CORONER'S INQUISITION, 1931-1936
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry Court House, Newberry SC in the County and State aforesaid, the 16th day of June A. D., one thousand nine hundred and thirty three before I. H. Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of HATTIE MANGUM of Newberry County then and there being dead by the oaths of M. O. Summer, O. W. Long, J. M. Bouknight, T. H. Longshore, Glenn Jones, J. B. Connelly being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said HATTIE MANGUM came to her death, upon their oaths do say that the said HATTIE MANGUM came to her death at the hands of Gonzalez Magnum by cutting her throat with a knife or some other sharp instrument. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid HATTIE MANGUM came to her death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson, Coroner, aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                                 /s/   I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/   M. O. Summer, foreman (L.S.)

/s/   T. H. Longshore (L.S.)                                                                                         /s/   J. B. Connelly (L.S.)

/s/   J. M. Bouknight (L.S.)                             /s/  Glenn Jones (L.S.)                     /s/   O. W. Long (L.S.)

Inquisition held over the dead body of HATTIE MANGUM, colored, June 16th, 1933

Direct Examination by MR. C. G. BLEASE, Sheriff

SOPHA JUNIAN being duly sworn says:

Q.    What is your name?

A.    Sofa Junian

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    On Mr. Fate Clampís Place.

Q.    Where were you last Saturday night a week ago, June 3rd? Were you along with Gonzalez Mangum and his wife in the road?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Which road? The Belfast Road?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    How far was it from Newberry?

A.    I donít know. It was on Miss Carrie Sennís place.

Q.    In front of Miss Carrie Sennís place?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Where were you walking? In front of them or behind them?

A.    I was in front of them.

Q.    Were you very close to them? About how far in front of them were you?

A.    I was about 70 yards in front of them.

Q.    What did you hear?

A.    I heard a pistol shot.

Q.    How many times did it shoot?

A.    Two times. No it was three times. He shot one time and I looked back and saw two more shots.

Q.    Who was there?

A.    I donít know exactly.

Q.    Where was this woman?

A.    She was along the road.

Q.    She was in the road with Gonzalez Mangum?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Was anyone else along with them?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Did you hear him say anything after it happened?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Where did he go?

A.    He ran out across the fields.

Q.    After you saw the shots what did you see?

A.    He fell on her.

Q.    What did you hear her say?

A.    She said, ďOh Lord Bud, donít kill me.Ē

Q.    Did you go down there?

A.    After she was killed.

Q.    What condition did you find her in? Was she shot?

A.    I thought at first that he had shot her but he had cut her throat. When he fell on top of her I heard her say, ďOh Lord Bud, donít kill me.Ē

Q.    What time was this?

A.    I donít know exactly what time it was. About dusk. It was just light enough for me to see him.

Q.    Where had you been?

A.    We had all been there in John Wilsonís yard and we left and they came on behind us.

Q.    How far was it from John Wilsonís house?

A.    I donít know exactly.

Q.    Just a short distance?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    After he left her what did he do?

A.    He went on down the side of that ditch.

Q.    You heard her say, ďOh Lord Bud, donít kill meĒ?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Have you seen him since?

A.    No sir.

MARIE BURTON being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    On Mr. Ben Abramsí place.

Q.    Were you along with this other woman when this happened?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    In front of them?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You were in front of Bud Mangum and his wife?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    How were they walking along in the road? Was he in front of her or behind her or were they walking along side of each other?

A.    They were walking along together.

Q.    What was the first thing that attracted your attention? What did you hear?

A.    The first thing I heard was the pistol. I could not see him but they said it was Bud Magnum.

Q.    You did not see him walking along side of his wife?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you hear her holler?

A.    Yes sir. She said, ďBud, donít shoot me.Ē

Q.    Did you see her when she fell?

A.    No sir.

Q.    All you heard was ďBud, donít shoot meĒ?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    This happened on last Saturday a week ago, June 3rd, didnít it?

