Coroner's Inquistions
 1908 - 1918
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

NEWBERRY COUNTY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at the Mad Pitts Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 2 day of Jan. A. D. 1910, before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon the view of the body of ASSIA SPEARMAN of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oath of W. E. Felker, Coroner, who being sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Assia Spearman came to his death, upon my oath do say that the said Assia Spearman came to his death from by mischance from a fall and no living person [is] to blame. I W. E. Felker Coroner aforesaid upon my oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Assia Spearman came to his death in the manner and form aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition, have set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                    W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

LILA SPEARMAN sworn says:

Assia Spearman and Ruby Belle Boozer were going to [the] spring yesterday morning about 8 o’clock. They were running. Assia Spearman fell. Ruby Belle never tripped him up in any way. He just fell himself. I picked him up and brought him home. He is my brother. He died about one o’clock. I know of no one [who] had anything against [the] boy.

                                                                                                                                                      LILA (X) SPEARMAN

This happened Jan. 1, 1910

INQUEST of HENRY WHEELER                                            January 22, 1910

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at J. E. Monts Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 22nd day of Jan. AD 1910, before W. E. Felker Coroner, upon the view of the body of HENRY WHEELER of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of G. W. Dominick, T. S. Miller, E. W. Dominick, J. B. Dominick, John C. Dominick, G. R. Bowers, C. D. Motes, J. F. Dawkins, L. L. Dominick, J. A. Bowers, B. E. Dawkins, J. L. Mayer being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Henry Wheeler came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said Henry Wheeler came to his death by a pistol shot wound inflicted by his own hands on the 18th day of Dec. 1909. And so the said jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Henry Wheeler in the manner and form of aforesaid then and there voluntarily and feloniously himself did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, W. E. Felker Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid                     .                                            W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       G. W. Dominick, Foreman (L. S.)

J. A. Bowers (L. S.)                          J. F. Dawkins (L. S.)          John C. Dominick (L. S.)                 T. S. Miller (L. S.)

J. L. Mayer (L. S.)                             C. D. Motes (L. S.)             G. R. Bowers (L. S.)                         B. E. Dawkins (L. S.) L. L. Dominick (L. S.)                        E. W. Dominick (L. S.)     J. B. Dominick (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

MRS. EUNICE MONTS sworn says:

Sunday morning I and my husband went down there to dress the wound. My husband asked him how he did it. He said he didn’t know. He said he had the pistol in his right hand.                                                MRS. EUNICE MONTS

DAISIE DAVIS sworn says:

All I know [is] when I got there I was on [the] other side of [the] house. [The] pistol was on his right side, [the] side he was shot on. He didn’t say nothing about being shot or who shot him then. He said afterward Columbus shot him. Columbus said that boy shot himself. I picked up [the] pistol and layed it beside [the] road and told Hattie to take it to [the] house. It was Columbus’ pistol. It was in [the] evening. Don’t know what time.            DAISIE DAVIS

J. E. MONTS sworn says:

I wasn’t at home that day. I went down there that evening but I didn’t ask him anything about it. Dr. Bedenbaugh told me and my wife to go down and show them how to dress [the] wound [the] next morning. I went in [the] house that morning. I said, “Henry, how did it happen?” He said, “Mr. Rastus, I don’t know how I done it.” I says, “Which hand did you have [the] pistol in?” He held up his right hand and said that was [the] one. I am sure he was conscious when he said it. He was shot on [the] 18th day of Dec. 1909.                                                                                                     J. E. MONTS

BESSIE DAVIS sworn says:

I was looking at him when he shot. He walked around a little. He put [the] pistol in his pocket. I said, “Son, who shot you?” That boy hurt him. I saw [the] shot fired. Columbus Derrick had [the] pistol in his hand when [the] shot was fired. Columbus put [the] pistol in his pocket after [the] shooting. Columbus laid [the] pistol down by Henry after [the] shooting. They wasn’t fussing. One was on our side of [the] road and one [the] other. Son was a little ahead. Grandma got down there and I whispered and said, “Columbus shot son” and I was scared. I went to Mr. Monts and told. They say son shot himself. Columbus was on [the] left side and son on [the] right side coming up. They stopped when [the] shooting took place. Did not turn around. Only when he shot – Columbus turned towards him. [The] man who got shot is my uncle.                                                                                                                                                                 BESSIE DAVIS

