CORONER'S INQUISITION, 1879 - 1893
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 22nd Jan. 1890 at Mrs. Lou Senn's place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Jack Summers by: W. T. Langston Foreman, Nelson Crawford, Caleb Mangum, Sol Harp, William Davenport, Ed M. Gary, Tom Gary, Daniel Ellison, Charles Gary, Alf Rhodes, G. W. Pinson, Westley Stephens a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jack Summers came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Jack Summers came to his death on 21st of January 1890 on Mrs. Lou Senn's Place from a blow received by being flung from a mule against a tree.                                                                                        C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. T. Langston Foreman, Nelson (X) Crawford, Caleb (X) Mangum, Sol (X) Harp, William (X) (X) Davenport, Ed M. (X) Gary, Tom (X) Gary, Daniel (X) Ellison, Charles (X) Gary, Alf (X) (X) Rhodes, G. W. (X) Pinson, Westley (X) Stephens
                                                                        EVIDENCE
                                                                                                                                                     

Nannie Bug sworn: I reside on Mrs. Lou Senn's place. Jack Summers was my son. He lived on the same place with me. He was out after daylight yesterday morning January 21, 1890. He was well when he left me. I saw him when he came back from Mrs. Lou Senn's after he got his mule. He was brought back by E. F. Boozer about 12 o'clock. He was complaining and went to bed. He said his bowels hurt him but was in too much pain to tell how he was hurt. E. F. Boozer said Jack Summers was thrown from a mule. I sent for Dr. Senn but he did not come until he was dead. He died about half an hour before sundown.                                                                                 Nannie (X) Bugg                                                                   

J. E. Senn sworn:  I saw Jack Summers get on his mule to start to dinner. He was in good health. He got home and was behind. He started on to feed the mule and was 300 yards from home when the mule began to run. The mule threw him off after running about 30 yards. He was thrown against a pine tree, about three feet from the ground. I picked him up but he was not breathing. He was alive. I asked him how he was hurt and he said across the bowels. I sent him to his home by E. F. Boozer. When I next saw him I supposed him nearly dead.                                                 J. E. Senn                                                                               

E. F. Boozer sworn:  I am acquainted with Jack Summer and saw him when he first went to work, half-hour after the sun rose. He was well. I saw him when the mule ran off with him. (I) think the mule was frightened by a bucket around its neck. I saw the mule when it flung him. I went up to him and he was alive still. I took him by the arm and brought him to the house. I saw him in the afternoon. He was still living.                                                                                 E. F. (X) Boozer                                                                    

W. G. Houseal sworn: I hereby certify that I have this day January 22, 1890 examined the dead body of Jack Summers and in my opinion he came to his death from internal injuries caused by a blow upon the abdomen.  W. G. Houseal MD


 State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 24th Jan. 1890 on the farm of F. H. Dominick by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Carrie Sheppard by: R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Carrie Sheppard came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Carrie Sheppard came to her death on 22nd of January 1890 on F. H. Dominick's Place from accidental burning.                 C. B. Buist, Coroner  

R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis

EVIDENCE

Richard Sheppard sworn:  I am the father of Carrie Sheppard. She was about 6 years old. I did not see her alive on 22, Jan 1890. I saw the house where Carrie Sheppard lived on fire, about 10 o'clock pm. There was no chance of saving the same after it was on fire. I saw it was on fire all around me and I could not get in it. My daughter Carrie Sheppard was burnt in the house. There was no chance of saving her.                                                                                                     Richard (X) Sheppard                                                                                                                                                      

William C. Sheppard sworn:  I saw Carrie Sheppard about daylight on the morning of the 22nd of January 1890. She was alive and in good health. I did not see her again until I saw her dead body. She was burnt in the house where she lived. The house was bolted and locked. No one could get out.                                                                                                            W. C. Sheppard

                                                           

Wade Ruff sworn: I did not see Carrie Sheppard alive on 22nd January 1890. She was dead when I saw her body. No one was in the house with Carrie Sheppard and Ada Waldrop. There was no chance of their getting out while the house was burning. I think the house caught from the inside. The house was 300 yards from Mr. F. H. Dominick's residence.              Wade (X) Ruff                                                                                                                                                                 

W. G. Houseal MD:  I hereby certify that I have examined the dead body of Carrie Sheppard and found it burned to a crisp, which I suppose caused her death.               W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 24th Jan. 1890 on the farm of F. H. Dominick by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Ada Waldrop by: R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Ada Waldrop came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Ada Waldrop came to her death on 22nd of January 1890 on F. H. Dominick’s Place from accidental burning.                                         C. B. Buist, Coroner
R. M. Martin Foreman, Asa D. Johnson, R. J. Johnson, J. H. Adams, A. W. Langford, J. R. Sligh, E.D. Reeder, Stokes Dandy, John Dilliard, R. Griffin, John Peterson, Giles Davis


EVIDENCE

J. H. Waldrop sworn:  I am the father of Ada Waldrop. I saw her at 7 am on Jan. 22, 1890. She lived in a house on Mr. F. H. Dominick's farm. I did not see her again until I saw her dead body. I saw the house on fire but could not get in to save her. The house was locked on the inside and bolted on the other side. She was not quite 1 year old. The house was burnt to the ground.     J. H. Waldrop

                                                                                                                                                     

Richard Sheppard sworn:  I am the father of Carrie Sheppard. She was in the same house that was burned with Ada Waldrop. I saw Ada Waldrop’s dead body. There was no chance of saving either one.                                                                                                               Richard (X) Sheppard

                                                           

W. G. Houseal MD:  I hereby certify that I have examined this day the dead body of Ada Waldrop and find the body burned to a crisp which I suppose caused her death.    W.G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 30th Jan. 1890 at the C. H. Suber place by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Laura Eichelberger by: William Dawkins, George Spearman, Phil Glasgow, Tom Johnson, John Higgins, Tom Ruffin, W. T. Hipp, J. J. Paysinger, T. F. Waters, Pen King, J. H. Dennis, J. T. Dennis a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Laura Eichelberger came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Laura Eichelberger came to her death on 30th of January 1890 on C. H. Suber's farm from natural causes. C. B. Buist, Coroner
William Dawkins, George Spearman, Phil Glasgow, Tom Johnson, John Higgins, Tom Ruffin, W. T. Hipp, J. J. Paysinger, T. F. Waters, Pen King, J. H. Dennis, J. T. Dennis


