Coroner's Inquistions
 1908 - 1918
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Prosperity in the County and State aforesaid, the 26th day of July A. D. 1913, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of FURMAN LEE SANDERS, alias FURMAN LEE CARSON of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of S. L. Fellers, G. W. Cromer, J. H. Baker, O. S. Miller, A. P. Dominick, S. G. Spence, D. E. Kohn, C. K. Wheeler, Louis Dominick, E. A. Counts, D. M. Cromer and A.L. Wheeler being a lawful jury of inquest, who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Furman Lee Sanders alias Furman Lee Carson came to his death do say that Furman Lee Sanders alias Furman Lee Carson came to his death on July 25, 1913 near Sligh’s in Newberry Co. SC from being struck by an engine on the Columbia/Newberry/Laurens [RR] and without the fault of the engineer or train crew. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Furman Lee Sanders alias Furman Lee Carson then and there instantly died.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       S. L. Fellers, Foreman (L. S.)

G. W. Cromer (L. S.)         J. H. Baker (L. S.)              O. S. Miller (L. S.)                            A. P. Dominick (L. S.)

S. G. Spence (L. S.)           D. E. Kohn (L. S.)              C. K. Wheeler (L. S.)                        Louis Dominick (L. S.)

E. A. Counts (L. S.)           D. M. Cromer (L. S.)         A.L. Wheeler (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

W. D. GRAHAM sworn says:

Just as I came to the South Whistle Post at Sligh’s yesterday evening I saw this boy about 49 yards ahead of my engine. I was curving to the left. I put my hand on the whistle cord to blow to the station but [on] seeing the boy on the track. [I] didn’t blow the station blow but blew the cattle alarm. The place that the man was on the track was about one half mile from any public crossing. He was on the outside of the track on the end of the ties. I applied the emergency brakes and did everything in my power to stop the train. It was impossible at that time to keep from hitting him. I do not know the deceased.                                                                                                                  W. D. GRAHAM

J. L. MAY sworn says:

I have been making inquiries as to the identity of the deceased. From what I have learned his name is Furman Lee Sanders, son of Carrie Sanders who lives at Owings SC.                                              J. L. MAY

MARY BOUKNIGHT sworn says:

I know this boy. His name is Furman Carson. The boy is deaf and dumb. He is about 18 years old. I know he was sent to deaf and dumb school.                                                                                                              MARY (X) BOUKNIGHT

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Chappells in the County and State aforesaid, the 5th day of July A. D. 1913, before W. K. Reid, Acting Coroner, upon view of the body of JIMMIE BURTON of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of Wess Davis, Wade Wilson, Press Davis, Tony Thompson, Forest Wilson, George Mingo, Walt Pitts, Reason Wilson, Dan Burton, Tom Mingo, Lawson Williams, Hampton Brown and Lawson Dembo. We find the deceased came to his death from natural causes.

EVIDENCE

ELLEN BURTON duly sworn says:

I live in Newberry County and am [the] wife of [the] dead body Jim Burton. My husband came in about one o’clock, washed his hands and had dinner. {he] had cabbage and blackberry pie for dinner. Then [he] lay down on [the] lap robe in [the] room but did not go to sleep. [I] did not see him drink any whiskey. About one hour after dinner he was dead. [He] did not say anything or make any noise before he died. Before I could get anyone to [help] me he was dead. He had been complaining last week about his heart hurting him.                                                                     ELLEN (X) BURTON

JOHN DOWDY sworn says:

I live in Newberry Co. and am a near neighbor to Jim Burton. When I came by the home of Jim Burton [I] found him standing in the field near the house.[He] asked me to stop and take dinner with him. I did stop and stay for dinner. He said he was very hot. [He] came in from the field about one o’clock and said he felt badly. [He] had cabbage and blackberry pie for dinner. He did not eat very much. I kept on eating after he quit. [He] said for me to help myself. I did so. [I] heard him say about 2 weeks back his heart was giving him trouble. He was my friend.

(Q) by foreman:  Did you take dinner with him.

(A)     Yes. [I] did not see him take any whiskey but did give his wife and Abe Mingo a drink of rye whiskey. Only had about ½ of a ½ pint drank up this whiskey before Jim Burton came in from work. We three, Ellen Burton, Abe Mingo and myself.

(Q)     Did you tell me last night Jim Burton did not drink more than ½ pint?

(A)     No sir – did not see him drink any whiskey.                                                              JOHN DOWDY

PRESS DAVIS sworn says:

I live near the home of Jim Burton. Dowdy told me he had not taken a drink that he knew of. Jim Burton’s wife did tell me he had a drink of whiskey.                                                                                                     PRESS DAVIS

DR. W. O. HOLLOWAY sworn says:

In my opinion the deceased came to his death from heart failure.                                     W. O. HOLLOWAY MD    


 

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Chappells in the County and State aforesaid, the 5th day of August A. D. 1913, before W. R. Reid, Acting Coroner, upon view of the body of JACK CRUMP of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of W. P. Allen, W. D. Watkins, H. C. Dominick, Leo Hamilton, John C. Coats, W. W. Watkins, H. C. Strother, E. M. Martin, B. S. Wells, Jasper Smith, Tom Brooks. Verdict of the Jury is that Jack Crump came to his death by a gun shot wound in the hands of Bill Spearman.                                                                        W. P. Allen, Forman (L. S.)

