Notable Men of Abbeville County, South Carolina


ACKER, WILLIAM B.—Baptist minister, Abbeville, South Carolina. Born July 20, 1839, in Greenville, South Carolina. Education acquired in Williamston Academy. Taught school at Donalds, South Carolina. In May, 1851, volunteered in Gist Rifles, a company gotten up at Williamston for the Confederate service. Joined the Hampton Legion. Lost an arm in the battle of Seven Pines. Is treasurer of the Abbeville Baptist Association. Taught school after the war. Later engaged in farming. Married Miss Barmore, a daughter of Larkin Barmore, October 8, 1862. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 1)



AIKEN, DAVID—Eldest son of the late Honorable D. Wyatt Aiken. for many years a member of Congress from Abbeville County. David Aiken, the subject of this sketch, was born at Stony Point, in what is now Greenwood County, on November 4, 1857. Received his preliminary training under the instruction of Mr. W. C. Benet; spent one year under Rev. George Round, and two years at the Carolina Military Institute, at Charlotte, North Carolina. He married Miss Annie Mary Connor, of Cokesbury, November 12, 1878. After marriage he moved on the farm near the old homestead, where he remained until January, 1892. at which time he moved to Coronaco and engaged in merchandising. Moved, in 1899, to Greenwood, where he now resides and is engaged in the mercantile business. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 2)


BARNWELL, BENJAMIN SMITH—Bank cashier. Son of William and Sara (Gibbs) Barnwell of Beaufort, South Carolina. Was born February 8, 1834. He attended the Beaufort College several years. He married Mary Anna McCaslan of Abbeville County, December 10, 1867. For several years before the Civil War. he was in the counting house in Charleston and since the war he has been engaged in the mercantile business for fifteen years. In 1885 he established the National Bank of Abbeville, and has been cashier since that time. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 18)


BECKHAM, ROBERT S., M. D.—Physician. Born in Lancaster County, South Carolina, March 9, 1839. His father was clerk of the court of Lancaster twelve years. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish. Received literary education from the Cokesbury Conference School, and graduated in medicine from the Charleston Medical College. Practised his profession at Pleasant Hill, Lancaster County, until 1872. Moved to Lowndesville. Abbeville County, where he practised medicine
and was trial justice four years. Has since practised medicine at Kershaw, and is also connected with the insurance business. Is Chancellor Commander of Knights of Pythias, Knight of Honor and Mason. Was delegate to the Haskell conferences in 1890. Married Miss H. Elizabeth Cauthen, May 3, 1860.
("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 22-23)


BELL, JESSE RUTLEDGE, M. D.—A practicing physician of Due West, South Carolina. Son of J. H. Bell. M. D. His primary training was received in the common schools of the county. He graduated from Erskine College in 1893. Principal of Preparatory Department of Erskine College, 1893-1896. He entered the Medical College of South Carolina in 1896, and graduated third in a class of ninety-nine, thereby winning a position on the stafT of the City Hospital of Charleston, South Carolina. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 23-24)


BLAKE, JOHN RENNIE—Treasurer of Abbeville County. Was born at Greenwood, South Carolina, October 4, 1852. Received academic training in the schools of Greenwood, and Cokesbury, South Carolina. Then entered the sophomore class of Erskine College, where he graduated with distinction, in 1871, at the age of nineteen. He married Miss Annie Johnson, of Lowndesville, South Carolina, on October 4, 1877. Taught school at Ninety-Six, Coronaco and other places. Was mayor of Greenwood, in 1876, and merchandised there for a few years. Was elected treasurer of Abbeville County in 1890. Has been treasurer and vice-president of the State Alliance for the past four years, declining the presidency of same. Is treasurer of State Alliance Exchange a director of the Merchants and Farmers Bank at Abbeville, a commissioner of the South Carolina Interstate and West Indian Exposition, and president of the Abbeville County Fair Association. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 31)


