Coroner's Inquistions
 1919 - 1931
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at L. P. Miller’s in #6 Township in the County and State aforesaid, the 1st day of June A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. Holland Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of AUSTIN WAGNER of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of L. P. Adams, J. P. Ringer, G. W. Tyson, Gilbert Cromer, L. P. Miller, W. A. Haskin being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said AUSTIN WAGNER came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said AUSTIN WAGNER came to his death after he had jumped off of a truck and the truck steering gear having got tight jumped over an embankment and struck the said Austin Wagner which was an unavoidable accident. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid AUSTIN WAGNER came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                   /s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ L. P. Adams, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ Gilbert Cromer (L.S.)                                                      /s/ L. P. Miller (L.S.)

/s/ E. A. Haskin (L.S.)                  /s/ J. E. Ringer (L.S.)                   /s/ G. W. Tyson (L.S.)

TESTIMONY

ROSS WAGNER sworn says:

I am 21 years old. I live in Polk County NC but am hauling lumber down this county for Cox Mag Lumber Co. I stay now at L. A. Laxton across the river in Union County. I was driving this Chevrolet truck with a load of lumber on it. Dell Wagner, Austin Wagner my brother and John Ford and Ben Laxton were on the truck with me. The steering got tight and I could not steer it. I was running about 5 to 10 miles an hour and I saw I was going off the embankment and I told the boys to jump. Austin Wagner jumped and I stayed on the truck and held to the emergency line and got under the steering wheel and the truck rolled off the embankment and hit my brother. I was driving the truck before the accident happened.                                                                                   ROSS WAGNER

DELL WAGNER sworn says:

The way my brother says this happened is true.                                                  DELL WAGNER

BEN LAXTON sworn says:

I am certain in the above statement of Ross Wagner.                                         BEN LAXTON

JOHN FORD sworn says:

I am certain in the above statement.                                                                  JOHN FORD

THE END

June 6, 1928

This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of DELLA WELCH of Newberry SC and find that she came to her death from a gunshot wound of the chest – probably self inflicted.

There was a wound penetrating of the forehead – also powder burns.

6/6/1928                           Frank D. Mower MD                    A note found beside her side says:

I died from my hands, Della


THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at the County Court House  in the County and State aforesaid, the 11th day of July A. D., one thousand nine hundred and twenty eight before I. Holland Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of FRED WILSON of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of T. R. Summer, M. O. Summer, J. H. Clary, W. R. Anderson, M. B. Hipp, W. B. Timmerman being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said FRED WILSON came to his death, upon their oaths, do say that the said FRED WILSON came to his by being accidentally struck by a car driven by W. H. Mann – said accident being unavoidable; said accident having occurred July 2 the said Fred Wilson dying July 8, 1928. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid FRED WILSON came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                   /s/ I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/ T. Ray Summer, foreman (L.S.)

/s/ F. R. Hunter (L.S.)                                                          /s/ M. O. Summer (L.S.)

/s/ M. B. Hipp (L.S.)                    /s/ W. R. Anderson (L.S.)            /s/ W. B. Timmerman (L.S.)

TESTIMONY of Inquest held July 11, 1928

Dr. W. G. Houseal being sworn says:

Direct examination by Mr. Cannon G. Blease

Q. Doctor – you are a practicing physician in the town of Newberry?

A.  Yes

Q. Did you see Fred Wilson last Saturday, this Negro that got hurt in the wreck?

A.  Yes

Q. Describe his condition.

A.  When I saw him he was on the x-ray table. His left leg was broken in three places above the knee; below the knee just above the ankle. His bones were badly broken and under physical scoping and taking pictures of the broken leg I put him in a wire splint. We found that the bones could not be put in position. It was a severe break. He said he lived on Mr. Boulware’s place. We realized that it was a severe break and that he needed to be placed in a hospital. And that he would have to be treated for several weeks before he could be put in a splint. I advised his son that he be sent to the Good Samaritan Hospital. He was sent to the Good Samaritan Hospital. I had a talk with the head nurse and asked her to have Dr. Bennett called. It was regarded as a severe break.