W. D. Watkins (L. S.)        H. C. Dominick (L. S.)      Leo Hamilton (L. S.)                        John C. Coats (L. S.)

W. W. Watkins (L. S.)       H. C. Strother (L. S.)         E. M. Martin (L. S.)                          B. S. Wells (L. S.)

Jasper Smith (L. S.)           Tom Brooks (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

FRANNY SPEARMAN being duly sworn says:

I live in Newberry County with Mr. H. G. Dominick. I saw Jack and Daught playing but not fighting. I saw Jack’s wife. They took Jack and Daught went around in [the] other room and Daught said, “Shoot him Bill”. I saw Bill when he took [the] gun around in [the] other room with him. [I] did not hear any cursing or fussing. [I] did not see Jack shot but was leaning against [the] house and blood [was] flowing from a wound in [the] neck. [I] saw Bill walking around [the] house with [the] gun in his hand. [I] did not see any whiskey but saw signs of it. [The] shooting was at Lewis Tribble’s.

                                                                                                                                                      FRANNY (X) SPEARMAN

VAN MARONY sworn says:

I live in Newberry Co. I live with Mr. Lamar Dominick. I was [at] Lewis Tribble’s house standing at [the] end window when I heard a gun fire. I saw Daught Tribble and Jack lying on [the] bed playing, They both went in [the] other room and while in there I heard Daught shoot him. [The] gun fired at once. I walked around to [the] corner of [the] house and saw Jack leaning against [the] house a few seconds. I saw Bill after [the] gun fired near [the] house with [the] gun in his hands. I did not see [the] shooting nor could I swear that Bill killed Jack. I saw Jack and Daught slapping and cursing each other with such words as son of a bitch. I smelled whiskey and their action showed that all were drinking.

                                                                                                                                                      VAN (X) MARONY

LEO BROWN being duly sworn says:

I live with Mr. H. C. Dominick in Newberry Co. I was standing in [the] door and heart Daught tell Bill to shoot Jack. Bill says, “You don’t believe I’ll shoot.” At once [the] gun fired. I saw Bill come around [the] house with [the] gun in his hand. Did not see Bill until after [the] gun fired. Bill gave me a drink of whiskey about 12 o’clock.

                                                                                                                                                      LEO (X) BROWN

FANNIE SPEARMAN being duly sworn says:

I live with Mr. H. C. Dominick in Newberry Co. I saw Jack and Daught playing but not fighting. I am Jack’s wife. They, Jack and Daught, went around in another room and Daught said, “Shoot him Bill.” I saw Bill when he took [the] gun around in [the] other room. [I] did not hear any cursing or fussing. [I] did not see Jack shot, but [saw he] was leaning against [the] house and blood flowing from a wound in [the] neck. I saw Bill walking around [the] house with a gun in his hand. [I] did not see any whiskey but saw signs of it. [The] shooting was at Lewis Tribble’s house.

                                                                                                                                                      FANNIE (X) SPEARMAN

RACHEL or DAUGHT TRIBBLE being duly sworn says:

I live with Mr. H. C. Dominick in Newberry Co. I was coming from my mother’s with bill about 3 o’clock and met Jack. Bill and Jack began fussing and I came on home and after getting in [the] house [I] heard a pistol fire over towards [the] road. Soon after, Bill and jack came on to [the] house. Bill said to me that, “Jack tried to kill me.” Bill walked across [the] room and got [the] gun from behind [the] door and walked in [the] room where [the] talk was. I tried to stop Bill but he came right on by. I then pushed Jack out of [the] back door. I did not see any pistol. Shortly [I] heard [the] gun fire. I walked to [the] back door and saw Jack leaning against [the] house with blood gushing from his throat. I met Bill coming in [the] front door with [the] gun in his hand.                                                                                RACHEL (X) TRIBBLE

ANNA SPEARMAN sworn says:

I live in Newberry Co. with Mr. H. C. Dominick. I was at Lewis Tribble’s house when I heard a gun fire. I did not see anyone shot. Bill Spearman was [the] only one I saw with a gun. Did not see him shoot. I saw Bill come in [the] room where I was and get [the] gun. My sister was in [the] room with me. When [the] gun fired only one shot was fired.

(Q)     Where was Jack?

(A)     He was dead on [the] ground when I saw him. I saw [the] hole in Jack’s neck where he was shot.

                                                                                                                                                      ANNA (X) SPEARMAN


 

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry CH in the County and State aforesaid, the 25th day of Sept. A. D. 1913, before J. C. Sample, Magistrate, upon view of the body of JAMES WILLIAMS of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of E. H. Leslie, H. L. Speers, G. W. Harrison, A. P. Boozer, R. L. Hutchinson, E. Y. Carlson, A. F. Lambright, Jas. M. Bowers, A. L. Rikard, W. B. Havird, R. R. Cannon, W. H. Jernigan being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said James Williams came to his death when their oaths do say James Williams came to his death by the wrench in his own hands while opening a door to unload cars of coal on the spur track at the Newberry Cotton Mill.

In witness whereof I, J. C. Sample, Magistrate, aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                              J. C. Sample, Magistrate, Acting Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                        E. H. Leslie, Foreman (L. S.)

