CORONER'S INQUISITION, 1879 - 1893
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at the Boyd Place in Newberry County on the 23rd day of May AD 1887 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of John Williams of Newberry County, then and there being dead by the oaths of John Johnson, J. P. Cook, J. W. Perkins, John Neel, Cal Gosham, Samuel Kennedy, William Agnes (sic), John Coleman, B. Heller, John Sheppard, Sherman Williams, George Coleman, Ben Caldwell and J. Jackson being a lawful jury of inquest, who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when and by what means the said John Williams came to his death – according to what we know with our knowledge and from the evidence he died with dropsy of the heart or from some means to the jury unknown. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, coroner, aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals the day and year above mentioned.           John N. Bass, Coroner

J. M. Johnson Foreman, J. Perry Cook, J. W. Perkins, J. M. Canady, J. C. Neel, Cal (X) Gosham, William Eighnes (sic), John (X) Coleman, Ben (X) Heller, John (X) Sheppard, Sherman Williams, George Calbin, Ben (X) Caldwell and John (X) Jackson

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Sarah Williams being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. His name is John Williams. He is my husband. He died 22nd day of May. Yesterday he was sitting down talking with Mr. Cook. He had not been well during the day but had been up all day. He sat in the door about a quarter of an hour. Seems to as Mr. Cook left he got up and came and laid down on a pallet and I asked him what was the matter. He said, ‘Oh my heart.’ And just then he tried to get his breath and about ten minutes after he complained of his heart he died. He had been subject to smothering spells. He went to Town on Saturday. He told me he ate a box of sardines. He had been subject to spells for about a year. He had a doctor to examine him about two weeks ago. The doctor has not been coming to see him. He did not have a difficulty with anyone. He was not killed by anyone. He was with me all day. I was with him until he died. This is all I know. He said he had the dropsy. He lived in Newberry when he died.               Sarah (X) Williams

                                   

J. P. Cook duly sworn says: I live in Newberry. I passed coming from the pasture and I talked to him a few minutes. I passed on and walked to the house and locked my door and she sent (Sarah) the little girl up there for me. I came back and was not more than five minutes, I think, before he was dead. I have known him a good while. About eight years he had been working for me and has got some land rented from me when he was taken. He would say he felt like something had got his feet. Wanted ?osma up? He did not have any difficulty with anyone that I know of. John Williams lived in Newberry before he died. He died in the house.    J. P. Cook


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at The Floyd Place in Newberry County on the 5th of June AD 1887 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Hettie Floyd then and there being dead by the oaths of J. W. Sanders, Ned Wright, C. B. Benson, Press Senn, William Black, William Paysinger, Edmond Renwick, Silas Renwick, George Partlow, James Cleland, Calvin Williams, Willis Williams, Thomas Young and Cal Stevens, being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Hettie Floyd came to her death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Hettie Floyd was found dead in the house, partly on the bed by one Susanna Gary and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that Hettie Floyd in manner and form aforesaid did die either of old age or from the want of proper food and from not having proper attention. (This is in accordance with our knowledge of the family) on June 4, AD 1887, in witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.         John N. Bass, Coroner

J. W. Sanders (Foreman), Ned (X) Wright, C. B. (X) Benson, Press (X) Senn, William (X) Black, William (X) Paysinger, Edmond (X) Renwick, Silas (X) Renwick, George (X) Partlow, James (X) Cleland, Calvin (X) Williams, Willis (X) Williams, Thomas (X) Young and Calvin (X) Stevens

                                   

EVIDENCE

                                   

Newberry SC June 5, 1887, Andrew Gary being sworn says: I live here at this place. Was at home yesterday. It was Saturday June 4, 1887. I went to one of my neighbor’s houses about 6 o’clock. I came home. Stopped down at an old tree to get some wood and when I got to the house my wife called me and said that Grandma was dead and I said, ‘I reckon not.” I went in and found her lying with the feet off the bed, just as she is now – dead. She had been living here about five months. She was as well as usual for a long time. She had been up all day and did not seem to be any worse than common. She was about ninety years old. Her name was Hettie Floyd. This is in Newberry County. I think she got enough to eat for I had asked her if she had enough and she told me that she did. She was my father’s wife but not my mother. I have a lien at Mr. Mower’s (store) and I get twelve pounds of meat and a bushel of meal and a gallon of molasses. This amount is given to me every two weeks. It is for the three of us. She has not got any clothes but what she has on.  I have not got a cent of money in the world and I do not know what I am to do about getting her buried. She has not got any relations about here. This is all I know about her death.                  Anderson (X) Gary

                                   

Susanna Gary being sworn says: I, John N. Bass, Coroner, found after questioning the witness that she was idiotic and therefore could not tell anything about the case. Did not even know how long she had been living at the place. Most of the jurors knew her to be unable to tell anything understandable. I do not think she got enough to eat. I do not think it was done for any bad motive. The neighbors say that Anderson Gary would give to her when he had it to give. I think it best to make this statement. I did not have a doctor to make a post mortem examination. Did not think it necessary, nor did the jurors, they being satisfied as to the cause of her death. Then too, it would be a considerable expense to the county. John N. Bass, Coroner


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at George S. Cannon’s Place in Newberry County on the 21st of July AD 1887 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Jim Gilliam then and there being dead by the oaths of Thompson Conner, S. M. Duncan, W. L. Waters, H. S. Ruff, Syrus Ruff, Richard Myers, Syrus Cannon, Henry Cannon, John Cannon, Jim Cannon, John G. Johnson and Wade Swittenberg, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Jim Gilliam came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Jim Gilliam came to his death from heart disease or from a cause to the jurors unknown at George S. Cannon's Place on 21st day of July 1887, in witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned. John N. Bass, Coroner

Thompson Conner (Foreman), S. M. Duncan, W. L. Waters, H. S. Ruff, Syrus (X) Ruff, Richard (X)  Myers, Syrus (X) Cannon, Henry (X) Cannon, John (X) Cannon, Jim (X) Cannon, John G. Johnson and Wade (X) Swittenberg.

EVIDENCE

                                   

Bruce Cannon being duly sworn says: I was with Jim Gilliam when he died at 8 o'clock 21st day of July. Died where he was. Got up on the wagon to drive and fell off. Had been having a smothering of the heart. Been complaining all the year at times. Had usual health. Had no difficulty with anyone. Believe he had apoplexy.         W. B. Cannon                  

                                   

Robert Sligh being duly sworn says: Saw Jim Gilliam today before he died July 21, 1887 in Newberry Co. He died where he now is – got on the wagon to drive. I went to the rear to fork on and when I saw him next he was on the ground. Had no difficulty with anyone. He was subject to smothering spells. I heard him this morning that he wanted to get to the house to get some medicine. Was complaining of his heart.       Robert (X) Sligh      

                                   

Col. George S. Cannon being duly sworn says: Jim Gilliam had been complaining of a smothering of his breast, especially this year. He has lost time at work. Did not hear him complain of anything this am. Was to all appearances as well as usual. Spoke to him this 21st July.         G. S. Cannon  

                                   

This is a case that I did not have a doctor make a post mortem examination as I did not think it was any use as all of the jurors knew all about the dead man’s health and it is an expense to the county. I think it proper to make this statement.     John N. Bass, Coroner