Q. In your opinion this accident was the cause of his death?

A.  Yes. A man of his age. I inquired his age. He was about 52 years old. I heard that was his age and a man that old with probably hardening of the arteries and not a good heart, why it was sufficient to cause his death.

Q. Doctor, who brought him to your office?

A.  Mr. Mann, W. H. I understand I arrived at the office after Mr. Mann brought him there.

Q. Did you talk to Mr. Mann?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. What instructions, if any, did he give you?

A.  To take good care of him and do anything that was needed and he would see that all the bills were paid. Do everything possible for him.

MR. W. H. NICHOLS sworn says:

Direct examination by Mr. Cannon G. Blease:

Q. Mr. Nichols, you live in Newberry County?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. Did you know this man, Fred Wilson?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. Where did he live? How far from you?

A.  About a mile.

Q. Did this accident happen about 6 miles out on Deadfall Road? Just tell in your own way how it happened.

A.  It happened on Ward’s Place. There was a Negro barbecue.

Q. Coming from Deadfall to Newberry, which side was the barbecue on?

A.  On the left hand side coming this way.

Q. Mr. Nichols, describe the road. Is there a down hill?

A.  Yes sir. Coming down the hill – you come down the hill a stretch and a little up.

Q. How far from the hill did the accident occur?

A.  Just a little this side of the rise.

Q. State how your truck was parked.

A.  On the right.

Q. Were you coming to Newberry?

A.  Yes sir, I stopped to let some darkies out of the truck that wanted to come to the barbecue and some wanted to come to Newberry. This old fellow came across the road and was talking to some of the hands in the truck, facing towards – toward Deadfall and his face towards Newberry. Just as my truck moved off I heard somebody holler, “look out” and the automobile hit him. There was a wagon on the left hand side of the road and I was on the right hand side – the middle of the road was open, I would say 12 feet or more.

Q. What rate of speed would you think this man was running?

A.  I might be a poor judge but he must have been driving around 35 or 40 miles. He went something like 40 or 50 steps and stopped his car and walked back.

Q. Was the automobile horn blowing?

A.  It drew my attention. That is one reason I looked back. He started across the road and somebody hollered, “Look out.”

Q. Was he talking to somebody in your truck?

A.  He was talking to Aleck Marshall.

Q. Do you know what part of the automobile hit this Negro?

A.  It might have been the left hand fender that struck him.

Q. How close to your truck did this man come?

A.  He just missed my truck about this far. He turned to the right and he had to turn back to the left to not hit me.

Q. Immediately after this what did this man do?

A.  He came back and the darkies – some say he ought to have done this and some say he ought to have done that – some said, get his number. He said, “I am not trying to run away. I am here and I am willing to do what I can.” And he said, “I am very sorry that I hit this old man.” He said, “He ran right out in the road in front of me.” He proposed that he would bring him to a doctor and he asked if I would come with him and I did. We first drove up to the hospital and we then brought him back to Dr. Houseal’s office.

MR. FRED H. DOMINICK:

Q. If he had not stepped in front of Mr. Mann, would the man have been hurt?

A.  No sir.

MR. CANNON G. BLEASE:

Q. Your opinion was that he was running about 35 or 40?

A.  He was running pretty fast – just on a glance look that I got of it. I know he was blowing the horn because it drew my attention.

MR. FRED H. DOMINICK:

Q. Mr. Mann seemed to be in perfect control of the car?

A.  Yes sir. It looked that way to me. If he had not handled it as he did he would have hit him square. If he had not struck him he would have run in the back of my truck. It looked to me like he tried to miss the old man.

Q. Was there any possible way to avoid the accident?

A.  No sir, I don’t see how he could. It looked to me like he was trying to talk when the truck moved away and he was sidling across the road, not paying any attention to where he was going. He made a jump but he was hit.

ALECK MARSHALL sworn says:

Direct examination by Cannon G. Blease:

Q. Did you see the accident?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. Tell what you know and tell it as quick as you can. You were on Mr. Nichols truck?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. Tell from there what you saw. Was a wagon standing there?