A.    Yes sir.

JURY:

Q.    You were with this woman that just testified?

A.    Yes sir.

MARY LEE WILSON being duly sworn says:

Q.    Were you walking in the road when it happened?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Where were you?

A.    I was at John Wilsonís house when it happened.

Q.    Did you hear a shot?

A.    Yes sir. After I heard the shots I ran on down there.

Q.    Did you see Bud Mangum?

A.    When I got there he took and crossed the road and went in the swamps.

Q.    Did you hear him say anything?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Did you hear her say anything?

A.    I heard her holler, ďOh Lord, Bud donít kill me.Ē

Q.    How long was that before she died?

A.    It was not long.

Q.    Five minutes?

A.    I reckon so. About that long.

JOHN WILSON being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    With Mr. Senn.

Q.    William Senn?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Had they been at your house before this happened?

A.    Yes sir. Gonzales and my sister had been there.

Q.    It was your sister that he killed?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did they leave there together?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Were they having any trouble when they left?

A.    No sir. They went down the road talking.

Q.    Were they fussing?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Did you hear them say anything?

A.    No sir. It happened about 75 yards from my house. I heard her holler, ďOh Lord, Bud donít shoot me.Ē That is all I heard.

Q.    Did you go down there?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Who was there?

A.    All of these people.

Q.    When Gonzales and his wife left your house was anybody with them?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Did you hear her say, "Oh Lord, Bud, donít kill meĒ?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Had they been fussing at your house?

A.    No sir. Gonzales came there about 1:30 when I came in with a load of slabs. He said to me that it sure was hot. I told him it sure was and that he ought to be down there in the woods with me where it was hot sure enough. I did not hear them fussing.

FRANK WILSON being duly sworn says:

Q.    Just go ahead and tell these gentlemen what you know.

A.    I was going down the road in front of Bud Mangum and his wife. I was about 150 feet in front of them. I looked back and saw the pistol when it first shot.

Q.    You saw Bud Mangum with the pistol?

A.    Yes sir. He shot in the bank and she hollered, ďDonít kill me.Ē I started back to meet them. She had started towards us and then turned around. He met her and caught her by the neck. He had the knife in his hand (Indicating)

Q.    He had a knife?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see the knife?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You say he cut her with the knife?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Have you seen him since?

A.    No sir.

DOCTORíS CERTIFICATE:

This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of Hattie Mangum of Newberry County SC and find death was caused by an incised wound of the right side of the throat and neck which severed the vessels. There was also an incised wound of the right hand between the thumb and forefinger.                       6/3/1933                      Frank D. Mower, MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid, the 7th day of July A. D., one thousand nine hundred and thirty three before I. H. Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of FRED WILLIAMS of Columbia, SC then and there being dead by the oaths of S. J. Mayer, W. S. Cameron, E. F. Linely, Troy Rogers, Fred Rodelsperger, J. B. Moore being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said FRED WILLIAMS came to his death, upon their oaths do say that the said FRED WILLIAMS came to his death by falling from a Southern Railroad train on July 4th 1033. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid FRED WILLIAMS came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson, Coroner, aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                                 /s/   I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/   S. J. Mayer, foreman (L.S.)

/s/   W. S. Cameron (L.S.)                                                                                           /s/   E. F. Linely (L.S.)

/s/   J. B. Moore (L.S.)                                     /s/  T. L. Rogers (L.S.)                      /s/   Fred Rodelsperger (L.S.)

Inquisition held over the dead body of FRED WILLIAMS colored, at Newberry SC, on July 7th, 1933

Examination by C. G. BLEASE, Sheriff for Newberry County

LOTTIE BROWN being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    1419 Blossom Street.

Q.    Columbia?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you go on this excursion July 4th?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Where did you get on the train?

A.    Columbia.

Q.    Did this boy get killed going up or coming back?

A.    Going up.

Q.    Fell off the train?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see Fred Williams when he fell?

A.    I looked around and saw his foot.

Q.    Where was he standing?

A.    In the baggage coach.

Q.    He was standing in the baggage coach?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Was anybody close to him?