BONHAM, MILLEDGE LIPSCOMB—Son of Governor Milledge L. and Mrs. Annie Griffin Bonham. Was born at Edgefield Court-house, South Carolina, on October 16, 1854. He received his academic schooling at Edgefleld and Columbia. Graduated from the Carolina Military Institute, under Colonel John P. Thomas, with the rank of adjutant. He began the study of law at Barnwell under his brother-in-law, Colonel Robert Aldrich. His studies were interrupted by calls to duty as a member of a Red Shirt company; but he took his full part in all the labors, hazards and victories of that epoch. He was admitted to the bar in February, 1877, and settled at Ninety-Six with a view to assist in the establishment of a county seat at that place—of a county to be formed of a part of Edgefield, Abbeville, and Laurens counties. Governor McSweeney at the same time, established the "Ninety-Six Guardian," of which young Bonham became editor. Two years later Mr. Bonham moved to Newberry and thence to Abbeville. Here he entered actively on the practice of his profession, and in 1881 was appointed by Governor Hagood, Master for the county. This office was held until 1885, when he voluntarily retired from it and took up the practice of law. He was captain of the Abbeville Rifles (in command of which he was at Yorktown, in 1881) in the regiment from this State in command of Hugh S. Thompson (afterwards governor). This regiment was sent by the State to take part in the ceremonies incident to the celebration of the centennial of the surrender of Lord Cornwallis in 1781. In August, 1886, on the death of General M. A. M. Manigault, adjutant and inspector-general of the State, he was appointed by Governor Sheppard to fill the unexpired term, and in November of that year, he was elected to a full term of two years. He held the office until 1890, when he was defeated. In 1894, he moved to Anderson, and formed a partnership with Captain H. H. Watkins for the practice of law. He married in 1878. Daisy, daughter of Judge A. P. Aldrich, of Barnwell. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 39)


BONNER, OLIVER YOUNG—Son of Rev. J. I. Bonner D. D. Was born In Due West, South Carolina, on November 15, 1863. His father was the founder of Due West Female College, and its president for twenty years. He was also editor of the "Associated Reform Presbyterian." The subject of this sketch graduated at Erskine College, in 1883. Spent two years in Erskine Theological Seminary, and graduated at Union Theological Seminary, New York. He was pastor of churches for four years in Lineshe County, Tennessee, and since 1891 has supplied the Associate Reform Presbyterian Church of Due West, South Carolina. He is also one of the editors of the "Associate Reform Presbyterian." He married Miss Belle H. Neel, on November 15, 1892. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 30-40)


BRANCH, WILLIAM TULLY—Son of Dr. Isaac and Fannie Branch. His parents came from Vermont to Abbeville County, South Carolina, in 1825, and his father practiced medicine in Abbeville until 1872. W. T. Branch was born April 23. 1845. He attended the public school until sixteen years of age, and entered the South Carolina Military Academy, in 1862. In 1863, entered the Civil War with the South Carolina Military Cadets as a whole, and remained until the close of the war, Was under Brigadier-General Elliott, of Johnston's army. Surrendered at Hillsboro, North Carolina. In 1869, went into the insurance work, and has been at it ever since. He is Past Grand Master of Masons of South Carolina, Past Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of South Carolina. In June, 1870, married Miss Annie C. Wilson, of Greenwood, South Carolina. Lives at Abbeville, South Carolina. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 45)



BROWNLEE ROBERT CALVIN—Son of Samuel R. and Lorrie Brownlee of Due West. South Carolina. Was born in Due West South Carolina May 31, 1854(?). He graduated from Erskine College in 1877. Married Miss Fannie P. Bonner dauaghter of J. L Bonner in September 1884(?). He was employed as salesman in Greenville a few years after learing college, and in 1880 began business on his own account at Due West. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 58)



John Caldwell Calhoun

7th Vice President of the United States
In office
March 4, 1825 – December 28, 1832

John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century, at the center of the foreign policy and financial disputes of his age and best known as a spokesman for slavery, nullification and the rights of electoral minorities, such as the Southern states.

