CORONER'S INQUISITION, 1967-1980
Book 6
NEWBERRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Transcribed and contributed by Edith Greisser

THE STATE 0F SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry in the County and State afore­said, the 2nd day of February A. D., one thousand nine hundred and sixty-eight before GEORGE R. SUMMER, Coroner, upon view of the body of Thomas Lee Butler, then and there being dead by the oaths of Jesse J. Ouzts, Carroll Bouknight, Virgil C. Bouknight, Lewis R. Cromer, William T. Boozer and Ronald W. Cromer, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Thomas Lee Butler came to his death, upon their oaths, do say he came to his death as results of an automobile accident in a car driven by Monroe Huskey. We recommend that Monroe Huskey be held for Grand Jury investigation. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid Thomas Lee Butler came to his death in the manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, GEORGE R. SUMMER, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, so say, that the aforesaid Thomas Lee Butler carne to his death in the manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, GEORGE R. SUMMER, Coroner aforesaid, the jurors afore­said, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ George R. Summer, Coroner (L.S.)
          /s/ Jesse J. Ouzts, Foreman (L.S.)

/s/ Carroll Bouknight (L.S.)

/s/ Virgil C. Bouknight (L.S.)                                                 /s/ William T. Boozer (L.S.)

/s/ Lewis R. Cromer (L.S.)                                                   /s/ Ronald W. Cromer (L.S.)

PROCEEDINGS

CORONER SUMMER: Will the foreman of the jury stand and be sworn?
(Whereupon, the foreman of the jury, and members of the jury, were duly sworn.)

CORONER SUMMER: Mr. Foreman and Gentlemen of the Jury, this is an inquisition into the death of Thomas Butler. It is now your duty to listen to the testimony we have to offer in this case, and from this testimony, you will arrive at how Thomas Butler came to his death. If you find someone else responsible for his death, you will recommend in this verdict that they be held for Grand Jury investigation.

CLYDE MOODY, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.   State your full name, please, sir.

A.    Clyde Moody.

Q.   On January 4, this year, Mr. Moody, just in your own words, just tell these gentlemen of the jury just
       what you know about this case of Thomas Butler.

A.    Well, should I start from the beginning, what happened at school?

Q.   Yes, at the beginning.

A.    Maybe--could I suggest that the boy I brought with me cou1d testify and then it would lead up to my testifying that Monroe Huskey was the operator of the car.

Q.  That would be all right. What is his name?

A.    Lamar Morris.

Q.   That was the boy who saw him leave?

A.    Yes, sir.

CORONER SUMMER: All right.

LAMAR MORRIS, being duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    State your full name.

A.    Lamar Milton Morris.

Q.    On January 4 this year, Lamar, go ahead and tell these gentlemen of the jury just what you know about this case of Thomas Butler?

A.    Well, I work in the mechanic shop of the school. I was sitting down by the stove. I saw the car come by,

       Somebody was driving fast. I looked in the car and saw two boys were in the car. I didn't know whether

some people carne to pet the car or whether the boys carried the car or not. At the time I had a toothache, so I went to get me a couple of aspirin. I went up there and she was knocking on the door. She told me to run tell Mr. Moody that Monroe stole her car.

Q.    Who stole the car?

A.    Monroe Huskey. She was locked in at the time.

Q.    That's a lady who works there at the school that you all go to?

A.    She's       a nurse.

Q.    Was this boy driving the car at that time?

A.    Monroe Huskey was driving the car.

Q.    Do you know who else was with him?

A.    Thomas Butler.

Q.    Is there anything else you can tell us about it?

A.    That's about all I know.

CORONER SUMMER: All right, that's all. Thank you.            (Witness Excused.)

CLYDE MOODY, having been previously sworn, resumed the stand and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.     All right, go ahead and tell these gentlemen what happened.

A.    Lamar came into the office all out of breath, telling me that the nurse was locked in the office and that Monroe

        Huskey had taken her station wagon, and that Thomas Lee was with him, too and that she was locked in the infirmary and that we only had four keys for the infirmary, master keys. I had one, so I went to the infirmary and unlocked the door for her and she told me, that was our nurse, told me that Monroe and some other boy, she didn't know who he was at that particular time, had taken her car--had stolen her car and that he had been acting peculiar that morning and that he had told some of the other boys around the school that big things would happen on that particular day.

Knowing that he was from just out of Gaffney and that Thomas Lee was from Spartanburg, that they would possibly take 1-26, so I came back up and got in my car and proceeded west on 1-26 and just west of the weight station that is from here would be the left and the furtherest weight station from Newberry, I could see the station wagon at a distance. I thought I recog­nized it and I came on up at a distance behind the station wagon. Of course it was weaving all on the road and later I found out at the weight station there had been turned in several complaints about the way this vehicle was being operated from 176 after it come on 1-26 and I wanted to see who was operating the car, so I came up in the left lane, switched lanes into the left lane. I could see it was Monroe Huskey and he, being in the school two time and being a hospital boy, I would easily recognize him before I would some of the others. I dropped back and my plans were to follow the car until it ran out of gas or maybe see a highway patrolman and get him to apprehend the car or assist in apprehension of the car. We rode--1 guess the accident occurred, I'm not positive,  I think a little less than a mile in Newberry County on highway 1-26 and the car went over to the left of the center and all of a sudden it went into a spin, the right side, I could see the right side, could see Thomas Lee, then it switched back to the left, then I could see Monroe. Then the next time it turned, it went off the highway and down the fill, and we were driving approximately 80 miles an hour at the time this skid took place. Then I went on past, when the car went down the fill, and I backed up then and I could see there was smoke coming from the car. I thought maybe it might be on fire, then I saw Monroe get out from the driver's side and around the door, he did not try to assist the boy, Thomas Lee Butler at all. He went on across a fence, jumped the fence and I called to Monroe. I said "Monroe, come back and let's help me with this boy, I believe he's hurt", and no response. I talked with the boy, he asked me to move his head, that he couldn't move. This was Thomas Lee Butler that I was talking with. I said no, and having experience as an ex-highway patrolman, I knew it was not advisable to move a person in a condition of this type. Several motorists came by and I asked them to contact the Highway Pa­trol, get an ambulance and to take the boy to the hospital. He told me before he died and while he was in the emergency room in Columbia Hospital that Monroe planned the whole thing, to steal the car and they were going to Spartanburg first and then on to Gaffney. This is about as much as I could tell you. Monroe was driving the car. He was the operator.

