Coroner's Inquistions
 1919 - 1931
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at J. N. Sligh’s at Jalapa #5 Township in the County and State aforesaid, the 4th day of January A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. H. Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of ZILCIE MAE TURNER of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of J. M. Bickley, L. C. Burns, F. D. Burns, B. F. Griffin, P. R. Hilderbran, A. A. Sligh being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said ZILCIE MAE TURNER YOUNG came to her death, upon their oaths, do say that the said ZILCIE MAE TURNER came to her death by the hands of Guss Turner using a sharp instrument, cutting her throat. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid ZILCIE MAE TURNER came to her death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ J. M. Bickley, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ L. C. Burns (L.S.)                                                           /s/ B. F. Griffin (L.S.)

/s/ P. R. Hilderbran (L.S.)            /s/ F. D. Burns (L.S.)                   /s/ A. A. Sligh (L.S.)

Inquest over the body of Zelcie Mae Turner

H. J. QUATTLEBAUM who being duly sworn says:

I went down to jail this afternoon – had a talk with Gus Turner. I asked him what kind of trouble he was in. [He] said he had been in a little devilment. I asked him what kind. He said with his wife. I asked him had he shot her. He said, “No”, he had hit her with a piece of iron. I asked him where he had hit her at. He said he hit her on the head. I asked him if he had killed her. He said he did not know whether she was dead or not.                         H. J. QUATTLEBAUM


J. M. SLIGH who being duly sworn says:

All that I saw was through a field glass from the back porch. Gus pulled his wife out of the door and caught her by the hand and led her down the path behind a piece of pines and I could not see any further. When I was looking through the glass one of the girls came up top me and told me Gus Turner was down there beating his wife and to call [sheriff] Cannon please. This happened on my place in No. 5 Township, Newberry County.   J. M. Sligh

CHRISTINA GLASGO who being duly sworn says:

Gussie Turner tried to get his wife Zelcie Mae Turner to go and sweep out his house when he was fixing to move and it was rather a cold rain this morning and she would not agree to go with him. So he came up to Ma Sligh’s house and when he came back he said he had to go so he walked to the fire and gathered the poker. So he struck her on the head with it and jerked her outside of the door and knocked her down with it again. Then he took her by the hand and went on running down towards the pasture and I followed them almost near the gate and that is the last I saw of them. I came on to Mr. Sligh’s house. The blood was flowing from her head when they left the house and I tried to keep him from dragging her off and he said he would clean us all up. I am Zelcie Mae Turner’s mother. Myself and Mr. Sligh found Zelcie dead in the pasture but I did not see Gus nowhere. We found her in almost 30 minutes after they left the house.

                                                                                                    CHRISTENA GLASGO

GENEVA HUNTER who being duly sworn says:

I saw just what Mr. Sligh saw and copyright his statement.                                  GENEVA HUNTER

DR. J. W. FOLK who being duly sworn says:

I find after examining the body of Zelcie Mae Turner – I find the wound in the center of the head about one inch in circumference. This wound did not fracture the skull. I found a wound; a smooth cut wound across and severed the wind pipe. This wound produced death within five minutes and was inflicted with a sharp instrument, more likely a pocket knife. Did not find any shots or missiles or powders being in the wound.                   J. WM. FOLK MD

MEDICAL CERTIFICATE

This is to certify I am a regular physician and on January 4, 1928 I examined the dead body of Zelcie Mae Turner and examined the body carefully. Found a wound on the top of the head but [the wound] did not fracture the cranium or head. Found a clear cut wound that severed the trachea or wind pipe that produced death. Did not find any powder stain or missile in the wound. This wound in my opinion was inflicted by a sharp instrument or pocket knife.

                                                                                                    J. WM. FOLK MD

THE END                FINIS

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Prosperity SC in the County and State aforesaid, the 5th of February A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. H. Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of HERMAN WISE of Saluda County then and there being dead by the oaths of J. B. Stockman, V. A. Bowers, G. D. Bedenbaugh, J. D. Lorick, J. A. Baker, I. J. Gibson being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said HERMAN WISE came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said HERMAN WISE came to his death by a gun shot wound inflicted by M. R. Singley on Feb. 4th 1928. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid HERMAN WISE came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                   /s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ J. B. Stockman, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ G. D. Bedenbaugh (L.S.)                                                /s/ V. A. Bowers (L.S.)