J. H. RANKGEN sworn says:

I was at [the] edge of [the] hill in sight when he got shot. Lester Hendrix was with me. We saw [the] smoke of [the] pistol. We couldn’t tell which one done [the] shooting part. We went down there – said, “Columbus, what’s [the] trouble here?” and Columbus was trying to get Henry’s shirt up to see where he was shot. Lester Hendrix says, “What does this mean?” Columbus says, “The damn fool has shot himself.” I says, “Pender, what’s [the] matter?” He grunted and said, “I can’t speak. It has gone to paining.” Lester Hendrix said, “Can you move? If so, turn out of [the] way of [the] wagon.” We were [the] first over there. Jose Morris drove up at that time. He says to Pender, “Get out of [the] road.” Then he tried to raise up. When he did I saw [the] pistol under his back. I picked it up and put it on [the] side of [the] road. Columbus said, "I want to show you all where [the] damn fool shot himself.” He turned him over on his side. Me and [the] Hendrix boy got him out of [the] road so we could pass. I don’t think anybody saw who did [the] shooting. We were [the] first over there. We were there before [the] women. Pender did not say how he got shot. He never said a word about Columbus shooting him. He was shot in [the] side. There was a bottle in Columbus’ pocket. Don’t think it had anything in it. Don’t think they were drunk. Columbus did not talk like he was drunk. I did not see him fall. Hendrix says, “They have shot one of Rastus’ hogs.” “No”, I said, “it is a man shot.” I saw his feet go up. They were together when I first saw them. I put [the] pistol in [the] right side of Pender.                                                                                     J. H. (X) RANKGAN

DR. J. I. BEDENBAUGH duly sworn says:

On the 18th day of Dec. 1909 he saw Henry Wheeler about one hour after he was shot with a pistol and treated him until his death Jan. 21, 1910 and that the pistol shot wound was the cause of his (Henry Wheeler) death.

                                                                                                                                                      J. I. BEDENBAUGH MD

INQUEST of LUCILLE MONTS

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Lucinda Mont’s Place in the [County] and State aforesaid, the 1st day of Feb. A. D. 1910, before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon the view of the body of LUCILLE MONTS of Newberry County then and there being dead. I, W. E. Felker, Coroner, who being sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lucille Monts came to her death, do say that the said Lucille Monts came to her death from burns accidentally on the 31st day of Jan. 1910.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition, have set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                     W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

BESSIE MONTS being duly sworn says:

I left home about four o’clock and went to Geo. Kinard’s. I left my three children in [the] house. I got back at five o’clock and when I walked in [the] door I saw my baby lying in front of [the] fire place. It was dead when I saw it. There was no one in [the] house but [the] children when I went in.                                                    BESSIE MONTS

BESSIE MONTS recalled says:

I don’t think anyone was to blame for it.

CARRIE HENTSLER being duly sworn says:

I came to Bessie Monts’ house about five o’clock and saw two of [the] children in [the] door and Azile told me Lucille had caught afire and she had poured water on her. I saw her dead in front of [the] fire. I called her mother who was on [the] outside and told her one of her children burned to death. Bessie Monts was below Mike Monts when I called her. This happened Jan. 31, 1910                                                                                        CARRIE (X) HENTSLER

AZILE MONTS being duly sworn says:

There wasn’t anyone here but my brother and Lucille. Aunt Martha Monts came and went away before Lucille got burnt and Carrie Hentsler came after she got burnt. I saw Lucille catch on fire and I poured water on her bonnet and head. It happened yesterday.                                                                                                     AZILE (X) MONTS

INQUEST over ERNEST HENTZ

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Bush River in the County and State aforesaid, the 28th day of March A. D. 1910, before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon the view of the body of ERNEST HENTZ of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of J. T. Mayes, J. C. Sample, C. G. Blease, J. P. Hutchinson, W. P. Hair, Sam Johnson, J. W. Henderson, D. F. Pifer, A. P. Boozer, W. G. Bullock, H. L. Speers, W. E. Boozer being a lawful jury of inquisition for the State of South Carolina who being charges and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ernest Hentz came to his death, upon their oaths do say that the said Ernest Hentz came to his death by No. 15 Southern Train going towards Greenville. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Ernest Hentz came to his death in the manner and form aforesaid on the 28 day of March 1910.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid and the jurors aforesaid to this inquisition, have set their hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                               W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                                      J. T. Mayes, foreman (L. S.)

J. C. Sample (L. S.)                           C. G. Blease (L. S.)                           J. P. Hutchinson (L. S.)     W. P. Hair (L. S.)

Sam Johnson (L. S.)                         J. W. Henderson (L. S.)                   D. F. Pifer (L. S.)                A. P. Boozer (L. S.)