After a short stint in the South Carolina legislature, where he wrote legislation making South Carolina the first state to adopt white manhood suffrage, Calhoun began his federal career as a staunch nationalist, favoring war with Britain in 1812 and a federal program of internal improvements afterwards. He reversed course in the 1820s, when the "Corrupt Bargain" of 1825 led him to renounce nationalism in favor of States Rights of the sort Thomas Jefferson and James Madison had propounded in the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of 1798. Although he died a decade before the American Civil War broke out, Calhoun was a major inspiration to the secessionists who created the short-lived Confederate States of America. Nicknamed the "cast-iron man" for his staunch determination to defend the causes in which he believed, Calhoun pushed the theory of nullification, a states' rights theory under which states could declare null and void federal laws they deemed to be unconstitutional. He was an outspoken proponent of the institution of slavery, which he defended as a "positive good" rather than as a necessary evil. His rhetorical defense of slavery was partially responsible for escalating Southern threats of secession in the face of mounting abolitionist sentiment in the North.

Calhoun held several high federal-government offices. He served as the seventh Vice President of the United States, first under John Quincy Adams (1825–1829) and then under Andrew Jackson (1829–1832), but resigned the Vice Presidency to enter the United States Senate, where he had more power. He served in the United States House of Representatives (1810–1817) and was Secretary of War (1817–1824) under James Monroe and Secretary of State (1844–1845) under John Tyler.
(Wikipedia.org, Abbeville, South Carolina)


James S. Cothan, (1830-1897), born near Abbeville, United States Congressman from South Carolina
John Henry Logan, (1822-1885), born in Abbeville, physician, served as a surgeon in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, professor at Atlanta Medical College, and editor of the Atlanta Medical Journal.
Benjamin Glover Shields, (1808-1850), born in Abbeville, was a United States Congressman from Alabama.
John C. Calhoun, 7th American Vice President under Andrew Jackson, notable States Rights Activist, and later the 16th Secretary of State of the United States.
(Wikipedia.org, Abbeville, South Carolina)


COOK, JOHN AMOS—Son of Eliza M. and Nathaniel Cook. Born in Chesterfield County, South Carolina. April 27, 1866, near Lynches River. Parents moved to Lancaster County when he was about one year old. His education was limited to a few months at the public schools. Married Miss Miranda C. Hitton, on January 26, 1888. After marrying, bought a small farm and continued to farm, until taking charge of the auditor's office, to which position he was elected, in 1896. Re-elected in primary of 1898, without opposition, and re-elected, for the third term, in primary of 1900. on the first ballot, over two prominent competitors, with a majority of 534 votes. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 93)


COTHRAN, WILLIAM COULTER—Member of the Greenville bar. Was born, August 28, 1872, at Abbeville. South Carolina. He attended the high school at Abbeville, and entered the South Carolina University, in 1890. Began work in railroad service as general agent of Blue Ridge Railroad, resigned and studied law. Admitted to the bar, May 20, 1897. He is a member of the law firm of Cothran & Cothran. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 95-96)


DeBRUHL, MARSHALL PRINGLE—Born in Abbeville, South Carolina. He attended the private schools of Abbeville until fifteen years of age. He was for two years a clerk in drug store. Married Miss Kate C. Calhoun, who died, October 22. 1900. Has been a member of the House of Representatives, since 1898, and is now actively engaged in the practice of law at Abbeville, South Carolina. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 109)



DuPRE, JULIUS H—Cashier of the Farmers' Bank of Abbeville, South Carolina. Was born in Lowndesville, South Carolina, November 8, 1857. Attended the public schools, and was one year at Wofford College. Married Miss Josephine Hill on the 5th of February, 1880. He was elected alderman of the city of Abbeville, four times. Is a notary publie and is in the fire insurance business. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 124)


