Coroner's Inquistions
 1908 - 1918
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

INQUISITION over the dead body of PINK HAMILTON

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at W. H. Bobb’s Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 15th day of Jan. A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of PINK HAMILTON (Colored) of Newberry Co. then and there being dead sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Pink Hamilton came to his death do say that the said Pink Hamilton came to his death from natural causes on the 15th day of Jan., 1917.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                                                                    F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

NARAH HAMILTON sworn says:

Pink Hamilton, my husband, went to bed last night well and hearty last night as usual and was talking with me at 4 o’clock this morning. I told him to get up. He said he would directly and he went to ‘lapping around are went’ (? Slapping around?) like it and I called him three times and he did not answer. I got up and lit [the] lamp and got some camphor and held it to his nose, I called for some neighbors and they came and he was about dead when they got here.

                                                                                                                                                      NARAH (X) HAMILTON

INQUISITION over the dead body of WILLIS GRIFFIN

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Helena in the County and State aforesaid, the 16th day of Jan. A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of WILLIS GRIFFIN of Newberry Co. then and there being dead sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Willis Griffin came to his death do say that the said Willis Griffin came to his death from natural causes on Jan. 16, 1917.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                                                                    F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

AMBROSE WILLIAMS sworn says:

About 3:15 o’clock pm some children came to Cornelia Marshall’s house and said that Willis Griffin was down at [the] mud hole lying on [the] ground and I came down to [the] mud hole and did not find him there but was close by holding [on] to a little bush. And I said to him did he want me to carry him to a fire and I told him I would go and find someone to help me carry him to a fire and when I returned I found him lying on [the] ground dead.            AMBROSE (X) WILLIAMS

EUGENE WILLIAMS sworn says:

A little after 12 o’clock I was talking with Willie Griffin and Robert Wallace brought me an overcoat and I put it on him. But after putting [the] overcoat on him he fell down twice and I left him standing and went away.

Jan. 16, 1917                                                                                                                               EUGENE WILLIAMS

This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of Willis Griffin (Colored) and in my opinion his death was due to natural causes.                           5 PM Jan 16, 1917            Newberry SC                      W.E. PELHAM JR. MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Roy C. Boozer’s in the County and State aforesaid, the 28 day of January A. D. 1917, before W. P. Allen Acting Coroner, upon view of the body of LOU LEE BOYD of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of M. J. Longshore, P. N. Boozer, R. E. Hollingsworth, H. D. Hollingsworth, J. B. Hollingsworth, L. H. Senn being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Lou Lee Boyd came to her death do say that the said Lou Lee Boyd came to her death by a gun shot wound in the hands of Morgan Boyd and that Will Williams was an accessory to the same. Said Lou Lee Boyd being shot Jan. 27, 1917 and died Jan. 28, 1917. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid in manner and form aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, W. P. Allen, Acting Coroner aforesaid, and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                  W. P. Allen, Acting Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       P.N. Boozer, Foreman (L. S.)

M. J. Longshore (L. S.)     P. N. Boozer (L. S.)           R. E. Hollingsworth (L. S.)              H. D. Hollingsworth (L. S.)

J. B. Hollingsworth (L. S.)                              L. H. Senn (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

Chappells, SC                    Jan. 28, 1917

I was called to see Lulu Boyd early this morning and found her dead when I got here. She died about the time I got here. Upon examination I found a gun shot wound on the right side just over the right kidney. The shot ranging towards the spinal column. The load of shot going inside the abdominal cavity. Death was caused from hemorrhage both internal and external – also from shock.                                                                                             J. M. OWENS MD

WILLIAM BROWN sworn says:

I was in [the] house and Morgan Boyd ran in [the] house with his gun. He said to Will Williams for him to hush. Will said he would not do so. Myself and Lou Boyd, [the] dead woman, were standing together in [the] house and she started off from me and I caught her by [the] hand and pulled her back. But by [the] time I pulled her [the] gun had fired. Morgan Boyd being [the] man that shot her. Will Williams shot at Morgan Boyd as he went out of [the] house.            