W. G. Bullock (L. S.)                       H. L. Speers (L. S.)                           W. E. Boozer (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

HACK HENTZ sworn says:

I live at Helena SC. This boy lying dead is my grandchild Ernest Hentz. I saw him this morning after breakfast – the last time before I saw him here dead. He told me he was going to Greenville.               HACK (X) HENTZ

R. H. RUSSELL sworn says:

I saw [the] body about 1:30 pm today. [The] body was lying about 300 yards from [the] coat. [The] body was scattered all along [the] track. [The] feet and legs were about 100 yards from [the] body. In my opinion he was killed by [the] No. 15 Southern Train going towards Greenville.                                                                      R. H. RUSSELL

INQUEST over MARK BURTON

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Silver Street in the County and State aforesaid, the 5th day of April AD 1910 before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon the view of the body of MARK BURTON of Newberry Co. then and there being dead. I, W. E. Felker, Coroner, who being sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Mark Burton came to his death do say that the said Mark Burton came to his death from natural causes. And I, W. E. Felker aforesaid upon my oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Mark Burton came to his death in manner and form aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition, have set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                    W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

RUBEN SPEARMAN sworn says:

I live with Mr. Hendrix. Mark Burton, Eugena Burdon and myself were in [the] field this morning planting corn. I saw Mark Burton run across [the] field after a rabbit. He ran about 150 yards and stopped and came back to [the] wagon. He went to sit down on [the] tongue of [the] wagon and fell with his feet on [the] tongue. I went to him and found him dead. He grunted about twice before he died. No one hit [him] or have [thrown] anything to him at all to cause his death.

                                                                                                                                                      REUBEN (X) SPEARMAN

EUGENA BURDON sworn says:

I live here with Mr. Hendrix. Mark Burton is my husband. We were in [the] field with Reuben Spearman planting corn. Mark run about 150 yards after a rabbit. He passed [the] wagon in [the] field and came back to [the] wagon. Reuben Spearman called me and I went to where he was. He was dead when I got there. No one done anything to him to cause his death. He had been suffering with cramps. He told me yesterday he had heart trouble.

                                                                                                                                                      EUGENA (X) BURDON

INQUEST over ENOCH BRIDGES

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY of NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at H. H. Ruff’s Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 11th day of May A. D. 1910, before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon view of the body of ENOCH BRIDGES of Newberry Co. SC, then and there being dead by the oaths of J. L. Ruff, T. T. Ruff, C. G. Blease, Luther Shealy, J. W. T. Sanders, G. H. Ruff, H. H. Ruff, W. B. Kibler, C. L. Ruff, Joe J. O. Koon, D. E. Halfacre, D. S. Halfacre being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Enoch Bridges came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said Enoch Bridges came to his death from the a pistol shot wound inflicted in the hands of Mell Wicker. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid Mell Wicker in the manner and form aforesaid Enoch Bridges then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                                 W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       J. L. Ruff, Foreman (L. S.)

T. T. Ruff (L. S.)                C. G. Blease (L. S.)            Luther Shealy (L. S.)         J. W. T. Sanders (L. S.)

G. H. Ruff (L. S.)                              H. H. Ruff (L. S.)                              W. B. Kibler (L. S.)           C. L. Ruff (L. S.)

Joe J. O. Koon (L. S.)        D. E. Halfacre (L. S.)         D. S. Halfacre (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

AMOS RUFF sworn says:

I live with Mr. Jim Ruff in Newberry County. I was in [the] woods gambling with Enoch Bridges, Floyd Young, Mel Wicker and Will Ruff last Sunday, May 8, 1910. We were playing ‘skin’. Enoch Bridges had a six-spot and Mel Wicker had a tray. Mel Wicker was playing a ‘blind’. I mean by that his card was turned face down. Enoch Bridges’ card was turned up. Mel said, “That was me fell.” Enoch picked up [the] money. Then Mel told Enoch to put [the] money down. Enoch told Mel that [the] money was his (Enoch’s) money. Mel jumped up and cocked his pistol and kicked Enoch and then knocked Enoch in his side with his fist, then slapped him in [the] face with his hand. Then we started off walking, Me and Will Ruff. We walked on and heard a pistol fire – saw Enoch falling on his face and Mel Wicker walking right behind him with [the] pistol in his right hand. He shot three times. [The] last two shots he fired at Will Ruff and myself. Before Mel shot - Enoch gave Mel all [the] money they had bet which was twenty cents.