Q.    What kind of car was this?

A.    I believe it was a '61 Chevrolet station wagon.

Q.    Approximately what time was this when this happened, when he stole the car from the school?

A.    I'm not positive, but I would say it was a little after nine o'clock.

Q.    That was in the A. M.?

A.    Yes, sir, A. M., 4th of January. I would think that the accident happened, I feel sure, somewhere just a little after ten oíclock.

CORONER SUMMER:  Any questions you gentlemen would like cleared up?

JUROR:  Is his name Huskey? How do you spell that?

THE WITNESS: Monroe Huskey, H-U-S-K-E-Y

CORONER SUMMER: That will be all.                        (Witness Excused.)

DAVID B. WARDLAW, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your full name?

A.    David B. Wardlaw.

Q.    What position do you hold, Mr. Wardlaw?

A.    South Carolina State Highway Patrol, stationed in Newberry County.

Q.    Mr. Wardlaw, on January 4th, this year, did you get a call to investigate a wreck on 1-26?

A.    No, sir, I didn't get a call. I was patrolling 1-26 and I came upon the wreck about five or ten minutes

       after it happened.

Q.    Just in your own works, Mr. Wardlaw, just go ahead and tell these gentlemen of the jury what your
       investigation was.

A.    I was headed east on Highway 1-26 about 10:10 or 10:15 on Thursday morning, January 4th of this year. As I

       Came over the hill just below the rest area, westbound lane, I saw several cars parked on the shoulder of the road and several people standing up. I crossed over and came back up to the group of cars and people and a gentleman who identified himself as Mr. Moody with the State Industrial School told me that a wreck had just taken place, the car was down the embankment and two escapees from the school were in the car, and that one of them was in the car hurt very seriously, and asked me if I would call an ambulance. I radioed, got an ambulance from Newberry Hospital to come down. I walked down to the car then and saw a person lying in the car who I later found out to be Thomas Lee Butler. He was semi-conscious at that time, groaning. He was lying with his feet facing the driver's side and his head, against the right door and he seemed to be in great pain. We didn't attempt to move him because we feared that his neck was broken. I walked back up and talked to Mr. Moody and asked him who else was in the car. He said there was another boy, Monroe Huskey. I asked if he knew which one was the driver of the car. He told me yes, he had seen the accident take place, that Monroe Huskey was the driver, and after the accident, Monroe jumped out and ran down to the woods.

I went back to the radio and called them for SLED bloodhounds and to the Sheriff's office in Newberry to request some help from the deputies. In the meantime, the ambulance arrived, we loaded him in the ambulance and took him to the Baptist Hospital in Columbia at the request of Mr. Moody, and shortly after the ambulance arrived, the bloodhounds arrived with SLED agents and two Newberry County deputies arrived. We began looking for Monroe Huskey then, and the time of this accident was approximately 10:05 a.m. and it was raining. The highway was wet and slick and about, I believe two o'clock, we apprehended Monroe with the use of bloodhounds. He had run back and forth several miles, doubling back over his trail in the woods. At one time one of the dogs had caught up with him and he tied the dog to the tree and left him. We came upon the dog tied up, untied him and later picked him up, apprehended him about two o'clock and brought him to the Newberry County jail and placed him in jail.

Q.    I believe you stated the b0y was taken to the Baptist Hospital, I believe it was the Columbia hospital

A.    Oh, I was thinking it was the Baptist. He was taken to Columbia to the hospital.

Q.    What day did he die after he was carried to Columbia hospital?

A.    I believe he died at 10:55 a. m. January 8, which would be four days and almost an hour.

Q.    This happened in Newberry County?

A.    Yes, sir, about six-tenths of a mile inside Newberry County.

Q.    Anything else you can tell us Mr. Wardlaw?

A.    Well, I can describe how the accident happened. Just like Mr. Moody said, they skidded off the  highway, down an embankment and hit a tree

Q.    What model car was this?

A.    1961 Chevrolet station wagon, owned by Rudine Lee Johnson, Columbia.

CORONER SUMMER: That will be all.                    (Witness Excused.)

CORONER SUMMER: This is the doctor's statement:

30 January 1968     Re: Thomas Butler. This 15-year-old male was injured in an automobile accident on 4 January 1968. He suffered a fracture/dis­location of C-5, with resulting quadriplegia and ascending myelitis. This resulted in his death on January 1969."                                                                    /s/     W. William Ledyard, M. D.

Mr. Foreman and Gentlemen of the jury, this is all we have to offer in this case. It is now your duty to retire to the jury room to pass your verdict on how Thomas Butler came to his death. (Whereupon the jury retired and after deliberation returned to the courtroom and delivered the following verdict, concurred in by all jurors).

ďThomas Lee Butler came to his death as results of an automobile accident in a car driven by Monroe Huskey. We recommend that Monroe Huskey be held for a Grand Jury investigation.

(Whereupon the inquest in the afore mentioned matter was concluded.)