A.  Yes sir. We were on our way to Newberry. ‘Preacher’ came to the truck to talk to me. After we had about ended the conversation and our truck was in the act of moving off he left to go back across to the barbecue place. Just as he was starting I shouted, “Look out.” He made a leap to run across and just got caught.

Q. How fast was the car going?

A.  I don’t know sir, I couldn’t designate because I hardly ever ride in a car.

Q. You have not had enough experience to judge?

A.  No sir. I couldn’t say just how fast.

Q. Would you call 40 miles an hour rapid?

A.  I would think I was riding pretty good. I ride in a Ford car and I would think I was riding pretty good.

Q. Do you think he was running over 40 miles? What do you think about it?

A.  It was a pretty rapid speed.

Q. Do you think it was running over 40 miles?

A.  I ain’t seen a car go that fast and ain’t noticed how fast it was running to get that kind of speed.

Q. Do you see anyway this gentleman could have avoided this accident?

A.  A car was on one side and a wagon on the other. No sir.

Q. If he had not stepped out in the road would this gentleman have hit him?

A.  No sir.

Q. Did you hear this man’s automobile horn blowing?

A.  Yes sir. I heard it.

MR. FRED H. DOMINICK:

Q. Was there anything between Wilson and this car that was coming?

A.  No sir.

Q. The car was coming towards Newberry – nothing between him and the car at all?

A.  No sir. I heard somebody holler, “Look out.” I saw him turn around to go across the road and I thought he might stop and the car was approaching him so rapid and he broke to run and get in about 4 feet of the ditch bank of the opposite side, I suppose.

BLUTH BUTLER sworn says:

Direct examination by Cannon G. Blease:

Q. Are you any kin to this man?
A.  No sir, other by marriage – he was a brother to my wife.

Q. Tell what you know about it.

A.  I was standing where I could see. I was up on the bank looking down. I heard a horn blowing and I hollered, “Look out, look out.” And I looked over to Mr. Nichols truck to see if anyone was in the way. I don’t know how Mr. Nichols could see so good and him pulling off. He was that close to Wilson when the car hit him and the wagon was down in the ditch. He was that close to the wagon. He hit his left leg and knocked him under the wagon. I could see just as plain as that. If he had been in the middle of the road he wouldn’t have hit him. The car showed that he was on the extreme left of the road. I said, “If you had been in the middle of the road you wouldn’t have hit him.” The truck was to the right. He curved way over to the left to keep from hitting the truck. I was up there where I could see. The wagon was on the left hand side and he was in 4 feet of the ditch.

Q. Didn’t he know the law was to drive on the right? If the wagon had been on the right hand side he wouldn’t have hit him would he?

A.  He was bearing to the left. I looked good because I could see they would hit him.

MR. FRED H. DOMINICK:

Q. You said you hollered at him?
A.  I said, “Look out.” The gentleman was running way to the left hand side.

Q. How fast was he running?

A.  He was running. Man I know. If there is such a thing as a car making 75 or 90 miles an hour he was making it. I know because I have ridden in cars making 60 miles an hour.

Q. Whose car were you riding in making 60 miles an hour?

A.  Mr. Red Johnson and Mr. Frank Hunter making 60 miles and hour and there never has been anything like that man was going. He was going it. They couldn’t see like I could.

Q. How much distance was there between the truck and the wagon?

A.  Right wide. He might have been on the left hand side where he came over the hill. I thought he was running that way to keep from hitting the truck because the truck was fixing to move off on the right hand side.

Q. You heard the horn blowing? Was Wilson deaf?

A.  No sir, he could have heard the horn blowing. He walked right across. He tried to run. He got across the middle of the road. He was on the right hand side of the road. When the automobile was coming instead of staying on that side he crossed in front of the machine. He crossed the road walking along as the truck was fixing to leave.