                                                                                                                                                      AMOS (X) RUFF

WILL RUFF sworn says:

I was in [the] woods gambling last Sunday May [the] 8, 1910 with Mel Wicker, Floyd Young, Amos Ruff and Enoch Bridges. We were playing ‘skin’. Mel Wicker was playing a ‘tray’ and Enoch Bridges was playing a ‘six-spot’. Mel and Enoch each bet ten cents. Another card turned off and Mel said, “Test (?) me.” Enoch then picked up then ten cents that Mel had put down. [The] dice ain’t fell [had not fallen] yet. Enoch said, “I picked up mine and left yours.” I turned [the] card off and looked at Mel’s card. I saw Mel was playing a tray. That time Mel got up and snatched out his pistol and told Enoch to give him his money. That time Mel kicked Enoch and struck him in his side about with his hand and [the] next time he hit him on [the] side of his head with his hand. Enoch told him to let him alone but [Enoch] did not try to strike Mel at all. I told Enoch to give Mel ten cents. He put his hand in his pocket and gave it to him. I started on [the] way and Enoch started on [the] other way. I looked back as I was walking along. I heard Mel curse Enoch for a son of a bitch and Mel had his pistol pointed at Enoch. Mel was behind Enoch. Enoch made a few more steps and Mel shot him. Enoch fell flat on his face and belly. Mel fired again and hit a tree close to us and we ran. This shooting happened in Newberry County.                                                                                                                                    WILL (X) RUFF

FLOYD YOUNG sworn says:

I was in [the] woods gambling last Sunday May [the] 8, 1910 with Mel Wicker, Amos Ruff, Enoch Bridges and Will Ruff. We were playing ‘skin’. Mell Wicker was playing a ‘blind’ and Enoch was playing a ‘six-spot’. Me said that he, Enoch, picked up his money. Mel said, “Put down that money.” Enoch said, “I just picked up what’s mine.” Mel jumped up then and snatched out his pistol, kicked Enoch and hit Enoch in [the] side with his fist, and slapped him. Will Ruff told Enoch to give Mel [the] money which Enoch did. Then Mel jerked out his pistol. I ran and got behind a tree. I was running when he kicked him. I was standing behind a pine and saw Mel Wicker when he shot Enoch. He shot him in [the] back and then turned around and shot at Will Ruff and Amos Ruff. This happened in Newberry County SC.

                                                                                                                                                      FLOYD (X) YOUNG

W. L. KIBLER sworn says:

I am a magistrate for Newberry County. I knew Enoch Bridges upon whose body an inquest is now being held. I took his dying declaration which is hereto annexed to the testimony marked Ex ‘A’. I took it on the 9 day of May, 1910.

                                                                                                                                                      W. L. KIBLER

DYING STATEMENT taken by W. L. Kibler, Magistrate

ENOCH BRIDGES sworn says:

That on May 8, 1910, myself and Amos Ruff, Will Ruff, Floyd Young and Mel Wicker were in [the] lane between Mrs. Anna Shealy and Mrs. Anna Banks. We went to have a little fun. We began to play a ‘skin’ game. Began to bet from five cents up to a quarter. We played about five games. I was playing ‘six-spot’ and Mel was playing ‘tray’. He said that (playing tray) to me about three or four times. I said I would pick up my ten cents and left his. He told me to put it down. I said that, “We had all fell but you and me.” He said to me that he would send me to judgment and jumped up and drew his pistol. I went around to where Amos was and he slapped and kicked me and I handed him [the] dime and told him that he did not catch me and I did not catch him. We started to leave. He ran up behind me and said that he was going to send me to judgment and shot me in [the] back. I fell on my face. He came up to me and said, “Did I shoot you?” I told him he had shot me in [the] body. He drew his pistol and I begged him not to shoot me and then he shot at Amos and Will Ruff twice. He called Floyd Young to come to me. He left and went out [the] public road.

Witness;                              G. W. Shealy and C. J. Ruff                                                                        ENOCH (X) BRIDGES

DR. W. A. DUNN sworn says:

I have examined the body of Enoch Bridges and found a gun shot (pistol) wound on the back three inches below the scapular in the side of the spinal column. The ball passed through his body and was removed three and one half inches to the right of the umbilicus from which wound he died May the 11th 1910.              W. A. DUNN MD

INQUEST over JOHN PITTS

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Chappells in the County and State aforesaid, the 16th day of May A. D. 1910, before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon view of the body of JOHN PITTS of Newberry Co. SC, then and there being dead by the oaths of J. J. Murran, E. M. Martin, J. W. Martin, J. A. Bouknight, W. R. Smith Jr., C. P. Stevens, G. E. Connelly, J. P. Davenport, Leo Hamilton, C. D. Dominack, J. B. Amick, Max Swain being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said John Pitts came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said John Pitts came to his death from the a gun shot wound received in the thigh May 13, 1910, the gun being discharged while resting in the lap of S. R. Fortune. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid John Pitts came to his death in manner and form aforesaid.