H. L. Speers (L. S.)            G. W. Harrison (L. S.)       A. P. Boozer (L. S.)                          R. L. Hutchinson (L. S.)

E. Y. Carlson (L. S.)          A. F. Lambright (L. S.)      Jas. M. Bowers (L. S.)                      A. L. Rikard (L. S.)

W. B. Havird (L. S.)          R. R. Cannon (L. S.)          W. H. Jernigan (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

W. H. WOODWARD sworn said:

The dead Negro man was James Williams. We was unloading a car of coal – could not use [the] regular wrench so got a small one. Each door opened to itself. [The] car has four door; each one opens to itself then if doors were already open. 4 hands were in [the] car unloading [the] same. James Williams came out of [the] car and got [the] wrench and started to open [the] 4th door. He was standing in a careless way by [the] side of [the] car using [the] wrench. [The] door became tight and as he was trying to open it [the] wrench use slipped out of his hand and struck him on [the] shoulder and must have struck him on [the] side of [the] head also. I asked him if he was hurt. He said it hurt his finger. I told him to go to [the] cloth room and get cloth and turpentine to put on it. I went up on [the] coal crib bin and opened [the] car myself. One of [the] boys asked me if it hurt my finger too. Williams came back upon [the] car – said his finger hurt and started to keep unloading coal. Later on [the] boys told me that he was in [the] bottom of [the] car and would not talk. I told them to bring him out. They him down and he was unconscious so I sent him home on [the] mill cart. Then I went to [the] office and got Mr. O. S. Wright to phone for [the] physician.                                                         W. H. WOODWARD

JERRY GRIFFIN sworn says:

I was in [the] car and Jim Williams was on [the] outside. I saw him try to open [the] door. I did not see him when hit. I saw him after he was hit. I looked [at] one side of [the] car [and] saw him holding up a finger. Said his finger was hurt pretty bad. I was in [the] car with him when he got unconscious. We did not hit him with anything. He was not saying anything and I did not know he was hurt bad. Did not see any blood on him – only a knot.        JERRY (X) GRIFFIN

HARRY CLECKLY being sworn says:

I was on one side of [the] car and Jim Williams was on [the] other unloading coal. I heard [the] door when it fell and I looked through under [the] car and I could only see legs of Jim and I heard Mr. Woodward ask him if he was hurt. I did not hear his reply. I came around [the] corner of [the] car and saw him. He was hurt but he said, “I am hit on [the] head and shoulder too but nothing but [the] finger hurts.” Mr. Woodward told him to go to [the] cloth room and get something to tie it up and while he was gone I got up in [the] car. When he come [returned] he got up in [the] car and started throwing out some coal. He said, “I am hit in [the] head too. Did not know I was hit in [the] head too.” He set down in [the] door of [the] car and I said, “Jim, if you are going to set in [the] car set around [the] corner.” He got back in [the] corner on a pile of coal and was there about 15 minutes before we noticed him. He was laying down where Ed Herbert went - where he was - and he [Ed Hurbert] said, “The boy won’t answer” and Henry Griffin called Mr. Woodward and told him about it. Mr. Woodward told us to bring him down out of [the] car, which we did and put him in [the] cart and carried him home. This happened on [the] spur house track of [the] Newberry Mill. Two women was at his house when we carried him home. [I] did not know one but Martha Harris was his sister.                          HARRY CLECKLY

ED HURBERT being sworn says:

I was in [the] car next to Jim Williams. I was on one side of [the] door. He was on [the] other one. [The] door was opened. We shoveled all [the] coal through that door that we could. When he got out to open another door I did not notice how he was opening it – but [the] door fell. After it opened I heard Mr. Woodward ask[ed] him if he was hurt. I lean[ed] and look[ed] one car and Jim was gotten down off [the] coal car. [He] gone out [and] got [his] finger tied up and came back – got a shovel and started to work. I ask[ed] him if he hurt his finger much bad. Answer – he said yes. He said it hurt his head and shoulder and mashed his finger. He worked awhile and then set down. He said, “Looks like I am going blind in one of my eyes.” Harry Cleckley told him if he was going to sit down – to sit down in one corner of [the] coal pile. He set down here – lays down. When I got through with my work on my side I moved to where he was and called him and he did not answer. Then I called Harry Cleckley and told him to come and see him for I could not get any sense from him. Harry could not either. Then Harry told Mr. Woodward. Mr. Woodward told us to bring him down so he could send him home. We brought him down. Sent him in a cart and took him home. Four hands were working in [the] car.                                                                                                                                                                               ED (X) HURBERT

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry in the County and State aforesaid, the 25th day of Sept. A. D. 1913, before F. M. Lindsay, Coroner, upon view of the body of GEORGE JONES of Newberry Co. then and there being dead. That the said George Jones came to his death from natural causes on the 28th day of Sept. 1913.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner, aforesaid.                                                    F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S)

EVIDENCE

MARK CALMES sworn says:

George Jones lives here in [the] house with me. He moved here [the] week before last and last week picked cotton at Jalapa and came in Friday night and he caught a good deal.  Sept. 28, 1913                MARK (X) CALMES

DOSIA CALMES sworn says:

George Jones is my brother. He has been complaining since July 1913. Don’t know [about what] [He] worked until Sept. He told me his nose had been bleeding up at Jalapa. I went down town yesterday evening and got back about sundown and he said he could not walk. He came out on the porch. He was sitting out on the porch when I left this morning about ten o’clock.   Sept. 28, 1913                                                                                DOSIA (X) CALMES

This is to certify that I examined the dead body of George Jones and found that the cause of his death from natural causes having had a hemorrhage of the lungs.  Sept.28, 1913                                                   J. M. KIBLER MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Mrs. W. E. Ruff’s Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 11th day of Oct. A. D. 1913, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of HENRY BAXTER of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of T. P. Adams, J. E. Ringer, J. T. Gilliam, B. Berley, J. H. Cromer, B. A. Cromer, L. P. Miller Jr., J. W. Gilliam, J. Kitchens, W. E. Ringer, O. B. Graham, R. L. Murphy being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Henry Baxter came to his death do say that the said Henry Baxter came to his death from a pistol shot in the hands of Hagood Brown on the 11th day of October 1913 in John Pope’s yard on Mrs. W. E. Ruff’s Place in No. 3 Township in Newberry Co. SC. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Hagood Brown in manner and form aforesaid Henry Baxter then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       T. P. Adams, Foreman (L. S.)

J. E. Ringer (L. S.)             J. T. Gilliam (L. S.)            B. Berley (L. S.)                                J. H. Cromer (L. S.)

B. A. Cromer (L. S.)          L. P. Miller Jr. (L. S.)        J. W. Gilliam (L. S.)                         J. Kitchens (L. S.)

W. E. Ringer (L. S.)           O. B. Graham (L. S.)          R. L. Murphy (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

JOHN POPE sworn says:

That 2 am, or after, Mr. Hagood Brown came to my house drinking at Mrs. W. E. Ruff’s Place in No. 3 Township and Mr. Hagood Brown had given someone a dollar bill. Mr. Wallace Suber said, “Who have you given it to?” Brown said, “Don’t know. Let it go.” Brown called for Simes and in a few minutes called Henry Baxter. Henry came. Brown said, “Give me my dollar or a quart of whiskey.” Henry told him that there was no whiskey here. “I have not got your dollar, Mr. Brown” and Brown hit Henry Baxter and drew his pistol. Wash Baxter said, “I will settle it rather than to have a fight about a one dollar bill.” My wife, Alice Pope, was standing on [the] piazza and Wash said to Alice, “Give me a dollar” and before she could untie her handkerchief to get [the] dollar to give to Mr. Hagood Brown, Mr. Brown shot Henry Baxter. I saw Mr. H. Brown’s hat fall off his head after he shot Henry Baxter in my yard. I saw a red handkerchief around Mr. Hagood Brown’s neck. Brown jumped in his buggy and left. There were three shots made by Hagood Brown with a pistol, blue steel.                                                                                                                          JOHN POPE

ALICE POPE sworn says:

Sometime between 2 and 3 o’clock on [the] night of 11 of October 1913 about 2 or 3 am Brother Wash Baxter called me to get a dollar for Hagood Brown. Before I could untie my handkerchief Mr. Brown had killed him, my brother Henry Baxter. I saw Hagood Brown shoot him. I saw [the] pistol and [the] fire from [the] pistol and saw Henry fall. Brown shot three times. They were about eight feet apart when [the] second shot was fired. I saw no one but Mr. Brown. Had no hat when he left. This all happened as before said on Mrs. Ruff’s Place in No. 3 Township, Newberry SC.

                                                                                                                                                      ALICE L. POPE

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at J. C. Hipp’s Place in No. 7 Township in the County and State aforesaid, the 28th day of Oct. A. D. 1913, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of JIM WELLS of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of J. S. Crouch, J. S. Werts, H. B. Lindsay, E. A. Fellers, H. C. Fellers, J. F. Pitts, John Deloach, J. C. Wilson, Fed Spearman, Mack Spearman, Neil Mangum, Alf Brown being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jim Wells came to his death upon their oaths say Jim Wells came to his death from natural causes on Oct. 27, 1913.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

J. S. Crouch (L. S.)            J. S. Werts (L. S.)                                             H. B. Lindsay (L. S.)                        E. A. Fellers (L. S.)

H. C. Fellers (L. S.)            J. F. Pitts (L. S.)                                 John Deloach (L. S.)                        J. C. Wilson (L. S.)

Fed Spearman (L. S.)        Mack (x) Spearman (L. S.)                             Neil (x) Mangum (L. S.)                  Alf (x) Brown (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

MARIE WELLS being duly sworn says:

I am Jim Wells wife. And on 27 Oct. I came home from my mother’s and found Jim at home. He seemed perfectly well. [Jim] took [the] horse up to [the] house and came back to his house, washed his hands and ate his supper. He sat up by [the] fire for a few minutes and went to bed. I went to bed with him and a few minutes [later] he commenced to tremble and breathe strange. I called him and he did not say anything. I called [the] children and told them that their pa was dying. I raised him up but he was soon dead.                                                                      MARIE (X) WELLS

EMMA WILLS being duly sworn says:

Pa Jim picked cotton all day yesterday. He seemed well. He went to bed before I did. He told me to cover up [the] fire and go to bed. Just as I was going to bed he commenced to snore and ma called, “Daughter” to bring a light and in a few minutes he was dead.                                                                                                        EMMA (X) WILLS

ELIZA HOLLOWAY being duly sworn says:

I came to Jim Wells’ home with Marie Wells on [the] 27th of Oct. [I] found Jim Wells at home. He seemed well. [He] took [the] horse up to [the] house and came back to his house and ate his supper and played with my baby a few minutes and then he took off his shoes and went to bed and in 10 or 15 minutes his wife called me and told me to get up and hold [the] lamp for her Jim was snoring and in a few minutes he was dead. Sister Marie had him in her arms when he died.