MR. CANNON G. BLEASE:

Q. Was anything parked in front of Mr. Nichols’ truck?

A.  I don’t know as there was. I know the wagon was down there in the ditch. Fred had got almost across and he struck him almost plumb across. I called his attention. I said, “You were extreme to the left” and he said if he had stayed there by the truck I wouldn’t have him. He was too far to the left hand side. I saw it good and I said to George, “Jump down and get the number.”

Q. Did the man stop and come back?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. He could have gone on if he had wanted to?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. How far did he go before he stopped?

A.  As far as from here to the OBSERVER before he stopped. He had such a speed he couldn’t stop.

MR. H. J. QUATTLEBAUM being duly sworn says:

Direct examination by Cannon G. Blease:

Q. You have a heap of experience with automobile wrecks etc in the discharge of your duty?
A.  Yes sir.

Q. A man stopping a car in 50 yards, what rate of speed would he be running?

A.  About 40 miles an hour. At 90 or 95 miles an hour he couldn’t stop in 50 yards. It would turn him over if he stopped in the short a space.

JIMMIE REUBEN sworn says:

Direct examination by Cannon G. Blease:

Q. Did you see the accident?

A.  Yes sir.

Q. Tell what you know about it.

A.  I was up on the bank and this gentleman was coming over the hill. Me and Butler and several more of the colored people were talking. ‘Preach’ had just gone over to Mr. Nichols’ truck to talk to some of them on the truck and intended to come back across and we heard someone holler, “Look out.” I don’t know whether he heard this horn blowing but I heard it. He made a dart across the road and failed to get across. It caught him and threw him under the wagon.

Q. What speed was this gentleman running?
A.  I don’t know. I don’t know what his register was registering. He might have been running less than 60 or 70 miles
     ‘cause I have been running 50 miles an hour.

Q. What have you been running 50 miles an hour?

A.  I was with Mr. Berry and Mr. Fant and I have seen it register 50 miles.

MR. CANNON G. BLEASE sworn says:

Gentlemen – this affair was reported to me about 1 o’clock Sunday. Dr. Houseal phoned to me and told me this Negro was dead. I did not know anything about this accident happening. He said the Negro who brought this Negro said the man’s name was W. H. Mann and that his home was in Winterhaven Florida and said he was going north. I wired the chief and asked him if he could give me the address of Mr. Mann so that I could wire him. Mr. Mann called me Sunday night and told my deputy he would talk to me the next day. Said he had heard the Negro was dead and said he was very sorry. Said that he wanted to come back to the Inquest and said he would wire me what day he would be here. Consequently we arranged the inquest for that date. I offer the following wires that were sent me to be put in the testimony.

New York, NY         July 9, 1928

Sheriff of Newberry County

Will arrive Newberry Wednesday morning. Arrange inquest for the afternoon please. STOP Kindly have Mr. Nichols and his son and also the doctor summoned. Thank you very much.                 W. H. Mann, 808A,  July 10

Bartlow FL  935A               July 11, 1928

Sheriff Blease                   Newberry, So. Car.

Understand Herman Mann of Winterhaven in trouble by reason of accident resulting in the death of Negro in your county recently. I am glad to advise that he is one of the leading citizens of this county of good repute and is deserving of such consideration as may be shown him under the circumstances.                   John G. Swearinger    1002AWinterhaven FL      906A  July 11, 1928

Sheriff Blease                   Newberry, So. Car.

Referring Mann accident. STOP Mr. Mann, one of our most prominent citizens has lived here practically all his life. I have known him personally nine years and am confident the accident was unavoidable. Any consideration you may show him will be appreciated by myself and the citizens of Winterhaven.    O. P. Warren, Mayor, Commissioner

939A

Winterhaven FL       822A  July 11, 1928

County Sheriff                   Newberry So. Car.

Referring to automobile accident in which W. H. Mann involved. STOP  I have known Mr. Mann for the past fifteen years. Have driven with him many times and consider him a conservative, careful and thoroughly experienced driver. He is not a reckless driver and I have never heard of his being unavoidable accident here. Of course, I am very sorry for the injured party but am confident accident unavoidable. STOP Any consideration you can show Mr. Mann will be appreciated.                                                John O. Snively, Pres. Haven Villa Corp.          936A

Winterhaven FL                 825A            July 11, 1928

County Sheriff         Newberry So. Car.