EVANS, BARNARD BEE—Third son of General N. G. Evans and Ann Victoria Gary. Was born on the 14th of September, 1865, at Cokesbury, Abbeville County, South Carolina. President of the South Carolina Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and manager of the Union Mutual Life Insurance Company. First assistant Money Order Bureau, Department of Post, Havana, Cuba, 1899, under American occupation. Government appointed him junior warden, and one of the organi-zero of the first English speaking lodge of Masons, in Cuba, at Havana. Major of the first South Carolina Brigade. He has always been prominent in local and State politics. He is now practicing law at Edgefield, South Carolina. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 135-136)


EVANS, JOHN GARY—Was born at Cokesbury, in Abbeville County, South Carolina, on the 15th day of October, 1863. He was the second son of General Nathan George Evans and Ann Victoria Evans (nee Gary). Nathan George Evans was born at Marion, South Carolina, on the 15th of September, 1827. He entered Randolph-Macon College, in Virginia. Was subsequently appointed a cadet at West Point, by John C. Calhoun; then United States Senator from South Carolina. He graduated from West Point, in 1848, and was shortly afterwards made a captain in the Second Dragoons. He gained renown as an Indian fighter, and was awarded a sword by the State of South Carolina for gallantry in the batte of Wichita. In this fight General Evans killed the Indian Chief in a hand to hand combat, capturing his head-dress used as a flag, and the bow and arrow and spear. After Carolina seceded, Captain Evans offered his services to his State. He was made a colonel, and, before the first battle of Manassas, a brigadier-general. At the First Ma-nassas, he distinguished himself at the defense of Stone Bridge, holding in check, with his small force of five thousand men, the entire Division of McDowell, numbering over seventeen thousand; this action saved the day to the Confederates. He was the hero of Balls Bluff or Leesburg, and for his gallantry in this battle, was thanked, a second time by his State; and awarded a gold medal by the General Assembly, the only one of its kind ever presented. He died, in 1869, leaving his widow and four children, all of whom now reside in South Carolina. Ann Victoria Gary, the mother of John Gary Evans, was born at Cokesbury, Abbeville, County, South Carolina, on the 15th of September, 1837. She was the daughter of Dr. Thomas R. Gary, a distinguished and representative citizen of the county, and Mary Ann Porter who was a descendant of John Knox and kinswoman of John Witherspoon, the signer of the Declaration of Independence. Both branches of this family are distinguished for their prominence in political and business affairs of South Carolina. The Evanses, Garys and Wither-spoon8 having been represented in every war of the United States, and having been members of every important convention of South Carolina. John Gary Evans attended the Cokesbury Conference School, a celebrated preparatory school for the old South Carolina College. He afterwards went to Union College, Schenectady, New York, entering the class of 1883. He was elected class president, in his junior year, and was the youngest member of his class by several years. Upon the death of his distinguished uncle and guardian. General Martin W. Gary. Evans left college just before his graduation, and entered the law office of his uncle Major William T. Gary, at Augusta, Georgia. In 1887, he opened an office at Aiken, South Carolina, for the practice of law. In 1888, he was elected a member of the Legislature, from Aiken County; and again returned, in 1890. He was Identified with all the important measures before that body, and introduced a bill repealing the old Civil Rights Law which was intended to humiliate the white people of 10 the State by the carpet-bag government. He introduced the resolution calling a Constitutional Convention. In 1892, he was elected to the State Senate, from Aiken County, for the term of four years; but served only two, having received the nomination of his party for governor, in 1894. He was elected to succeed Governor Tillman, and his administration was a stormy one, as the Dispensary Law, which he had fathered while a member of the Senate, was being fought most bitterly by the opposition. An effort was also made to set aside the law, calling a Constitutional Convention, and the United States courts were appealed to by the Republicans and the opponents of the Dispensary Law. Judge Nathan Goff took great pleasure in granting an injunction against the governor and State officials which brought forth from Governor Evans a scathing denunciation of the Judge and his allies, and the statement that "The Constitutional Convention would be held, Judge or no Judge"; and it was held, and South Carolina elected Governor Evans president of the Convention. This Constitution has been attacked by the Republican party for the reason that it disfranchised the negro; but the Supreme Court of the United States sustained it; and its practical operation and effect has been to disfranchise 200,000 ignorant negro voters, and to place the State forever in control of the intelligent, and property-owning citizens. Governor Evans was opposed to the waging of the War against Spain, but after it was declared by Congress, he offered his services to the president in any capacity he might see fit to accept them. He was commissioned a major, and assigned to duty as inspector general on the staff of Major Keifer, of General Lee's Seventh Corps. Upon reaching Cuba, Major Evans was detached from the Seventh Army Corps, and attached to the staff of Major General Wm. Ludlow, governor of the department of Havana. He assisted in organizing the civil government of Havana and instituted the first court, on the Island, formed upon American ideas and principles. Upon the expiration of his term, he returned to South Carolina, and is now engaged in the practice of law, at Spartanburg, South Carolina. On the 15th of December, 1897, he married Emily Mansfield Plume, daughter of Honorable David S. Plume of Waterbury, Connecticut, an influential manufacturer and banker as well as statesman. Governor Evans has a daughter, Emily Victoria, born August 10, 1899. He is a member of the Spartan City and Elks Clubs of Spartanburg, the Commercial Club of Augusta, the Waterbury Club of Waterbury, Connecticut, and the Union College Alumni of New York. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 136-139)


