Desserts
 

APPLE DOUGHNUTS

Make a batter as for Shaker raised doughnuts, adding one half cup sugar. When cool add two tablespoons of home-made yeast and flour enough to knead. Let this rise over night. In the morning roll out and cut with a biscuit cutter, folk like Parker house rolls, and let rise ten minutes, then fry in deep beef fat. Prepare the apple by stewing, sweetening, and adding spice, cinnamon or nutmeg as desired. Split the hot doughnuts and put in a generous spoonful of the apple.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

BAKED HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one half cup butter, one cup milk, three eggs, four cups flour, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream of tartar, salt, one quart huckleberries.

Beat the whites seperately, and add the last thing before berries. Roll berries in flour. Bake in deep pudding dish one hour. Bake in deep pudding dish one hour. Serve hot, with sauce made of twice as much sugar as butter. Sauce should be chilled. Flavor it with rose.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

CHARLOTTE RUSSE

Whites of two eggs, one pint cream, one-half cupful sugar, one-half teaspoonful vanilla. Beat until it thickens and serve on stale sponge cake.

From Mrs. J. C. Chace, R. I.

Source: The Book Of Priceless Recipes, By hahnemann Hospital Assoc., Phila., 1907, Transcribed by C. Anthony

CHOCOLATE CAKE

Delicious little choclolate cakes to serve at five o'clock tea are made from one quarter pound grated sweet chocolate, one quarter pound sugar, three eighths pound flour, three eggs, one quarter pound almonds blanched and cut fine, length-wise; mix together, adding the beaten eggs last, and knead well, dusting with a little flour to prevent sticking, roll out not too thin, and cut with fancy cutter; bake on sheets, rubbed over with the best of salad oil, in a moderate oven.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

COCOANUT CAKE

Grate two ounces cocoanut, and allow it to dry for two days. Beat one quarter pound butter and one half pound powdered sugar to a cream, then add about one tablespoonful of milk. Beat well three eggs and add them to the butter and sugar. Shake in one half pound flour and one teaspoonful baking powder; add one teaspoonful of vanilla essence, and lastly, the grated cocoanut, beating the mixture well as each ingredient is added. Mix all well together and put in a buttered cake tin. Bake in a gentle oven for one hour.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

CORNSTARCH CAKE

1/2 cup butter,
1 cup sugar,
1/2 cup milk,
1/2 cup cornstarch,
1 cup flour,
2 teaspoons baking powder,
1/2 tablespoons vanilla or,
1/2 teaspoons almond extract.
 

Cream the butter and sugar. Add milk and the dry ingredients which have been sifted together. Lastly, add flavoring, and fold in the beaten egg whites. Pour into buttered pan, and bake in a moderate overn. 

Source: University of RI Bulletin, Cooperative Extension, Vol IV, No. 9,  Nov. 1914,  Transcribed by C. Anthony

GINGERBREAD

Three pounds of flour, one half pound of butter, two tablespoonfuls of ginger, two tablespoons of soda. Put the butter, flour, and other ingredients together and mix as much molasses as will make a dough. Roll into thin sheets. Cut in any shape you fancy and bake in a moderate oven.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

GRAHAM PUDDING

One and one-half cups of Graham flour; one cup of milk; one-half cup of molasses; one cup of raisins, seeded and chopped; one teaspoonful soda; one-half teaspoonful salt. Sift the Graham flour to make it light, but return the bran. Dissolve the soda in one tablespoonful of the milk and add the remainder of the milk, molasses and salt. Then pour all the mixture on the Graham flour, beating it thoroughly with a spoon; then stir in the fruit (and spice if you wish). Pour the pudding into a well greased mould and steam four hours. Serve with a wine or any rich sauce.

From Mrs. George A. Mumford, of Rhode Island, Alternate Lady Manager.

Source: Favorite Dishes, Compiled by Carrie V. Shuman, Chicago, 1893, Transcribed by C. Anthony

INDIAN MEAL PUDDING

In a mixing bowl place one teacup Rhode Island corn meal, five generous tablespoonfuls molasses, or use sugar. Add a litle salt, spice to taste, a tablespoonful or more of butter, and half a cup seeded raisins. Can be made richer by adding chopped suet, if desired. Upon these ingredients pour gradually one quart of boiling milk, rubbing the lumps even. Turn into a greased pudding dish, and just before placing in the oven pour in half a cup or more of cold milk, and do not stir much. Bake rather slowly until done.

To spoil this pudding stir the meal into the boiling milk; to have it rich and satisfying and wholesome, follow directions as given.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

PRUNE WHIP

Cook one quart of prunes until tender; add one half cup of sugar. Rub through a colander. Beat the whites of four eggs stiff, add prunes and bake slowly fifteen minutes in a dish set over hot water.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

SHAKER APPLE CAKE

Mix one cup sour buttermilk, one teaspoon soda, one quarter teaspoon salt, with sufficient flour to make the dough thick enough to roll out, adding two tablespoons beef drippings and one cup chopped apple, not too sour. Bake in cake tins, and eat hot with maple syrup or vinegar sauce.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

SHAKER DRIED APPLE SAUCE

Wash and soak dried apples. Add one half pound sugar, and boil twelve hours, adding water as needed. This makes a delicious red apple sauce.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony

SPONGE PUDDING

Mix one cup sifted flour with one cup milk, and pour into one cup boiling milk, stirring till it thickens, then add a half cup each of sugar and butter and beat. When cool, add six eggs separately beaten and bake in dish set in hot water one hour. Serve with hard sauce.

Source: Modern Housekeeping Magazine, August 1905, Transcribed by C. Anthony