EVIDENCE

Foster Farrow sworn: I am the son of Laura Eichelberger and lived in the same house with her. When I got up I heard my sister say, "Mother was dying". My sister and mother slept together. I went to my mother's bed and found her strangling. She died in a few minutes. She was picking cotton on Jan. 29, 1890. She did not complain during the day. She retired about 8 o'clock January 29, 1890. She has three children living with her. I heard nothing from her during the night. If she had made any noise I would have heard it. After I heard her strangling she died in about three minutes.                                                                                                   Foster (X) Farrow      

                                                                                                                                                     

Dora Dawkins: I am 13 years old. I lived in the same house with Laura Eichelberger and was in the same bed and room with her when she died. She slept well during the night. I was awake when I heard her coughing and choking and she died immediately. She was picking cotton yesterday and did not hear her complain during the day.                                                      Dora (X) Dawkins
                                                                                                                                                     

W. A. Houseal MD sworn: I hereby certify that I have examined the dead body of Laura Eichelberger and in my opinion she died from natural causes.  W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 17th Feb. 1890 at the W. C. Swittenberg’s place by C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Jack Davis by: J. M. Sligh Foreman, J. W. Brooks, Tom Abrams, George Clark, Burley Davis, Nathan Swindler, James Clark, David Warner, W. Wilson, Peter Williams, Alex Davis, James Gary a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jack Davis came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Jack Davis came to his death on 17h of February 1890 on W. C. Swittenberg's place from the effects of a wound caused by a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Doc Sligh.                                                             C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. M. Sligh Foreman, J. W. Brooks, Tom (X) Abrams, George (X) Clark, Burley (X) Davis, Nathan (X) Swindler, James (X) Clark, David (X) Warner, W. (X) Wilson, Peter Williams, Alex (X) Davis, James (X) Gary

EVIDENCE

                                                                                                                                                     

J. H. Shell sworn: I am the stepson of Jack Davis. I was raised by him. He was a quiet and peaceable man. I saw him on Monday 17th Feb. 1890 after he was shot. When I saw him he was laying on the ground. He was complaining. He said he was obliged to die. He said he was shot through the bowels. He did not say who shot him. I did not ask him who shot him. Lou Abrams told me that Doc Sligh had shot him before I saw him. He died between 30 and 40 minutes after I saw him. He left no wife but 6 children survive him. He was dead before Doctor Clark reached him. He was over 60 years of age. Doc Sligh was over 20 years of age. J. H. Shell                                                                                                                                                                        

Lou Adams:  I knew Jack Davis and Doc Sligh. I saw Jack Davis before he was shot. I saw Jack Davis after he was shot. He told me he was dying and wanted him (J. H. Shell) to take care of his children. I heard him say nothing else.     Lou (X) Abrams                                                                                                                                                                

Bedford Sligh:  I was acquainted with Jack Davis and Doc Sligh. I saw them both on the 17th Feb. 1890. They appeared to be in good health when I saw them. I saw Jack Davis after he was shot, a little after 8 am. He seemed to be in pain. He did not say who shot him. My son Doc fired the pistol that caused his death. I have seen Doc with a pistol before this. Doc went off after shooting him and carried the pistol with him. Doc and Jack had no quarrel before this. Jack was a peaceable man. Doc was a quiet boy at times but sometimes he was quite windy. Jack Davis did not carry a pistol. Doc carried a pistol with him regularly. Jack died in about 30-40 minutes after he was shot. I have not seen Doc since he shot Jack Davis. Jack and myself were good friends. I did not hear what passed between Jack Davis and Doc Sligh but saw Doc when he fired the pistol. Bedford (X) Sligh      

                                                                                                                                                     

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I hereby certify that I have this day Feb. 17, 1890 examined the dead body of Jack Davis and find that he came to his death from a pistol shot wound 3 ½ inches below and 1 ½ inches to the left of the right nipple, the ball passing through the liver and defrag mating and lodging in the right thoracic cavity.    W. G. Houseal MD 


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 20th March 1890 at Newberry Court House before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Jeannie King by: Reuben Harrington Foreman, Major Cannon, Charles Williams, Turner Bond, Hack Hentz, W. Robinson, Laurens Fleming, Henry Abb, Andrew Burton, Fielding Wright, S. Blakely, Mike Reeder, a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Jeannie King came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Jeannie King came to her death on 20th  of March 1890 on Mrs. Mary Goodman's place from natural causes.                                                                                                                                                C. B. Buist, Coroner

Reuben (X) Harrington Foreman, Major (X) Cannon, Charles (X) Williams, Turner (X) Bond, Hack (X) Hentz, W. (X) Robinson, Laurens (X) Fleming, Henry (X) Abb, Andrew (X) Burton, Fielding (X) Wright, S. Blakely, Mike Reeder

EVIDENCE

                                                                                                                                                     

Isabella Simms sworn: I knew Jeannie King. She had lived with me two weeks. She had been sick since she came but not sufficiently so to lay in bed. She had lived at Helena before she came to live with me. She was on the street this morning and returned complaining of being sick. She laid down and died in about a half of an hour. I sent for a doctor but none came before she died. She was about 21 years of age, a light colored woman. No doctor attended to her during the time she lived with me but she was constantly complaining.                                                               Isabella (X) Simms                                                                                                                           

Mary Goodman sworn:  Jeannie King was staying in my yard when she died. I saw her 15 minutes before she died. She was having fits. She kept jerking in the bed. I did not know her but have seen her passing.            Mary Goodman

                                                                                                                                                     

Mollie Simms sworn:  I went about ½ past 8 o'clock am with Jeannie King on the street. She was complaining. We came back together. She went to bed. She said she thought she felt bad and thought she would go to bed. I went for a doctor and she was dead before I got back.                   Mollie Simms


W. G. Houseal MD:  I hereby certify that I have this day March 20, 1890 examined the dead body of Jeannie King and in my opinion she came to her death from Natural causes. W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 23rd March 1890 at Robert Porter’s Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Milton Brown by: W. B. Spence, F. M. Bowers, A. G. Wise, G. L. Paysinger, E. K. Bedenbaugh, H. Graham, G. A. Maffett, W. W. Fulmer, W. P. B. Harmon, J. L. Langford, W. Brown, G. Cannon, a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Milton Brown came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Milton Brown came to his death on 23rd of March 1890 on Robert Porter's place from natural causes.                                                            C. B. Buist, Coroner

A. G. Wise (Foreman), W. B. Spence, F. M. Bowers, G. L. Paysinger, E. K. Bedenbaugh, H. Graham, G. A. Maffett, W. W. Fulmer, W. P. B. Harmon, J. L. Langford, Washington Brown, George Cannon