GARY, EUGENE BLACKBURN—Associate justice of the Supreme Court of South Carolina. Born at Cokesbury, South Carolina, August 27, 1854. After attending the schools at that place until 1872, he entered the South Carolina College, and graduated in the classical branches. At the age of eighteen, he began the study of law under his uncle, General Mart W. Gary, of Edgefield. Was admitted to the bar a few weeks after attaining his majority. After graduating at the South Carolina College, he taught school, for one year, at Hodges. He began the practice of law, at Abbeville. South Carolina, where he continued until 1894, attaining a front rank in his profession, being engaged in nearly every case of importance tried in Abbeville and the surrounding counties. In 1881, when General Carlos J. Stolbrand contested the election of the Honorable D. Wyatt Aiken for Congress, Mr. Gary represented Colonel Aiken, and succeeded in seating his client. He was for many years county chairman of the Democratic party in Abbeville County, his election being unanimous. He was a member of the State Democratic Executive Committee for several years. He served one term in the Legislature, and there gained an enviable reputation. His work on the floor of the House calling him the next year to become lieutenant governor of the State, to which office he was re-elected. While serving in his second term as lieutenant governor, he was elected associate justice of the Supreme Court, in which capacity he is now serving his State with dignity and ability, having just been re-elected. He married Miss Eliza Tusten, a direct descendant of the Honorable Benjamin Tusten, member of the first Colonial Congress of New York, whose son Benjamin, was a colonel in the Revolutionary War. Colonel Benjamin Tusten was killed while leading his regiment in the fight for American independence, and his brave deeds are commemorated by a monument erected by the public at Boshen, New York. Justice Gary's mother was Miss Mary Carolina Blackburn, a lineal descendant of William Blackburn, a hero of the battle of King's Mountain. His father was Dr. F. S. Gary, an eminent physician, who held many positions of trust. On his father's side he is a lineal descendant of John Witherspoon, who was born near Glasgow. Scotland, in 1670, and suffered persecution during the time of the Stuarts. John Witherspoon was a grandson of Mrs. Lucia Welch, the grandmother of John Knox, who married a lineal descendant of Robert Bruce, of Scotland. He is a member of very distinguished family in this State. His only brothers are Judge Ernest Gary, judge of the Fifth Circuit, and Honorable Frank B. Gary, who was for many years speaker of the House of Representatives. His only sister is Mrs. James M. Eason, of Charleston. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 155-155)