IN witness whereof I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                                           W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       J. J. Murran, Foreman (L. S.)

E. M. Martin (L. S.)                          J. W. Martin (L. S.)            J. A. Bouknight (L. S.)      W. R. Smith Jr. (L. S.)

C. P. Stevens (L. S.)                          G. E. Connelly (L. S.)        J. P. Davenport (L. S.)       Leo Hamilton (L. S.)

C. D. Dominack (L. S.)                    J. B. Amick (L. S.)             Max Swain (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

PATRICK PITTS duly sworn says:

I was standing in my yard at home. I heard a gun fire. S. R. Fortune and my son John Pitts says, “S. R. Fortune had a gun pointed on my son.” Fortune [was] just driving through the yard and my son was shot by Fortune. No words passed as I could hear. Don’t know if accidentally or not. Fortune [was] in the wagon. John Pitts [was] on the ground. Don’t know of any other difficulty between the parties. This shooting took place last Friday May the 13, 1910.

WILLIAM PITTS duly sworn says:

I saw Fortune come in our yard with a gun across [his] lap. [I] did not hear any fussing. [I] was at [the] lot when [I] heard [the] gun shoot. [I] did not see [the] boy when [he was] shot. Once before Fortune passed our house. [He] saw us in [the] field and said, “Hold up your hands” and shot over our heads.                               WILLIAM (X) PITTS

WILLIS LARK duly sworn says:

Saw S. R. Fortune in [the] wagon in [the] yard with a gun across [his] lap. I was in [the] wagon with Fortune. I heard a gun shoot and John Pitts was shot. Did not see John Pitts take hold of [the] gun. Fortune said after [the] shot was fired, “I am sorry I shot him.” I saw John fall up against [the] garden after he was shot. Fortune got out of [the] wagon and carried [John] in [the] house. [I] have seen him with a gun often in hunting season, [I] never knew him to point a gun at anyone before. Fortune told me he was going to Boozer’s to get a grass blade. John Pitts was shot after dinner, Friday May [the] 13, 1910.                                                                                                                 WILLIS (X) LARK

STATEMENT of S. R. FORTUNE:

John Pitts came to where I was in [the] wagon with a gun across [my] lap and said, “Where are you going? Fishing?’ and caught hold of [the] gun and pulled down my hand on [the] hammer. [The] gun went off and shot John in [the] leg. I carried him in [the] house and [the] boy begged me not to leave him.

INQUEST over LAFAYETTE HALTIWANGER

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Sun Set Park in the County and State aforesaid, the 17th day of May A. D. 1910, before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon view of the body of LAFAYETTE HALTIWANGER of Newberry Co. SC, then and there being dead by the oaths of L. W. Mills, J. T. Hutchinson, J. O. Dunson, W. J. Sweetenburg, T. McCracken, H. O. Fellers, J. M. Bowers, G. A. Addy, A. J. Havird, C. W. Douglass, C. E. Powell, A. P. Boozer being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lafayette Haltiwanger came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said Lafayette Haltiwanger came to his death from the a blow on the side of his head by a rock from a blast. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid Lafayette Haltiwanger came to his death in manner and form aforesaid.

IN witness whereof I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                                           W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       L. W. Mills, Foreman (L. S.)

J. T. Hutchinson (L. S.)                    J. O. Dunson (L. S.)           W. J. Sweetenburg (L. S.)                T. McCracken (L. S.)

H. O. Fellers (L. S.)                          J. M. Bowers (L. S.)           G. A. Addy (L. S.)                             A. J. Havird (L. S.)

C. W. Douglass (L. S.)                     C. E. Powell (L. S.)            A. P. Boozer (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

H. D. WHITAKER sworn says:

On May 12, 1910 I was at [the] fitter bed about two miles from Newberry SC. Just before 12 o’clock I loaded three small blasts with dynamite. At 12 o’clock I told all [the] hands to go out on [the] hill, I was going to shoot off [the] blast. I waited about 15-20 minutes. I thought they were all gone. I lit [the] fuse and hollered ‘Fire!” and ran out on [the] hill and got behind a pine tree near [the] tool house. [The] first blast went off. I heard someone holler. I looked and saw this little boy fall. I still stayed behind [the] pine for [the] other two blasts to go off. Soon as they fired I went to him. We picked him up and took him out of [the] tool house so [the] air could strike him and sent for a doctor. Dr. Gilder came. After Dr. Gilder came we made a litter and brought [the] boy home. At [the] time of [the] blast [the] boy was in [the] tool house on [the] left side of [the] door. I saw [the] boy fall and his father caught him.                   H. D. WHITAKER