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY 0F NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION indented, taken at Newberry in the County and State aforesaid, the 2nd day of February A. D., one thousand nine hundred and sixty-eight before GEORGE R. SUMMER, Coroner, upon view of the body of Al­berta Goree, then and there being dead by the oaths of R. Vernon Boozer, William T. Boozer, Virgil Bouknight, Carroll Bouknight, Lewis R. Cromer, and Bobby R. Nichols, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Alberta Goree came to her death, upon their oaths, do say she came to her death as the result of a gunshot wound. We recommend that Hubert Goree be held for Grand Jury investigation. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid Alberta Goree came to her death in the manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS Whereof, I, GEORGE R. SUMMER, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set our hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ George R. Summer, Coroner, (L.S.)

/s/ R. Vernon Boozer, Foreman, (L.S.)

/s/ William T. Boozer (L.S.)

/s/ Virgil Bouknight (L.S.)                                           /s/ Lewis R. Cromer (L.S.)

/s/ Carroll Bouknight (L.S.)                                         /s/ Bobby R. Nichols (L.S.)

PROCEEDINGS

CORONER SUMMER: Will the foreman of the jury stand to be sworn? (Whereupon, the foreman of the jury, and members of the jury, were duly sworn.)

CORONER SUMMER: Mr. Foreman and Gentlemen of the Jury, this is an inquisition into the death of Alberta Goree. It is your duty now to listen to the testimony we have to offer in this case, and from this testimony you will arrive at how Alberta Goree came to her death. If you find that some one else other than the deceased is responsible for her death, you will recommend in this verdict that they be held for Grand Jury investigation.

L. L. HENDERSON, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your full name, sir?

A.    L. L. Henderson.

Q.    What position do you hold, Mr. Henderson?

A.    Deputy Sheriff, Newberry County.

Q.    Mr. Henderson, on the 25th of last month, did you have a call to investigate a shooting down near Pomaria?

A.    Yes, I did.

Q.    Go ahead and tell these gentlemen of the jury just what your in­vestigation was.

A.    We got down to Hubert Goree's house, which is on Highway 176, just before you get to Pomaria and we found

        His wife dead in the yard. Hubert was out in the yard with Magistrate Shealy down at Pomaria, Tallye Hugh's shed. They were out in the yard a little closer to the road. In talking to Hubert Goree, he said he and his wife had been having some trouble for, well, he said ever since they had been married, but the day before they had some trouble about a pistol, so he said and he said that he hadnít been home in two nights until that day, he came home and he had gone in the house and was shaving and he said he heard a rifle shoot out in the front yard and he looked out and saw it was his wife out there had this .22 caliber rifle. He said he picked up another rifle that was there in the house and went out and told her, said, ďCome on back in the house, you donít know what you are doing out here and said he turned and when he did he heard the rifle fire again and he just whirled around and shot and killed his wife.

Q.    About what time of day was this, Mr. Henderson?

A.    It was in the afternoon, just what time I wouldn't be able to say because I was at home at lunch when I got the

        call and of course I hurriedly went on over to Charles Senn's house and picked him up. Naturally, I didn't take time to notice what time it was; just a little after noon, I would say.

Q.    What kind of rifle was it he shot her with, Mr. Henderson?

A.    He was shooting a .22 automatic, and the rifle that was lying up near where she was lying was a .22 bolt action.

Q.    Was this body still lying there when you pot there?

A.    No, sir, the ambulance had beat us there and they had loaded her up and were there in the yard when we
        drove in.

Q.    Did they tell you what position she was lying in?

A.    Tallye Hugh Shealy, the magistrate down there, told me that she was lying with her feet sort of toward the house and her head was in a westerly direction from the house, I would say northwesterly.

Q.    Did he say whether she was on her back, side or stomach, how she was?

A     No, sir, he didn't.

Q.    Did you find any cartridges there where her body had been lying?

A.    Yes, sir, we found one spent cartridge where she was lying and two down right close to where Hubert
        Goree said that he was standing.­

        Q.    Mr. Henderson, after you picked up this rifle that was lying there supposedly where she was lying, did you
        examine it to see whether it was ready to shoot again or not?

A.    Yes, sir, it was a bolt action, and of course he told me that he heard her shoot in the yard then when he went out and as he turned, she shot again, so I had found one spent cartridge and I couldn't find another one so I looked in to see because in a bolt action if she had been shot imme­diately at the time she shot then of course the spent cartridge would pro­bably be in the rifle, but it wasnít a spent one, it was a loaded one.

Q.           You have to reject it by the bolt?                                   .

A.    That is right. As it pulls the empty out, it pushes another full one in.

Q.    Well, from the way you found this bullet, could you tell whether or not she was maybe headed this way or was she facing him? Which way did it throw the bullet? Do you remember which side of the body?

A.    It would have been to the right of her in both events, his were to the right of where he was standing, both of those empties were to the right.

Q.   Then that would kind of point that she was facing him when she fired or facing toward the house?

A.    It would indicate to me that she was, yes, sir.

Q.    Well, where he was standing, where did you find the bullets?

A.    Well, they were to the right of where he said he was standing. Of course the rifle he was shooting it would eject

        itself because it was an automatic.

Q.   About how far was the distance between where he shot and she was standing?

A.    Well, about where he told me he was, to where she was, was about as far as from here to that little place that

       Comes out in the wall yonder.

Q.   How far was he from the house?

A.    I would say about as far as from here to you.

Q.   After he shot her, what did he do then, Mr. Henderson?

A.    He said that he went over to Tallye Hugh Shealy's and told Tallye Hugh that he had shot his wife, and of course Tallye Hugh called up here and we went down there.

Q.    This shooting took place in Newberry County, did it not?

A.    Yes, sir.

CORONER SUMMER: Any questions you gentlemen would like to ask?

BY JUROR: Could you tell whether she was shot from the front, rear, or side?