GARY, FRANK BOYD—Born at Cokesbury, on the 9th of March, 1860. His early education was obtained in the Cokesbury Conference School. Afterwards entered Union College, Schenectady, New York, where he remained for three years, graduating, in 1881. Married Miss Maria Lee Evans, January 6th, 1897. He was elected to the House of Representatives, in 1890, serving continuously until 1901, but was not a candidate for re-election. He held the position as speaker of the House, upon retiring; was also a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1895. He is trustee of the city schools of Abbeville, South Carolina. A member of the board of trustees that located and built Winthrop College at Rock Hill, South Carolina. He holds the position as high priest of Hesperian Chapter Number 17, Royal Arch Masons and past master of Clinton Lodge Number 3, Accepted Free Masons. Is also a member of Columbia Commandery Number 2, Knights Templars, and of Oasis Temple of Shriners, at Charlotte, North Carolina. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 155-156)


GORDON, MYRAN W.—Preacher. Pastor of the Baptist Church at Abbeville, South Carolina. Son of Jackson and Sarah A. Gordon. Born, March 16, 1866, in Davies County, Kentucky. Obtained education from Masonville High School; Scearces College, Shelbyville, Kentucky; and Bethel College, Russellville, Kentucky. Twice married. His first wife was Hulda Sawyer, of Kentucky, whom he married, in 1888. Married Miss Margaret Amos, of Spartanburg, South Carolina, May 16, 1900. Has supplied churches in Camden, Georgetown, and Chester. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 171)


GRAYDON, WILLIAM NORWOOD—State Senator from Abbeville County. Son of S. E. Graydon and Susan (Dun-woody) Graydon. Born at Cokesbury, South Carolina, on December 11, 1860. He was educated at the Cokesbury Conference School. Studied law, and was admitted to the bar at Abbeville, South Carolina. He carried up to the Supreme Court the case of Aultman vs. Rush, in which it was first decided that a married woman could not give a mortgage to secure her husband's debt. He married Ada L. McMillan, January 11, 1890. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 173-174)


GREEN, EDWIN LUTHER—Assistant professor of English languages in the South Carolina College. Son of A. H. Green and L. V. Fisher. Born in Milton, Florida, December 13, 1870. His great-grandfather, John Green, moved from Abbeville District, South Carolina, to Georgia, in 1800; and from there to Alabama. Served several times in the Legislature, and constitutional conventions of Alabama. Graduated, with degree of Bachelor of Arts, from Washington and Lee University, and with degree of Doctor of Philosophy, from Johns Hopkins University, in 1897. Taught two years in Washington and Lse University; private schools and Central University, Richmond, Kentucky. Member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Author of a "School History of Florida," which is used in the schools of that State. He is unmarried. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 174)


GREENE, WILLIAM PINCKNEY—Son of James H. Greene, and Elvirah T. (Bowie). Born in Abbeville County, November 24, 1873. Prepared for college in Erskine College Preparatory School, entered freshman class Erskine College, in 1889. Graduated in 1893, taking highest stand in class. Taught school two years. Read law in office of Ernest Moore, at Lancaster, South Carolina, 1895. Admitted to the bar, December, 1895. Practiced law with W. C. McGowan, at Greenwood. 1896, under firm name of McGowan & Greene. Removed to Abbeville, 1897, on death of Mr. McGowan; and formed partnership with McGowan's former partner, William Henry Parker. Practiced law at Abbeville since then. Member of firm of Parker & Greene, attorneys for National Bank of Abbeville. Farmers' Bank of Abbeville, Abbeville Cotton Mills, local attorneys for Charleston and Western Carolina Railway. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 174)