/s/ J. A. Baker (L.S.)                    /s/ J. D. Lorick (L.S.)                   /s/ I. J. Gibson (L.S.)

TESTIMONY

Inquest over the body of HERMAN WISE at Prosperity Town Hall, February 5, 1928

JOHN N. TAYLOR sworn says:

I am the policeman in the town of Prosperity and arrested Malcolm Singley yesterday afternoon. I was about 40 yards up the street from John Mathis’ store and I heard two shots fire. When I heard two shots fire and I then turned around and went back to the store and saw Singley coming out the door with a pistol in his hand. I said, “What have you done Mr. Singley?” He said, “I have shot Herman Wise.” I said, “You have not hurt him, have you?” He said, “Yes, I think I killed him.” I carried Mr. Singley to his store, taken his pistol from him at which time Mr. Joe Quattlebaum came over and I asked Mr. Quattlebaum to stay with him until I went to see if Mr. Wise was dead. When I got there I found Dr. Bedenbaugh at his body and he, Dr. Bedenbaugh, said he (Mr. Wise) was dying. I examined Wise and he did not have a weapon on him. This is all I know.                                                      John W. TAYLOR

DR. J. I. BEDENBAUGH sworn says:

I am a practicing physician in Prosperity. Yesterday afternoon Mr. Willis Harmon came to my drug store and told me to go to Mr. Jack Mathis’ store – that Mr. Singley had shot Mr. Herman Wise. I went immediately and found Mr. Wise behind the counter about one half way to the rear of the store lying on the floor somewhat on his left side with his right side lying a little up and Mr. Gad Bedenbaugh supporting his head out of the blood which was under his face somewhat to the front. I felt for his pulse and found none. He breathed a few times after I arrived and was dead. Dr. Bedenbaugh’s certificate was introduced as evidence:

This is to certify that I this day examined the dead body of Herman Wise and found that he came to his death from the effects ---                                                                         DR. J. I. BEDENBAUGH MD

Q. Did you find his skull mashed?

A.  After they had washed the blood from his hair I found his skin broken in two places to the bone. I felt into these cuts and felt the bone but found that the bone was not broken.

Q. What kind of instrument was used?

A.  Unable to say but it was not cut with a knife.                                        J. I. BEDENBAUGH MD

WILLIE L. HARMON sworn says:
Mr. Guy Parrott and I were sitting 25 or 30 yards above them when I saw them. Mr. Parrott called my attention to it and I looked around. Mr. Wise was coming across the street facing Mr. Barnes’ store coming from the opposite side. Mr. Singley was behind him beating him with a stick. Mr. Wise was running. Just as they reached the sidewalk Wise turned facing Mr. Singley. Mr. Singley continued beating him. Mr. Wise continued going backwards. I did not see Mr. Wise make any attempts to him, in fact it appeared to me that he was trying to ward off the blows. When I saw it I jumped up and ran towards them and when they got near the front of Mr. Mathis’ store Mr. Wise turned his back to Mr. Singley for a step or two and then – I cannot say whether Mr. Singley jerked him around or he turned around. I saw him throw his pistol in his chest or side and shoot twice with a pause between each shot. I rushed inside and found Mr. Singley coming out about ten steps from the door. Mr. Wise was lying back of the counter. I went for Dr. Bedenbaugh.

Q. What kind of stick was he beating him with?

A.  A long stick, about 3 feet long, pretty big around.

Q. Did Mr. Singley follow him into Mr. Mathis’ store?

A.  Yes
Q. Did Mr. Wise go straight into the store or did he stop?
A.  Yes, right in – both of them.

                                                                                                    W. L. HARMON

D. L. KINARD sworn says:

I did not see the beginning of the fight. I stepped up to West’s fish stand and was talking with him being last night and time for me to go home. I went into Malcolm Singley’s store at the back door and he was at the front. I hollered at him and he came to where I was. He asked me how I was getting along and I said not much as I awoke with a cold. That time he stepped towards the front door and said, “It’s going to be hell this afternoon”, and of course he was gone. I stood there a minute or two and I heard someone running. Then I saw Herman Wise and Malcolm Singley in front of Cook’s barber shop. Mal had a stick and was striking him with a stick and both going towards Will Barnes store. That time he struck Herman once or twice across the head and they went together. As Herman threw Mal from him he lost his stick. Mal jumped up and grabbed Herman in the coat. Herman hit him around the neck with his right arm and the pistol fired.