A.    No sir. There was no one else close to him.

Q.    No one else in the door except him?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Did his foot slip or what happened?

A.    His foot slipped.

Q.    Did anybody push him off?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Was he drinking?

A.    I donít know.

Q.    Was he acting like he was drunk? Was he acting boisterous on the train?

A.    Not that I know of.

Q.    His foot slipped and he fell off the train?

A.    Yes sir.

JOSH LYLES being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    Columbia. 1630 Tobacco Street.

Q.    Did you go [on] this excursion July 4th?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see him when he fell off the train?

A.    No sir. I was acting as Porter on the train and we had orders to keep all doors closed. The last time I saw him he was in the passenger coach. I did not see him fall off the train.

Q.    You did not see him when he fell?

A.    No sir.

Q.    He was in the passenger coach when you saw him?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    When was the next time you saw him?

A.    I did not see him any more. I did not know anything about it until Mr. Street told me about it about Greenwood.

MR. STREET:

Q.    Did you try to keep the passengers off the steps of the coach?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You saw this man?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    What was his condition?

A.    He had apparently been drinking a little.

Q.    Staggering?

A.    Yes sir.

WILLIE SMITH being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    Columbia.

Q.    Who do you work for?

A.    Mr. Long and Mr. Street.

Q.    For the railroad?

A.    No sir.

Q.    What kind of work do you do?

A.    I just work there on the yard.

Q.    Were you on this train?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    What do you know about it?

A.    Mr. Street told me to keep the doors closed and not to let anyone stand in the doors. I went to him and told him to get out of the door. He said that he had paid his damn money and that he would ride where he wanted to. I went and got Mr. Street and Mr. Street ran him out of the door and shut the door. I went on back in the baggage coach and was talking with some of the girls. I did not see him anymore. After awhile Mr. Street told me that he had fallen off the train. That is all I know about it.

MR. R. L. STREET being duly sworn says:

Q.    What do you do Mr. Street?

A.    I am Police for the Southern Railway Company.

Q.    Were you on the train that day?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Just tell the jury what you know.

A.    On leaving Columbia we had a very orderly crowd all the way. The majority of them were church members. After investigation I learned that this manís name was Fred Williams. He had had a drink or two but was not a drunk man. He was orderly except that he wanted to ride in the doorway. I put him out of the door two or three times. Leaving Silverstreet I closed all doors and gave instructions not to let anyone stand in the doors. Willie Smith came to me and said that Red would not stand anywhere else. That he had paid his money and would ride where he wanted. I went back and told him to get out of the door. I closed the trap door. I made a trip through the train and back as far as the baggage car and this woman (Lottie Brown) told me that some man had fallen out of the car. From the description she gave me I knew immediately that it was the man that I had put out of the door. I got in touch with the conductor. That was close to Old Towne. The conductor wired instructions that he had. I do not know what they were. I went all through the train looking to see if anybody else had seen him fall. Lottie Brown was the only one that saw him.

MR. CAUGHMAN:

Q.    Did you go through the train?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Lottie Brown was the only one that saw him?

A.    Yes sir. She was making change and she was looking at the door when he fell. There was no one else at the door at the time.

DOCTORíS CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of Fred Williams of Columbia SC and find he came to his death from a broken neck and fracture of the skull. Left leg crushed off at about the middle third.

7/6/1933                                                                                                                                                             Frank D. Mower, MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid, the 12th day of July A. D., one thousand nine hundred and thirty three before I. H. Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of C. D. CALLOWAY of Newberry SC then and there being dead by the oaths of B. P. Ringer, J. T. Dennis, J. H. Clary Jr., A. C. Mills, J. F. Thompson, J. H. Long being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said C. D. CALLOWAY came to his death, upon their oaths do say that the said C. D. CALLOWAY came to his death by train #12 on the CN&L Railway on July 12th 1933. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid C. D. CALLOWAY came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson, Coroner, aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                                                /s/   I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/   B.P. Ringer, foreman (L.S.)