                                                                                                                                                      ELIZA (X) HOLLOWAY

PRISCILLA WELLS being duly sworn said:

On Sunday night Jim Wells, Papa, was sick – complaining with [pain in his stomach. He grunted and went on for a long time. He seemed well Monday morning and got up and picked cotton all day. He was sitting up by [the] fire when I went to bed. My step-mother called me and told me to get up and make a light. She thought that Pa was dying. In a few minutes he was dead. . [The] mother had been gone off. A few days [ago) Jim and Marie had had some words before she went off. She came home in [the] afternoon before he died.                                                                            PRISCILLA (X) WELLS

DR. W. A. DUNN being sworn says:

I have examined the body of Jim Wells and that I believe he came to his death from natural causes.

                                                                                                                                                      W. A. DUNN MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at J. L. Crooks’ Place Township No. 11 in the County and State aforesaid, the 30th day of Oct. A. D. 1913, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of WALTER CANNON of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of A. J. Myers, Wm. Ruff, Felix Ruff, Charley Ruff, J. D. Crooks, Bachman Suber, W. S. Melton, J. L. Crooks, J. S. Fowler, Hagood Brown, J. F. Glymph, J. M. Felker being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Walter Cannon came to his death do say that the said Walter Cannon came to his death from a gun or pistol shot inflicted by the hands of Henry Carter on the 28th day of October 1913 from which he died Wednesday the 20th 1913. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Henry Carter alias Dawkins in manner and form aforesaid Walter Cannon then and there feloniously did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       J. L. Crooks, Foreman (L. S.)

A. J. Myers                         Wm. Ruff                            Felix Ruff                           Charley Ruff

J. D. Crooks                        Bachman Suber                 W. S. Melton                      J. S. Fowler

Hagood Brown                   J. F. Glymph                       J. M. Felker

EVIDENCE                       Oct. 30, 1913

GEORGE FREEMAN sworn says:

Henry Carter says, “You have got to gamble with me.” Walter Cannon says, “It ain’t no need of trying to make him gamble” and in that time he shot him, Walter Cannon. This happened about Tuesday night at Henry Carter’s house. There was no whiskey in [the] crowd nor no one seen to have had any. [I live at] Dr. Hentz place under [the] supervision of Mr. Jim Felker.                                                                                                                           GEORGE (X) FREEMAN

ELBERT DAWKINS sworn says:

I was at Henry Carter’s house Tuesday night Oct. 28, 1913. Henry Carter and George Freeman were there in [the] yard gambling. George Freeman put down a half dollar and Henry Carter put down a dollar and George picked it all up. Henry says, “Put down my money” George said, “I have not got your money.” Henry said, “You is – for I put down a dollar.” Henry said, “I[t] must [then be] my dollar.” When Henry said, “I must have my dollar” George Freeman made a start towards Henry. When George made a start towards him Henry there was a maul (? Mallet?) laying in [the] yard. Walter picked up [the] maul. Henry started stepping backwards towards [the] house. When he got against [the] house Walter was coming on him with [the] maul and he, Henry, got against [the] house. He shot one time. Elbert Dawkins says that there was whiskey there and all four of us were drinking; George Freeman, Henry Carter, Walter Cannon and myself. Elbert Dawkins and George Freeman brought [the] whiskey there and sold Henry Carter one pint for 50¢. I, Elbert Dawkins, had no side bet in [the] game. That is all I know.                                                                                     ELBERT (X) DAWKINS

ELLEN CARTER sworn says:

George Freeman sold Henry Carter one pint of whiskey in the house. I never saw no money pass. Henry asked George would he sell him a pint of whiskey. He let him have it for 50¢. Henry said all right George [and] gave Henry whiskey out of a quart bottle. I heard a pistol fire. I[t] was Henry shot Walter with a pistol for I saw the pistol in the house. They were out in the yard shooting dice. I heard them fussing. When I opened the door nobody was there but Walter Cannon. Henry told me he done the shooting. This is all I know about it.                                                     ELLEN (X) CARTER

This is to certify that I this day 30th Oct. 1913 viewed the dead body of Walter Cannon and when examination certify that the said Walter Cannon came to his death from a gun shot wound which penetrated the abdomen of said Walter Cannon.