Q. Did you see the stick he beat him with?

A. I saw the stick but could not tell what size it was but it looked about three feet long.

Q. Did he leave out of the store with a stick?
A.  I could not say.

N. E. TAYLOR sworn says:

I heard someone come running down the street and looked out the door and saw Mr. Wise and Mr. Singley behind him. Mr. Wise jumped off the walk down into the street and Mr. Singley jumped off too. Mr. Wise went across the street backwards. Mr. Singley was after him with a stick. They got on over the other sidewalk in front of Cook’s barber shop. Mr. Singley was still after him. Mr. Wise went backwards up the street, Mr. Singley following and hitting him with a stick until they got in front of Mr. Jack Mathis store. When Mr. Wise stopped and grabbed around Mr. Singley. They had a little scuffle and I heard a pistol fire twice. Mr. Wise turned and went into Mr. Mathis store and Mr. Singley followed. This is all I know.

Q. You don’t know what kind of stick he had?

A.  It was a good size stick about the size of a broom handle.                              N. E. TAYLOR

POLICEMAN TAYLOR recalled sworn says:

I was in the store unloading Mr. Singley’s pistol and several people came in and brought a stick and said here is your stick. It was a stick broom handle.                                                                 JOHN W. TAYLOR

This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of Herman Wise and find that he came to his death from the effects of gun shot wounds. Prosperity, SC          Feb. 4, 1928                     J. I. BEDENBAUGH MD

THE END

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY                    

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at George Epting’s Place in #6 Township in the County and State aforesaid, the 28th day of February A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. H. Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of HANNAH BRIDGES of Newberry then and there being dead by the oaths of J. F. Long, L. M. Long, J. J. Sease, Olin Fellers, D. B. Sease, E. G. Hazel being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said HANNAH BRIDGES came to her death, upon their oaths, do say that the said HANNAH BRIDGES came to her death by gun shot wounds at the hands of Young Bridges. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid HANNAH BRIDGES came to her death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ L. M. Long, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ J. J. Sease (L.S.)                                                           /s/ D. B. Sease (L.S.)

/s/ J. F. Long (L.S.)                                                             /s/ E. G. Hazel (L.S.)

/s/ Olin Fellers (L.S.)

TESTIMONY           Feb.28, 1928

DR. HENTZ being sworn says:

I was called to see Hannah Bridges on the morning of Feb. 20, 1928. I examined the body of Hannah Bridges and found a gun shot wound in the lower abdomen which was sufficient to cause death. She said her husband had shot her. She was standing in front of him.                                                       E. O. Hentz, MD

LILLIA MILLER being sworn says:

I was in Mr. George Epting’s back yard the morning of the shooting. I saw Young Bridges go around the corner of Peter Neal’s house immediately after the shooting.                                                  Lillia (X) Miller

CANNON G. BLEASE sworn says:

Young Bridges told me that he heard on Saturday a week ago that his wife Hannah was at the house of Peter Neal’s and that he, Bridges, went to Peter’s house about 8 or 9 o’clock Monday morning following the Saturday that he heard she was there. That he walked in Peter Neal’s house. His, Bridges’ wife, was lying in the bed and he told her to get up and let’s go home and, “She got up and ran out the door and ran to the edge of the yard and turned around and came back at me, hitting at me with both hands. I said, “Hannah, ain’t no need of that.” And she looked down and saw the pistol in my right front pants pocket with the handle sticking out and she grabbed it and then I grabbed it and we were tussling and she had got it out of the pocket and we both had our hands on it. I was trying to take it from her and it went off. And she said, “Lord, I am shot in the stomach.” I do not know who pulled the trigger. Then she sat down on the steps and told me to go in the house and get her shoes. She wanted to go home. I said, “You cannot walk home.” Then I looked at her and saw blood there. I walked off around the corner of the house then I saw her going over to Monroe Jones.”