EVIDENCE

Robert Porter sworn: I am acquainted with Milton Brown. He lived on Mr. Young's Place. I saw him before day in my house on 23rd March 1890. He slept in my house. He was not complaining when he went to bed. He retired to bed between 8 and 9 o'clock pm. When I first saw him this morning he was making a noise, as if in pain. I did not send for a doctor but sent for his wife. I was not here when she came as I had gone to let his other children know. It was 11 o'clock am when I returned. I left about daylight. He was dead when I returned. He was an old man. He was my wife’s father. He was crippled with rheumatism as long as I knew him. He was not breathing when I went after his wife.                                                                                                         R. Porter

                                                                                                                                                     

J. M. Kibler MD:  I hereby certify that I have examined this day the 23rd of March 1890 the dead body of Milton Brown and that he came to his death of natural causes.         J. M. Kibler MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 24th March 1890 at Newberry Court House before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of J. A. Reeder by: W. F. Ewart, W. T. Tarrant, R. H. Wearn, W. Johnson, G. J. Ruff, E. Scholtz, J. W. Kibler, J. L. Kennerly, W. W. Hodges, J. W. White, J. W. M. Simmons, E. C. Jones a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said J. A. Reeder came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said J. A. Reeder came to his death on 24th of March 1890 in Iley W. Fant’s bar room from the effects of a wound received from a ball fired from a pistol in the hands of Jason Summers.                                                                                 C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. F. Ewart (Foreman), W. T. Tarrant, R. H. Wearn, William Johnson, G. J. Ruff, E. Scholtz, J. W. Kibler, J. L. Kennerly, W. W. Hodges, J. W. White, J. W. M. Simmons, E. C. Jones

EVIDENCE

                                                                                                                                                     

J. W. McCullough sworn:  I reside in Jalapa but was in Newberry on the 24th March 1890. I knew Jack Reeder and Jason Summers. I was present at the shooting. I saw Jack Reeder off and on all day. I saw Jason Summers before the shooting took place. Before the shooting occurred the lie was passed by both of them. Jack Reeder walked out and returned. The lie was passed. Jason Summers caught Jack Reeder by the beard and fired. After the shot I saw Jack Reeder. He was dead. Jason Summers leaned over the counter and caught Jack Reeder by the beard and fired. Jack Reeder walked out after he was shot and his body was brought back to the bar room.     J. W. McCullough                                                                                                                              

P. B. Reeder sworn:  J. A. Reeder is my first cousin. I saw J. A. Reeder on the 24th March 1890. I was present when the shooting occurred. It occurred at Iley Fant’s bar room between 4 and 5 o'clock p.m. I heard words passed between Jason Summers and J. A. Reeder. Both passed the lie. Then Jason Summers shot from behind the counter. Before he shot he caught J. A. Reeder by the beard. J. A. Reeder was shot in the front room of Iley Fant's bar room. J. A. Reeder walked out after he was shot. J. A. Reeder fell inside the bar room. He was living when I saw him. Then I walked out. J. A. Reeder had no weapon in hand when shot. Before the shooting occurred Mr. Reeder said he would go and get a pistol.                                                                                  P. B. Reeder

                                                                                                                                                     

I. W. Fant sworn: Jason Summers was my barkeeper. He had been in my employ for a month. He was a peaceable man. Whenever J. A. Reeder came to Town he came to my bar room. J. A. Reeder was in my bar room when I saw the shooting. I heard J. A. Reeder called a liar first. J. A. Reeder returned the lie. Then J. A. Reeder said he would go and get a gun and after he returned the lie was passed between them again. When Mr. Reeder returned he made a motion to draw his pistol. Then Mr. Summers fired from behind the counter. Mr. Reeder did not return the fire. Mr. Reeder walked out after he was shot. I saw him after he fell. He was breathing.                       Iley W. Fant                                                                                                                                                                     

S. P. Fant sworn: I am the brother of I. W. Fant. I heard J. A. Reeder called Jason Summers a liar first. Mr. Summers returned it. Jason Summers fired. I saw no pistol in J. A. Reeder's hand. I saw Mr. Reeder make a motion to draw a pistol when Mr. Summers fired. After Mr. Summers fired Mr. Reeder walked to the door. I saw Reeder when he fell. He was breathing when I got to him. He died in 2 or 3 minutes. I saw no pistol in Mr. Reeder's hand. I saw Reeder make a grab at Summers' before he, Jason Summers, fired.                                                                        S. Preston Fant

                                                                                                                                                     

James K. Gilder MD sworn:  I hereby certify that I have examined the body of Mr. J. A. Reeder and find that he came to his death from the effects of a gunshot wound in the left breast entering about 2 inches above the nipple.    James K. Gilder MD 


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 25th March 1890 on Levi F. Longshore's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Fannie Humphries by: J. S. Spearman, David Pitts, L. F. Dennis, W. A. Read. T. F. Hendrix, E. F. Longshore, W. W. Waldrop, B. M. Adams, L. F. Longshore, J. D. Spearman, H. Hendrix, John Harp a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Fannie Humphries came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Fannie Humphries came to her death on 25th of March 1890 at Levi F. Longshore’s Place from internal injuries received in the tornado of March 22, 1890 at F. H. Dominick's place. C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. R. Spearman (Foreman), David Pitts, L. F. Dennis, W. A. Read. T. F. Hendrix, E. F. Longshore, W. W. Waldrop, B. M. Adams, L. F. Longshore, J. S. Spearman, H. Hendrix, J. A. Harp

                                                                                                                                                     

EVIDENCE

                                                                                                                                                     

C. N. Humphries sworn:  My wife’s name was Fannie Humphries. On Saturday 22nd March 1890 myself and wife were in the house when the tornado commenced. I left the house when it commenced and told her to follow me. When I saw her again the house had fallen on her. She could not be seen unless the timber was removed. I carried her to a house 100 yards off. She was alive. She remained here until 23rd March when she was moved to Mr. Levi F. Longshore’s house, where she died 25th March 1890 at 5 o'clock am. Dr. Senn and Smith attended her. They attended her for internal injuries.     Charles (X) Humphries

J. M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of Fannie Humphries and that she came to her death from internal; injuries received from falling timber on March 22, 1890.     Newberry County SC, March 25, 1890                      J. M. Kibler MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at Newberry Court House at the RR Depot before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of John Robertson by: D. W. Hicks, Isaiah King, J. H. Turner, Palmer Henley, Silas Abrams, Dan Spelling, Robert Harris, Winback House, Frank Miller, John McMorris, Morgan Scurry a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said John Robertson came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said John Robertson came to his death on 28th of March 1890 while engaged in coupling the cars of the Greenville & Columbia division of the Richmond & Danville RR from the injuries received from being crushed between the cars. C. B. Buist, Coroner