/s/   J. F. Thompson (L.S.)                                                                                                          /s/   J. H. Clary Jr. (L.S.)

/s/   J. T. Dennis (L.S.)                                                   /s/  J. H. Long (L.S.)                         /s/   A. C. Mills (L.S.)

Inquisition held over the dead body of C. D. CALLOWAY at Newberry SC, on July 12th, 1933

Examination by C. G. BLEASE, Sheriff for Newberry County

Honorable Fred H. Dominick, attorney for the CN&L Railroad present

MR. R. B. SHEALY being duly sworn says:

Q.    You live in Newberry Mr. Shealy?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You run a store at Mollohon Mill donít you?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see this man, Mr. Calloway, this morning when he got killed?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Just tell in your own way just what you saw.

A.    I had opened up this morning and was sitting in the back door reading the paper. I heard the train blow for the first crossing and then I heard it make some short blasts. I looked up and saw this man on the tracks just in front of the train and then the train hit him. I ran through the _ after the train had stopped and saw him lying up the railroad track.

Q.    Was it daylight?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    What time was it?

A.    Just about 6:30 oíclock.

Q.    You heard the whistle blowing?

A.    Yes sir

Q.    Bell ringing?

A.    I would not say.

Q.    Was he blowing like he usually does or like someone was in front of him?

A.    Yes sir, like someone was in front of it.

Q.    Moved like it was warning someone to get off the track?

A.    Yes sir.

MR. C. C. SMITH being duly sworn says:

Q.    You live in Newberry?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Down at Mollohon Mill?

A.    I donít live at the mill. I live at the Columbia Highway.

Q.    Just go ahead and tell these gentlemen what you saw this morning when this man got killed.

A.    I was out delivering my papers and saw him walking along on the railroad tracks. I heard the train blow for the first crossing and then I heard the short blasts and looked and saw the train hit him.

Q.    Where was he walking? In the middle of the track or where?

A.    He was walking at the cross ties at the side. Not in the middle of the track.

Q.    Was he looking back at the train?

A.    No sir.

Q.    You did not see him when the train hit him?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    What part of the train hit him?

A.    The front. The cow-catcher, looked like to me.

Q.    Did you go to him?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Was he conscious?

A.    No sir.

Q.    How was he laying as you came up the railroad? Which way was his head?

A.    His head was on the tracks and feet were away from the tracks.

Q.    Happened in Newberry County?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    This morning?

A.    Yes sir.

MR. DOMINICK:

Q.    How close was the train on him when you saw it?

A.    It was pretty close when I looked around.

MR. BLEASE:

Q.    You heard it blowing for the crossing?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Then you heard it blowing like someone was in the way?

A.    Yes sir. It gave some short blasts.

MR. DOMINICK:

Q.    That was before the train struck him?

A.    Yes sir.

MR. COLIE COOK being duly sworn says:

Q.    Mr. Cook, you live in this county?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    At Mollohon Mill?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Just go ahead and tell what you know about this accident?

A.    Well, I was in the mill this morning and was looking out the window to see how many hobos I could see on the train as it came by. I saw this man walking down the track and I heard the train blowing for the first crossing. Then I heard three or four short blasts. I figured that he was going to get off the track. The fellow then got behind some trees that was between me and the tacks and I could not see the train when it hit him. When the train came out from behind the trees I saw the man lying cross-ways on the cow catcher. Then I saw him begin chocking and the man rolled off. It looked like he was going to roll off right in front of the train but he kinda rolled to the side. I ran down there and Mr. Smith and several men had already got there. He was lying with his face to the ground.

Q.    You heard the train blowing?

A.    Yes sir. I heard it blowing for the first crossing and then it gave several short blows.

Q.    Blowed like something was wrong?

A.    Yes sir.

MR. DOMINICK:

Q.    State whether or not the train had passed the second crossing when it hit him?

A.    No sir. It was above the crossing.

Q.    How far was it from the crossing when it hit him?

A.    I am not much of a judge at distances. I would say 50 yards above the crossing when I saw him go behind the trees. I did not seethe train when it struck him because of the trees that were between us.