Understand W. H. Mann had automobile accident in your county. STOP  Have know Mr. Mann eight years and know he is not reckless driver. He is on of hardest workers and most successful fruit growers in our association and any consideration shown him will be appreciated.                         George R. Williams

                                                                                Manager Winterhaven Citrus Assoc.904A

Darton FL     July 10, 1928

County Sheriff                   Newberry So. Car.

W. Herman Mann of Winterhaven in this county known to me since his boyhood. He stands well in every way as a sober, law abiding and self respecting citizen in my connections of many years with law enforcements in this county. Never once heard of his being charged with reckless driving or other improper conduct of any kind. I commend him without reservation to your county officials and court officers.                  S. S. Holland, County Judge

                                                                                Polk County  8_8A, July 11

Mr. Mann has a young man that he brought, at his own expenses, from NY:

J. D. HASKINS sworn says:

Direct examination by Mr. Cannon G. Blease:

Q. Where is your home?
A.  Atlanta GA
Q. Had you been to Fl recently?
A.  Yes sir.
Q. Did you go with this gentleman?
A.  I went with my father
Q. Where were you when this gentleman picked you up?
A.  I was between Dublin GA and Savannah. I don’t know the name, I believe the town was Adria or something
     like that. It was a town between Dublin and Savannah. I rode with that gentleman clear to NY. We had just
     gone over a small rise there on this road headed towards Newberry. I could see the tops of two vehicles, one on each side of the road. I couldn’t tell what they were. We went to the bottom of this small hill and about half way he blew his horn. He blew it until he was 50 or 60 feet from this man. The truck was facing towards Newberry and the Negro towards us. We had got about 300, or maybe 200 feet, the Ford truck was just leaving towards Newberry. The Negro turned in the road and looked towards the car. He started to run. This gentleman almost turned over his car trying to dodge to keep from hitting him. He was hit by the fender, not by the bumper. The dust on the fender was brushed off where we hit him. I had just looked at the speedometer as we came over the hill. It is just a habit of mine. In fact it was registering 41. As soon as this Negro started across the road Mr. Mann applied his brakes. He skidded both hind tires. He stopped in about 40 or 50 steps. The steps were 150 – we measured it this afternoon. Mr. Mann and I immediately got out and walked back. It was not 30 seconds until we got back to where the accident happened. Some Negro had picked this Negro Wilson up and got him on the back. Mr. Mann immediately did everything that was humanly possible for him to do. The Negroes were running around there all excited and the Negroes were excited and yelling. Mr. Mann asked for the nearest hospital. He said, “Put him in my car and we will go there right away.” He took two Negroes with us. We went to this hospital but they could not accommodate him. We looked up Dr. Houseal and found the doctor’s son. He did everything he could and the doctor said he had two bones broken and we thought that it was OK so we started out. Mr. Mann told the doctor to do everything that he could. Before we left Mr. Nichols and I were on the front lawn. It seems that this Negro’s brother that got hurt was talking to Mr. Nichols. I walked up to listen to the conversation. Mr. Nichols said that he thought it was an unavoidable accident and said if he hadn’t gone like he said he would have side-swiped the truck and that is about all.

MR. DOMINICK:

Q. You went on to NY? Had you ever known this man?
A.  No sir, just from GA up here. I found that he was a careful and slow driver. He had two bum tires. He had to drive
     slow or he would have been taking his own life in his hands. I thought he had blown them out when he slid his
     wheels. I found him to be careful, clear on to NY. I was not the least bit afraid and I have been driving for seven
     years.