                                                                                          CANNON G. BLEASE

This is to certify that I attended Hannah Bridges from Feb 20, 1928 to Feb 26, 1928 and that said Hannah Bridges died Feb 27, 1928 as the result of a gun shot wound inflicted in the lower abdomen on Feb 20, 1928.

                                                                                          E.O. HENTZ MD, Newberry SC

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at the County Court House in the County and State aforesaid, the 5th of March A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. Holland Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of Dr. W. A. DUNN of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of M. B. Hipp, B. P. Ringer, B. M. Scurry, Ray Anderson, Wilbur Long, L. W. Mills being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said DR. W. A. DUNN came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said DR. W. A. DUNN came to his death by bring struck by train #53 on the CN&L RR, said death being caused by an unavoidable accident. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid DR. W. A. DUNN came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ M. B. Hipp, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ W. E. Long (L.S.)                                                           /s/ L. W. Mills (L.S.)

/s/ B. P. Ringer (L.S.)                  /s/ B. M. Scurry (L.S.)                 /s/ W. R. Anderson (L.S.)

Testimony at the inquest of Dr. W. A. Dunn, reported killed by the CN&L train on March 1, 1928

MR. T. A. EISON sworn says:

I live in Newberry and was at home Thursday afternoon when Dr. Dunn was hurt in the accident. I was out in my garden Thursday afternoon when the 3 o’clock train came down and the train blew first on Nance Street above the crossing. It continued blowing all the way down to Pope Street where the accident happened. I think it was running not over 15 miles an hour. Did not see the wreck but heard the ‘jar’. [My] wife said, “[I] believe they have run over someone.” Then I jumped over the fence, ran down the track and saw the car and Dr. Dunn lying flat on his back.

MRS. GEORGE B. EARHARDT sworn says:

I saw the accident Thursday afternoon on way to town, about 3 o’clock. Just as I got in front of Mr. Arthur Kibler’s house, Dr. Dunn passed me in his car. I heard the train coming and it was blowing. Dr. Dunn was going slowly and I thought was going to stop. When I saw that he was going into the crossing I called to him but he did not hear me. As he landed on the crossing the train struck him. I saw of course the wrecked car afterwards but it was on the other side of the train. The ambulance came and carried him away and I went on to town. Dr. Dunn was running slowly and the train was running slow. Dr. Dunn attempted to turn the car but was too late. He tried to speed up when he got on the track. Dr. Dunn tried to avoid being struck. The train stopped about middle ways of the crossing. Don’t remember whether the bell was ringing but do remember that the train was blowing.

MISS LUCILLE MAFFET sworn says:

Thursday afternoon I was on my way to town. Dr. Dunn passed me in front of Arthur Kibler’s. I called to him to stop but he did not hear me. Just as he went on the track the train struck him. I heard the whistle blow but do not know whether the bell was ringing.

MR. H. M. MEYER sworn says:

I live in Newberry County and did not see the accident. I was working on Mr. Havird’s house and we can see the trains coming and the boys have a habit of asking the number of what train that blows. I went to the window and saw the #7 engine and it slacked up after the first signal whistle for the crossing and it was coming in slower than usual, so they say, and it blowed several times just before the crossing and the bell was ringing and I saw the car slack all of a sudden and heard the smash. I ran out in a hurry, jumped over the car steps, turned around to see who it was and it was my friend, Dr. Dunn. I took my hat off and fanned him. I asked to send for an ambulance and Welborn & Walker came in a hurry. Could not see Dr. Dunn’s driving. The train slacked up, put on the emergency brakes and then I heard something crash. I could not say how fast the train was running. But the bell was still ringing after it stopped. I am working on Mr. Havird’s house – no obstruction – can see both ways. The train coming to town, going downgrade but was running slow. [I] heard the signal at the crossing above. Dr. Dunn is a careful driver as I have ridden with him several times.

MRS. J. E. GLENN sworn says:

I live in Newberry but did not see the accident. Saw the car just before the accident. I was in the kitchen Thursday afternoon, heard the train coming and blowing and was slowing for the crossing. I looked out to see if Mr. Glenn was on this train that was coming down and I saw this car coming down the street to the RR crossing running slowly. After it passed the train cut off my view but I heard the crash. I live between the two crossings. I live in the house next to the RR. Heard the whistle but did not hear the bell ringing. The train was slowing up and at the time was running very slow.