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken in Newberry County on the 24th day of July AD 1887 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Johnson Brown then and there being dead by the oaths of F. L. Paysinger, C. A. Teague, S. H. Paysinger, G. M. B. Epting, H. W. Cameron, Moses Moon, Nathan Russell, Robert Golding, Sam Johnson, Phil Ford, Mack Tucker and Simon Williams being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Johnson Brown came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Johnson Brown came to his death by drowning in what is known as Kinard’s Creek on the night of July 23, 1887 and that the aforesaid Johnson Brown in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune and accidental drowning. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.           John N. Bass, Coroner

F. L. Paysinger (Foreman), C. A. Teague, S. H. Paysinger, G. M. B. Epting, H. W. Cameron, Moses Moon, Nathan (X) Russell, Robert (X) Golding, Sam (X) Johnson, Phil (X) Ford, Mack (X) Tucker, Simon (X) Williams

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Coleman Brown being duly sworn says: I live in this county. Last night me and my son Johnson were coming home and met Mr. Johnson and I told him I did not think there was any danger in crossing as I lived just on the other side of the creek and he turned back as he lived in Newberry and he said he wanted to get home. And when we got to the Ford he told me to drive as I knew the Ford and my son and he was in the back end of the wagon. My son was on the top of a barrel and I drove into the creek and the horse turned down stream and I saw him and Mr. Johnson jump out. That was the last I saw of him until this morning. I got a ‘bib’ and looked for him last night but the water was too high. I could not find him. He could not swim. He was 18 years old. I told my wife about it just before day. I knew he was drowned and killed. It is ¾ of a mile to where the Ford was. That is all I know.              Coleman (X) Brown

                                                                                         

Robert Golding being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry county. We were looking for Johnson Brown this morning as we had heard that he was drowned and when I found him his head was in the water and his feet were on the bank.         Robert (X) Golding

                                                                                         

Coleman Brown recalled says: I live in Newberry County. On July 23, 1887 my son and I were coming home. When we got to Kinard’s Creek I was driving and I saw my son jump out of the wagon and this is the last time I saw him until this morning. He was a mute – could not talk. Coleman (X) Brown


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Jolly Street in Newberry County on the 8th of September AD 1887 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of James Sadler then and there being dead by the oaths of B. B. Hair, P. B. Ellesor, Mark Mills, A. J. Livingstone, Renée Vann, T. P. Richardson, R. B. Livingston, J. A. C. Kibler, T. J. Willson, G. A. Singley, T. D. Kinard and George A. Long being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said James Sadler came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid James Sadler came to his death by a gun shot wound to the left side by the hands of J. W. Werts on 8th day of September 1887 in Newberry County and that the said J. W. Werts did kill the said James Sadler in self defense in witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.       John N. Bass, Coroner

B. B. Hair (Foreman), P. B. Ellesor, Mark M. Mills, A. J. Livingston, Renée Vann, T. P. Richardson, R. B. Livingston, J. A. C. Kibler, T. J. Willson, G. A. Singley, T. D. Kinard and George A. Long

                                                                                         

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Dr. D. H. Werts being duly sworn says: I live in this county and I have examined the dead body of James Sadler. I find a gun shot wound in the left side and left arm. I think that it was inflicted with a gun filled with buckshot. I have probed the wound about one foot in the direction of the heart. I think it was the cause of his death. Also his arm was broken. Think it was all from the same shot. I do not know who inflicted the wounds, only by hearsay. Have known Sadler for several years. I do not recognize the knife. Can’t swear to the stick seen. He had one like it. He has threatened my own and my son’s life also and had received a message from Sadler. He intended to waylay my son and cut him all to pieces. His wife said she did not notice his knife when he started. Told him not to go out there. Sadler had a bad reputation and he had threatened people before. My son’s name is J. W. Werts. Sadler was killed today.      Sept. 8, 1887,  Dr. D. H. Werts
                                                                                                                                                     

Mrs. Harriet Sadler being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. This is my house. This is my husband that is lying out at the gate killed. Dr. Werts son, Joe, killed him with a shotgun this morning.        Harriet (X) Sadler

                                                                                         

This witness was unwilling to tell any more about the killing of Sadler and under the circumstances I did not press her.        John N. Bass, Coroner

                                                                                         

G. M. Singley being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I was here yesterday morning. Dave Cannon was at Sadler’s house when I came to Sadler. Sadler asked Dave for some tobacco. Sadler told me that if myself and son, Dr. Werts and son Joe Werts did not hush and let him alone he would have revenge out for us. Said it was of no use for any body or party of men to come and try to take him. His reputation was bad and he was a dangerous bad man.    G. M. (X) Singley           

                                                                                         

Dave Cannon being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County at Dr. Werts, Joe Werts’ father. Mr. Sadler told me to tell Mr. Joe Werts he had been talking about him and G__d___ his heart he intended to lay around his house and some one of these nights would cut him all to pieces. I delivered the message to Mr. Joe Werts. This he told me on the 7th day of September 1887 and he was killed on the 8th.           Dave (X) Cannon
                                                                                         

I think it proper to make this statement. When I got to Sadler’s he was lying on his face in the gate. He had not been moved. He was killed at the place he was laying. When I got to his house and saw his knife it was lying about two inches from his hand open and his stick was lying at one side and the knife at the other.         John N. Bass Coroner
                                   

J. W. Werts being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Know James Sadler. I had no difficulty with him before today. Yesterday morning I sent a boy for a load of wood and on his return the boy said that Sadler told him to tell me G___d--- my heart. I had been talking about him and for him to tell me I could not see very far before me and some one of these nights he would cut me to pieces. I had business up this way today by his house to haul wood to Eugene. I was coming from the woods to Gin. Jim Sadler attached me. I was coming from the field to the road; saw Sadler coming from his house towards his gate. When I got there he was at his gate. When I got there he spoke to me and said to stop. I stopped about ten feet past his gate. He asked me what I had been talking about him. “About a monkey wrench”. Said I sent a warning to you and I am going to do it and now is the time. He had a stick and a knife in his hands. Thinking my life was in danger and knowing his general reputation to be bad and dangerous I have no objection to telling who shot him. I shot him in self-defense in fear of my own life. There was no one nearer than his house.     J. W. Werts


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry County on the 10th of September AD 1887 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Steven Kinard then and there being dead by the oaths of J. G. Abrams, D. W. Barre, E. L. Leavell, Peter Ruff, Hampton Robertson, Mack Johnson, Morgan Davis, Frank Glenn, Sim Neel, John Adams, Melvin Butler, Murphey Adams and Sam Gillam who being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Steven Kinard came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Steven Kinard in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by misfortune and accident by being struck on the head with a circular saw by his own clumsiness. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.              John N. Bass, Coroner

J. G. Abrams (Foreman), D. W. Barre, E. L. Leavell, Peter Ruff, Hampton Robertson, Mack Johnson, Morgan Davis, Frank Glenn, Sim Neel, Jack Adams, Melvin Butler, Murphey Adams and Sam Gillam

                                                                                                                                      

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

E. P. Matthews being duly sworn: I live in Newberry County and this place. I knew Steven Kinard. He has been to my place all this year. On the 6th of September he was hauling saw dust out that day from under the mill. I had sawed two logs. The hole under the saw was four feet deep. He was down the mill when he got hurt. He was by the saw. He was hit over the left eye. I did not see him when it hit him. No one went under the mill but him. It was against my orders for anybody to go under the mill while it was running. He died on the 10th of Sept. AD 1887. He lived on my farm.               E.P. Matthews

Dr. W. D. Senn who being duly sworn says: I live in the county and I certify that Steven Kinard died of inflammation of the brain caused by a wound of the head, the instrument being a circular saw.       W. D. Senn MD

                                   

In this case Mr. Matthews had sent for the doctor. I got there and did not find that I could hold an inquest without a doctor and this is who I had. The jurors were ordered not to hold an inquest without a doctor's exam.  John N. Bass, Coroner 


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry County on the 8th of October AD 1887 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of J. F. Oxner then and there being dead by the oaths of W. D. Hardy, W. B. Whitney, J. H. Kitchens, W. E. Rutherford, W. M. Nance, W. E. Pressley, B. S. Lyles, R. E. Lyles, P. F. Baxter, Thomas M. Roebuck, Thomas J. Eison, and R. L. Irby, who being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said J. F. Oxner came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid J. F. Oxner came to his death by a gunshot wound from the hands of Will Murphey and that Judge Glenn was an accessory to the murder and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid said Will Murphy in manner and form aforesaid did kill the aforesaid J. F. Oxner, then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.