WILLIAM (X) BROWN

CORNELIUS THOMAS sworn says:

Will Williams and Morgan Boyd saw one shot out [the] door and Morgan said [the] next man to shoot here [he] would beat him. Will was swinging his pistol at Morgan. Morgan stepped to [the] table and got his gun and walked to [the] door and shot towards Will and hit Loula and went out [the] door. Will Williams did not shoot at Morgan.

                                                                                                                                                      CORNELIUS (X) THOMAS

MARY BARRE sworn says:

I saw [the] shooting. He shot at Will Williams and hit Louease Boyd. Hear Morgan Boyd ask Will Williams to hush. Will said he was not going to hurt him. I and ‘Ern’ are brothers (?) [in] laws.                                            MARY (X) BARRE

EPH THOMAS sworn says:

I saw [the] shooting. Morgan Boyd shot at Will Williams and Morgan hit this woman, Louise Boyd. Morgan was out [the] door and Will Williams shot at Morgan. Will Williams shot in [the] yard.                            EPH (X) THOMAS

WILLIE FLOYD sworn says:

I saw [the] shooting. I heard Will Williams say that Morgan Boyd was his brother – in – law. “We ain’t going to hurt one another.” Morgan said he didn’t give a damn who he shot. [The] gun shot and I ran.               WILLIE FLOYD

WILL WILLIAMS sworn says:

I shot out in [the] yard. I went on in [the] house to apologize to Morgan Boyd for shooting out in [the] yard. He said, “Damn [the] apologies.” He shot at me and he hit Louisa Boyd. He hit me too, but killed Louisa Boyd and he ran and I shot at him.                                                                                                                          WILLIE (X) WILLIAMS

INQUISITION over the dead body of ELLEN BRICE

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Roy C. Boozer’s in the County and State aforesaid, the 28 day of January A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of ELLEN BRICE of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of L. M. Player, J. R. Eison, W. G. Bullock, J. T. Fulmer, J. D. Wicker and Charlie Bishop being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ellen Brice came to her death do say that the said Ellen Brice came to her death by being struck by Engine No. 942 train No. 18 of the Southern Railway Company tracks, it being an unavoidable accident. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Ellen Brice came to her death in manner and form aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                 F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                                      L. M. Player, Foreman (L. S.)

J. R. Eison (L. S.)     W. G. Bullock (L. S.)     J. T. Fulmer (L. S.)     J. D. Wicker (L. S.)     Charlie Bishop (L. S.)


EVIDENCE

I hereby certify that Ellen Brice came to her death from the effects of a blow received upon her head or by falling – the fall producing concussion of the brain. Both arms and the right leg also being broken.

January 28, 1917                                                                                                                                       JAMES K. GILDER MD

B. F. NICELY sworn says:

I was engineer on passenger train No.18 with engine 942 coming into Newberry on Jan. 27, 1917. I blew the signal for the road crossing for Newberry. When I turned the curve coming from Helena I saw several persons on the CN&L Track. My track was clear. Saw a woman between the tracks. She was clear of both tracks when I saw her. Just as we passed my fireman said, “Hold on, look out – we have struck someone>”I put the brakes on and stopped as soon as I could. The bell was ringing and I backed up about three coach lengths to where the woman was struck and they loaded her in the baggage car and brought her to Newberry. I did not see her myself.

In answer to a question by Juror Player:

Mr. Nicely said further: My fireman called my attention to the woman. She was clear of the track the last time I saw her. She was on the other side of the track from my seat. The engine was just rolling. Had cut off the steam.

                                                                                                                                                      B. F. NICELY, Engineer

DR. J. K. GILDER sworn submitted the following statement:                              See above

FIELD ROBINSON sworn says:

[I] was [the] fireman for No. 18 Southern Railway, January 27, 1917, Turning [the] curve [I] saw several men walking down [the] CN&L track. I noticed a woman walking between [the] tracks. She was perfectly clear of both tracks. Something attracted her mind and she turned around and looked back and saw [the] train coming and she aimed to run across [the] track. I hollered to [the] engineer and he put on [the] brakes at once but struck her before she got on [the] track,. She was about as far from [the] train as from here [to] across [the] street. She seemed to get frightened and ruined [the] wrong way. If she had stood where she was [the] train would not have struck her.             FIELD ROBINSON