THE WITNESS: She was loaded when I got there. Now I had some information that she was shot over the eye. They already had her in the ambulance and of course I didn't go in the ambulance to see, that maybe the doctor's report will probably explain that.

CORONER SUMMER: Is there anything else you could tell us?

THE WITNESS: No, sir, I believe that's it.

CORONER SUNMER: All right, thank you.                            (Witness Excused.)

BESSIE MAYER, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your full name?

A.    Bessie Mayer.

Q.    Bessie, where do you live?

A.    Pomaria.

Q.    Do you live close to where Hubert Goree and his wife lived?

A.    Right next door.

Q.    Did you see anything on that day of the shooting?

A.    I seen them out there in the yard scrambling, then they went back in the house. After then, she come back out in the front yard and made a shot. He came out on the porch and told her come on back, she didnít know what she was doing. He went to go back up the steps and she made a shot and he turned around and made one.

Q.    Where were you when this took place?

A.    Down at my house hanging out clothes.

Q.    You could see them real good from where you were?

A.    Yes.

Q.    Did you see her with a gun?

A.    Yes, sir, she had a gun.

Q.    Did you see him with a gun?

A.    I just seen him--I didn't see him when he come out with it, but he had it.

Q.        When you saw him he was already in the yard with the gun?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    And this Alberta Goree, she wasn't running from the house?
A.    She wasn't running when I seen her.

Q.    She was facing Hubert Goree?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Did she shoot at him or in the air or how did she do this shooting!
A.    When I saw her, she had shot. I couldn't see so good because it was a big old tree there between my house and
        their house, but I could hear the shot.

Q.    You couldn't tell which way she shot?

A.    I couldn't tell which way she shot.

Q.    Could you see him real good?

A.    He was standing up in the yard.

Q.    Could you see him good enough to tell, was he shooting at her?

A.    I couldn't see good enough to see what he was shooting at.

Q.    How far were you from these people? The length of this court room or further than that?

A.    My clothes wire, it ain't in their yard, but it's right next to their house.

Q.    Is it the length of this courtroom?

A.    Right along in there where those people are sitting.

Q.    You were that close to them?

A.    I was about way back behind yonder, back in that corner, like.

Q.    Where you were standing, you were about as far as to the back of the courthouse?

A.    Yes, sir. That's about all I know because I run over to another girl's house and told them and I ran on up to the store. That's about all I know.

Q.    Were they tussling together before they got these rifles? You said you saw them arguing out there in the yard.

A.    In the yard, yes, sir.

Q.    Did they throw each other on the ground, or anything like that?

A.    No, they didn't fall on the ground.

Q.    When you saw them tussling, did you see him take a baseball bat or some object from Alberta?

A.    He took it from her but he didn't hit her with it.

Q.    I asked did you see him take it from her.

A.    I saw him take it from her.

Q.    But Alberta is the one had the baseball bat?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    And he taken it from Alberta. All right, is that all you can tell us?

A.    That's all I know.

CORONER SUMMER: All right, thank you.                           (Witness Excused)

DOROTHY ANN MAYER, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    Where were you the day of the shooting?

A.    I was in the house but my mama called me.

Q.    You were in the house and your mother called you?

A.    Yes.

Q.    Did you see any of this shooting?

A.    Yes, sir, some of it.

Q.    You saw both of them?

A.    Yes.

Q.    Well, just tell these gentlemen what you saw?

A     When I saw her she was coming out of the door with a gun. She made a shot, and her husband, he was out there on the porch shaving and he heard the shot. He come to the door and he kind of tell her to put down the gun and she wouldn't put it down. He come out the door and asked her to put it down again. She wouldn't. He started back in the house and she made a shot and he turned around and shot. When I saw her she was falling to the ground.

Q.   When he came out of the house he had a gun too?

A.    Yes.

Q.   Was he facing him whenever he shot her?

A.    Yes.

Q.   Could you tell whether she shot at him? When she made her shot, did she shoot at him or up in the sir or what?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    You couldn't see how she shot?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    All you know, you heard a shot.

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Did you see any fussing or anything between them before the shooting took place?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    Do you live next door to the Goree's house?

A.    Yes.

Q.    You said your mother called you out of the house, were you in the house looking out the window when you first saw them?

A.    I was looking at TV.

Q.    Looking at TV?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Well, how did you see them? You said you saw them.

A.    She called me outdoors.

Q.    Oh, she called you outdoors, then you saw them?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    You say you heard the shot from Alberta Goree?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Yet you say you didn't see them. How do you know she shot?

A.    I saw her with a gun.

Q.    Yes, but if you see her with a gun, that doesn't say she shot.  You heard a shot, but if you could see her with the gun, couldn't you tell whether or not she shot?

A.    Yeah.

Q.    You said while ago you didn't see her shoot the gun. Did you see her shoot the rifle?

A.    Yes.

Q.    Which way did she shoot?

A.    I don't know which way she shot.

Q.    Could you tell whether she was shooting at Hubert?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    Yet you know she shot?

A.    Yes.

Q.    How far apart was Hubert and Alberta, was it the length of this counter here or closer than that?

A.    Closer than that.

Q.    Was it as far as from you to the chair there? That close? I'm not trying to mess you up, Iím just trying to establish whether or not you saw her shoot the rifle or not. You say you saw her with the rifle and you heard a shot. Do you know that it was her rifle that shot the shot?

A.    Yes.

Q     Could it have been the other rifle shooting?

A.    It was her rifle because she had started back in the house.

Q.    And then she shot?

A.    Yes, sir, that's all I saw.

Q.    Well, could you see her at this time when she was shooting?

A.    Yes.

Q.    Hubert, after he told her that she didn't know what she was doing, to come on back in the house, did he turn around completely and head back toward the house? You said she shot then he whirled around and shot her, was he headed hack towards the house?