GEORGE HALTIWANGER sworn says:

On May [the] 12, 1910 I was down on sewer work. My son brought my dinner and while we were sitting, eating, someone hollered “Fire!” and five or six of us ran to [the] tool house. My son was in [the] crowd. I heard a blast. I looked up and saw my son falling. I reached out my arm and caught him and found he was struck with a rock. I suppose ‘Will’ weigh[ed] about two pounds. Mr. Whitaker brought [the] boy to my house. He lay sick til Tuesday morning May 17, 1910 and died.                                                                                                                  G. W. HALTIWANGER

H. D. WHITAKER recalled:

There was a bank of dirt which would not let the rock go on a straight line to the window. H. D. WHITAKER

J. K. GILDER sworn says:

This is to certify that Lafayette Haltiwanger died from [the] effects of a blow on [the] left side of [the] head, crushing [the] skull.              May 17, 1910                                                                                            JAMES K. GILDER MD

INQUEST of WILLIAM CARTER

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Old Town in the County and State aforesaid, the 22 day of May A. D. 1910, before J. W. Hendrix Magistrate, Acting, Coroner, upon view of the body of WILLIAM CARTER of Newberry Co. SC, then and there being dead by the oaths of J. L. Fellers, A. B. Lindsay, A. N. Chapman, J. S. Gilliam, J. H. Willingham, W. E. Perry, Avery Walton, E. A. Fellers, J. S. Crouch, J. W. Gentry, J. S. Werts, Z. O. Whittle, J. J. Stilwell, John DeLoach being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said William Carter came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said William Carter came to his death in Newberry County on the 22 day of May 1910 from a gun shot wound and at the hands of one Arthur Stevens.  And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid Arthur Stevens in manner and form aforesaid William Carter then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

IN witness whereof I, J. W. Hendrix Magistrate, Acting, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                             J. W. Hendrix Magistrate, Acting, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                        J. L. Fellers, Foreman (L. S.)

A. B. Lindsay (L. S.)                        A. N. Chapman (L. S.)       J. S. Gilliam (L. S.)            J. H. Willingham (L. S.)

W. E. Perry (L. S.)                            Avery Walton (L. S.)        E. A. Fellers (L. S.)            J. S. Crouch (L. S.)

J. W. Gentry (L. S.)                          J. S. Werts (L. S.)                              Z. O. Whittle (L. S.)           J. J. Stilwell (L. S.)

John DeLoach (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

WILL BYRD sworn says:

I live in Newberry SC. William Carter and Elick Rooks were playing with a pistol. Arthur Stevens say, “God damn you, give me my pistol.” [He] asked him [the] second time, “God damn you, ain’t you going to give me my pistol?” William Carter was on [the] bottom step. Then he came back in [the] house to give Arthur Stevens his pistol. About that time Arthur Stevens, he shot him with a double barreled gun. This was in Newberry County on [the] 22nd of May. That was what killed him. No words had passed. William Carter and myself came together. We were just spreeing. No one was drinking here but William had been drinking. We had been here about 40 minutes before [the] killing. William Carter came here to get whiskey. We had just got outside of [the] house and William Carter turned around and came back. William Carter and myself had had a quart bottle with whiskey in it. It was William’s whiskey. I went over to William’s house this morning about sun-up. I was with William last night and left him about 2 o’clock on Mr. Whittle’s place. [We] had no whiskey then. William Carter got whiskey at Mary Mingo’s house this am. We didn’t have any whiskey when we got here. We got a pint and drank it all up. I had took about two drinks. William Carter had taken about four drinks. We had got almost to Williams house and we turned around to come back and get William’s hat and then came on here. William was not ordered away from here. He was in bed when we reached here. We didn’t ask for any whiskey. I did hear Arthur tell William not to go off with [the] pistol. I was standing out on [the] ground. William was standing at least two feet above me. William was between me and Arthur. After I saw Arthur Stevens raise his gun I was expecting him to shoot. I told Arthur not to shoot William. Then after [the] shooting Arthur said he didn’t give a God damn if he did kill him. William Carter was my uncle. At [the] time William Carter was shot he had a pistol in his pocket but it was unloaded.                                                                                                                  WILL (X) BYRD