D. W. (X) Hicks (Foreman), Isaiah (X) King, J. H. (X) Turner, Palmer Henley, Silas Abrams, Dan Spelling, Robert (X) Harris, Winback (X) House, Frank (X) Miller, John McMorris, Morgan Scurry

EVIDENCE

                                                                                                                                                     

B. F. Pennington being duly sworn deposes: I was acquainted with John Robertson. He was in the employ of the G&C RR division of the R&D RR. I saw him this morning at 5:30 am. I had him throwing wood off a flat of timber and then went to couple the cars. He tried to make the couplings between two flat cars and was killed. I saw him killed. Had hold of him when he died. His head was crushed between the cars. He died within minutes. He was trying to couple cars on the wrong side. He should have been on the outside of ___ of road. I immediately removed the body.                                                                                                                                          B. F. Pennington

J. M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that John Robertson came to his death from the effects of a smash while coupling cars on the G&C RR causing a fracture of the skull and concussion of the brain.   J. M. Kibler MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at Jacob Bedenbaugh’s place on 2nd April 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Adam Sligh by: J. B. Bedenbaugh, B. B. Hair, R. Stewart, E. Mayes, John Atwood, Calvin Henderson, H. Cannon, Stan Mayes, James Mayes, J. Cannon, John Sligh, E. B. Bowers a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Adam Sligh came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Adam Sligh came to his death about 11 am on 1st of April 1890 on Jacob B. Bedenbaugh's Place from congestion. Witness our hands and seals on this April 2 in the year of Our Lord 1890.                                                                         C. B. Buist, Coroner

J. B. Bedenbaugh (Foreman), B. B. Hair, R. Stewart, E. Mayes, John Atwood, Calvin Henderson, H. (X) Cannon, Stan (X) Mayes, James Mayes, J. Cannon, John Sligh, E. B. (X) Bowers

EVIDENCE

Lula Sligh sworn: Adam Sligh was my husband. I saw him on April 1, 1890. He was well. He worked all day. He went to bed about 9 o’clock pm. About the middle of the night he pushed me with his hand. I turned over and called him. He did not answer. I called my grandson and told him his grandfather was dying. He got a light. He (Adam) was breathing. After my grandson and myself got the light and looked at him, then he quit breathing and I saw he was dead. He was about 72 years of age. I sent for his daughter and Mr. Bedenbaugh to let them know he was dead.                                                                                                                                               Lula (X) Sligh

James Mayes sworn: I am the grandson of Adam Sligh. I slept in the same house with him on April 1, 1890. His wife woke me up in the night and told me to get a light and said Adam Sligh was dying. I did so and went to the bed with her and he then died. Two breathes and died. I went off then and informed his children.                                                                   James (X) Mayes                                                                   

J. M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that Adam Sligh came to his death from congestion. 
Newberry County, April 2, 1890      J. M. Kibler MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at Andrew J. Langford's Place on 16th April 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Bessie Caldwell by: A. J. Langford Foreman, F. A. Kenny, Lem Hunter, Charles Bates, M. Ellison, E. Satterwhite, Jacob Cannon, H. Abraham, Isaac Harp, A. Flanagan, H. Wertz, W. G. Houseal a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Bessie Caldwell came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Bessie Caldwell came to her death about 11 am on 15th of April 1890 on A. J. Langford's Place from inflammation of the lungs. Witness our hands and seals on this April 2 in the year of Our Lord 1890.                                 C. B. Buist, Coroner

A. J. Langford Foreman, F. A. (X) Kenny, Lem (X) Hunter, Charles (X) Bates, M. (X) Ellison, E. (X) Satterwhite, Jacob (X) Cannon, H. (X) Abraham, Isaac (X) Harp, A. (X) Flanagan, H. (X) Wertz, W. A. (X) Houseal

EVIDENCE

                                                                                                                                                     

Jane Satterwhite sworn:  I saw Bessie Caldwell on Monday. She was crying all day. On Tuesday I saw her again. She was better. I saw her on Tuesday afternoon 15th April 1890. She was dead. I live on Mr. A. J. Langford's Place where Bessie Caldwell lived. I was surprised when I heard of her death. Linda Williams told me she was dead.                                               Jane (X) Satterwhite                                                              

Lucinda Williams sworn: I live on Mr. A. Langford's place where Bessie Caldwell lived. I saw her on Monday. She appeared to be sick. I saw her again on Tuesday morning and she seemed to be better. I saw her next on Tuesday afternoon 15th April 1890, she was dead. I was surprised to hear of her death. Her mother, Linda Jackson, called me and said she was dead.   Lucinda (X) Williams                                                                       

Lucinda Jackson sworn:  I was the mother of Bessie Caldwell. She appeared to be sick for some days past. She appeared to be better on the 15th April 1890. About 2 o'clock I went and left her. I left a little boy with her. When I got back about ½ hour until sun (down) she was about dying. I took hold of her hand and she was dead.                                                 Linda (X) Jackson                                                                                                                                                           

W. A. Houseal MD sworn:  I hereby certify that I have this day April 16, 1890 examined the body of Bessie Caldwell and find that her death was caused by inflammation of the lungs.              

 State of South Carolina, Newberry County       W. A. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at F. H. Dominick's Place on 23rd April 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Leonard Sheppard by: Preston Dominick (Foreman), D. Griffin, W. Turner, E. Burton, George Sheppard, C. E. Steck, G. Harris, Asa Longshore, John Boozer, Wallace Davis, R. Sheppard, J. Cleland a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Leonard Sheppard came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Leonard Sheppard came to his death on 23rd of April 1890 on F. H. Dominick's Place from the effects of a wound received from a ball fired from a pistol accidentally discharged by him. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 23rd April Anno Domini 1890.                                       C. B. Buist, Coroner

Preston Dominick (Foreman), D. (X) Griffin, W. (X) Turner, E. (X) Burton, George Sheppard, C. E. Steck, G. (X) Harris, A. W. Longshore, John Boozer, Wallace Davis, R. (X) Sheppard, J. R.  Cleland

EVIDENCE

Fanny Sheppard sworn:  Leonard Sheppard was my son. He was 7 years of age. About sun up I called him. He was well. I left him eating his breakfast. I went to Miss Alice Miller's to wash. I heard a report of a pistol. I came to the house to see what was the matter and when I got to the house I did not see my son. He was not in the house. I did not see him but Mary Bonds saw him lying on the road. He appeared to be dying. I saw he was shot. Blood was coming from the wound, which appeared to be in his breast. I saw no pistol with him. I found a pistol lying in front of this house. It was my pistol. When I left it was partially loaded. I always kept it in the house but had it his where no one could find it, as I thought. The boy had seen it before. It was a five shooter but only three chambers were loaded. When I went off I left him in charge of the baby, which was my usual custom. I found the baby in the house crying. No one was with the boy when I left him except the baby. When Mary Bonds told me she had found the boy I went to the place where his body was. Mary Bonds and myself were washing together. I came ahead of Mary Bonds and she following in the road was the reason of her first seeing him.                                            Fanny (X) Sheppard                                