   John N. Bass, Coroner

W. D. Hardy (Foreman), W. B. Whitney, J. H. Kitchens, W. E. Rutherford, W. M. Nance, W. E. Pressley, B. S. Lyles, R. E. Lyles, P. F. Baxter, Thomas M. Roebuck, Thomas J. Eison, and R. S. Irby

                                                                                                        

EVIDENCE

                                                                       

Judge Glenn being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Saw J. F. Oxner killed today between here and Maybinton. William Murphy killed him with a double-barreled shotgun belonging to Glenn. People told him Will Murphy got Jack’s gun to go hunting with and went with him to Mr. Oxner’s. Said he hoped Mr. Oxner would not bother him. Mr. Oxner came up and said who shot his pistol. Will replied, "Me".Mr. Oxner asked Will if he did not tell him he would shoot him. Will said, ‘No you did not tell me".So Oxner said, "You lie. You heard someone say so and I mean to get you and old Reighley today. I said to Oxner, "Go back home and let him alone. He is nothing but a boy." Mr. Oxner stopped then afterwards came up in a gallop and pointed his gun at Will and shot him. Will shot Oxner. Will said nothing after he shot Oxner. Will ran off. I stopped the wagon when Will shot Oxner. Oxner fell from his mule. I went up to him with my gun loaded with shot. I loaded it a few days ago. Will was sitting on the left side of the wagon where shot from Mr. Oxner’s gun struck the wagon body and the hind wheel. Don’t know how far Mr. Oxner was when he shot. Both shots close together. Oxner had one gun and one gun barrel. Will had a pistol. Oxner was sitting on his mule with the gun in the right hand. Oxner was on the right side of the wagon. When he shot at Will, Will's gun was covered up with a quilt. When Oxner shot at him Will had to uncover his gun before he could shoot. Did not see Will reload pistol after Will shot Oxner. He ran down the road and I called him and told him to go to Newberry and give himself up. Will Murphy is a yellow boy about 20 years old, has no beard, straight legs, about 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs about 150 pounds. He has rather large eyes. Heard Will and others say that Mr. Oxner and Will had a difficulty before. Said he hoped Oxner would not bother him. Said if Mr. Oxner came up on him he would shoot him. Will did not shoot first. Both shots were about together. Told Dr. Ruff this morning that I thought Will was going to hunt him. Mr. Oxner's shot hit the left corner of the wagon body behind where Will was sitting. Not very far from the corner sitting there when Oxner shot. The shot turned Mr. Oxner over on his back when he was shot and his hands did not then touch his gun. The wagon did not stop when Oxner shot. Did not say Will had gone to Dr. Ruff to get shot out of him. Thought he was shot. Never told anybody Will was shot. Oxner was not dead when I turned him over. He said nothing. Saw him move his hand. Told Mrs. Oxner not to go where he was shot. Don’t know who brought him to the house. Told her not to go because I hated to see her there. The wagon was about stopped when Will Murphey fired. This is the gun Will Murphey fired. This is the gun Will Murphey killed Mr. Oxner with. He was killed today, the 8th day of Sept. 1887                                                                                                                   Judge (X) Glenn

                                                                                         

Amos Ruff being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Heard gunfire after Mr. Oxner went down the road. The reports were very close together. Never heard Will threaten Mr. Oxner.     Amos (X) Ruff

                                                                                         

Robert Gillam being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Caught a mule for Mr. Oxner when Judge came up and told me Mr. Oxner was shot and was nearly dead. Judge told Dr. Ruff he thought Will Murphey was gone to see him to get him to pick the shot out of him. This was today the 8th of Sept. 1887.     Robert (X) Gilliam

                                                                                         

Dr. J. M. H. Ruff being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. The body was moved by my directions. He was killed on the public highway about 600 yards from here. Judge Glenn told me that Will Murphey was shot and he was gone to hunt me and then go to Newberry to give himself up.        J. M. H. Ruff

                                                                                         

This is to certify I have examined the body of J. F. Oxner and find that he died from the effects of a gunshot wound penetrating the left side of the chest near the valve.              J. M. H. Ruff MD                                                                                                    

W. E. Pressley being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Sold Will Murphey a pistol on Friday. He said he wanted something to kill rabbits with. Sold him a 38-caliber pistol and sixteen cartridges.    W. E. Pressley

                                                                                         

J. M. Henderson being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Heard Mr. Pressley tell Will Murphey that he was just now able to get into trouble as he had just now bought a pistol. Will Murphey said Mr. Oxner had chased him from his wife’s house and he had nothing to defend himself with and had bought the pistol for that purpose.        J. M. Henderson 


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Helena in Newberry County before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Tom Gallman then and there being dead by the oaths of N. Chiles, Alford Bell, Darrell Coleman, C. P. Pitts, A. M. Miller, Bill Harris, Paul Swittenberg, James Coates, Alf Wilson, J. T. Larkin, Frank Hair and Wesley Williams who being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Thomas Gallman came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Thomas Gallman came to his death by heart disease on the morning of the 19th day of Oct. 1887 and so the jurors aforesaid in manner and form aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Tom Gallman in manner and form aforesaid did die of heart disease in his bed. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.             John N. Bass, Coroner

N. Chiles (Foreman), Alford Bell, Darrell Coleman, C. P. Pitts, A. M. Miller, Bill (X) Harris, Alford (X) Milam, Paul (X) Swittenberg, James (X) Coates, Alf Wilson, J. T. (X) Larkin, Frank (X) Hair and Wesley (X) Williams

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Oley Coates being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Was at home this morning. Heard some one calling my mother who is a mid wife and was called off last night. One of my daughters lives with my mother who answered the man who called my mother. I asked her if Tom Gallman, who is my father, if he was not at home and she said he was not. Then I went into the house and made a light and found my father lying in the bed dead. I live about 25 yards from Tom Gallman’s. Saw him about dark last night. He had been at work all day yesterday and was not sick any more than he is as a common thing only. He had sprained one of his wrists some time back. He said it was paining him at times, all the way to his shoulder. He has had something like asthma for some time. All the year would hear something like smothering at his heart. Would have to prop himself up in bed or he could not sleep for smothering. He would get to take one good nap of sleep when he first went to bed then he would have to get up and sit in a chair the rest of the night. He had a spell of sickness about a month ago. My daughter that lives with Tom Gallman is about 11 years old. I am ?sixteen? No one had been in the house but him and my daughter since my mother left the house last night, which was about 10 o’clock. I know when she left. It was George Matthews who was calling for mother. When we found out that my father was dead it was about 5 o’clock this morning on the 19th day of October AD 1887.         Oley (X) Coates         

                                                                                         