ELLICK ROOKS sworn says:

I live in Newberry County. Uncle William had Arthur’s pistol and Arthur asked him for it and William asked him who was he talking to and Uncle William said, “You, God damn son of a bitch. I will kill you.” Then [he] stepped back and throwed his hand on his hip pocket and then Arthur shot. Arthur shot Uncle William Carter with a double barrel shot gun. I didn’t try to stop it. There was no fuss before this shooting took place. I wasn’t expecting Arthur to shoot Uncle William. I didn’t see him when he got [the] gun. I saw him shoot William. I was in another room when [the] shooting took place. I didn’t see [the] shooting. No one has talked to me about [the] shooting. William Carter had whiskey when I got here. This was in Newberry May 22nd 1910.                                                                          ELLICK (X) ROOKS

MABLE ROOKS sworn says:

I live in Newberry County. William Carter had Arthur Stevens pistol. Arthur asked him for it and ordered him out of [the] house. William Carter cussed Arthur for a God damn son of a bitch and throwed his hand back to his pocket. That’s all I know. I was out doors. This was in Newberry County on May 22nd 1910. [The] shooting was at Arthur Stevens’s house.

                                                                                                                                                      MABEL (X) ROOKS

INQUEST over DRAYTON GLYMPH

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at M. L. Wicker’s Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 2nd day of July AD 1910 before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon the view of the body of DRAYTON GLYMPH of Newberry Co. then and there being dead. I, W. E. Felker, Coroner, who being sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Drayton Glymph came to his death do say that the said Drayton Glymph came to his death from natural causes. And I, W. E. Felker aforesaid upon my oath aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Drayton Glymph came to his death in manner and form aforesaid by the act of God.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition, have set my hand and seal the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                    W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

TESTIMONY

SALLIE SIMPKINS being duly sworn says:

Drayton Glymph, [the] dead man, is my brother. He came to my house about three weeks ago. He came here sick. He came from Anderson County. We were looking for him to die. I think he had consumption. I left [the] house about nine o’clock this morning, came back at 11 o’clock and found him dead. I thought a few days ago he was dying. He had a fainting spell but got over that.                                             July 2, 1910                              SALLIE (X) SIMPKINS

M. H. WICKER being sworn says:

This is my father’s place. Drayton came here about three weeks ago sick. I know that he has been sick ever since he came here. I was not surprised when I heard he was dead. I think he died a natural death.           

                                                                                          July 2, 1910                                      M. H. WICKER

HAYNE WADSWORTH being sworn says:

Drayton Glymph is my uncle. He came to Aunt Sallie’s house about three weeks ago sick and has been sick ever since. I was not surprised when I heard he was dead. I am satisfied he died a natural death.

                                                                                          July 2, 1`910                                     HAYNE (X) WADSWORTH


INQUEST of WILL MOORE

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Kinards in the County and State aforesaid, the 17th day of July A. D. 1910, before W. E. Felker, Coroner, upon view of the body of WILL MOORE of Newberry Co. SC, then and there being dead by the oaths of J. A. Dominick, M. B. Bedenbaugh, W. W. Motes, D. P. Wright, L. H. Poag, G. R. Miller, R. Hitt, L. S. Davenport, J. R. Lathup, M. W. Oxner, W. O. Goree, J. F. Bedenbaugh, J. A. Attaway being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Will Moore came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said Will Moore came to his death in Newberry County from a gun shot wound at the hands of Tump Ellison. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid Tump Ellison in manner and form aforesaid Will Moore then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

IN witness whereof I, W. E. Felker, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                            W. E. Felker, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                        J. A. Dominick, Foreman (L. S.)

M. B. Bedenbaugh (L. S.)                W. W. Motes (L. S.)          D. P. Wright (L. S.)            L. H. Poag (L. S.)

G. R. Miller (L. S.)                            R. Hitt (L. S.)                      L. S. Davenport (L. S.)      J. R. Lathup (L. S.)

M. W. Oxner (L. S.)                          W. O. Gore (L. S.)              J. F. Bedenbaugh (L. S.)   J. A. Attaway (L. S.)