Mary Bonds sworn:  I and Fanny Sheppard were washing together on the morning of Wednesday 23rd April 1890 Miss Alice Tanner's when I heard the report of a pistol. Fannie Sheppard started to see what it was and I followed her. I found the boy lying along the side of the road. I saw he was bleeding. I and another woman, Caty Wyatt brought the body to the house. On examination I found he was shot by a ball. He was dying when I first saw him, but was dead when we reached the house. I live on the same place with Fanny Sheppard but not in the same house. It was about 9 o'clock in the morning when I heard the report of the pistol.                                         Mary (X) Bonds                                                                                            

Caty Wyatt sworn:  I live on the same place with Fanny Sheppard but not in the same house. I heard of Leonard Sheppard being shot but did not hear the report of the pistol. I started and came to the house when I saw the people around the body. The boy was dead when I and Mary Bonds brought him to the house. It looked as if a ball had entered his breast as the blood seemed to come from there.                                                                                                                   Caty (X) Wyatt
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           
W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Leonard Sheppard and find that he came to his death from a pistol shot wound upon the right breast, two inches above and two inches to the left of the right nipple, the ball passing obliquely downward and backward through the edge of the superior lobe of the right lung, through the right pulmonary vein and lodging nears the border of the right scapula.   W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at Michael Wertz's Place on 11th May 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Ella Wilson by: S. Boozer, P. Wertz, A. Lake, A. Burton, W. Scott, A. Long, E. Young, G. Lake, E. Penn, M. C. Moon, H. Boyce, G. Wilson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Ella Wilson came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Ella Wilson came to her death on 10th of May 1890 on Michael Wertz's Place from accidental burning on 7th May 1890. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 11th May Anno Domini 1890.                                                                                                                   C. B. Buist, Coroner       

 S. (X) Boozer (Foreman), P. (X) Wertz, G. (X) Lake, A. (X) Burton, W. (X) Scott, A. (X) Long, E. (X) Young, B. (X) Lake, E. (X) Penn, M. C. (X) Moon, H. (X) Boyce, G. (X) Wilson

EVIDENCE

David Wilson sworn: I am the father of Ella Wilson. She was burnt on 7th May 1890 and died 10th May 1890 at ½ past 9 o'clock pm.  She was 8 months old. I and my wife left her on the 7th May 1890 with a little boy. She was burned on the fanny. My brother who is 15 years old was with her before she was burnt. We left her on the floor and walked out and came back in a half hour. When we returned she was in the fire. When we returned we took her out of the fire and called my brother in. The child lingered until Saturday night and died. My opinion is the child crawled from the middle of the floor into the embers we had left her on one or two occasions before with a little boy. David Wilson

Sudy Wilson sworn:  I am the mother of Ella Wilson. Left her on the 7th of May 1890 in the house. When I returned she was burned. She was 8 months old. I think she must have turned or rolled over into the fire. She died on the 10th May 1890.I applied linseed oil, lime and lard to the burns. I did not send for a doctor. She had constant spasms and died in a spasm. We thought she would die every moment. We did not send for a doctor. We live on Michael Wertz's place and he thought it was of no use to send for a doctor, as he could do no good.                                    Sudy Wilson                                                             

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I have this day May 11th 1890 examined the dead body of Ella Wilson and find her feet and legs, left forearm and hand and abdomen badly burned which burns caused her death.     State of South Carolina, Newberry County,       W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 13th May 1890 at F. G. Spearman's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Ella Wilson by: Jonathan Wertz Foreman, J. D. Pitts, James B. Stewart, Lewis Jesse, Lewis Young, Silas Sanders, J. M. Swindler, F. G. Spearman, J. M. Sanders, J. S. Werts, S. Calless, J. Anderson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Ella Wilson came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Ella Wilson came to her death on 10th of May 1890 on Michael Wertz's Place from accidental burning on 7th May 1890. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 11th May Anno Domini 1890.                        C. B. Buist, Coroner

Jonathan Wertz Foreman, J. D. Pitt, James B. Stewart, Lewis (X) Jesse, Lewis (X) Young, Silas (X) Sanders, J. M. Swindler, F. G. Spearman, J. M. Sanders, J.A. Werts, S. Calless, Jim (X) Anderson

EVIDENCE

Thomas Wilson sworn:  I am Ella Wilson's uncle. I saw her on the 7th day of May 1890 in the morning. I left Ella Wilson half in front of the door when I went into the field. Father gave me some medicine to take and I stayed at home that day. I was sick. I left the baby with George Lake, a boy four years old. I found the baby on the hearth lying on its stomach with its feet in the fire. The head was laying on the __ in front of the fireplace. I saw the child first after I returned to the house. Nothing of the clothing was burned but the stockings. When I came back to the house there was about as much fire in the fireplace as I could hold in my hat. There was as much fire in the fireplace or less. The fire was made up of live coals. David Wilson is my brother. I was working this year with my father George Wilson. I was plowing with my brother David Wilson. We all planted together. I was at the graveyard the day the inquest was held. My brother married Sarah Penn's daughter. I and Sarah Penn are friends. Sarah Penn said nothing to me about the child being burnt. I did not hear that Sarah Penn thought anything more about my leaving the child. I left the baby five feet from the hearth when I went out. The child could crawl a little. It was 8 months old. I know nothing of what became of the clothing of the child after it was burnt. I was about one half hour from the time I went out until I came back. I went out because I was taking medicine. When I found the child burnt I took it out of the fire and called my brother David Wilson. Thomas Wilson                                                       