GRIER, BOYCE HEMPHILL—Son of Rev. R. C. Grier, D.D., of Due West, South Carolina. He is a native of that town, having been born on November 8, 1861. His father was for many years president of Erskine College, and his older brother, Dr. William Grier, lately deceased, was president, for more than twenty-five years, of the same institution. His education was obtained from Erskine College and the University of Virginia. Graduated from Erskine Seminary, in 1S87. Taught school a short time. Married Miss Susie M. Lee, on July 28, 1891, at Due West, South Carolina. Was pastor of Mount Zion Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, in Lincoln County, Missouri. Has been pastor of Tirzah and Yorkville Churches seven years. He is at present a useful minister of the gospel. Has recently received a call to the church at Ora, Laurens County, South Carolina, which he has accepted. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 175)


GRIER, PAUL LIVINGSTON—Son of Rev. R. C. Grier, D.D., and Barbara (Moffat) Grier; father for many years president of Erskine College. He was born in Due West, South Carolina, April 28, 1864. His primary training was received in the town schools of Due West, South Carolina. He graduated from Erskine College, with first honor, in 1884. After graduation he taught in the country, near Covington, Tennessee, then in the preparatory department of Erskine College for two years. He was also principal of one of the public schools in Washington, District of Columbia, one year; at which time he was elected to the chair of mathematics in Erskine College, which position he still holds. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 176)


GRIFFIN, VINCENT—Judge of probate for Greenwood County. Was born near Whitehall, Abbeville County, September 30, 1837. His early training was received in the common-schools of Barrattsville; later attended Mount Pleasant, and the High Schools at Cueryton, Edgefield County. His second wife was Miss Bond, whom he married in 1886. He was magistrate of Abbeville County. Joined Company F, Second South Carolina Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel J. B. Kershaw; during the remainder of the war, was in Company G, Second South Carolina Volunteers, Colonel T. J. Lipscomb, formerly commanded by General M. C. Butler. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 176)


HASKELL, ALEXANDER C.—Was born in what is now Abbeville County, on September 22, 1839. In early years he was educated at home under private instructors and at about the age of fifteen attended school for a time in Charleston. In 1865, he entered the South Carolina College at Columbia, from which institution he was graduated, in 1860, with the second honor of his class. In 1861, Mr. Haskell enlisted as a private in Company D, First Regiment South Carolina Volunteer Infantry, under the command of Colonel Maxcy Gregg. The original term of enlistment for the regiment was six months, at the expiration of which time it was reorganized and Mr. Haskell was appointed adjutant, which rank he held until November, 1861. At that time he was appointed chief of staff, a position he held until the death of General Maxcy Gregg, in 1862. In March, 1864, Mr. Haskell was given command of the Seventh Regiment of South Carolina Cavalry with the rank of colonel, and he continued in this capacity until the surrender at Appomattox. At the battle of Cold Harbor he was badly wounded, in May, 1864, and still carries the ball. He was also wounded and left on the field for dead at Darbytown, near Richmond, October 7, 1864. Returning from the army at the close of the war, Colonel Haskell commenced teaching school at Abbeville, at the same time he was engaged in the study of law. In December, 1865, he was admitted to the bar, and in the same year, was elected to the Legislature, serving two years. He continued teaching and practicing law, until 1867, when he was elected judge of the district court at Abbeville. But he resigned this position in September of the same year, to accept a professorship of law, in the South Carolina College. In December, 1868, he was requested by the State Democratic Convention, to be an elector in the presidential contest between Grant & Seymour, the acceptance of which called for his resignation as professor of law in the South Carolina College. At the close of the campaign, Colonel Haskell opened a law office in Columbia, and in the following year, formed a partnership with Joseph D. Pope, whicii lasted until December, 1877. Was chosen associate justice of the Supreme Court of South Carolina, a position he held for two years. He was elected for a term of four years, but resigned to accept the presidency of the Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta Railroad, an office he held until December 1889. He was also president of the Columbia & Greenville Railroad. President of the Loan and Exchange Bank of South Carolina. From 1887, to 1889, he was one of the government directors of the Union Pacific Railroad, and was chairman of the committee which reported to the government the best method of dealing with that road. In 1876, he was chairman of the State Democratic Executive Committee. At its close, he was chosen to represent the State at Washington, to secure the recognition of General Hampton as governor of South Carolina. He married Rebecca C, daughter of John Singleton, of Richland County. In 1870, he was again married to Alice V. Alexander, of Washington, Georgia. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 192-194)


