.

JOHN WAPLES

Was born in Schuylkill county, in 1848. His father. James Waples, was a native of Ireland and came to America when a young man, settling first in Schuylkill county, and about 50 years ago moved to Wilmot township, Bradford county. In 1883 Mr. Waples married Anna Middendorf, who was born in Cherry township. She was a daughter of Barnhart Middendorf, a native of Prussia, Germany, who settled in Cherry township in 1800. Mr. Waples settled on a farm in Wilmot township, which he sold two years ago and moved to Bernice, where he is engaged in mining. To Mr. and Mrs. Waples have been born six children, Catharine, Frank, Tressa, James, Joseph and Eugene.

J. P Murphy

J. P. Murphy, of Mildred, was born at Ashland, Pa , in 1870. His father, Patrick Murphy, was a native of Ireland and came to America about 47 years ago, settling first at Wyalusing. When Bernice was first started he moved there, later to Ashland, Pa., and after living there a few years, came back to Bernice. J. P. Murphy conducts a restaurant at Mildred. In 1901 he married Ella Driscoll, a daughter of Patrick Driscoll, who came from Ireland to Pottsville in 1864; two years later he came to Sullivan county, and was one of the first miners to locate at Bernice when that town was started. The family still resides at that place.

PATRICK HANNON

of Mildred, was born in Ireland, in 1852. He came to America, landing at New York city in 1869, and came to Sullivan county in 1870, working at the La Porte tannery eighteen months. In 1872 he took charge of the coal yard at Bernice, and held that position until 1901. About two years ago he purchased a fine residence at Mildred, where he resides. At present he is night watchman at the Likens breaker. Mr. Hannon was school director 8 years and township treasurer 2 years. He is a member of Div. No. 1, A. O. H., and of Local Assembly, No. 7137, K. of L,, of Mildred; Katonka Tribe, No. 336, Imperial Order of Bed Men, of Mildred, and of Davidson No. 1, United Mine Workers. In 1873 Mr. Hannon married Sarah Jane Burke, who was born in Luzerne county in 1855. She was a daughter of John Burke, who was a native of Ireland, but spent most of his life previous to coming to Luzerne county, in England. Mrs. Hannon's mother's maiden name was Margaret Kane. She came to Scranton when 16 years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Burke were among the first settlers of that place. To Mr. and Mrs. Hannon eight children have been born, Patrick J., Theressa, Mary, John, Edward, Lucy, Ella, and James L., who died in infancy.

CHARLES COOK

Was born in Cherry township in 1852. His father, Conrad Cook, was one of the early settlers of Cherry township. His mother, Mrs. Conrad Cook, was a daughter of Joseph and Urse (Kani) Baumgartner, who were natives of Germany and settled in Cherry in 1828. Mr. Cook is a wagon maker by trade, and owns a handsome residence and shop near Cherry Mills, where He is engaged in business. In 1S87 lie married Florence Richley, who was born in Cherry in 1862. She is a daughter of Wendell and Elizabeth (Litzelswope) Richley, who settled on a farm near Cherry Mills in 1840. To Mr. and Mrs. Cook, one daughter, Alma E., has been born.

JOHN BIDDLE

Was born on Hessen, on the Rhine, Germany, in 1840. In 1861 he came to America, remaining in New York city three years, when he came to Sullivan county. He dealt in stock and hides for many years. He owns a fine large farm in Cherry near Dushore, which he is engaged in tilling. In 186"i he married Mary J. Weaver, who was born in Cherry in 1846. She was a daughter of Barnhart and Mary (Thrasher) Weaver, who were among the early settlers of Cherry township To Mr. and Mrs. Weaver (Biddle?) one daughter, Stella M , has been born.

NATHAN C. WEAVER

Was born in Cherry in 1863. He was a son of Barnhart and Mary (Thrasher) Weaver, and a grand-son of Christian Weaver, who was of German descent and came from Luzerne county to Cherry in 1847. In 1890 Mr. Weaver married Bernice H. Kinsley, who was born in Cherry in 1872. She is a daughter of Jacob Kinsley, of Cherry, whose father and grand-father were early settlers in Cherry township. Mr. Weaver owns two farms in East Cherry. To Mr. and Mrs. Weaver have been born four children, Jacob M., Nathan Ellery, Leonard E. and Beatrice C.


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