Viney Gallman who being sworn says: I live in Newberry County SC. I live here in Helena. That is my husband that is dead, Tom Gallman. He died sometime after 10 o’clock last night. I am a midwife and was called off last night. He was in as good health as he has been all this year. When I left him he told me his arm pained him very bad at times and that was why he was going back to bed. Sometimes he has had something like smothering at his heart all the year and could not sleep at night. He sat up most of the time and told me he got Dr. Mayer to give him something, which did him good. He was taking of it when I left home. He did not complain any more than common. He asked me when I was going. I told him. Then he told me good night when I started. I know that he had heart disease. I was not surprised when I heard he was dead for he sometimes could not hardly get his breath. It was the 19th day of October 1887. He was going to do some work for someone today. He had a spell of sickness about a month ago but he had got well and had been at work. I think he died with one of his smothering spells.            Viney (X) Gallman


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at John A. Kinard’s in Newberry County the 24th day of October AD 1887, before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Dembo Higgins then and there being dead by the oaths of O. P. Sexton, A. L. Knighton, T. G. Williams, Paul Johnston, P. A. Clarke, J. P. Fant, E. B. Blease, A. J. Sproles, E. G. Morriss, R. B. Reeder, W. F. Chappel, E. Cabiness, G. A. Langford and J. F. Wheeler who being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Dembo Higgins came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Dembo Higgins came to his death by a gunshot wound probably from the hands of W. G. Miller who was in the discharge of his duty as a peace officer and in defense of his life and that of J. H. Chappel, a peace officer who also was assisting the said Miller in  enforcing the peace while the said Miller and Chappel was being set upon by a mob and we recommend that the Miller be discharged upon his own recognizance in witness whereof, I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.          John N. Bass, Coroner

G. A. Langford (Foreman) O. P. Sexton, A. L. Knighton, T. G. Williams, Paul Johnston, P. A. Clarke, John P. Fant, E. B. Blease, A. J. Sproles, E. G. Morris, R. B. Reeder, W. F. Chappel, E. Cabiness, and John F. Wheeler

EVIDENCE

State

Vs

The dead body of Denbo Higgins

J. H. Chappel sworn says: I live in Newberry, the Town and am the Chief of Police. I was asked by Gilbert Gray and Jessie Jones to come out. That there was a fuss out there and for me to come on the place of John A. Kinard, just inside of the Town corporate limits. Miller and myself could hear cursing and pistol shots from P. Gilder’s house. When we got in sight we heard very loud and boisterous cursing and we stopped about 30 yards this side of the property in order that we might identify the parties. When we got in order that we might know who that was, I said to Miller, “Do you recognize that black man there by the fire?"He said, "Yes, it is Sam Higgins”. Sam was cursing very loudly. I said to Miller that I was going to arrest him. I got him arrested by putting nippers on him before he saw me. I started off with him and he asked to be let to go down to see Mr. Kinard. I saw a large crowd of black men and concluded it was best to bring him to Town. I started to Town and got about 30 yards. Miller was running just behind me. Sam Higgins called to John Dembo, his brother, that he had been arrested. That was on the hill. John and Dembo Higgins came running down with sticks. I tried to push my man onto Town. Miller was between me and John and Dembo calling out where is the s__of a b__. They ran a little past Miller and he said, "Stop Boy".Then they turned and made for Miller. They did not seem to see me. Miller drew his pistols and he began to walk backwards. They advanced upon him threatening to kill him (Miller). Dembo was saying that he would cut out his d__ heart. Miller had his pistol drawn and was saying, "Stand back", and was walking backwards. One black man caught me around the back and another took my pistol and then the crowd had me down. I called to Miller after I was struck and asked him to shoot the men off of me. Several times he fired and all the men promptly got off me and I ran and I was about half way between the road and the house, (Miller was nearer the road than the men). The men ran back to the house, except Dewitt Jackson. Miller and I got together. Miller said that he had to shoot. We then came on to Town. Since then we have arrested John Higgins and Sam Higgins. John and Sam told us John A. Kinard claimed the house was his and that the people had no business there. The shooting was in the incorporated limits of the city. Dembo was found about 30 yards from where the shooting occurred. Miller was in the discharge of his duty as a policeman of this Town. It was necessary for Miller to fire to save his own and my life. There were at least 10 or 12 black men after Miller. I heard two pistol shots. That night the moon was hid behind the pines. The arising was enough to disturb the people and to keep them from sleeping as far up as Bob Leavell's. John A. Kinard lives just about where the shooting occurred. Some of the black men live on the place known as 'Generalport'. Kinard lives with a Negro.               J. H. Chappel 
Tom Alexander sworn: I live in Newberry. I was at J. A. Kinard's, about a mile from Town. The place where the difficulty took place. I went up to where they were. Miller had a pistol pointed at me. I told him who I was and then he let me alone. Two men were after Miller. He fired two shots on the hill. Miller was fussing? The parties. Someone threw a brick at him. Then he shot in the opposite direction. Saw no one fall. Saw several men after he shot. Miller was in danger. Several had J. H. Chappel down. Sam Higgins was on him. Sam's father pulled Sam off. After they were all gone I looked for Chappell's hat. Didn't go back in the house. Didn't hear any threats but there was cursing. Chappel and Miller were doing their duty. Didn't see any rocks but heard them passing me. Cursing was loud, they all talked like they were under the influence of whiskey. Dembo was next to the road. I helped to take the Sam Higgins off of Chappel.                   Tom (X) Alexander

John A. Kinard being sworn says: I live in Newberry nearly a mile from this place. I saw nothing of a difficulty nor heard of one. Don't know much about it. Was sick in bed and didn't go about. A woman that cooks for me had supper there. She lives on the road 30 or 40 yards from where they had the supper. Higgins doesn't live on my place. I told them the night before. Told them they must keep order. I told several that the police had no right to interfere while they behaved themselves. I don’t remember telling anyone that the police had no right there unless I sent for them. Up to the time the police got here it was quiet. I live about 60 yards from where Dembo was found this morning. Didn’t see him yesterday. Could not see him from my house but could from the road. Was not out to the road yesterday. I heard of Sam Higgins living about 2 years. I found Dembo this morning with an open knife in his hand. Dembo was lying on his face. When I found him his mother said she hadn't seen him since Saturday. I think he died where he was found. Saw tracks there. I think that if there had been a disturbance the police would have been doing their duty. I only heard two shots fired. It was a little before 10 o'clock pm.        John A. Kinard

Tom Williams sworn says: I was coming to Town this morning. A man and a boy said there was a man out in the field. I went and found a man dead lying on his arm. It looked like a Barlow knife in his hand. I did not know the man. Only saw his tracks coming from the road. He came from the road just about the bridge. He wasn't carried there. I reported it to the coroner. His hand was closed on the open knife.     T. A. Williams
                                                                                         

Dr. James McIntosh being sworn says: I hereby swear that I have this day on the 24th day of October 1887 examined the dead body of Dembo Higgins and find that from a gun shot wound the ball entered his left breast one inch to the left of the nipple between the fourth and fifth ribs, entering the left ventricle of the heart. There was sufficient cause for said wound to have caused death.    James McIntosh MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Town in Newberry County the 26th day of October AD 1887, before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Baylus Taylor then and there being dead by the oaths of W. F. Ewart, G. M. Long, Pruet Todd, M.J. Scott, H. H. Kinard, Gary Coleman, J. W. Chappel, R. G. Perry, William Johnson, F. E. Huitt, R. W. Davis, H. Mittle, J. P. Aldridge and B. E. Dawkins who being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Baylus Taylor came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Baylus Taylor came to his death from heart disease and so the jurors aforesaid do say that Baylus Taylor did die in the manner and form aforesaid in witness whereof, I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.     John N. Bass, Coroner