PETER NEEL sworn says:

I saw [the] old lady Ellen Brice coming down [the] railroad between [the] Southern and [the] CN&L tracks. A little before she got to [the] crossing I heard [the] train blow for Helena. She was on [the] other side of Cline Street crossing Helena when I first saw her. I came on down [the] railroad and got off and [the] train had knocked her down. I saw her when [the] train struck her. She was on [the] town side of Cline street when [the] train struck her. When I first saw her she was between [the] tracks and she seemed to think it was [the] CN&L train and stepped on [the] Southern Track. [I] did not hear [the] whistle or bell. When I saw her first she was on [the] CN&L track. I am a little hard of hearing myself and [the] whistle may have blowed or [the] bell sounded without my hearing it. Ellen Brice could not hear good.

                                                                                                                                                      PETER (X) NEEL

JAMES CONNER sworn says:

I had started up [the] railroad and saw an old lady on [the] railroad. I hollered at her. She was on [the] CN&L track. She got off [the] CN&L track to go on [the] Southern and at that time [the] train struck her. She was between Mr. Baxter’s and Mr. Wicker’s. I was beyond Cline Street crossing, going toward Helena. I was on [the] left hand and she on [the] right. I had just crossed [the] Cline Street Crossing. Heard [the] train blow and as [the] train passed me [the] bell was ringing. Don’t know how old she was.                                                                                                         JAMES (X) CONNER

HENRY SHELL sworn says:

I knew Ellen Brice. She was about 70 years old. She was hard of hearing.                      HENRY SHELL

INQUISITION over the dead body of ABNER DEWALT

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry CH in the County and State aforesaid, the 5th day of April A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of ABNER DEWALT of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of P. E. Way, Henry Player, E. S.  Dickert, P. E. Jeans, H. D. Havird, John H. Baxter being a lawful Jury of Inquest sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Abner Dewalt came to his death do say that the said Abner Dewalt came to his death by natural causes on April 5th 1917.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                                                                    F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                                      P. E. Way, Foreman (L. S.)

Henry Player (L. S.)          E. S. Dickert (L. S.)           P. E. Jeans (L. S.)                              H. D. Havird (L. S.)

John H. Baxter (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

Upon [the] autopsy of [the] dead body of Abner Dewalt, I found that [the] death was caused by edema of lungs secondary to heart disease.                                                                                                                          F. K. SHEALY MD

                                                                                                                                                      P. G. ELLISOR MD

H. D. HAVIRD being duly sworn says that:

He was riding by Johnston woods about 6:30 or 7:00 o’clock and seen one Abner DeWalt lying by [the] sidewalk on his back, jumped from [the] buggy and had some boys to turn him on his side, then sent for Dr. Shealy, but he died before Dr. Shealy could do anything for him.                                             April 5, 1917                                    H. D. HAVIRD

INQUISITION over the dead body of WILLIE SUMMER

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Little Mountain in the County and State aforesaid, the 30 day of April A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of WILLIE SUMMER of Lexington Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of S. W. Young, V. O. Shealy, R. O. Shealy, A. C. Wheeler, B. L. Bowers and H. P. Fulmer being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Willie Summer came to his death do say that the said Willie Summer came to his death by being struck on the head with a rock or some other blunt instrument inflicted by the hands of Ben Martin on April 29th 1917.

And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Willie Summer came to his death in manner and form aforesaid on April 29, 1917.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                 F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                                      S. W. Young, Foreman (L. S.)

V. O. Shealy (L. S.)           R. O. Shealy (L. S.)            A. C. Wheeler (L. S.)         B. L. Bowers (L. S.)

H. P. Fulmer (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

REBECCA SUMMERS:

I am [the] mother of Willie Summers. We brought him home from Little Mountain about 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon and put him to bed. He got senseless about 7 o’clock. Willie went to sleep. We went to bed about 11:30.I woke up about 4 o’clock and found him dead.                                                                                             REBECCA (X) SUMMERS

ROBERT TOBE sworn:

Yesterday, below Mr. W. N. Shealy [the] boy playing, stumbled against me. I told him excuse me – I did not mean to rub up against him. Then he cursed me and Willie Summer and Ebb Tobe and Murray Summer. Then I looked back and Willie Summer and [the] boy were fighting. [the] boy hit Willie Summer on [the] head with a rock. [the] same boy that rubbed against me hit Willie Summer. This boy in Court is [the] boy that hit Willie Summer (Produced was Bennie Martin).                                                                                                                                              ROBERT (X) TOBE

GEORGE SUMMER sworn:

I was coming up [the] road and I saw Bennie Martin hit Willie Summer with a rock. There was lots of cursing. Willie Summer fell to [the] ground when he was hit. Bennie Martin stayed there after he hit Willie Summer. I did not see Willie Summer hit Bennie Martin.                                                                                                   GEORGE (X) SUMMER

LONNIE MAYER sworn:

I saw Willie Summer hit Bennie Martin and then Bennie hit Willie with a rock. They went towards [the] Church fussing and I stayed up [the] road. This was Sunday, April 29, 1917. I did not see [the] fight start.              

LONNIE (X) MAYER

MAGNUS SUMMER sworn:

I saw [the] fight. I was coming up [the] road. I saw Bennie Martin hit Willie Summer with a rock and cut him with a razor. I did not see Willie Summer hit or out Bennie Martin. I am 12 years old. This was on April 29, 1917. I am a brother to Willie Summer. I know right from wrong.                                                                                MAGNUS (X) SUMMER

JOHN SUMMER sworn:

I am a brother to Willie Summer. I heard Bennie and [the] other boys cursing. Some one told me that some one had knocked my brother down. Bennie wanted to go back to Willie. I saw Bennie Martin throw [the] rock. I saw [the] rock hit Willie Summer. I do not know if Bennie Martin’s eye was out or not.                                             JOHN (X) SUMMER

ALEX MARTIN sworn:

I saw Bennie Martin hit Willie Summer with a rock. I did not see Willie hit Ben Martin.            ALEX (X) MARTIN

JACOB MAYER recalled:

Sworn and saw Bennie Martin have a knife in his hand.                                                     JACOB (X) MAYER

I hereby certify that I have examined Willie Summer now dead and find a wound on [the] right side of [the] head three inches from [the] right ear, 2 inches long, apparently made with a blunt instrument which crushed [the] skull. I also found an iminotrohlar (?) wound two inches back of this wound extending from near [the] top of [the] head through [the] scalp down toward [the] neck, apparently made with a very sharp instrument.

Death was caused by a concussion of [the] brain from [the] blunt instrument which made [the] first wound.

April 30, 1917                                                                                                                            J. M. SEASE MD

INQUISITION over the dead body of SAM HILL

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry CH in the County and State aforesaid, the 11th day of June A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of SAM HILL of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of (???Sam Hill natural causes???) being a lawful Jury of Inquest sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Sam Hill came to his death upon their oaths do say natural causes. And so the said Jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid___

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid (??and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition??) have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

ALMA MAYER sworn says:

I heard Sam Hill this morning about four o’clock. I heard him pulling a chair in his room and quieting. I came into his room about nine thirty to wake him up and found him dead in bed. He was at home at nine o’clock last night and [I] don’t know what time he went to bed. I live in [the] adjoining room to him.                                  ALMA (X) HILL

WILL KINARD                  June 11, 1917

I came to Sam Hill’s house this morning to get him to go to [the] mill to go to work. This was about nine thirty this morning and [I] found him dead in bed.                                                                              WILLIE KINARD

This is to certify that I have this day examined [the] dead body of Sam Hill and find that [the] death was from natural causes.

                                                                                                                                                      FRANK D. MOWER MD


INQUISITION over the dead body of COLEY MORGAN

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at B. H. Wilson’s in the County and State aforesaid, the 5th day of July A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of COLEY MORGAN of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of B. L. Bishop, L. M. Player, J. Sease, P. R. Hunter, Jas. Johnson and J. T. Mayes being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Coley Morgan came to his death do say that the said Coley Morgan came to his death by being struck on the head with a some instrument inflicted by the hands of H. C. Wilson. Said Homicide being justifiable. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Coley Morgan came to his death in manner and form aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                 F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                                      B. L. Bishop, Foreman (L. S.)