MR. W. H. MANN sworn says:

Direct examination by Fred H. Dominick:

Q. Mr. Mann, where is your home?
A.  Winterhaven, FL

Q. What business are you engaged in?

A.  Fruit growing business, grapefruit and oranges
Q. When you had this accident you were on your way to NY?
A.  Yes sir.
Q. Just tell in your own way how the accident occurred?
A.  I first came in the sight of a parked truck and a team of mules. About a quarter of a mile from where they were
     I saw there was room for me to go through. I first sounded my horn. I couldn’t tell about the people. I couldn’t tell they were there. There was room between the vehicles to go through. I went down a little slump and about 4 or 5 hundred feet we were in full view and I could see there were quite a few people about. I saw the man who was struck. I could demonstrate better how it was if you will allow me. This was the way it was. This was Mr. Nichols’ truck here on the right hand side and this was another vehicle on this side. The road is very wide here. It is one of the nicest roads around here. I should judge that parking the two there was about 12 feet between the two vehicles. When I got in about fifty feet of the truck I could see this man Wilson right in the middle of the road. There were other Negroes on the truck. I sounded my horn both a quarter of a mile and when I got within four or five hundred feet of them. If there had been a necessity two cars could have gone through. I sounded the horn. This man did not appear to hear and it did not register. As I came along he gave a little step backwards. He looked up and saw the car and without any reason seemed determined to go across the road. He started across the road like that. I tried to dodge him and Mr. Nichols’ truck. I only missed him about six inches. I know if I swerved too far I would hit him with the rear end. So I hit him with the fender, a place about as big as my hand where the dust had been wiped off by his leg. It was just reflex action, like a child with its mother. The child runs across the road to its mother. There was nothing between us and I did all I could to miss him. It would have been more disastrous if I had hit the truck with all those people on it. I had already started to stop and brought the car to a stop in about 50 steps. Within a few seconds we ran back to where the Negro was and they were all excited. Nobody had any suggestions. Some were hollering, “Get his number.” I said, “I am not trying to get away.” I could have not stopped. I came back to do what I could for the Negro. I asked Mr. Nichols where the nearest town was and he said Newberry. I asked him if they had a hospital. He said they did. I asked Mr. Nichols to go with me and show me where the hospital was. We brought him to the hospital. The doctor there said they could not take him and Mr. Nichols took us to Dr. Houseal, his own family physician. I talked to young Dr. Houseal and after he made a superficial examination he said that it showed that his leg was broken. There were no bruises and he did not bleed and he was conscious. No one seemed to think he was seriously injured. Mr. Nichols and all the other people there said it was unavoidable. After taking him to the doctor’s office and giving Mr. Nichols and the doctor my address and name so that he could be taken care of. I told them I would pay his doctor bill and everything that he needed. I left there and any question about it being unavoidable, I would have made a report of it at the time. Even the man’s relatives made no objection. I did everything possible. As much as I could have done for one of my own family. After leaving my name and address here I went on North to work. I was due there to work on Monday. I had a telegram after I arrived from Newberry saying the Negro had died.  Within five minutes I called up the police department and I called Mr. Blease next day. I got here as soon as I could. I telegraphed I would be here Wednesday but got here last night and spent the night here. It was unavoidable. If he had just stayed still I wouldn’t have hit him. He was an old man and it was just reflex action and I cannot explain it but it happened. That is my remembrance of it. My speed was approximately what Mr. Nichols and Mr. Haskins testified. We had been running slow on account of two bad tires. We averaged 32 miles an hour to New York. We had poor tires on the car and we had not driven over that speed. Naturally, being two cars parked, I would have slowed down a little and I had applied the brakes. I should have been going 36 or 37 miles an hour at the time the Negro was struck, probably less than that. Thirty seconds after I had stopped the car I had gotten back to the Negro.

MR. CANNON G. BLEASE:

Q. You told them you would pay these expenses?
A.  I told Dr. Houseal I wanted him to do everything that was necessary. I did as much for him as I could have for
     one of my own family. I gave him the name and address of myself and the company.
Q. You are still willing to pay the expenses?
A.  Yes sir.
MR. RALPH HIGGINS sworn says:
Direct examination by Mr. Cannon G. Blease:
Q. You are Magistrate of Newberry County?
A.  Yes sir.
Q. What is the speed limit in Newberry County?
A.  45 miles an hour. That was passed this year, 1928, an Act of the General Assembly of 1928.

THE END
 

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