W. F. Ewart (Foreman), G. M. Long, Pruet Todd, M.J. Scott, H. H. Kinard, Gary Coleman, J. W. Chappel, R. G. Perry, William Johnson, F. E. Huitt, R. W. Davis, H. Mittle, J. P. Aldridge and B. E. Dawkins

                                   

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

P. H. Duckett being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. Mr. Taylor ate a hearty meal for supper and asked them to make a ‘paley’ before the fire and he would rest and he went to sleep and commenced snoring and made a little strangling sound. I called him and he did not wake. I put my hand on him and shook him. He threw his head back with his mouth open. I commenced to rubbing him and felt his pulse and he had none and then prepared to heat water and bathe him. But I thought then it was no use as he was gone. Went after Mr. Bass the coroner. Mr. Taylor had not complained any during the day. He had worked in the forenoon picking cotton. To my knowledge he was not subject to heart disease. I live in Newberry.       P. H. Duckett                                                 

This is a case where the jury demanded a doctor and I got Dr. Pope.   John N. Bass, Coroner

                                                                                         

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

I have examined the body of Baylus Taylor deceased and find from all of the circumstances concerning his death, I certify that he died on Oct. 25th 1887 of heart disease. Given under my hand and seal this Oct. 26th 1887.                   Samson Pope MD

Subscribed and sworn to before me this Oct. 26, 1887      John N. Bass, Coroner


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Josh Henderson’s Place in Newberry County on the 1st of February AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Josh Henderson of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of A. J. Gibson, William H. Mudd, S. S. Cunningham, Joseph Caldwell Jr., William Chaplin, Gabe Singleton, Godfrey Rice, Albert Nance, Hack Suber, Zack Martin, Brack Rice, Alf Renwick, Butler Rice, Henry Shelton, being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Josh Henderson came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Josh Henderson came to his death by a gunshot wound in the hands of Tom Sims on the 1st day of February AD 1888 in his house in Newberry County and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Tom Sims in manner and form aforesaid Josh Henderson then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.             John N. Bass, Coroner

A. J. Gibson (Foreman), William H. Mudd, S. S. Cunningham, Joseph Caldwell Jr., William Chaplin, Gabe (X) Singleton, Godfrey (X) Rice, Albert (X) Nance, Hack (X) Suber, Zack (X) Martin, Brack (X) Rice, Alf (X) Renwick, Butler (X) Rice, Henry (X) Shelton

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Isabella Henderson being duly sworn says: I live on Carrie Caldwell’s place in Newberry County. Yesterday I was at home until 12 o’clock. I left my husband Josh Henderson at home. Last night I was in Fairfield County. Josh was well when I left home. I know nothing about his death. I know of no difficulty he has had nor do I know that anyone had any spite against him or had threatened him. When I left he was mending shoes. He was a shoemaker by trade. He had money – nine or ten dollars. Have found no money since I came back. He carried his money in his pocket. At night he was accustomed to putting it in his pocketbook under his pillow. He would play cards. He quit for a while when the earth shook but since Christmas has been at it again. To my latest knowledge he played on Monday night. I don’t know whom he played with Monday night. I don’t know where he went. Don’t know how much money he had Monday. When I left he had paper money. I gave him fifty cents in silver when I left. He never slept on a palate so I don’t think he made the palate. The bedclothes of which the palate was made were mine. I left the bedclothes folded up on which the palate was made.         Isabella (X) Henderson
                                                                                         

Charlie Nesbitt being sworn says: I live on Mrs. Della McCant’s land in Newberry County. I came from home this morning to get Josh to mend my shoes. When I arrived I saw his body lying across the fire, I think on his left side. The door was open. When I saw him I went to him and snatched him out of the fire for his clothes were burning. I put out the fire of his clothes. I live about a mile away. Heard no gunfire. I don’t know where Josh was Monday night. I don’t know that he was naturally warm. Don’t know whether he was stiff or not. I arrived a little after sun-up. The fire was not burning much. I did not put out the fire. I know of no difficulty Josh has had. After I left I reported Josh’s death to Howard Brennan. I started to let it be known and then went to Mrs. Caldwell’s. There I met Mr. Cunningham and told him. Mr. Cunningham told me to go to the Coroner. When I first saw the deceased it was my intention to go to Town to report it. I walked here this morning. I found the house open. A chair was before the fire, which I moved back. I did not know that the deceased was shot. Did not examine him. Saw nothing to make me think he was shot. Saw          C. H. Nesbitt    

Howard Brennan being duly sworn says: This morning I got up late. Went after chips for the fire. When I went back I heard talking over at Josh’s. It was Nesbitt and my two boys. They told me Josh was dead. I rode over and looked at him. I live in the first house from here. Heard no report of gun. I did not see Josh yesterday. I was not at his house last night. Heard no noise last night nor did I hear or see anyone pass my house. I saw no light in Josh’s house last night. My dogs did not bark last night. My boys had been to their rabbit gum.                                        H. P. Brennan            

                                                                                         

Billy Greenwood being duly sworn says: I saw Josh yesterday three hours by sun in his yard. I live half a mile from Josh. Heard no report of a gun. I saw no one with a gun this morning.                         Willie Greenwood

Lawrence Williams being duly sworn says: This morning I went to my rabbit gum when the sun was nearly up. I met Mr. Nesbit. He told me Josh was dead. He met me at the road, which goes to our house. I heard no gunfire this morning or last night. Saw no one coming this way. Last time I saw Josh was Sunday evening.             Lawrence Williams                                                                                             

Lavinia Sims being duly sworn says: I live at Mrs. Carrie Caldwell’s. Saw Josh Monday evening. It was not dark. Don’t know who was in the empty house on Monday night. I saw or heard no one there. Heard Josh call Gus Douglas Monday evening. I saw no light in the empty house on Monday night. Josh was by himself when I saw him on the bank by the shop. I don’t I know that Josh played cards in the empty house on Monday night. Tom, my husband, was not at home on Monday night. He was at home the time someone was calling. He went out afterwards. I don’t know when he came back. It was after daylight.       Lavinia (X) Sims                                                                                                 

Gus Douglass being duly sworn says: Monday I was in Town. Got back after dark. Saw Josh at the old shop on Mrs. Caldwell's place. He came from the empty house calling me. I would not let it be known that it was I. I was sober. I saw Josh coming from the empty house. Saw light in the empty house. I don’t know that Josh played cards in the empty house. I did not go there.              Gus (X) Douglass

Tom Sims being duly sworn says: I live on Mrs. Carrie Caldwell's place. Monday night I was a t home all night in my own house. Josh was at my house Monday night. I don't know the time he left. Was talking with Josh.  It was 10 o'clock when I lay down. I saw Josh last Monday night. Today I started over to tell Nias Henderson of Josh's death. Nobody was with Josh when he came Monday night. Milligan Nance came over and went back home. He left soon. I heard no report of a gun in the direction of Josh's today. Heard no one call Gus Douglass Monday night. I know nothing about the light in the empty house. Heard someone in a wagon calling Monday night. My wife was at home when Josh called me. I have a shotgun, No. 5's. My gun was used last on Monday. I shot at a squirrel between Mr. Gibson's and Mrs. Caldwell’s at the line fence. I was at Josh's last on Monday night at 12 o'clock. I came down to get my shoe fixed. I told my little girl this morning to go to Josh's to get her shoe fixed. I took a game of cards with Josh at his house Monday before dinner. Nobody else was present. I heard no one but Judge Gilliam and Manuel Kinard say they were going to Josh's Tuesday night. I was at Josh's Monday. I left and went home by the big road. Judge Gilliam told me he was a t Josh's last night (Tuesday night). Monday night I was at home sitting down talking. On Monday Josh and I played for pinders. We had no money up. Monday when I was at Josh's Bella was not at home. She passed my house and said she was going to Carrie Reid's.                 Thomas Sims 