L. M. Player (L. S.)            J. Sease (L. S.)     P. R. Hunter (L. S.)            Jas. Johnson (L. S.)

J. T. Mayes (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

C. G. BLEASE being duly sworn says:

I was at dinner just at 2 o’clock today, July 5, 1917 when Mr. Dorroh, my deputy, phoned me to come to the office at once, as there was someone there who wanted to see me. When I got to the office H. C. Wilson told me that he had killed Coley Morgan down in Wilson Bottoms and that he (Wilson) had come in to surrender. He said that he and Morgan got into words and that Morgan cut at him and did cut him on the right leg with a grass blade. That he then struck Morgan with a pitch fork knocking him down. Morgan got up and advanced towards him again in an advanced position and that he again struck Morgan with the pitch fork. He said that he then went home and sent for Dr. Moore and Dr. Moore dressed his (Wilson’s) wound. Then he and Dr. Moore came on to see about the Negro. When they got to where the Negro was, they found the Negro dead. That he then went immediately to town to give up. He said that he and the Negro were together in the

‘bottoms’ cutting grass.                                                                                                             CANNON G. BLEASE

To whom it may concern:

This certifies that I have examined the body of Coley Morgan and find that he came to his death by a blow received on the top of his head fracturing the skull.     July 5, 1917                                                     E. H. MOORE MD

We the following Jurors hereby find that Coley Morgan came to his death at the hands of H. C. Wilson, homicide justifiable.

B. L. Bishop Foreman, L. M. Player, J. Sease, P. R. Hunter, Jas. W. Johnson and J. T. Mayes

INQUISITION over the dead body of JESS BURNSIDE

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at C. S. Suber’s in the County and State aforesaid, the 7th day of September A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of JESS BURNSIDE of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of C. S. Suber, E. C. Brown, J. A. Brown, W. M. Suber, S. A. Rikard, C. A. Rikard a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jess Burnside came to his death do say that the said Jess Burnside came to his death by being shot with a shot gun in the hands of Jack Williams, accidentally. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid ____

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                 F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                                      Chas. S. Suber, Foreman (L. S.)

Eugene C. Brown (L. S.)                  J. A. Brown (L. S.)             W. M. Suber (L. S.)           S. A. Rikard (L. S.)

C. A. Rikard (L. S.)


EVIDENCE

JACK WILLIAMS being duly sworn says:

I live on Mr. C. S. Suber’s Place. This afternoon about an hour and a half ago I came up on [the] side of [the] branch and I heard a noise and stopped and crossed [the] branch and peeped through [the] bushes. And I saw [the] bushes shake. I thought it was a squirrel and I shot in [the] direction of [the] fuss. I heard a groan and I stopped to make out what [the] groan was. And I went through [the] bushes and it was Uncle Jess Burnside. I called him five or six times and he shook his head. I had him lying on my arm. I called for Jake Taylor loud as I could and Fate answered. I layed him down and ran out and called Fate again and told him to come here quick, “I am in trouble.” I says, “I done shot Uncle Jess Burnside.” I went on down to [the] house toward Mr. Suber’s and stopped and told James Epps and Sarah Suber. Then I went on and told [the] cook and went on out and told Mr. Rikard.                                                                         JACK (X) WILLIAMS

The bushes were so thick between next [to] Uncle Jess that I couldn’t see him. I was about 50 feet from him.

                                                                                                                                                      JACK (X) WILLIAMS

FATE McCORD sworn says:

Jack Williams called me and I came and Jack told me he was sure he was in trouble. He was lying down dead.

                                                                                                                                                      FATE (X) McCORD

E. C. BROWN sworn says:

When I got here to where Jess Burnside [was] he was dead lying cramped up with pinders in his mouth and the gun lying down to his right. He was evidently eating pinders when he was killed.                                        EUGENE C. BROWN

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at J. T. Summers’ in the County and State aforesaid, the 19th day of September A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of JOHN P. HAIR of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of Y. T. Dickert, M. L. Cousins, Forest Cousins, Kade Cousins, W. P. Lathrop, George Sligh being a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said John P. Hair came to his death do say that the said John P. Hair came to his death by being struck in the head with a rock on Sept. 18, 1917 by the hands of Will Butler. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid John P. Hair came to his death in the manner and means aforesaid at the hands of Will Butler.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                 F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                                      Y. T. Dickert, Foreman (L. S.)