A.    Yes.

Q.    How many times did he shoot?

A.    One, I think.

Q.    I want you to tell what you heard or saw, not what somebody else said. Is that all you can tell us?

A.    Yeah.

CORONER SUMMER:       All right, thank you.                      (Witness Excused.)

JANIE MAE WHEELER, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your full name?

A.    Janie Mae Wheeler.

Q.    Janie Mae, on January 25th this year, where were you at the time of the shooting?

A.    I was at the house next door from her. I was in the back room cleaning up. I heard two shots and ran to the door but I don't know who made the two shots or what and I seen her when she fell. She was facing the ground when I seen her.

Q.    Did she fall face down, over like this?

A.    No, slanting like this.

Q.    She was falling like that?

A.    She was falling like this.

Q.    Oh, falling forward?

A.    Yes.

Q.,   Well, you didn't actually see the shooting then?

A.    No.

Q.    You just heard two shots?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    That's all the shots you heard, just two?

A.    That's all.

Q.    You didn't hear any other shots any other time?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    Did you hear any fussing between these two?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    Did you see her with a rifle when she was falling?

A.    No, sir, she didn't have no rifle in her hand when she was fal­ling.

Q.    She didn't have a rifle in her hand when she was falling?

A.    No, sir, I didn't see one.

Q.    Did you see a rifle after she fell?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Where was it?

A.    It was lying on the ground.

Q.    Beside her?

A.    Yes, sir, near her.

Q.    Near her? How far from her was it? Was it just a small distance, a foot, two feet?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Like she fell this way, which side was the rifle on?

A.    The rifle was laying on the left side of her.
Q.    Laying on the left side of her?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Did you go up there where she was lying?

A.    I went up there after Hubert had left the house, to get my clothes off the wire.

Q.    You had your clothes on their clothes line?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Did you get close to her where she was shot?

A.    I didn't get too close; about as far from here to that chair.

Q.    You didn't see her with a rifle when she was falling?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    How quick did you get out of the house after you heard the two shots?
A.    Time I heard the two shots, I ran to the window and peeped out.
Q.    Where was Hubert when you peeped out?

A.    He was just leaving the yard going back in the house.

Q.    Did he have a rifle?

A.    Yes.

Q.    You only heard two shots?

A.    Two shots is all I heard.

Q.    Hubert's house is like this, and you live below, or across or how?

A.    Right across just a little below there.

Q.    Right across the street just below?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    From the time you heard the shots and you got out there, how much time do you think it took you?

A.     Talking about going up there?

Q.    Yes.

A.    I didn't go up there right then. I waited ten or fifteen minutes before I went up there.

Q.    You didn't go out of the house at first?

A.    No, sir.

Q.    You were just looking out of the window?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    These two shots you heard, were they close together, or one shot, then later another?

A.     No, sir, they were right behind each other.

Q.   Just bop-bop, just like that?

A.    Yes.

Q.   When you first heard the shot and you were looking out the window and you saw her falling and you didnít see a rifle when she was falling, but after you got there, you saw this rifle beside her. Did you look out the window the whole 15 minutes time?

A.    No sir.

Q.   Were you away from these people that somebody else could have done something without you seeing it? I mean, could anybody have, say, put a rifle up there beside her without your seeing it?

A.    I donít know sir. I didnít see anyone put one there.

Q.   That is what I am trying to establish. You said you went out there in about 15 minutes. Were you looking all this time and could see everything that was going on?

A.    Yes sir, from the time I was to the window.

Q.   And when you came out of the house, you just came from that room out of the back of the house, or the front?

A.    I was standing at the window. I stood there a long time and then I came out the house and went over there and got my clothes.

Q.   You didnít see a rifle, you didnít see anybody put a rifle or anything up there where she was?

A.    No sir

Q.   Well, when he turned around, you said, after the shooting, did he go back in the house?

A.    Yes sir, he went back in the house after she had fallen.

Q.   When he went in the house, did he stay in the house any length of time?

A.    He stayed in there about five or ten minutes before he came back out.

Q.   What did he do when he came back out?

A.    Got in his car and went somewhere. I donít know where he went.

Q.   Did he have the rifle with him?

A.    No sir.

Q.   After he came out of the house, before he got in the car, did he go up there where his wife was?

A.    Yes sir, he went and put his hand to feel her heart beat and then he went and got in the car.

Q.    He had been in the house, when he first shot, did he go near the body at that time?

A.    No, sir, he went in the house.

Q .   Just turned around and went back in the house?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    When he came back out of the house he went up to the body and felt her heart to see if it was beating?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Then he got in the car and drove off, is that right?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Was he carrying anything when he went to the body?

A.    I didn't see him with nothing.

Q.    Could you see his hands real good?

A.    Yes, sir.

CORONER SUMMER:       All right, thank you.                      (Witness Excused.)

L. L. HENDERSON, having been previously sworn, was examined and testified further as fol­lows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    The gentlemen of the jury would like to ask you some questions.

A.    All right.

BY JUROR: I believe you stated that there was two spent rounds near Hubert?

THE WITNESS: Two where he said he was standing, yes, sir.

BY JUROR: And a spent round and a live round in the chamber by her body?

THE WITNESS: That's right.

BY JUROR: The rifle she had had a live round in the chamber?

THE WITNESS: Yes, sir.

BY JUROR: During your investigation, did you ask him or did you hear how many times Hubert said he fired a rifle?

THE WITNESS: I believe we can put Charles Senn on the stand and he can testify as to the amount of times he said he fired. The reason I can't do that is because Goree was showing Charles some stuff down there while I was up making investigation, and when I found the spent one next to the woman and of course Goree told him some things that he didn't tell me and that is one of the things.