Manuel Kinard being duly sworn says: Monday night I was at Tom's house and left about 8 o'clock. Tom and Josh were there. They were in Tom’s house. Brooks Griffin was there. I have not been to Josh's house this year. I was at Tom's house last night, just before dark. No body else was there but Tom and his wife. Josh and Tom played cards Monday night. I don't know that they played for money, saw none. Judge Gilliam went in the direction of Josh's house Tuesday night. I saw no light in the empty house.          Manuel (X) Kinard

                                   

Judge Gillam being duly sworn: Monday night I was at Alf Renwick's house, my uncle. Last night I was at Albert Nance's house and then stayed all night at Tom Caldwell's house. I told no body that I was going to Josh's house last night nor did I tell Tom Sims that I was there this morning.             Judge (X) Gilliam

Doctor W. G. Houseal being duly sworn says: I hereby swear that I have this day, Feb. 1, 1888 examined the dead body of Josh Henderson and find a gunshot wound through his right temporal bone entering the brain which wound is sufficient to have caused immediate death.                 W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry South Carolina on the 4th of February AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Ike Boozer of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of R. T. Caldwell, W. H. Folk, W. C. Hayes, J. D. Nance, J. H. Goree, W. W. Caldwell, R. C. Maybin, Isaac Sherer, Tobe Franklin, Judge Gilliam, Noah Wilson, Jeff Wilson, and William Carter being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Ike Boozer came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Ike Boozer came to his death from a blow by an axe or some blunt instrument, probably in the hands of Patience Chalmers and that her daughter Margaret is an accessory to the fact, on or about January 28, 1888 at her house in Newberry County and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Ike Boozer in manner and form aforesaid Patience Chalmers then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid, Patience Chalmers the said Ike Boozer contrary to his will and in manner and form aforesaid did kill and slay. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.             John N. Bass, Coroner

R. T. Caldwell (Foreman), W. H. Folk, W. C. Hayes, J. D. Nance, J. H. Goree, W. W. Caldwell, R. C. Maybin, Isaac (X) Shearer, Tobe Franklin, Judge (X) Gilliam, Noah (X) Wilson, Jeff (X) Wilson, Jack (X) Kibler and William (X) Carter

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Willie Franklin being sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I know nothing but that this morning (Feb. 1, 1888, when I passed by saw the deceased lying in the woods. Did not go to the body. When I went home I reported it to Mr. Willie Caldwell. I went and showed Mr. Caldwell where the deceased lay. Saw him Saturday before last. His name is Ike Boozer. I do not know nor have I heard of the deceased having had a difficulty. Have not heard of anybody threatening him. Do not know that he gambled.         Willie Franklin

                                                                                         

Patience Chalmers being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County at Archie Sloan's. I know nothing about the death of Ike Boozer who was at my house last Saturday morning. He told me he was going to his uncle Col. Wilson's. I don't know that h had any difficulty nor have I heard of any one having threatened him. I have not heard of him since. Saturday he left my house at about 9 o'clock. I never knew him to gamble. He went in the direction of Caleb Buzhardt's when he left my house. He has relatives living at Willie Chalmer's. I do not know of him having had money. He lived at John Spence's. He did not make it a regular practice of coming to my house.                               Patience Chalmers

Jim Brown being duly sworn says: I live at John P. Sloan’s in Newberry County. I had just got up from a spell of measles and would see Ike going down the road week before last. Yesterday evening, Feb. 3, 1888, I went to Patience Chalmer's house and saw blood on the door facing and the door peg, which fastens the front door. Saw some on the bedstead, some on the stud of the house near the window at the head of the bed, some on the plank, which runs from the front door down. I took it for blood. Also looked like blood. Had been in the back door and it looked freshly scoured. No other portion of the house looked like it had been scoured. I saw two axes this morning, an old and a newer one. I examined the axe, which looked like it had blood on it, but could not swear it was blood. What I scratched up on the axe stuck together. I can't say when I saw Ike last. It was last week. Can't say what day. I don't know that Ike was in the habit of visiting Patience Chalmers. I saw Ike go along the road some mornings. Have not known him to have a difficulty. Saw no one following him with an axe. I heard his body was found Wednesday morning Feb. 1, 1888.                       James H. Brown

Archie Sloan being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. On Tuesday last I was sowing oats on my grandfather's place. I was informed on Wednesday morning by Jake Sherer that Ike Boozer was dead. I last saw Ike Monday one week ago. I do not know that Ike was in the habit of visiting Patience Chalmers. I saw blood at Patience's house in different places. I examined the plank at the back door, which runs down towards the steps. There was blood on it. On the inside near the back door was blood. Some was on the bedstead, some on the stud of the house near the window, some on the peg, which fastens the front door. The floor looked freshly scoured, so did the plank outside the front door, so did the head board of the bed. I looked under the house at the back door. It looked like water had been dripping from the house through the floor. This was the only place I noticed which appeared so. I saw blood on the bed tick. When I went to Patience's house W. Caleb Buzhardt, Col. Wilson, and Abe_ whose full name I don’t know and Job Goree were there. Job Goree told me he wanted me to go to Patience's house with him. I told him I would and I went. Patience was not there at that time. She came afterwards. She did not say to me why she left. I heard her say she left because she was afraid. She has a daughter. I can't say that she lives with her mother. Can't say when Patience left. Don't know whether it was before or since Ike's death.                     H. A. Sloan

Caleb Buzhardt being duly sworn says: I saw blood at the door and blood on the stick used to fasten the front door. I saw blood on the outside of the house near the back door. Nothing being dragged out of the house by a cat could have caused it. I saw blood on the bed and on the stead. I could not have gotten up there accidentally. It was three or four feet up. Saw axe, which appeared to have blood on it. Saw axe scraped and the scrapping stuck together like blood. When the axe was scrapped it appeared bright. Rust so scrapped would not stick together nor would the axe appear bright. I am satisfied that what I saw was blood.  I did not look underneath the house. I knew Ike Boozer. I last saw him about 9½ o'clock last Saturday morning on my brother-in-law's land. He was going in the direction of Darcus Means' house. This was about ½ mile from Lizzie Caldwell's. Ike was coming from Lizzie Caldwell's. I did not speak to him. My wife said she saw Ike about 10 o'clock passing along by my house. I don’t think he gambled. He was not fussy and generally attended to his own business. When I saw Ike he was coming towards Town. I know of no intimate relations between Ike and Patience but heard that he visited her. When he lived with me last year he did not sleep on my place and I heard that he spent a great deal of his time at her house.                     Caleb D. Buzhardt        

Billy Franklin being duly sworn says: I don't know what is Patience's name besides patience.

Archie Sloan: Patience's name is Patience Chalmers.