M. L. Cousins (L. S.)         Forest Cousins (L. S.)       Kade Cousins (L. S.)         W. P. Lathrop (L. S.)

George Sligh (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

9/19/1917

John P. Hair came to his death from a lick on his head by some blunt instrument causing concussion of the brain and all probability rupture of some blood vessels causing pressure on the brain which would cause death. Concussion and pressure – either is sufficient to cause death.                                                                               W. E. LAKE MD

ABRAHAM CALDWELL sworn says:

I live with Mr. Tom Summer. I was in [the] cotton field yesterday with Andrew Hunter, Essie Butler, Will Butler and John P. Hair. John came in from [the] house with [the] wagon to where I was picking cotton. He said, “Abe, give me my cotton lap and I will give you yours.” He says, “No, I am going to take mine now and broke [the] cotton lap off of my shoulder. Then me and him went to teasing each other. He says, “Abe, I don’t want to hurt you for I ain’t mad at you.” I says, “No, I am not mad at you either.” Then we both laughed at one another. We came on out to [the] cotton pile and was out there talking and Will Butler came to where we were from in [the] field about 100 yards and hit John P. Hair with a rock. Will was facing John about 12 steps and when he threw at John, John turned his head and [the] rock hit him on [the] side of [the] head back of [the] left ear. When Will walked up to where we were he said, “What are you arguing for John?” Then John says, “You damn son of a bitch, don’t you like it?” Then Will Butler threw [the] rock and hit him. Then John fell and we picked him up and brought him to Will Butler’s house. This was about 3 o’clock Sept. 18 that this fuss happened. Dr. Lake came and saw him. John died last night about 12 o’clock. When John came towards us he came a running. John broke [the] cotton string that holds [the] cotton sack. If it was tied back John must have tied it back. I don’t know whether Will picked up [the] rock before or after John called him a son of a bitch. If he picked it up I did not see him. John didn’t have anything in his hands. John didn’t have any pistol.                     ABRAHAM (X) CALDWELL

ANDREW HUNTER sworn says:

I was in [the] field yesterday afternoon picking cotton with Abe Caldwell, Will Butler and Will’s wife. John Hair brought [the] wagon from [the] house to where we were picking cotton. Abraham had his sack and John asked for it. Abraham said he was not going to give it to him and John said he was going to have it. Abraham had cotton in t [the] sack. John took it off his shoulder to empty it and then they got to scuffing over [the] sack and Will Butler told John not to hit Abraham and Will hit John with a rock. Will was about 30 steps from them. When they started fussing Will picked up [the] rock before he started towards them. John had not rock.                                               ANDREW (X) HUNTER

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at W. C. Miller’s at No. 5 Township in the County and State aforesaid, the 10th day of October A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of MARJORY WADSWORTH of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by ___ sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Marjory Wadsworth came to her death upon their oaths do say that the said Marjory Wadsworth came to her death from natural causes Oct. 10, 1917.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                                                              F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

INQUISITION over the dead body of COLIE McMORRIS

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Cromer’s Store in the County and State aforesaid, the 21st day of October A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of COLIE McMORRIS of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by ___ sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Colie McMorris came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Colie McMorris came to his death from accidental strangulation on Oct. 21, 1917.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                                                              F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

Colie McMorris found dead Oct. 21, 1917

WILLIE McMORRIS being sworn says:

I am the father of Colie McMorris. I was over to Church and was notified that Colie was hanging in the window dead. When I arrived at home I saw him hanging in the window. His head was fastened between the sash and the window sill. The doors of the house were locked. All the other windows were locked with catches except this window. He knew he could get in it. I am satisfied there was no foul play in my boy’s death. Colie is 14 years old.

                                                                                                                                                      WILLIE McMORRIS

INQUISITION over the dead body of JIM DORROH

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry CH in the County and State aforesaid, the 16th day of December A. D. 1917, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of JIM DORROH of Newberry Co. then and there being dead, who being charged to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Jim Dorroh came to his death upon their oaths do say that the said Jim Dorroh came to his death from natural causes.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay Coroner aforesaid have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                                                                                                   F. M. Lindsay (L. S.)            