TESTIMONY AT INQUEST

TILDY MITCHELL sworn says:

That on [the] Saturday night July 17, Will Moore came home with me from [the] barbecue at Gary’s Lane. We left at 12 ½ o’clock at night, set down and went to sleep and laid his pistol on my machine at my house. I made a pallet on [the] floor and told him to lay down and asked where was his pistol. He said it was on [the] machine. When he got up to look for it - it was gone. This was about four o’clock am. There was at my house at that time Nancy Peterson, Zack Baker, Boss Brown, Horace Davis, David Williams, Mealy Williams, Dink Kinard and Tump Ellison. (They) left about four o’clock. Will Moore went to look for his pistol and it was gone. Nancy Peterson said that Tump Ellison and Dink Kinard had left. Will Moore said, “One of them had my pistol.” These people stayed at my house because [the] river was up and they could not get home. When he found his pistol was gone Will Moore said either Tump Ellison or Dink Kinard had it as they were [the] only ones that had left. I saw Tump Ellison and Dink Kinard when they left my house.

                                                                                                                                                      TILDY (X) MITCHELL

DINK KINARD sworn says:

When me and Tump was standing out of doors at Tildy Mitchell’s house talking about [the] women he had at Capt. Mire Bedenbaugh’s (Henrietta Sheppard) and when we got through talking about that he said, “If anybody bothered me, I have a good pistol. Let us go down to Jno Turner’s house where [the] boys are ‘skinning’ at”, and I said alright. And when we got to Jno Turner’s house we called him and he was in bed. Then he said, “Let us go back to Tildy Mitchell’s house and lay down or sit up one.” And when we got back to [the] railroad crossing at Kinards in Newberry County near J. A. Dominick’s store we met Will Moore. Will Moore asked Tump Ellison, “Where is my pistol?” Tump Ellison put his hand on his hip and run backwards. I broke and run down across Mr. Man Oxner’s cotton field and way down across Mr. Oxner’s field I heard pistol shots. I saw Tump Ellison buy ½ pint of whiskey from Mary Jones and paid twenty five cents for it. Mart Gary saw Tump Ellison buy [the] ½ pint of whiskey. I and Tump Ellison and Will Moore was [the] only ones present at [the] shooting. I did not see Will Moore put his hand in his pocket. Will Moore asked Tump for his pistol and Tump ran backwards and put his hand in his pocket. Then I ran. When we met Will Moore – Will Moore asked Tump for his pistol. “Tump, where is my pistol?” and Tump began to run backwards, then I ran. [The] reason I ran is because I thought Tump was going to shoot Will Moore, as I saw him put his hand in his hip pocket.

                                                                                                                                                      DINK (X) KINARD

MART GARY sworn says:

I heard five shots about four o’clock am. I asked, “Where was that shooting?” I heard someone saying, “Oh! Oh!” I thought it was at Francis Mars’s house. I looked out and found someone near [the] railroad lying down. I went to [the] man and seen it was Will Moore. So said Mary Jones. Will Moore never spoke after I got there. Then I got Rance Summer to go after Mr. Dominick. It was about 30 yards from my house in Newberry County. I found him near [the] railroad near Mr. Dominick’s store. He was not quite dead when I got there. It was about ten minutes after [the] shooting before I got there.                                                                                                                   MART (X) GARY

DR. T. H. POPE sworn says:

I examined [the] body of Will Moore on [the] 17 day of July at Kinards in Newberry county and found three gun shot wounds on his person; one in [the] right leg just above [the] ankle joint, one in [the] left leg about eight inches above [the] knee; third wound [was] about three inches below [the] right nipple. This one I consider [the] fatal wound.

                                                                                                                                                      THOMAS H. POPE MD

STATEMENT of TUMP ELLISON

On [the] morning of July 17, I was down to Tildy Mitchell’s and asked Will Moore to lend me his pistol. He loaned it to me. I and Dink Kinard went from there to Jno Turner’s where they were ‘skinning’ but when we got there Jno Turner had gone to bed. I came on by Mary Jones’ house and got a half pint of whiskey and paid 25 cents for it. I and Dink Kinard drank it. [I] gave Mart Gary some of it and got a pint of whiskey from Tildy Mitchell and paid 50 cents for it. [I] gave Jack Baker some of it. We came on up [the] railroad crossing and met Will Moore. Will Moore said to me, “Where is my pistol?” “You treated me mighty low”. I said, “How? I was going down Tildy Mitchell’s to bring it.” Then he began to back and I began to back. Then I pulled out [the] pistol belonging to Will Moore and began to shoot and then I saw Dink Kinard was present when I shot Will Moore. Then he ran. When I got [the] whiskey at Tildy Mitchell’s house Nancy Peterson and Jack Baker was there at [the] time. I gave Boss Brown, Horace Davis and Malcolm Marshall a drink behind [the] house. This was at Kinards in Newberry County near Mr. Dominick’s store.

Witness:                              W. O. Goree/J. A. Dominick                                                        TUMP (X) ELLISON
 

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