CORONER SUMMER: All right, thank you.                                     (Witness Excused.)

CHARLES SENN, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your name, sir?

A.    Charles Senn

Q.    What position do you hold, Mr. Senn?

A.    Deputy Sheriff, Newberry County.

Q.    Mr. Senn, the jury would like to ask you a few questions to get something cleared up.

BY JUROR: What I want to know, at any time during the investiga­tion, did you hear Hubert Goree say how many times he fired the rifle?

THE WITNESS: I asked him. He told me he didn't know whether he fired the rifle once or twice. That's before we made any search at all. He showed us where he was standing. From that point, we found two empty cases to his right, which, if he was standing where he told us, they would have been there, but he said he doesn't know, he said he turned and fired fast and said he didn't know whether he fired it once or twice, but we did find two empty cases.

BY JUROR: There was a baseball bat mentioned. He took a base­ ball bat away from her before the shooting?

THE WITNESS: He told me that before the shooting, she had the baseball bat and he took it away from her and then he went back into the kitchen, on the back porch, I believe he said, to shave. While he was on the back porch shaving, he heard her fire a rifle in front of the house. He went through the house, his rifle was standing by the front door. He picked up this rifle and he went out and told her she didn't know what she was doing, to come back in the house, and he said when he turned to go in the house, she fired, he said he didn't know where she fired, and that's when he turned and said he didn't know whether he fired once or twice, but he did hit her and she fell. He said at that time he went back in the house and tried to call Mr. Tallye Hugh Shealy, the magistrate, by telephone and the line was busy, so then he came out and got in his car and went over to Tallye's and told him he'd shot his wife. I understand that Tallye came back over there with him. I know the magistrate was there. I guess he came back with him.

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    Did you find any other firearms at that time when you were there at the scene, other than the two rifles?

A.    He gave me a .22 pistol out of the trunk of his car, locked up in the trunk in a box. Whether this pistol was
        connected, I don't know.

Q.    Did he tell you why he had the pistol in his car?

A.    He said he had taken the pistol away from her. I don't know when he put it in the automobile. It was locked up in the trunk.

CORONER SUMMER: Is that all you gentlemen want to ask? Thank You.         (Witness Excused)

CORONER SUMMER: Since this is kind of a peculiar shooting, I would like to ask if there is anyone out in the audience who has any true facts about this shooting and would like to testify. If so, I would like for you to come up now and be sworn and testify. If anyone saw anything that hasn't been brought out that you saw with your own eyes, I'd like to have you come up.

 (The only response was from one person who saw the deceased and said he knew the location of the bullet wound.)

CORONER SUMMER: Mr. Foreman and Gentlemen of the Jury, this is the doctor's statement:

1-26-69. This is to certify that I examined the body of the above colored female (Alberta Goree) and found where a bullet entered her head, just above the right eye.                                            /s/  V. W. Rinehart, M. D.

You heard your charge at the beginning of this inquisition. It is now your duty to retire to the jury room to pass your verdict on how Alberta Goree came to her death. (Whereupon, the jury retired, and after deliberation, returned to the courtroom and rendered the following verdict, concurred in by all jurors:)

Alberta Goree came to her death as the result of a gunshot wound. We recommend that Hubert Goree be held for Grand Jury investigation.

 (Whereupon the inquisition in the afore mentioned inquest was concluded.)

THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF NEWBERRY

AN INQUISITION, indented, taken at Newberry in the County and State aforesaid, the 2nd day of February A.D., one thousand nine hun­dred and sixty-eight before GEORGE R. SUMMER, Coroner, upon view of the body of Ada Mae Gallman, then and there being dead by the oaths of Virgil C. Bouknight, William T. Boozer, Carroll Bouknight, Jackie B. Shealy, Bobby O. Nichols, and Lewis R. Cromer, being a lawful jury of inquest who being charged and sworn to inquire, for the State of South Carolina where and by what means the said Ada Mae Gallman came to her death, upon their oaths do say she came to her death as the re­sult of a gunshot wound. We recommend Nathaniel Ellison be held for Grand Jury investigation. And so the said jurors aforesaid, upon their oaths aforesaid, do say, that the aforesaid Ada Mae Gallman came to her death in the manner aforesaid.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I, GEORGE SUMMER, Coroner aforesaid, and the jurors aforesaid, to this inquisition, have set out hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid.

/s/ George R. Summer, Coroner, (L. S.)

                                                                                /s/ Virgil C. Bouknight, Foreman, (L. S.)

/s/ William T. Boozer (L.S.)

/s/ Carroll Bouknight (L.S.)                                         /s/ Bobby O. Nichols (L.S.)

/s/ Jackie B. Shealy (L.S.)                                          /s/ Lewis R. Cromer (L.S.)

                                               PROCEEDINGS

CORONER SUMMER: Will the foreman of the jury stand?

(Whereupon, the foreman of the jury, and members of the jury, were duly sworn)

CORONER SUMMER: Mr. foreman and Gentlemen of the Jury, this is an inquisition into the death of Ada Mae Gallman, and it is your duty now to listen to the witnesses and the testimony they have to offer, and from this testimony you will arrive at how Ada Mae Gallman came to her death. If you find that someone else other than the deceased is respon­sible for her death, you will recommend in this verdict that they be held for Grand Jury investigation.

L. L. HENDERSON, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your name, sir?

A.    L. L. Henderson.

Q.    What position do you hold, Mr. Henderson?

A.    Deputy Sheriff, Newberry County.

Q.    Mr. Henderson, on January 4th this year, did you investigate a shooting?

A.    Yes, I did.

Q.    In your own words, Mr. Henderson, just go ahead and tell these gentlemen of the jury just what your investigation was.