This certifies that I have examined the dead body of Jim Dorroh. I found no marks of violence upon the dead body and in my opinion his death is due to natural causes.                       Dec. 16, 1917                     W. G. HOUSEAL MD

LEWIS DORROH sworn says:

I came to Jim Dorroh’s house and he did not answer. I pushed the door open and found him lying on the trunk dead. I am his brother.                                                                                                                                  LEWIS (X) DORROH

INQUISITION over the dead body of GEORGE FELLERS

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Mrs. Maggie S. Havird’s Place in the County and State aforesaid, the 31st day of January A. D. 1918, before F. M. Lindsay Coroner, upon view of the body of GEORGE FELLERS of Newberry Co. then and there being dead by the oaths of D. G. Livingston, J. W. Berry, H. C. Lake, J. S. Crouch, E.L. Werts and J. F. Stephens a lawful Jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said George Fellers came to his death do say that the said George Fellers came to his death from a gun shot wound in the hands of Wesley Gary. And so the jurors aforesaid upon their oaths aforesaid do say that the aforesaid Wesley Gary then and there did cause the death of the said George Fellers in the manner and means aforesaid against the peace and dignity of the State aforesaid.

In witness whereof I, F. M. Lindsay, Coroner aforesaid and the Jurors aforesaid to this inquisition have set our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                  F. M. Lindsay, Coroner (L. S.)

                                                                                                                                       D. G. Livingston, Foreman (L. S.)

J. W. Berry (L. S.)              H. C. Lake (L. S.)               J. S. Crouch (L. S.)            E.L. Werts

J. F. Stephens (L. S.)

EVIDENCE

I have made a post mortem examination on [the] body of George Fellers by order of [the] Coroner’s Jury. George Fellers died from a wound of a shot gun tasking effect in [the] bridge of [the] nose and going straight through [the] brain to [the] back of [the] skull. [the] load did not come out. Frontal and Parietal bones, also [the] base of [the] skull were fractured. [Victim’s] body 5 foot 9 inches tall. Examination made Jan. 31st 1918.                                       HUGH B. SENN MD

JOHN P. LONG sworn says:

Wes Gary met me on [the] streets of Silverstreet and told me he had killed George Fellers accidentally. He said they were tussling and [the] gun went off accidentally. He said he was about 15 or 20 steps from him but his tracks show he was about three feet from him.                                                                                                                    JOHN P. LONG

J. M. NICHOLS sworn says:

Wes Gary came to [the] door of my store and I was sitting and he called me to [the] door and he said, “I have shot George” and I said, “Which George?” and he said, “George Fellers”. He said, “I have done it accidentally.” He said some birds had flew up and Wes cocked his gun and he said it went off accidentally. I think he said something about a tussle but I won’t be positive about that. He said Mr. Long told him to come on over here. That was today Jan. 31, 1918.

                                                                                                                                                      J. M. NICHOLS

WESLEY GARY sworn says:

I live on Mr. B. M. Havird’s Place. George Fellers lives with Mr. J. P. Long. We live about a mile apart. George came down home and me and him started to hunting a little before dinner. I loaned him four shells. We were hunting and some doves flew up and me and him both throwed our guns up at [the] doves and we neither one shot at [the] birds. I took [the] gun down. I forgot to let [the] hammer down and we were walking along and my gun went off and shot him. We were walking along side by side. He was on my right side when [the] gun went off. When [the] gun went off I ran towards papa’s house. I had [the] gun lying on my right arm when [the] gun went off. I keep a hand on [the] trigger when I am hunting. George had his butt in [his] hand.                                                                            WESLEY (X) GARY
 

Back to Coroners Inquest

Return to Newberry County, South Carolina Genealogy Trails
 This is a FREE website.
If you were directed here through a link for which you paid $ for, you can access much more FREE data via our Newberry County index page at
http://genealogytrails.com/scar/newberry/index.htm
Also make sure to visit our main Genealogy Trails History Group website at
http://genealogytrails.com
for much more nationwide historical/genealogical data and access to our other state/county websites.