Oct. 30th, 1913                                                                                                                            C. O. HENTZ MD


 

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at F. J. Harmon’s in the County and State aforesaid, the 17th day of Nov. A. D. 1913, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of NED ROBINSON of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of J. J. Amick, J. W. Livingston, June Summers, J. P. Davenport, J. A. Attaway, Joe Bremer, G. T. Davenport, Jobe Davenport, L. J. Hunt, F. J. Harmon, F. T. Summer, W. F. Chappell being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ned Robinson came to his death do say that the said Ned Robinson came to his death from a pistol shot in the hands of Will Moses on the 16th day of November 1913. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Will Moses in manner and form aforesaid Ned Robinson then and there did kill against the peace and dignity of the same State aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       J. J. Amick, Foreman (L. S.)

J. W. Livingston (L. S.)     June Summers (L. S.)        J. P. Davenport (L. S.)                      J. A. Attaway (L. S.)

Joe Bremer (L. S.)             G. T. Davenport (L. S.)     Jobe Davenport (L. S.)                    L. J. Hunt (L. S.)

F. J. Harmon (L. S.)           F. T. Summer (L. S.)          W. F. Chappell (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

WILL GARY being sworn testifies that he:

Lives in Newberry Co. with Mr. F. J. Harmon. Was at home on 16 Nov. 1913; Ned Robinson, Will Moses and myself. Ned and myself headed to town together. Will Moses and Emanuel Reeder met us. Ned turned to me and called Will Moses. Ned says to Will, “Stop [the] deal.” Will answers, “What is [the] matter?” Will pulled his pistol and went to swinging it over his head and [the] pistol fired and Will stepped back and said to Ned, “Have I shot you?” and Ned fell. Will said, “[I] didn’t intend to shoot.” Ned saw Will after this – said he hated [the] accident. [Will] had not been careless with [the] pistol before to my knowledge.                                                                                     WILL GARY

Being recalled says he:

Thinks [the] words “Stop [the] deal” meant ‘to wait for me’. We often use it when we want another to wait for us.

JESS WATTS sworn testifies:

I live with Mr. Livingston in Newberry Co. I was going towards [the] store and heard a pistol fire and walked back and saw smoke from a pistol. Will stepped back to Ned and said, “Did I shoot you?” I went up [the] road and stopped. This was on Nov. 14, 1913 about 3 o’clock. [I] had been with Ned and Will during [the] day and they had not had any fuss in any way. Will had not been careless with [the] pistol before as I know of. [I] knew him to shoot at Fed Harris one time. Fed was not molesting him at [the] time. They were in [the] big road. Fed – to shoot more than once and I stopped him. Will Moses was perfectly peaceable when sober. Didn’t have [the] reputation of being fussy when drinking.

                                                                                                                                                      JESS (X) WATTS

EMANUEL REEDER sworn says:

I live with Mr. M. M. Livingston In Newberry Co. On [the] 16 day of Nov. 1913 I walked up to Mr. Harmon’s. I met Will Moses. He asked me for a drink of whiskey. I told him I didn’t have any. He told me to come and go with him to Mr. Harmon’s, that he would give him a drink. Ned Robinson came around [to] Walt Lee’s house and said to Will to “Stop [the] deal”. Will looked back and asked Ned, “What do you want?” By that time Ned got to Will and Will saw his hand in his pocket and commenced to pull his pistol. Ned said to Will, “Do not project with me with that pistol for I don’t play that.” By that time Will Moses had pulled [the] pistol and was swinging it around and [the] pistol fired. Will said to Ned, “Did I shoot you?” and Will looked around and said, “Boys, I recon I will have to go to [the] penitentiary. He walked to Ned and asked him if he was shot. [I] don’t think he shot him intentionally. Hadn’t ever heard any hard words between them. Never knew him to meet up with anyone and shoot at them.                                    EMANUEL (X) REEDER

GEORGE AUSTON being sworn says:

I live with Mr. Livingston in Newberry Co. I saw Emanuel Reeder and Will Moses talking. When Reeder walked away from Will, Will came up [the] road and Ned called him and told him to stop [the] deal. Ned started to Will. Will asked him what he wanted. Will pulled his pistol and wrung it around and [the] pistol fired. Ned fell. Will stepped to Ned and asked him if he had shot him. Will walked down [the] road and said, “I guess I will have to go to [the] penitentiary.” I was about ten steps from them. Never heard any words between them any time.                      GEORGE (X) AUSTON


 

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at J. W. Suber’s in the County and State aforesaid, the 16th day of Dec. A. D. 1913, before R. M. Aughtry, Acting Coroner, upon view of the body of DAVIS REEDER of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of John M. Suber, J. H. Wicker, T. E. McClelland, L. T. Wicker, C. R. Baker, J. M. Wicker, F. W. Seymore, J. C. Seymore, A. L. Franklin, J. D. Oxner, T. W. McClelland, J. W. Suber being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Davis Reeder came to his death do say that the said Davis Reeder came to his death from a pistol shot wound inflicted by Wes Brown accidentally discharged. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Davis Reeder came to his death in manner and means aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, R. M. Aughtry, Acting Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                  R. M. Aughtry, Acting Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       Jno M. Suber, Foreman (L. S.)

J. H. Wicker (L. S.)            T. E. McClelland (L. S.)    L. T. Wicker (L. S.)                          C. R. Baker (L. S.)

J. M. Wicker (L. S.)           F. W. Seymore (L. S.)        J. C. Seymore (L. S.)                        A. L. Franklin (L. S.)