HASKELL, JOHN C. — Was born in Abbeville, South Caolina, October 4, 1842. Was educated at home until 1859, when he entered the South Carolina College. There he remained until 1860, when he enlisted in the Confederate army, and was appointed second lieutenant in Company H, Regular Artillery. In December, 1861, he was appointed an aide on General Joseph E. Johnston's staff, which position he held for only a short time. He was wounded at Gaines' Mill, which resulted in the loss of his right arm. In the battle of Fredericksburg, in December, 1861, his horse was shot under him, and in falling he was so injured that he was compelled to return to Richmond. In 1863, he was given the command of the North Carolina Artillery, and served under General D. H. Hill, during the winter campaign in that State. He joined General Longstreet's Corps and was assigned to the command of a battalion, thus serving until the close of the war, having been in the meantime promoted to the rank of colonel. Returning from the army, he married Miss Sarah, daughter of General Wade Hampton. Went immediately to Mississippi, where he engaged in the occupation of a planter for seven years. In 1877, he took up his residence in Columbia, and was soon after elected to the State Legislature. Has been elected several times since. He is practicing law in Columbia, and was counsel for several railroads, but gave up that line of practice, in 1890. ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 194)


HEMPHILL, ROBERT REID—Was born in Abbeville, South Carolina, May 3, 1840. He enlisted June 8, 1861. at Richmond, in the Seventh South Carolina Volunteers, as a private. Acted as orderly, for General M. L. Bonham, deceased, at the first battle of Manassas. June 25, 1862, he was transferred to Orr's Rifles; and was made sergeant major, in 1864. In that rank, he served in most of the battles in Virginia, until the end of the war. He was imprisoned at Baltimore six weeks. He graduated with first honor at Ers-kine College, in 1859. Was married to Miss Eugenia Cornelia Brewton, of Spartanburg County, April 6, 1870. He was a member of the House of Representatives, from 1870, to 1880, and from 1884, to 1886. In that year he was elected to the State Senate, and served until 1894. He was also elected clerk of the Senate. Member of the Constitutional Convention, of 1895. Appointed a member of the Legislative committee to investigate charitable and penal institutions— a part of the great fraud committee. Chairman of committee on education in Senate, and ex-offlcio trustee, of Win-throp, when founded. Represented South Carolina at the funeral of Jefferson Davis, in New Orleans, on committee from State Senate. Delivered an address at Nashville Exposition, on Tennessee Day; also delivered an address before National American Woman's Suffrage Association in Atlanta, Georgia, 1895. Introduced a bill into the Senate so as to change constitution in order that women might be allowed to vote. He is now editor of the "Abbeville Medium." ("MEN OF THE TIME - Schetches of Living Notables", A Biographical Encyclopedia of Contemporaneous South Carolina Leaders, by J. C. GARL1NGTON - 1902, pg 198)


Shields, Benjamin Glover  (1808 – 1850) was an American politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives from Alabama. He was born in Abbeville, South Carolina. He moved with his father to Clarke County, Alabama and later resided at Demopolis, Alabama in Marengo County. He completed preparatory studies and was a member of the Alabama House of Representatives in 1834.
Between March 4, 1841 and March 3, 1843, he served as a Democrat in the Twenty-seventh Congress. In 1845, he was commissioned by President James K. Polk as United States Chargé d’Affaires to Venezuela. He remained in this position until January 7, 1850. He moved to Texas and engaged in planting until his death.
(Wikipedia.org, Abbeville, South Carolina)



contributed by Dena Whitesell

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