A.    Ada Mae Gallman and Nathaniel Ellison lived in what we call the Buck Wicker apartments up in Helena. I

        received a call to go to the Newberry County Hospital, that there was a woman out there who had been shot. I got out there and Ada Mae Gallman was in the x-ray room, on the table in the x-ray room when I got there. She had three places that looked to me like was bullet holes, one about there (indicating) and about an inch above that was another one and about an inch above that was another one. In her left arm, inside, about midway from her wrist to her el­bow appeared to be a bullet hole there. Nathaniel Ellison was out in the waiting room part there from the x-ray room when I got there and she got to where they couldnít keep her on the table so the nurses asked him to come on inside and help hold her on the table and while I had the two in there together, I asked dr. Rinehart if it was alright for me to talk to Ada Mae and he said that it was. I went and asked her what happened. She said that she and Nathaniel got in an argument, then she said, ďHe done all this to me.Ē Of course she was complaining more with this arm than anything else and every time I would ask her a question she would start talking about her arm hurting her so bad. That was about all I got out of her in the presence of Nathaniel.

Nathaniel told me that she had started an argument with him, something about some cooking and that he was sitting in the kitchen in a chair behind the table and had this .25 caliber automatic pistol, and he said he was loading it and that she was sitting out in the front room where her bed was. He said she was sitting on that bed and he said while he was loading the pistol, that it went off and struck, the bullet struck her. I saw her before I went to the apartment, and seeing these four places that I think is places that were made by bullets, naturally when we went up to the apartments later on after we left that night, we got to looking for any spent cartridges that we might find and he was shooting a .25, an automatic, so we looked in the kitchen where he said he was at the time he said he was loading the pistol and it went off. We couldn't find any spent cartridges. We come inside of the room where they said she was, inside the room where the bed was. We found three just in a little bit after we got in there, found three spent cartridges, and we looked and looked and finally in a chair right close to the bed we found the fourth one in there. From where he said he was sitting on the far side of the table from her to where he said she was sitting on the bed, made him 16 and l/2 feet, and this was a .25 automatic and she had on her clothes, powder burns. Of course, as I said, where he said he was in the kitchen there, we didn't find a single empty cartridge in there, but we did find them on the inside of the room where he said she was.

Q.    This .25 automatic, will it shoot as fast as you pull the trig­ger after it starts? ­

A.    Yes, sir.

Q     Did he give you the gun?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Were there any other cartridges in the gun?

A.    There was                 some live ammunition in it.

BY JUR0R: On the .25 automatic, when you fire it, the spent shells will come out automatically?

THE WITNESS: That is right.

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    I believe she was taken to Columbia hospital after they released her from out here at Newberry?

A.    That same night, yes, sir.

Q.    Do you know what date she died, Mr. Henderson?

A.    No, sir, I don't. I was down there to see her the same day be­fore she died that night, but now I don't remember the date that she died, but it was several days later.

Q.    I have the doctor's report but I thought maybe you remembered. Is there anything else you can tell us about this, Mr. Henderson?

A.    I believe that covers about what I would like to testify now.

Q.    She did state to you that he had shot her?

A.    Well, she didn't say it exactly in those words. She said that "He done this to me".

Q.    Oh, "He done this to me"?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    This happened in Newberry County?

A.    Yes, sir.

CORONER SUMMER: Any questions you gentlemen would like to ask Mr. Henderson?

BY JUROR: In your estimation, she was shot in the room where the bed was instead of the kitchen, the weapon had been fired in that room?

THE WITNESS: Yes, sir, that would be my way of thinking, yes, sir.

By Coroner Summer:                                                              

Q.    You didn't find any bullet holes or anything in the walls?

A.    No, sir, we searched the walls good since that time. Right that particular night we didn't, but since that time we have.

CORONER SUMMER: Any other questions? That will be all.                     (Witness Excused)

LEVER SUBER, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your name?

A.    Lever Suber.

Q.    Were you up at the home of Ada Mae Gallman on the 4th of January this year?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Go ahead and tell the gentlemen of the jury what your business was to be at this home that night?

A.    Well, I was up there to get a drink and so we knocked on the door. She was sitting by the door, near the door on

        the bed and he was back in the kitchen. I think he was cooking. He had the light on in the kitchen and she had the light off in the house. She said that he would come to the door and let us in - in a few minutes. Shortly he came to the door and let us in. She jumped up charging, saying one bad word after another, then he came out and hit her several times with a stick.

Q.    He hit the Gallman lady with a stick?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    All right, go ahead.

A.    Then her pocketbook fell open on the bed. She was near the bed. Her pocketbook fell open on the bed and I
        think it must have been a .22, I believe, a little short, small pistol fell out and one or two dollars, some paper money fell out and a little change, and he reached and grabbed the pistol and went back toward the kitchen. She told him, "You better had took the pistol because I might kill you tonight". He chunked the pistol back over to her and told her to shoot, he didn't believe she had guts enough to shoot the pistol tonight. She held it in her hand. She didn't shoot then, she held it in her hand and he went back in the kitchen. I don't know what he was doing. Shortly after he went in the kitchen, she was wailing and crying and talk­ing about how he was treating her. She said, "I'm going to kill you tonight". That's what she told him. She shot several times, I don't know how many she shot, she shot toward the kitchen. Shortly after she stopped shooting, he came out to the door and he had a .25 automatic in his hand, I don't know whether he had it in his hand or reached over on the dresser and got it, but when I seen him, he had it up like that and started firing.

Q.    Was he firing at her?

A.    I think he must have hit her; I know he hit her.

Q.    Was she standing up or sitting down?

A.    She was standing up.

Q.    Is there anything else you can tell us?

A.    In a few minutes after that, just a second or so, she wheeled over to the bed and went to hollering and going on,
        "You done killed me, I'm paralyzed" and he went back in the kitchen.