                                   

Lizzie Caldwell being sworn says: Ike Boozer had a contract for him and me to work for Asa Oxner. Ike was to marry me on Wednesday. I was living on Ben Cannon's place until then. Ike was there on Saturday morning tolerably early. I gave him breakfast and he ate it. We had a conversation. Emma and Neely Harmon were there. Ike said he was going to Town and buy a bed and bring it back on Mr. Buzhardt’s wagon. He was preparing to marry me on Wednesday. Ike, they say, was in the habit of visiting Patience Chalmers. I don't know from what direction he came to my house. He left going in the direction of Newberry. He said not a word to me about Patience Chalmers that morning. He gave me no money on that day. He had three or four bills. He wrapped them in a brown paper and put them in his pocket. He wore a reddish hat. He was not of a fussy character. I know patience Chalmers. We have never had a difficulty. I have not seen her since Wednesday ‘til this morning.               Lizzie (X) Caldwell

                                                                                         

Neely Harmon being duly sworn says: I live at Ben Cannon's in Newberry County. On Saturday I was at home. Ike Boozer passed through the yard that morning and when he left he went in the direction of Newberry. I talked to him. He asked me where was my husband. He said he was going to Newberry. I saw Patience Chalmers Wednesday at 1 o'clock at the dead body of Ike Boozer. I saw her Tuesday and she asked me for some salt. She said nothing about Ike Boozer. I don't know that Ike Boozer visited patience Chalmers but it is generally rumored that Ike was intimate with her. I knew nothing about Ike's getting married. Lizzie Caldwell aid to me, " Ike is dead and he was going to marry me on Wednesday".. She told me this Wednesday (when) going up to where Ike lay dead. He ate breakfast at Emma Harmon's on Saturday morning.           Neely (X) Harmon 
                                                                                         

Emma Harmon being duly sworn says: I live on Ben Cannon's place. Ike Boozer ate breakfast at my house early Saturday morning. He and Lizzie Caldwell were to be married on Wednesday. They talked it over at my house on Saturday morning. He went in the direction of Newberry. I haven't seen him since. I heard Caleb Buzhardt saw him afterwards. I heard he – Ike – was intimate with Patience Chalmers.               Emma (X) Harmon                                                                                              

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says. I hereby certify that I have, this day Feb. 1, 1888 examined the body of Ike Boozer and find that he came to his death from the effects of puncture wounds of the left parietal and the occipital bones of the skull.     W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry South Carolina on the 15th of February AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Charley Owens of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of J. J. Suber, T. B. Starns, J. R. Sligh, Preston Dominick, G. H. Nates, T. H. Davis, Le. Britt, Fed Wyatt, Fed. Colwell, John Burton, Fed Cleland, A. W. Longshore, J. B. Collands, J. B. O. Waldrop, who being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Charley Owens came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Charley Owens came to his death from a gun shot wound inflicted the 25th of December 1887 and he died Feb. 14, 1888 at his home in Newberry County and the wound was caused by the hands of Dick Wyatt by accident and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Charley Owens in manner and form aforesaid came to his death by accident and misfortune. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.             John N. Bass, Coroner 

J. J. Suber (Foreman), T. B. Starns, J. R. Sligh, Preston Dominick, G. H. Nates, T. H. Davis, Le. Britt, Fed Wyatt, Fed. Colwell, John Burton, A. W. Longshore, J. B. Collands, J. B. O. Waldrop, B. W. Slyght

                                   

EVIDENCE

Adeline Wyatt being sworn says:

I live in Newberry County. Charley was shot the 25th day of Dec. 1887. I was in the house. I heard the gun when it shot and thought it was a cracker and my son Charley said to me Dick did not do it on purpose. My son Charley was cutting wood at __ cut in the yard and he said Dick and he were going to shoot at a spot on a pine tree and Charley had his pistol in his hand and it went off accidentally and I know that is the way that __ for Dick and Charley were always good friends. All of their time Dick came to spend Christmas with Charley and I know that Dick did not shoot him on purpose for Charley told me all the time after he was shot that Dick did not aim to shoot him. He walked Monday. He was as well as we thought. He died the 14th of Feb. 1888. That is all I know about Charley's death.   Adeline Wyatt

                                                                                         

Dick Wyatt being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I came to my uncle’s the day before Christmas and stayed all night and the next morning me and Charley were out in the yard. He was splitting some wood and we were going to shoot at a spot on a tree and I had the pistols in my hands and pulled the hammer back to fill a cap and it did not stand cocked and it went off and shot him in the side and he said, "Oh my God, You have shot me." And then he said, "I know you did not mean to do it." I never had a fuss with Charley in my life.  We were like two brothers. We were always together when we could get together. He told everybody it was an accident. He was at work Monday of this week. I had nothing against him in the world. He was my own cousin. That is all there is about it.        Dick (X) Wyatt                                                                                                    

Noah Wyatt being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I was not at home when Charley got shot and I do not know only what Charley told me himself and he said it was done accidentally and he did not want anything done to Dick. He did not aim to do it. I am satisfied of it. I know in my own mind it was an accident. I got Dr. Smith to wait on him. He (Dr. Smith) never found the ball. He (Charley) worked this week Monday. He said all the time it was an accident and he told this, the last thing he said about it, sitting before the fire yesterday evening in a chair and he got up and he called his uncle who was in the house with him at the time and said to him, "My God". And then went and lay down on the bed and died in a minute. He has not been sick. I know he died from the effects of the shot. Dick and Charley have always been good friends. They never had a fuss in their lives.            Noah (X) Wyatt

                                                                                         

This is to certify that I have this day, Feb. 15, 1888 examined the body of Charley Owens and that he came to his death from the effects of a gun shot wound of the left side said to have been received Dec. 25, 1887.       James M. Kibler MD

                                   

This is a case that I have bound the boy that had the pistols in his hand over for Court. So that the matter can be fairly investigated as everything goes to show that it was an accident and I was of the opinion in that it was a clear case of an accident and I think it best to make this statement.        John N. Bass, Coroner


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Maria Boozer’s in Newberry County on the 3rd day of March AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Maria Boozer of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of John Kenner, Charlie Gilliam, Henry Turner, Thomas Renwick, D. Renwick, Fed. Gilliam, Ned. Renwick, Thomas Gise, Jack Colands, Ed. Austin, David Renwick, Tom Boozer who being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Maria Boozer came to her death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Maria Boozer came to her death from some cause to the jury unknown and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Maria Boozer in manner and form aforesaid came to her death. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.       John N. Bass, Coroner

John Kenner, Charlie Gilliam, Henry Turner, Thomas Renwick, D. Renwick, Fed. Gilliam, Ned. Renwick, Thomas Gise, Jack Colands, Ed. Austin, David Renwick, Tom Boozer

                                   

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Sallie Boozer who being duly sworn says: I live in the County of Newberry. I was at home this morning the 3rd day of March 1888. I sent my little daughter up to my mother's, Maria Boozer, the dead woman, to see if she was gone as she had told me she was going to Town today and she said that the door was fastened on the inside and she could not get it open and then I came to the house and called her but she did not answer me. I knew she was in her house for she always fastens her door inside with a piece of plank. Then I broke the door open and found her in her bed dead on her side, as she was when you came. She was at my house last evening and told me she was going to Town. She was as well as she is all the time. She had good health. She was not sick as (far as) I knew of. She would sometimes say that her side would pain her back. She didn't have any trouble with her heart that we ever knew of. She was as healthy as she could be. She walked to Town and back by dinner time any time she wanted to. I didn't think she killed herself for she did not have anything to take to kill herself with and I know nobody killed her. She was about 80 years old. No one lived with her since her husband died. Nobody was here with her when she died. That is all I know about it. It was about 5 o'clock when she was at my house. It is about 150 yards to my house from hers. She could always call to us when she wanted us from her own house. I cannot write.     Salley (X) Boozer      