DR. E. O. HENTZ MD sworn says:

I was present with the other physicians at the hospital Thursday and found bruises sufficient to cause death.

MR. H. S. SHEALY, Conductor, sworn says:

I was sitting in the rear of the second class car. Coming down to Nance Street he blew for the crossing. I felt the brakes going on the train and then heard a shrill blow for the crossing and I saw that he was about to stop. I stood up ion order that I might see out the window on either side. Just before the engine got to this crossing I felt the brakes applied immediately and the engine stop with the car at the crossing. I saw Dr. Dunn through the window, ran out of the train and straightened him out on the ground. The train had slowed down to about 15 miles an hour. I couldn’t say positively whether or not the bell was ringing because of the noise from applying the brakes. I don’t often hear the bell as it doesn’t make the noise the whistle makes.                                                          H. S. SHEALY

MR. J. M. KEITH, Engineer, sworn says:

Well, of course I blew for the Oakland crossing, continued that blow until I was passed that crossing. Then I began to blow for the Nance Street crossing. I blew two regular signal blows before coming to the crossing. Brought the train down to about 12 miles an hour. Blew three times between the Oakland and Pope Street crossings. Continued to blow when I saw the car coming very slowly – I thought [it was] going to stop for the crossing. When he got to about 15 feet from the crossing saw that he wasn’t going to stop. [I] threw the brakes into emergency and stopped the train but it was too late. The bell was ringing from the 45 mile post at the Gulf Place. I do that every day. Nothing was on my right that would obstruct my view. I could see the car. I would think that he could see the engine before I could see him. He could see about 75 yards either way. Naturally I thought Dr. Dunn was going to stop. He could have stopped. I blew from the crossing above clear to that crossing.                                                            J. M. KEITH

JIM BLUFORD fireman, sworn says:

We were coming down on the #53. When we were at the 45 mile post the bell began to ring and the whistle was blowing – came right on with the bell still ringing. The train slowed down to about 10 or 12 miles an hour. The whistle blew the second and third time and then I held the whistle until the car was hit. Came right into the engine. The car stopped right about the middle of the crossing. Wasn’t running fast.                              JIM BLUFORD

THE END                FINIS            THE END

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at B. M. Suber’s store in #11 Township in the County and State aforesaid, the 16th of April A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. Holland Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of HARDY OGLESBY of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of B. M. Suber, Haynie Murphy, F. A. Graham, Jason Ringer, C. C. Epting, David Harris being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said HARDY OGLESBY came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said HARDY OGLESBY came to his death in an automobile wreck – car being driven by L. C. Glasgow at a high rate of speed. We the Jury recommend that L. C. Glasgow be held responsible for the wreck. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid HARDY OGLESBY came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ B. M. Suber, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ David Harris (L.S.)                                                          /s/ Haynie Murphy (L.S.)

/s/ Jason Ringer (L.S.)                 /s/ F. A. Graham (L.S.)                /s/ C. C. Epting (L.S.)

Testimony of Hardy Oglesby on April 16, 1928 at B.M. Suber’s store, Newberry SC

ALBERT BLAIR being sworn says:

I got in the car with L.C. Glasgow and the car wrecked. I got in the car at Dry Branch on Pressley Road about one mile from Mr. B. M. Suber’s store. L. C. Glasgow was driving. Hardy Oglesby was in the car with Glasgow. He was driving fast. The car started to switch and turned over. I wanted to get out on the top of the hill at my uncle’s house. He said, “Ride on down to the bottom of the hill,” and he would let me out.

Q. What caused the wreck?
A.  Running too fast. I told him not to drive so fast. He never said anything but didn’t slow down any. This
     happened in Newberry County.                                                           ALBERT BLAIR

ROBERT WRIGHT being duly sworn says:

I was coming towards Mr. B. M. Suber’s store on Monday morning April 16th 1928 about 9 o’clock. I met a car coming down the hill hard as it could tear. I heard them holler. I looked back and saw a car turning over. I turned around and went back down where it was. I found three boys there. I asked Blair who was it? He said it was Dock Glasgow’s car. I asked what boy it was that was killed? He said he was one of old man John Oglesby’s. When I saw the car coming I got inside a ditch. I was on a horse. If I hadn’t got inside the ditch the car would have hit me. The car was running fast.