Sarah Penn sworn:  I am Ella Wilson's grandmother. I came up on Wednesday night to see her. Her uncle Ned came for me. He told me about the child being burnt. I asked him how it happened. He said he did not know. The child was left with Tom Wilson on Wednesday night when the child was burned. I dressed the child, its clothes were on it and I stayed until Saturday morning. I took the clothes off (Witness showed the clothes and they were examined by the jury). They are the clothes that were on the child when it was burnt. I said nothing to Tom about burning the child. I attended the funeral on Sunday on the 13th May 1890. I went at Newberry with G. Penn to find out what had been done about it. I thought it strange the child was burnt and none of its clothes were burnt. Coroner told me my husband was one of the jury. I was not satisfied. I asked the doctor did he think the child could be burnt that way without its clothes being burnt. I told people in Newberry that the child was burnt but its clothes were not. I went to the solicitor, Mr. Schumpert. He sent for the coroner. I told the solicitor that it seemed strange the clothes were not burnt. I said the jury on the past inquest did not act right because they asked no questions about the child's clothes. I conveyed to the solicitor, that it was owing to Tom's carelessness. I was present Sunday when the inquest was held. I said nothing to the coroner on Sunday. I did not offer any evidence on Sunday. I am friendly with the grandfather of the child. I am not so friendly with Laura Wilson. We had a difficulty before this and Laura was cool towards me. I went to the Solicitor because I thought the verdict of the coroner's jury on Sunday was wrong. I could get no satisfactory information from my husband G. Penn. That is the reason I went to the solicitor. I have nothing to _ with. Tom Wilson, he has never been to my house but once. The diaper was on the child when I took the clothes off on Saturday. None of it was burned. The child was burned on Wednesday evening and died Saturday night at ½ past 9 o'clock pm. I don't know that this was the same diaper that the child had on when burned but this is the same outer clothes.                                                                  Sarah (X) Penn                                         

Laura Wilson sworn:  I am Ella Wilson's grandmother. I was present at the Coroner's jury on Sunday and was satisfied with the verdict of the jury. I am friendly with Sarah Penn. I thought Sarah was alright with me. We had a quarrel on the night the child was born. The clothes look like the same clothes the baby had on when burnt. I did not know if any of the baby's clothes were burnt. I was more than astonished to know that Sarah Penn had gone to have another inquest held. Ella Wilson's father and mother did all they could to save that child. The child could roll a little and slide backwards. I think it could move a distance of five feet.                     Laura (X) Wilson                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

David Wilson sworn: I am the father of Ella Wilson. On Wednesday I left the baby with Tom. He was sick. We carried the baby to my mother’s house but she was not at home and it was left with Tom. He was there. Ned, my brother, came riding rapidly on a mule and told me the baby was burnt. When I got to the house the baby was in Mitty Wertz's lap. I did not notice whether the clothes were burned. I went to Mr. Wertz, had to go after grandmother to stay with the baby. I went through the lot and asked Mr. Wertz to get me some medicine for the burn as he was going to Town. The child died Saturday night. I sent for a coffin but not for the coroner. I did not know an inquest was necessary. I am friendly with Sarah Penn.                                             David Wilson

Sudy Wilson sworn:  On Wednesday morning I carried the baby to its grandmother’s house. Tom kept her until dinner. I carried her to my house at dinner. After dinner I carried her back to Tom with dinner and to keep which he promised me (he) to do. When I left the house the baby was in the middle of the floor. Ned Wilson told me the child was burnt. I went back to the house and found my child in Mitty Wertz's lap and the clothes were not burnt. Tom seemed to be kind to the child. I would have trusted the child with him anytime. This is the first time I had left the child with Tom. I was satisfied with the verdict of the jury on Sunday. I was surprised that Sarah Penn was not satisfied. The wrapper was not burned or separated but had ashes on it. My baby could not crawl but could move about from rolling from one side to the other on its stomach. I never knew it to move more than about one yard, if not quite. The clothes exhibited are the clothes the baby had on. I doubt whether there was any hot water about the fire.                                Sudy Wilson

                                                           

George Wilson sworn: I am the grandfather of Ella Wilson and husband of Laura Wilson. I heard Sarah Penn's evidence and was astonished at it. I and Sarah were friendly. I heard Sarah and my wife Laura once had a quarrel. I was satisfied with the verdict on Sunday. I saw the child burnt in Mitty Wertz's lap. I did not notice the clothes. Saw the foot and the abdomen were burned. Tom Wilson is my son and is a well-behaved boy. I had given him medicine. A dose of calomel. I don’t think that Tom would do the child harm. When I came in the house the ashes were swept over the fire.                                                                                                                   George (X) Wilson 

Pressley Werts sworn:  I am no relation to Ella Wilson. I live on Walter Spearman's place. I went to Town on the 11th May 1890 for a coffin for Ella Wilson. I saw the child on Wednesday after it was burned, 7th May 1890. I paid no attention to whether the child’s clothes were burned. I was one of the jury at the first inquest. I did not hear Sarah Penn offer to give any evidence on Sunday. I saw her at the inquest after the verdict was given. She expressed no dissatisfaction about the verdict. Riley Penn, the husband of Sarah Penn, agreed. He was satisfied and agreed with the other jurymen in the verdict given on Sunday.                                                                         Pressley (X) Wertz

                                                           

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I examined the dead body of Ella Wilson May 13, 1890 and found a severe burn upon the abdomen, left hand and feet and legs, the loss of the left foot being burned to a crisp. The burns in my opinion were made by fire and caused the death of the said Ella Wilson.   State of South Carolina, Newberry County       W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 8th June 1890 at Benjamin Halfacre's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Corrie Moore by: D. A. Ruff Foreman, Jefferson Quattlebaum, Perry Halfacre, Benjamin Halfacre, William D. Halfacre, F. C. Maybin, R.C. Maybin, H.E. Buzhardt, C. O. Buzhardt, W. J. Sheeley, W. P. Meetze. W. Coleman a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Corrie Moore came to her death, on their oaths do say that the said Corrie Moore came to her death on 7th of June 1890 on Benjamin Halfacre's Place from strangulation at the hands of Doc Moore. In witness whereof we have placed our hands and seals on this 8th June 1890.     C. B. Buist, Coroner

D. A. Ruff Foreman, Jefferson Quattlebaum, Perry Halfacre, Benjamin Halfacre, William D. Halfacre, F. C. Maybin, R.C. Maybin, H.E. Buzhardt, C. O. Buzhardt, W. J. Sheeley, W. P. Meetze. Walter Coleman

EVIDENCE

John H. Banks sworn:  Read the following statement:

Newberry County June 8, 1890.