Q.    You were in the mill?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You heard some short blows?

A.    Yes sir. Four or five short blows.

Q.    The man could have heard it, couldnít he?

A.    Yes sir. I figured he thought the train was on the other track.

MR. SHEALY recalled:

Q.    How far up the track from the crossing was it that the man got hit?

A.    I would say around 25 yards.

MR. G. W. FOLK being duly sworn says:

Q.    Mr. Folk, you work with the CN&L Railroad?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    In what capacity?

A.    Engineer.

Q.    You were on the train this morning?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Just go ahead in your own way and tell how it happened?

A.    I was approaching Newberry this morning. There are two crossings down there. I blowed the whistle for the first crossing and had blowed several for the second crossing. I saw the man on the track and immediately blowed for him to get off Ė all the time I was getting closer to him. He threw up his hands as if to give me the signal to come on. I made sure that he was going to get off. When I saw that he was not going to get off I immediately put on my brakes but could not stop in time to keep from hitting him. I stopped in about the trainís length. That is about all I can say.

Q.    How far from the crossing was he when you hit him?

A.    I would judge he was 30 or 40 yards.

Q.    What time was it?

A.    About 6:22 or 6:25 oíclock.

MR. DOMINICK:

Q.    You gave all the customary signals?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    How far were you from him when you first saw him?

A.    I saw him as I started blowing for the second crossing. He was walking towards the big crossing.

Q.    He was bound to have heard your warning, wasnít he?

A.    I do not see how he could not have heard it. I was making all the fuss I could.


MR.BLEASE:

Q.    You did all in your power to keep from hitting him?

A.    Yes sir. I did everything I could.

FRANK WILSON, colored, being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    Columbia.

Q.    You are the fireman on this train?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Go ahead and tell what you know about this ting.

A.    I saw the man walking along in the middle of the track when we got to the first crossing. The engineer was blowing the whistle. He blowed for the second crossing a couple of times and then gave some short blasts. The man waved his hand like he was giving us a signal to come on. I thought that he was going to get off the tack. He threw up his hands and walked on.

Q.    Did the engineer blow the whistle?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did he do anything unusual?

A.    He gave a warning signal and put on his brakes.

Q.    Was the man on the side of the track or in the middle?

A.    In the middle of the track.

Q.    How far from him were you when the engineer put on brakes?

A.    I donít know exactly. 30 or 40 feet from him.

Q.    You all picked him up?

A.    I did not go back there.

Q.    The train crew picked him up and carried him to the crossing?

A.    I do not know. I did not go back there.

JOHN KOON being duly sworn says:

Q.    You work for the CN&L RR?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    What is your job?

A.    Brakeman.

Q.    Did you see the man?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Just tell what you know about it.

A.    Mr. George was blowing for the second crossing. Then he gave a couple of short blasts and the man waved his hand for us to come on. We got about 30 or 40 feet from him and Mr. George put on his emergency brake. He did not look back. I saw his lunch box go up in the air.

Q.    The engineer put on the emergency brake?

A.    Yes sir.

H. J. ROPER being duly sworn says:

Q.    You are the conductor on the train?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Tell what you know about this accident.

A.    The only thing I know about it is that all at once the brakes went down. I was on the left hand side. I saw several people running toward the train and knew that something had happened. I looked out and saw this man on the ground. I did not hear the whistle blowing on account of the fuss on the car. The first thing I knew of it the brakes went down.

Q.    How far do you think the train went after hitting the man?

A.    About twenty cars after hitting the man.

Q.    What did you do?

A.    Called for an ambulance to take him to the hospital. I started getting the evidence and witnesses.

Q.    Took him to the hospital?

A.    Yes sir.

W. H. BROWDER being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    At Mollohon Mill.

Q.    Did you see the man?

A.    I saw him on the cow catcher.

Q.    Go ahead and tell what you know about it.

A.    I came out of the mill this morning about 5:50 and was sitting out there to watch the bums when the train came along. He blowed for the first crossing and then gave a short blast. I saw the man on the cow-catcher and jumped up and ran out there. The man was laying on the side of the track.