                                                                                                    ROBERT (X) WRIGHT

H. J. QUATTLEBAUM being duly sworn says:

I was called down on Pressley Road near Mr. B. M. Suber’s store on the morning of April 16, 1928 to investigate an automobile wreck. I found a Ford Touring car turned over and that car had killed Hardy Oglesby. I examined the steering gear of the car – found it still connected. It had not come loose. The tracks of the car showed back in the highway that the car started to switching about 60 yards before it turned over. This was a smooth straight highway at the place the car turned over.                             H. J. Quattlebaum, deputy sheriff, Newberry County

4/16/1928

This is to certify that I have examined the dead body of Hardy Oglesby and find that he came to his death by a head injury – crushing skull.                                                                               DR. Z. T. PINNER MD
TO BE TRIED JUNE 18, 1928
THE END

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at R. E. Livingston’s store in #6 Township in the County and State aforesaid, the 19th of May A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. Holland Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of EZELL HILL of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of J. H. Bedenbaugh, R. E. Livingston, John Earl Smith, M. C. Moates, I. M. Smith, L. B. Johnson being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said EZELL HILL came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said EZELL HILL came to his death by a pistol wound in the hands of P. Claire Workman, that the said shot being fired in self defense. The shooting occurred May 18 1928 and death occurred May 19, 1928. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid EZELL HILL came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ J. H. Bedenbaugh, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ R. E. Livingston (L.S.)                                                     /s/ L. B. Johnstone (L.S.)

/s/ John Earl Smith (L.S.)             /s/ I. M. Smith (L.S.)                    /s/ M. C. Moates (L.S.)

LAURA STEPHENS being duly sworn says:

I work on Mr. Clair Workman’s place. I lived with Ezell Hill. He was not my husband. Yesterday morning May 18, 1928 I was with Ezell when he got shot. Mr. Workman shot him. It happened in front of Mr. Workman’s house. Ezell and myself were coming up the road and got in front of Mr. Workman’s house. Mr. Workman said to Ezell, “What does this mean?” and Ezell answered him and said something but I do not know what he said. Then I heard the pistol shot. I do not know whether Ezell had his hand on his hip pocket or not when Mr. Workman shot. Ezell was walking off and Ezell shot at Mr. Workman. Ezell has been toting a pistol in the field at his work. I heard Mr. Workman tell Ezell he didn’t want him to tote the pistol in the field. Ezell said he would rather get money he owed Mr. Workman and pay him rather than give up the pistol. We did not stay at home the night before the shooting. We had spent the night somewhere else.                                                                                            LAURA (X) STEPHENS

RICHARD WORKMAN sworn says:

I am 12 years old. I am the son of Mr. Claire Workman. Yesterday morning I saw the shooting at Ezell Hill. It happened in front of our house. Papa was standing on the edge of the road. Ezell was on the other side of the road in the other feller’s field. I did not hear the conversation between them. I do not know who shot first; they were both shooting at each other. I saw the Negro open a knife and put it in his pocket just before the shooting started. He was going towards father at this time. I saw Ezell shoot at father and snapped at him again.                       RICHARD WORKMAN


D. J. TAYLOR sworn says:

Mr. J. E. Smith, Mr. Clifford Smith and myself found the coat and clothes of Ezell Hill that he had pulled off after the shooting occurred. We found his knife open in his vest pocket. John Golden, a Negro, showed me where Ezell Hill threw the pistol down. This is his pistol. Ezell Hill told me in the presence of Sheriff Blease and Mr. Earl Smith that he had a pistol when the shooting occurred and that he had his pistol at the saw mill. Mr. Smith, Sheriff Blease and I searched for the pistol and clothes at the saw mill but did not find them. Then we went back, we two (2) men (Smith and myself) and found the clothes. Then we found the pistol after Earl Hill told us that John Golden knew where the pistol was.                                                                                             D. J. TAYLOR

This is to certify that I examined the body of Ezell Hill and found a wound on the left side 5 inches from the spinal column between the 7th and 8th ribs. The wound by a lead missile ranged through the body and was cut out in front3 inches from the medium line between the 6th and 7th ribs. The above described wound was sufficient to cause death.

May 19, 1928                                                                                          W. D. SENN MD
 

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