J. D. Oxner (L. S.)              T. W. McClelland (L. S.)  J. W. Suber (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

HENRY BROWN being sworn says:

I live in Newberry Co. on Johnnie Suber’s Place. I was there Saturday night, Dec. 13. Wes Brown, Davis Reeder, Sam Carter and myself went to Jim Carter’s home. When we got there John Johnson was in Sam Carter’s. Sam said lets go. John says he wasn’t ready to go. Sam says lets go and run and get there. Wes said all right. Sam Carter and Wes went in [the] house and grabbed him. Dave Reeder gave Wes Brown a pistol and to bring John Johnson out. They were coming to [the] door scuffling. Wes Brown shot [the] pistol. Dave said, “You have shot me.” He fell to his knees. He got up and said, “God damn it, I’ve a great mind to kill you, but I believe you did not aim to do it.” I was about 15 feet from them. Wes had [the] pistol in his hand and [the] other hand around John Johnson. They were playing. Dave gave Wes his pistol to scare him. Wes shot [the] pistol as they were coming out [the] door. Wes did not intend to shoot Dave, I don’t think. I heard he didn’t intend to shoot him.                                                                               HENRY (X) BROWN

JOHNNIE JOHNSON sworn says:

I heard [the] testimony of Henry Brown. That was [the] way it happened.                      JOHNNIE (X) JOHNSON

SAM CARTER sworn says:

I heard [the] testimony of Henry Brown and Johnnie Johnson and that was [the] way it happened.

                                                                                                                                       SAM (X) CARTER

I have examined [the] body of Davis Reeder and in my opinion his death was caused by a pistol or rifle ball striking and penetrating his abdomen on [the] right side.                                                                                        VAN SMITH MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry CH in the County and State aforesaid, the 17th day of Dec. A. D. 1913, before J. C. Sample, Acting Coroner, upon view of the body of ZEDDIE BERRY of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of F. R. Hunter, R. S. Burton, H. W. Dominick, T. Roy Summers, B. A. Dominick, R. L. Hutchinson, R. L. Burton, A. F. Lambright, F. H. Halfacre, H. L. Spears, J. R. Tilley, C. E. Summers being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Zeddie Berry came to his death do say that the said Zeddie Berry came to his death by being run over by an automobile driven by Chalmers Brown and we further say that it was accidental. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Zeddie Berry came to his death in manner and means aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, J. C. Sample, Acting Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                  J. C. Sample, Acting Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       Frank R. Hunter, Foreman (L. S.)

R. S. Burton (L. S.)            H. W. Dominick (L. S.)     T. Roy Summers (L. S.)                   B. A. Dominick (L. S.)

R. L. Hutchinson (L. S.)    R. L. Burton (L. S.)            A. F. Lambright (L. S.)                     F. H. Halfacre (L. S.)

H. L. Spears (L. S.)            J. R. Tilley (L. S.)              C. E. Summers (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

DR. W. E. PELHAM sworn says:

This is to certify that I attended Zeddie Berry during his last illness and that his death was due to a fracture of the skull caused by an external blow on the head.                                                                                        W. E. PELHAM JR. MD

CLAUD LATHAN sworn says:

I started to [the] post office and was coming back around by Main Street and I stepped in Mayes Book Store. I came out and crossed [the] Street and right in front of Williamson’s an automobile was running very slow and just as [the] auto got in front of Pelham’s [the] boy shot across [the] street. I saw [the] auto hit him. I did not know [the] man in [the] auto but heard afterwards that it was Mr. Brown. He went about 6 feet after it hit him. I saw him on [the] ground. [The] car ran over him. [The] car was running very slow. [The] boy was running from Pelham’s across to [the] picture show, Mr. Leslie’s picture show. Do not know really what time it was. It happened here in Newberry Dec. 17, 1913.

                                                                                                                                                      CLAUD LATHAN JR.

HUMBERT AULL sworn says:

I was coming from Becker’s Barber Shop with John Nance to Pelham’s, [the] Newberry Drug Co. to get something to drink. I met this little boy coming out. Before he could make our drinks I saw Chalmers Brown come in [the] store with [the] boy in his arms. He told me to [take the] auto and go to [the] carnival and get Dr. Moore. Chalmers Brown says [the] car was running very slow.                                                                                               HUMBERT AULL

E. H. LESLIE sworn says:

I did not see [the] accident at all. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson were standing in front of [the] theater when [the] car came up and stopped. [The] young man turned back. We looked out to see what had occurred. I ran over to see what it was. I found [the] child in [the] street. I laid it back down after feeling it thinking it was dead. Someone picked it up again and carried it in [the] drug store. [The] car could have been running fast as he stopped [the] car so quick. He was driving on [the] side next to [the] Newberry Drug Co. I think that [the] center of [the] car must have struck [the] boy. I did not know who [the] boy was at that time.                                                                                                                 E. H. LESLIE