The following is the confession of Doc Moore to the undersigned, on the above date, concerning the killing of his wife, on the night of 7th June 1890:

Said - Doc Moore came to my house on Sunday morning 8th June 1890 between daylight and sun-up and called my son, who being asleep, did not answer. I went to the door and asked what he wanted and at the same time said to him," You talk like one in trouble”. He answered that he was in a great deal of trouble. I asked what was the matter and (he) replied the reply that he hated to tell. I then asked how he could expect help or advise if he did not state his trouble. Moore then said that he had killed his wife. Upon interrogation as to how it happened he said that his wife had provoked him by using some bad language when he told her that he would not take such language from anybody and struck her with the outer edge of the hand on the side of the neck, which killed her. That he had used camphor with the hope of resuscitating her without effect and had then carried her body to the pond when found and sank it. When informed by Doc Moore as to the situation of the body of his wife, I went at once to the residence of Mssrs. Willie and Ben Halfacre and got them to go with me and secure help to find and raise the body, placed it upon the bank of the pond and covered it with bushes, in which condition I suppose it now lies. We then dispatched Joe Suber to summon the coroner.                                                                                               John F. Banks

Derry Rutherford sworn: I live on Ben Halfacre’s place. I heard Doc Moore and Corrie Moore quarrelling about 10 o'clock pm on 7th June 1890.                                       Derry (X) Rutherford

                                                           

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I this day June 8, 1890 examined the dead body of Corrie Moore and found that her death was caused by strangulation.                      W. G. Houseal MD

The State of South Carolina, Newberry County


 State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on July 30, 1890 at John M. Hartman’s Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of James Ruff by: S. C. Barre, B. B. Hair, J. M. Hartman, J. L. Cook, G. B. Cook, J. M. Taylor, A. L. Purcell, W. E. Bowers, J. M. Wertz, J. C. Cook, L. J. Long, Mark Reeders   a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said James Ruff came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said James Ruff came to his death on 29th of July 1890 on the Settlement Road near Springfield Township No. 9, Newberry County from a blow from a shovel in the hands of David Page.                                                                                                      C. B. Buist, Coroner

B. B. Hair (Foreman), S. C. Barre, J. M. Hartman, J. L. Cook, G. B. Cook, J. M. Taylor, A. L. Purcell, W. E. Bowers, J. M. Wertz, J. C. Cook, L. J. Long, Mark Reeders 

                                                           

EVIDENCE

                                                           

J.M. Hartman sworn: I was on the Settlement Road when David Page struck James Ruff. It was about ½ past 11 o’clock am on the 29th July 1890. James Ruff called Page a liar when David struck him with a shovel, fracturing his skull. He died about four hours afterwards.   J. M. Hartman                                                            

John Schumpert sworn:  I was on the Settlement Road when the act was committed. The boys were quarrelling when David Page told James Ruff   he would cut his head off wit the shovel. James Ruff called David Page a liar. When David Page hit James Ruff with the shovel, his skull was fractured. This happened at ½ hour past 11 o’clock am. The body was taken to his father's house where he died. David Page escaped. This happened on 29th July 1890.               John M. Schumpert                                                                                             

Boss Boozer sworn:  I was present when David Page struck James Ruff with a shovel. It was about ½ past 11 o'clock am on July 29, 1890. James Ruff's skull was fractured. James Ruff died four hours after he was struck. David Page escaped. They were quarrelling when James Ruff was struck. David Page hit James Ruff an overhand blow, having both hands on the shovel.            Boss (X) Boozer                                

W. G. Houseal MD sworn: I certify that I examined the dead body of James Ruff July 29, 1890. He came to his death from a fracture of the skull and compressions and concussions of the brain.  W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Pickens P. Matthews by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. C. Sligh, P. Clark Smith, W. S. Dobbins, G. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, P. B. Workman, J. F. Johnson, G. Z. Pitts a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Pickens P. Matthews came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Pickens P. Matthews came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. C. Sligh, P. Clark Smith, W. S. Dobbins, G. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, P. B. Workman, J. F. Johnson, G. Z. Pitts

                                                           

EVIDENCE

                                                           

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I am the owner of the steam engine that exploded. Seven hands were employed. The engine was in good order on 13th August 1890. I heard the explosion on the 14th August 1890 at 7 o'clock am. I was at Dr. J. W. Dorrah's place when the explosion occurred. I came up and saw the engine was destroyed. I found four men killed. The engineer was killed. Three were scalded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.                        E. P. Matthews                                                                                                                                  

J. H. Dorrah sworn: I heard the explosion of the engine on the 14th August 1890. I came up at once and found four men killed and three scalded. The engine was destroyed. I was at home ¾ of a mile from the explosion when it occurred.                                                                  J. H. Dorrah

                                                           

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of P. P. Matthews and find that his death was caused by an explosion, his body being horribly mangled and torn.  W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Carey Davis by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. C.  Lake, P. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, J. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Carey Davis came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Carey Davis came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:
A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. C.  Lake, P. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, J. S. Pitts, Nelson (X) Crawford, Lewis (X) Robinson


EVIDENCE

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I was ¾ mile from the explosion occurred. Came up and found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.   E. P. Matthews
                                                           

J. H. Dorrah sworn: I was ¾ of a mile from the explosion. Came up and found four men killed and three wounded. Think the explosion was caused from want of water.                J. H. Dorrah

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Carey Davis and find that his death was caused by an explosion, the top of his skull being blown off and his body wounded in other members.                                                                              W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Tump Ellison by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. F. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Tump Ellison came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Tump Ellison came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:

 A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, G. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. F. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson (X) Crawford, Lewis (X) Robinson

                                                           

EVIDENCE

                                                           

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I was ¾ mile from the explosion occurred. Came up and found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.   E. P. Matthews

                                                           

J. H. Dorrah sworn: I was ¾ of a mile off and heard the explosion. Came up and found four men killed and three wounded. Think the explosion was caused from want of water.        J. H. Dorrah.

                                                           

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Tump Ellison and find that his death was caused by his skull being blown open, said wound caused by an explosion. W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 14th August, 1890 at Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Hillery Chalmers by: A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, J. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson, J. H. Dominick a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Hillery Chalmers came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Hillery Chalmers came to his death on 14th of August 1890 on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's from the explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:
A. J. Livingston (Foreman), T. M. Bishop, J. H. Dorrah, T. Conner, W. S. Dobbins, J. B. Pitts, R. S.  Lake, J. B. Workman, N. F. Johnson, G. S. Pitts, Nelson Crawford, Lewis Robinson, J. H. Dominick

                                                           

EVIDENCE

                                                           

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I was ¾ mile away when I heard the explosion. Came up and found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.
                                                                                                                                    E. P. Matthews

J. H. Dorrah sworn: I was ¾ of a mile off when I heard the explosion. I came to the sawmill and found four men killed and three wounded. Think the explosion was caused from want of water.         
                                                                                                                         J. H. Dorrah
                                                           