Q.    It happened in the county?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you hear the whistle blowing?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Unusual?

A.    Yes sir.

D. G.WHITE being duly sworn says:

Q.    Did you see this man when he got killed?

A.    No sir.

Q.    Did you hear the train blowing?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Blowing for the crossing?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you hear any unusual blows?

A.    Yes sir. Three or four short blows. I ran out there and found the man laying by the track.

DOCTORíS CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that I have this day examined the dead body of C. D. Calloway of Newberry SC and find that he came to his death from a fracture of the base of the skull. There were also cuts on his left elbow, over the right eye and the left side of the head and a compound fracture of the left leg just above the ankle.              7/12/1933       Frank D. Mower, MD

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA

COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry Court House in the County and State aforesaid, the 26th day of August A. D., one thousand nine hundred and thirty three before I. H. Wilson, Coroner, upon view of the body of CLARENCE WORTHY of Newberry SC then and there being dead by the oaths of W. P. Lominick, J. S. Shannon, O. W. Bundrick, T. J. Price, W. H. McCullough, J. E. Sease being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the state of South Carolina, where and by what means the said CLARENCE WORTHY came to his death, upon their oaths do say that the said CLARENCE WORTHY came to his death by being struck by an automobile driven by R. M. Saverance on August 26, 1933 and was an unavoidable accident. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say that the aforesaid CLARENCE WORTHY came to his death by means and manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, I. H. Wilson, Coroner, aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.                                                                 /s/   I. H. Wilson, Coroner (L.S.)

/s/   O. W. Bundrick, foreman (L.S.)

/s/   W. P. Lominick (L.S.)                                                                                          /s/   J. E. Sease (L.S.)

/s/   T. J. Price (L.S.)                                        /s/  J. S. Shannon (L.S.)                    /s/   W. H. McCullough (L.S.)

Inquisition held over the dead body of CLARENCE WORTHY colored, of Newberry SC, on August 26th 1933

Examination by C. G. BLEASE, Sheriff

MR. CLAUDE PRICE being duly sworn says:

Q.    Mr. Price, you live in this county?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see this accident?

A.    Yes sir, I saw it.

Q.    Just go ahead and tell these gentlemen about it. You were coming towards Newberry?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You were on the other side of the road when it happened?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You were coming towards Newberry. Just go ahead and tell what was in front of you.

A.    There was a Ford Touring or Roadster in front of me. The Negro was standing on the fender and when they got to the cross road he jumped off. There was a car coming from toward Columbia. He stepped right in front of the car and it killed him. The car was about 30 feet away when the Negro got off. If I had been driving the car I would have done the same thing.

MR. QUATTLEBAUM:

Q.    Which way was the Negro looking when he got off?


A.    He was looking down toward Mr. Suberís station. Seems that when the car got right on him he made the jump.

Q.    Was he on the pavement?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    How far across the pavement was he?

A.    He was pretty bear in the middle of the pavement.

Q.    How far would you say that the car was from him that killed him when he jumped off?

A.    About thirty feet.

Q.    Which side of the car was he on?

A.    He was standing on the right hand side of the car.

Q.    The car that he jumped off of was coming to town?

A.    It turned and went down the road.

Q.    How fast was the car running that hit him?

A.    Around 35 or 40 miles an hour.

Q.    Did he swerve the car?

A.    I donít think he could have. He was trying to stop.

LUTHER MOSS being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you get your mail?

A.    Union SC. Blackson-Gaines Street, No. 19

Q.    Did you see this accident?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Where were you going?

A.    To Union

Q.    Just go ahead and tell how you saw this thing happen.

A.    We were behind the car that hit him. The Negro was on the right hand side of the car and he jumped off of this other car and he knocked him down.