G. L. ROBINSON sworn says:

Mr. Leslie and myself were standing nearly opposite [the] arcade picture talking [the] sign in my store window. I glance up [the] street and saw [the] auto coming about opposite Williamson’s store. I looked off and did not see [the] accident. My attention was attracted by [the] noise made by [the] auto striking or running over something. [The] auto was running very slow, hardly faster than I can walk, not 6 miles an hour. It was Dr. Brown’s son in [the] car. [I am] not positive about [the] lights on [the] car. [The] car was in [the] direction of [the] Depot on [the] side or near [the] center of [the] street. When we got to [the] body it was about 5 feet off [the] curbing. Dr. Brown’s son and myself picked up [the] boy and carried him into [the] Newberry Drug Co. store and Mr. Brown seemed very anxious to do all that he could for [the] boy and we called Dr. Pelham.                                                                                                                     G. L. ROBINSON

CHALMERS BROWN makes a statement as follows:

I was going along slowly and as I came under [the] light at Mower’s corner I looked at my battery indicator. It was discharging. When it discharges it is running at 10 miles an hour. When I got to Pelham’s I saw something flash by across my left hand light. I had my starter out and immediately put on [the] brakes. I heard someone say, “Look, there”. I stopped my car, went back and picked up [the] child. When I first saw [the] object it was about 4 feet from [the] front of [the] car. I had [the] lights burning on [the] car., electric lights. It was sometime before nine o’clock when this accident happened. [There was] no one with [the] child at [the] time.                                                      CHALMERS BROWN

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Aunt Jane Renwick’s Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 28th day of Dec. A. D. 1913, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of JACK TOLAND of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of Ben H. Caldwell, M. A. Renwick, L. H. Brooks, C. M. Folk, M.L. King, R. C. Carlisle, T. B. Carlisle, B. S. Franklin, J. G. Glenn, P. G. Glenn, H. T. Felker, H. T. Carlisle being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jack Toland came to his death do say that the said Jack Toland from a blow on the head by a blunt instrument inflicted about Dec. 23, 1913 by party or parties unknown to the Jury.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       Ben H. Caldwell, Foreman (L. S.)

M. A. Renwick (L. S.)       L. H. Brooks (L. S.)           C. M. Folk (L. S.)                              M.L. King (L. S.)

R. C. Carlisle (L. S.)          T. B. Carlisle (L. S.)          B. S. Franklin (L. S.)                        J. G. Glenn (L. S.)

P. G. Glenn (L. S.)             H. T. Felker (L. S.)             H. T. Carlisle (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

JIM YOUNG sworn says:

Jack Toland and me left Jeff Means’ house about twelve o’clock Tuesday Dec. 23, 1913 and we came on over here about [the] old Bramlet field and Jeff Means caught up with us and we came on to Jack Toland’s house. Jack got an oak rail off [the] fence and cut it and made a fire and we sat down and got warm. I got sleepy. [I said] “Cousin Jack, I believe I will go home.” Jeff Means says to me, “Thought you were going to have another game. You all beat me out of my money and you don’t want to give me another chance at it.” I says, “No, I am tired and sleepy” and then I left. I left Jack Means and Jack Toland sitting at [the] fire. Jeff Means had a stick of wood about 2 ½ feet long and an axe-fitting heel plate on his shoe heel.                                                                                                                                    JIM (X) YOUNG

Recalled:

[I] had been gambling Monday night. I had won $5 and Jack Toland had won $8 dollars. Jeff Means, Jim Young and Jack Toland were in the game.                                                                                                           JIM (X) YOUNG

DAVE GILLIAM sworn says:

Saturday, Dec.27, 1913 I was hunting and James Toland called me and said, “Come up here and see what is [the] matter with Uncle Jack. He looks like he has a hole in his head, sitting up in a chair.” And I came on up to [the] door and looked at him and then I told him to go on and tell his Pa about it.                                                     DAVE (X) GILLIAM

JAMES TOLAND sworn says:

I came over here Saturday Dec.27, 1913 at about 12 o’clock when I got nearby. Then I started to go back home because I thought he was not at home. Then I walked up to [the] door [and] saw that it [was] shut. Then went around to [the] other door and it was open and I looked in and saw his hat under [the] bed and then I saw him in [the] chair and his head was bloody and no hair on it and then I called Jim Young and Dave Gilliam and told them to come and see about Uncle Jack. And they asked me what was [the] matter with him and I told them I thought he was dead and then I went and told my Papa about it.                                                                                                                                JAMES (X) TOLAND

DR. W. A. DUNN sworn says:

That Jack Toland came to his death by a blow on his head with some blunt instrument which crushed his skull.

                                                                                                                                                      W. A. DUNN MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at W. R. Rook’s Residence in the County and State aforesaid, the 2nd day of Jan. A. D. 1914, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of W. R. ROOK (colored) of Newberry Co. then and there being dead. That the said W. R. Rook (colored) came to his death from natural causes.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid to this inquisition have set my hand and seal.

                                                                                                                                                      F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

MACK GARY sworn says:

I was at [the] Henry Lane Place Jan. 1, 1914. W. R. Rook was there working and had eaten his supper and went out in [the] yard. I heard him strangling behind [the] house and was laying on his back. W. R. Rook drew about three breaths after I got to him                                                                                                                     MACK (X) GARY

ANDREW GARY sworn says:

I live on [the] Henry Lane Place and on [the] 1st day of Jan. 1914 I hear W. R. Rook making noise out in [the] yard and went to see what was [the] matter and found him lying flat on his back and when we took him up he gave about three breaths.                                                                                                                                    ANDREW (X) GARY

 

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