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Hillery Ellison and find that his death was caused by an explosion, his body being horribly mangled and lacerated.  W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 15th August, 1890 at Abney Reeder's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Milton Abb by: J. H. Aull, J. Z. Pitts, Eugene Leavell, R. A. Welch, W. E. Merchant, W. S. Dobbins, Calvin Williams, James Young, W. Gillam, H. Clark, E. Clark, J. H. Workman a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Milton Abb came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Milton Abb came to his death on Dr. W. M. Dorrah's Place on 14th of August 1890 from the accidental explosion of a boiler of a steam engine. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors:

J. H. Aull, J. Z. Pitts, Eugene Leavell, Robert A. Welch, W. E. Merchant, W. S. Dobbins, Calvin Williams, James Young, William Gillam, H. Clark, E. Clark, J. H. Workman

                                                           

EVIDENCE

E. P. Matthews sworn:  I heard the explosion about 7 o’clock am. I was about ¾ mile away on Dr. W. M. Dorrah’s Place. I found four men killed and three men wounded. I think the explosion occurred from want of water.                                                                                E. P. Matthews

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I have examined the dead body of Milton Abb and find that his death was caused by a wound of the hip joint, made by a missile, hurled from some explosion.    W. G. Houseal MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 30th August, 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Adam Davis on Mr. Werber's Place by: Alan Mendenhall, Andrew Gallman, Joseph Moon, Richard Nance, Oley Waits, Simon Waits, Neill Nance, Bennet Dowling, James Stewart, Billy Mendenhall, Joe Boozer, B. L. Boozer being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Adam Davis came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Adam Davis came to his death on the 29th of August 1890 from a blow from a tree falling on him. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors have set our hands and seals this 30th day of August 1890.
Alan (X) Mendenhall (Foreman), Andrew (X) Gallman, Joseph (X) Moon, Richard (X) Nance, Oley (X) Waits, Simon (X) Waits, Neill (X) Nance, Bennet (X) Dowling, James (X) Stewart, W. (X) Mendenhall, Joe (X) Boozer, B. L. Boozer

EVIDENCE

Benny Davis sworn:  I was with Adam Davis on 29th August 1890. I saw him cutting a tree. I was 8 feet from him. I went up to him when the tree fell. He was trying to crawl. I called for grandmother. She came and we brought him to the house. He lived about two hours after he came to the house.                                                                                                                         Benny (X) Davis

Mary Wheeler sworn:  Benny Davis called to me to help and bring Adam Davis to the house. We brought him to the house. He was groaning. I sent for a doctor. He died before the doctor came. He lived for about two hours after he came to the house.                                                                                                                                                                                     Mary (X) Wheeler 

J. W. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that Adam Davis came to his death from internal injuries received from a falling tree. Newberry Court House, August 30, 1890      J. M. Kibler MD


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken at the County Poor House on 2nd day of October, 1890 before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of John W. Counts by: T. B. Leitzey, W. Reighly, M. Dickert, Antoin Buzhardt, Wade Ruff, Pierce Suber, George Pope, Joe Kinard, Thomas Gray, Henry Gray, Rob Caldwell, John Thomas being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said John W. Counts came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said John W. Counts came to his death on the 1st of October 1890 at the Poor House in Newberry County from a wound inflicted by a falling tree. In witness whereof we the coroner and jurors have set our hands and seals this 2nd day of October 1890.                                                                                                       C. B. Buist, Coroner

T. B. Leitzey (Foreman), W. Reighly, M. Dickert, Antoin Buzhardt, Wade (X) Ruff, Pierce (X) Suber, George (X) Pope, Joe (X) Kinard, Thomas (X) Gray, Henry (X) Gray, Rob (X) Caldwell, John (X) Thomas

EVIDENCE

Elery Fair being duly sworn says:  I saw the body of John W. Counts after the tree fell on him. It was about 4 o’clock pm on October 1, 1890. He was dead when I saw him. He was mashed by the tree and his intestines were out.                                                                    Elery (X) Fair                                          

Lydia Peeler being duly sworn says: I saw the body of John W. Counts after he was dead. The tree fell on him. He was dead when I first saw him. His bowels were mashed out.            Lydia (X) Peeler

                                                           

James M. Kibler MD sworn:  This is to certify that I have examined the dead body of John W. Counts and that he came to his death from a wound inflicted by a falling tree. James M. Kibler MD

Newberry County, October 2, 1890


State of South Carolina, Newberry County

An inquisition indented and taken on 4th November 1890 at the George Griffin's Place before C. B. Buist, Coroner, on view of the dead body of Eolas Renwick by: W. G. Houseal Foreman, Edward Chalmers, W. H. Davis, Jacob Miller, Edmund Johnson, Neill Renwick, Boyce Clark, Wade Suber, Bill Davis, Martin Wilson, Henry Tanner, Anthony Young who being a lawful jury of inquest solemnly charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina, when, where and by what means the said Eolas Renwick came to his death, on their oaths do say that the said Eolas Renwick came to his death on the 3rd of November 1890 on George Griffin's Place from accidental burning.                                                                                                                C. B. Buist, Coroner

W. G. Houseal Foreman, Edward Chalmers, W. H. Davis, Jacob Miller, Edmund Johnson, Neill Renwick, Boyce Clark, Wade Suber, Bill Davis, Martin Wilson, Henry Tanner, Anthony Young

                                                           

EVIDENCE

                                                           

Rachel Renwick sworn: I am the mother of Eolas Renwick. He was burnt on the 3rd November 1890 at 11 am at my house on George Griffin's place. I was at Ben Turner's about 300 yards off picking cotton. I left my house at 8 o'clock am. I left Eolas with my 8-year-old daughter. My husband Alex Renwick told me my child was burnt and to come in a hurry. When I met Eolas he told me to take him. He was burning up. All his clothes were burnt off. He had on several garments and was well clothed. He died at 5 minutes after 5 pm. The house was not locked. I frequently left my child with my daughter.                                                                                                         Rachel (X) Renwick

Frances Renwick sworn: I am the sister of Eolas Renwick. I was in bed sick when Eolas was burnt. Was not sick when my mother left the house. I had a chill. I was asleep when Eolas woke me up crying. I tried to put the fire out. When I went to bed Eolas was sitting by the fire. I poured water on him. All his clothes were burnt.                                                                   Francis (X) Renwick                                                                                           

Alick Renwick sworn:

I am Eolas Renwick's father. I came to my house about 11 am for my girl to haul cottonseed. I found Eolas with all his clothes burnt off. He was severely burnt – all over the body. Eolas was 3 years old and was in the habit of leaving the child under charge of my eight-year-old daughter.                                                                                                                                 Aleck (X) Renwick

W. G. Houseal MD sworn:  I certify that I examined the dead body of Eolas Renwick on the 3rd of November 1890 and find his death was caused by a burn from fire.              W. G. Houseal MD
 

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