                                                                                         

I hereby certify that I have this day, March 3, 1888 examined the dead body of Maria Boozer and in my opinion she came to her death from natural causes.           W. G. Houseal MD

                                                                                         

This is a case I could not find out anything about before I left Town and for this caused me to take a doctor with me at _. I did not know what trouble I might have to get one. I did not take one with me.      John N. Bass, Coroner


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Prosperity in Newberry County before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of the infant child of William Young then and there being dead by the oaths of A. L. Sheetz, J. D. Beacham, J. R. Watts, Francis Bobb, J. H. Cannon, L. E. Schumpert, J. S. Wheeler, J. L. Wise, D. S. Maffett, J. T. Hawkins, L. A. Enlower, W. P. Crumpton being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said child to its death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid child came to its death by accidentally let fall out of the arms of the 6 year old little girl, the sister of said child, to the floor and dislocating its neck on the 8th day of June 1888 in the Town of Prosperity in Newberry County and so the jurors aforesaid upon their oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid child in manner and form aforesaid came to its death. In witness whereof I, John N. Bass, Coroner aforesaid and jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have interchangeably have put our hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.   John N. Bass, Coroner

A. L. Sheetz, J. D. Beacham, J. R. Watts, Francis Bobb, J. H. Cannon, L. E. Schumpert, J. S. Wheeler, J. L. Wise, D. S. Maffett, J. T. Hawkins, L. A. Enlower, W. P. Crumpton

                                   

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Jane Young being duly sworn says: I live in Newberry County. I was out in the yard at the back end of the house yesterday washing clothes.  My little daughter was nursing my baby and about 10 or 11 o’clock I heard the baby fall. I ran as soon as I could to it. When I got to my little girl who had picked it up and it was bleeding at the nose and mouth. I called to my sister who lived next to me to come – that the girl had killed my baby – and she ran as soon as she could get here and took and we got the camphor and rubbed it but it was dead. I know that my little girl would not have dropped it if she could have helped it. She always thought genteelness to the baby. I sent for Dr. McFall. He came soon after but it was dead before he got here. This is all about the case of its death. It was the 8th of June 1888. My child was 3 months old.             Jane (X) Young

                                                                                         

Alice More being sworn says: I live in Newberry County Newberry. I was called by the mother of the child who said come here – Hattie has killed my baby. When I got to it I took it but I think it was dead. We rubbed it with camphor but it did not ? respond to? it. We sent for the doctor McFall but I knew it would not do any good. It was 10 or 11 o’clock, the 8th day of June 1888. This is all I know about it.         Alice (X) More          

I and the jury thought that it was best to let the little girl make a statement, as she was too young to be sworn.                                                                      Hattie Young's statement: Don’t know how I dropped the baby. I was in the house at the bed and had it in my arms. Went to put it on the bed. It fell out of my arms onto the floor. The head was under the bed. I did not let it fall on purpose. I loved the little thing.

                                                                                         

Billie Young sworn says: Hattie Young is my daughter. I was not at home when my child got hurt. Don’t know of my own knowledge anything about it. I know Hattie would not have done it if she could have helped it. She thought a heap of the baby and am sure it was not done on purpose.  Billy Young 

This is to certify that I have examined the body of the infant of William Young and am satisfied that death was caused by dislocation of the neck this 9th day of June 1888.                    J. D. Bruce MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at W. A. Chalmer’s in Newberry County on the 5th of May AD 1888 before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of William Schumpert then and there being dead by the oaths of W. A. Chalmers, J. M. Wilson, W. G. Houseal, John Williams, A. Williams, Frank Wilson Jr., Frank Wilson, D. Gallman, J. Ruff, Matt Wilson, Jesse Wilson, Cal Wilson, being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said William Schumpert came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid William Schumpert came to his death by a stroke of lying at his house the 4th day of May AD 1888 in Newberry County in manner and form aforesaid. Willie Schumpert came to his death by misfortune and accident and so the jurors aforesaid and the coroner aforesaid have interchangeably have put their hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.    John N. Bass, Coroner

W. A. Chalmers (Foreman), John M. Wilson, W. G. Houseal, John Williams, Albert Williams, Frank Wilson Jr., Frank Wilson, Drat. Gallman, Jack Ruff, Jesse Wilson, Cal Wilson, Wert Williams

                                   

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Angie Schumpert sworn says: I live on our W. A. Chalmers place in Newberry County. Was at home yesterday. Lightening struck the house about 4 o’clock. My two sisters and two children were in the house at the time. My child was killed. I was sitting on the trunk. I was shocked and when I came to myself I was lying on one of my children in the cradle. All was gone but me and the one in the cradle and one killed. I know that he was killed by lightening. The house was torn all to pieces. He was sitting in front of the fireplace. He fell in the fireplace but did not fall in the fire.     Angie (X) Schumpert

I have examined the dead body of William Schumpert May 5, 1888 and I certify that he came to his death from a bolt of lightening.      W. G. Houseal MD


                                                                                         

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

                                                                                         

An inquisition indented and taken at Tom Burton's Place in Newberry County before John N. Bass Coroner for said County upon viewing the body of Henry Teague then and there being dead by the oaths of W. G. Houseal, P. M. Miller, Burt Satterwhite, Walter Suber, J. J. Gary, Humphrey Gary, James Teague, Lewis Reeder, John Kinard, Lewis Burton, John Burton, M. G. Teague, Lewis Johnson, Pink Suber being a lawful jury of inquest who being sworn and charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina, where and by what means the said Henry Teague came to his death – upon their oath do say that the aforesaid Henry Teague came to his death by a pistol shot wound in the left side on the 23rd day of June AD 1888 and they do say that it was inflicted on the 23rd day of June 1888 by his own hands accidentally and so the jurors aforesaid and the  Coroner aforesaid have to this inquisition interchangeably put their hands and seals this day and year above mentioned.    John N. Bass, Coroner

W. G. Houseal (Foreman), P. M. Miller, Burt Satterwhite, Walter Suber, J. J. Gary, Umphrey Gary, James Teague, Lewis Reeder, John Kinard, Lewis Burton, John Burton, M. G. Teague, Lewis Johnson, Pink Suber

                                   

EVIDENCE

                                                                                         

Lewis Reeder sworn: I live at Tom Burton’s in Newberry County. Was with Henry Teague. He was shot 3 or 4 o'clock. When he was shot Jim Reeder was walking in front of Henry and had his pistol in his hip pocket. Henry snatched the pistol out of his pocket of Jim Reeder and started to run and fell and shot himself. He was shot in the left side. Henry died Sunday morning. Was shot Saturday 3 or 4 o'clock. They had no difficulties with each another. Jim and Henry were not scuffling when Henry Teague was shot. Henry just wanted to shoot the pistol for Fern.    Lewis (X) Reeder                                                                                                

Jim Reeder sworn says: I live on Dr. Gary's place in Newberry County. I was walking in front of Henry. He asked me to let him shoot my pistol. It was in my hip pocket. The handle was out and he slipped up and tried to take it out and ran and fell and shot himself in the side. We did not have any fuss. We had always been good friends. He was shot Saturday and died Sunday. We were not scuffling when he was shot, nor had been that day. Henry was about six feet away from me when he fell. This was on the 23rd day of June 1888. He walked to the house with my help.  J. J. Reeder                                                                                      

I hereby certify that I have this day, June 25, 1888, examined the dead body of Henry Teague and find a gunshot wound in the left side, three inches below the nipple, which wound is sufficient to have caused his death.    W. G. Houseal MD
 

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