Q.    Which way was he headed? Back towards Newberry? Was he going towards Newberry?

A.    He was looking back down the road from us.

Q.    Which way was the car going that killed him?

A.    It was going toward Union.

MR. WILSON:

Q.    Were you in the car that hit him?

A.    No sir, I was in the other car behind it.

MR. QUATTLEBAUM:

Q.    Do you know about what part of the road the Negro was in when he got hit?

A.    Just about half way of the road.

Q.    Half way across the pavement?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    How far from the car was the Negro when he got off the fender?

A.    I donít know.

Q.    Was it about as far as 25 yards?

A.    Something like that. Yes sir.

Q.    How fast was the car running?

A.    Just about 40 miles an hour.

Q.    How much?

A.    40 miles an hour.

JOE BEARD being duly sworn says:

MR. WILSON

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    Union SC, 98 West Main Street.

Q.    Just go ahead and tell what you know about this accident?

A.    I was driving. The car was in front of me. All I know is that this Negro was in the middle of the road when this fellow hit him.

Q.    You were behind his car?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    You did not see the Negro before he hit him?

A.    I was not paying any attention. I know he stepped out in front of him.

VASTUS BEARD being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    Union SC, 98 West Main Street.

Q.    Did you hear the testimony of Mr. Price?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see it as he saw it?

A.    I was in the car with these other two boys that just testified. I saw it just like they did.

FRED MOSS being duly sworn says:

Q.    Where do you live?

A.    Blacken-Gaines Street, No. 19, Union SC.

Q.    Did you hear Mr. Price testify?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see anything that he did not see?

A.    No sir.

Q.    How fast was he running?

A.    About 40 miles per hour.

A. W. WILLINGHAM being duly sworn says:

Q.    Did you hear Mr. Price testify?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did you see the thing like he said it was?

A.    Yes sir. Except when he got right on him he tried to dodge him.

Q.    About how fast would you say he was going?

A.    About 40 miles an hour. Like anyone else would do on a main highway.

A. O. WILLINGHAM being duly sworn says:

Q.    Did you see the thing?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Like Mr. Price saw it?

A.    Yes sir. He tried to dodge him, otherwise what Mr. Price said is correct.

Q.    Did the car run over him?

A.    No sir.

Q.    How did he fall? On his back?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Did he move any afterwards?

A.    No sir. I donít think he moved after he was hit. He made a little fuss with his mouth and that was all.

Q.    Happened in Newberry County?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    On the 26th day of August 1933?

A.    Yes sir.

R. M. SAVERANCE makes the following statement:

The only thing I would like to say is that I was driving about 40 miles an hour. I saw him when he first stepped off the car and I gave two short blows and then a long one. He was looking at the filling station. When I got within about 6 feet of him he made kind of a jump and went on the head of the car and broke the windshield.

Q.    You put on the brakes?

A.    Yes sir. I did everything I could to keep from hitting him.

Q.    Where were you going?

A.    I was going back to work at Middleton Ohio. I had been down in Florence County visiting my people.

Q.    Were you by yourself?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    What kind of car were you driving?

A.    A Ford, 4-door sedan, 1930 model.

Q.    You did everything in your power to keep from hitting him?

A.    Yes sir. I did everything I could. I swerved at the last minute to keep from hitting him. I regret it very much.

Q.    What is your home address?

A.    Cordesville SC.

Q.    What is your address in Ohio?

A.    1910 Queen Ave. Middleton Ohio.

Q.    Are you married or single?

A.    I am Single.

Q.    How old are you?

A.    27

Q.    Your people live in this state?

A.    Yes sir. I am still a citizen of this state.

Q.    What kind of work do you do?

A.    I am an electrical engineer.

DOCTORíS CERTIFICATE

Newberry SC

August 26, 1933

I have examined the body of Clarence Worthy. In my opinion death was caused by a fracture of the base of the skull from a blow on the back of his head.                                                                                                              R. W. Houseal
 

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