Q.    Did you leave the house at that time, or did you still stay there?

A.    I left the house and went out for a few minutes and I came back. When I came back some of them, I don't know who, put her in the car, had put her in his car and carried her to the hospital, so we trailed them from his house out to the hospital. Shortly after we got out there, Mr. Slin carne.

Q.    You have told us all you know about the case?

A.    Yes, sir.

BY JUROR: How far away was Nathaniel from Ada Mae when he started shooting?

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    Was he close?

A.    He must have been about as far as from here to that wall, I imagine, about that distance.

Q.    You didn't ever see him up close at her at all?

A.    The only time was when he was hitting her.

Q.    With the stick?

A.    Yes, sir.

CORONER SUMMER:  All right, thank you.                          (Witness Excused.)

GENERAL ABRAMS, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    What is your name?

A.    General Abrams.

Q.    On this day of January 4, tell these gentlemen of the jury just what your business was up at this house?

A.    Well, same thing: as Lever Suber told you.

Q.    Were you with him?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    Well, just go ahead and tell these gentlemen in your own words what you saw that night?

A.    Well, we went up there and I did not see no gun or nothing. I was sitting on a lawn chair. The only thing, I heard shots. They started arguing about cooking. Thatís all I know about it.

Q.    Were you in the same room with them?

A.    I was sitting on a lawn chair.

Q.    Did you see him hitting her with a stick like the other one testified?

A.    Thatís right.

Q.    Did you see him take the pistol from her?

A.    I seen the pistol fall on the bed.

Q.    Did he get the pistol off the bed?

A.    Yes sir.

Q.    Where did he go after he got the pistol off the bed?

A.    Went in the back room.

Q.    What did she say at the time?

A.    I don't know what she said at that time. I just don't know.

Q.    After he went in the back room there, what did he do?

A.    I don't know what he did when he went in the back room. I couldn't see him.

Q.    Then's when you heard the shots, later after that?

A.    I just heard shots, I ain't seen no pistol.

Q.    How many did you hear?

A.    I don't know just how many, I just heard shots.

Q.    Is that all you can tell us?

A.    That's all I can tell you about it.

CORONER SUMMER: All right, thank you.                                     (Witness Excused)

DAVID HARP, being first duly sworn, was examined and testified as follows:

By Coroner Summer:

Q.    Your name is David Harp?

A.    Yes, sir.

Q.    David, on this January 4th this year, go ahead and tell the gentlemen of the jury just what you know about this shooting?

A.    Very little I know, but I will tell you what I know. When I went in, they was arguing. He came out of the kitchen or from somewhere and he hit her a couple of times with a stick and went back in there and I left out.

Q.    You weren't in the house when the shooting took place?

A.    No, sir, I was outside.

Q.    Did you hear the shots from the outside?

A.    Yes, I heard the shots.

Q.    How many shots did you hear?

A.    I don't know exactly, several times, but I don't know how many.

Q.    You can't tell us anything else about it then?

A.    No, sir, because I left out.

CORONER SUMMER: That will be all.                                  (Witness Excused)

CORONER SUMMER:

This is the Pathologist's report by Dr. W. B. Mullins, M. D.

(Autopsy summary read by Coroner. Complete autopsy report at conclusion of this transcript.)

CORONER SUMMER: This is all the information we have in this case.

It is now your duty to retire to the jury room to pass your verdict on how Ada Mae Gallman came to her death. You received your charge at the begin­ning of this inquest.  (Whereupon, the jury retired, and after deliberation, returned to the courtroom and delivered the following verdict, concurred in by all jurors:)

"Ada Mae Gallman came to her death as the result of a gunshot wound. We recommend Nathaniel Ellison be held for Grand Jury investigation."

 (Whereupon, the hearing in the above-styled inquest was concluded.)

MULLINS PATHOLOGY LABORATORY

1467 Harper Street

Augusta, Georgia 722-1846

AUTOPSY PROTOCOL                                                                           Autopsy No: #A-1630

Decedent: GALLMAN, Ada Mae                                 Age: ?60       RACE Negro           SEX Female

DIED: January 23, 1968 at 6:15 p.m.

AUTOPSY: January 24, 1968 at 1:30 p. m.

PHYSICIAN: Geo. Summer, Coroner, Newberry

CLINICAL DIAGNOSES:

1.          Gunshot wounds, bullet to be recovered.

PATHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS:

1.     Gunshot wound of the lower chest extending into the abdomen. (History of gunshot wound of 1/6/1968)

2.     Perforation of duodenum secondary to the gunshot wound.

3.     Laceration of the pancreas secondary to the gunshot wound.

4.     Retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to #1.

5.     Focal peritonitis, slight.

6.     Acute passive congestion of the lungs, mild.

7.     Two excoriated areas of anterior left chest, near midline.

8.     Recent surgical scars of the abdomen.

9.     Fatty degeneration of the liver, moderate.

10.   Acute passive congestion of the liver and kidneys.

11.   Arteriosclerosis of the coronary arteries and aorta, slight.

12.   Recent surgical incision of left elbow.

AUTOPSY SUMMARY:

This was the case of a gunshot wound of the lower chest extending into the abdomen. The bullet perforated the second part of the duodenum and the pancreas and resulted in moderate retroperitoneal hemorrhage and inflammatory reaction. Focal peritonitis change was found. The cause of death was the gunshot wound. The bullet was recovered from near the vertebral column at the junction of the lower lumbar vertebrae with the sacrum. The bullet was just to the right of the midline. The bullet was given to Mr. George R. Summer. The course of the bullet was consistent with a course that started at the upper part of the chest making the two excoriated areas and entering the upper part of the abdomen through the lower chest. Respectfully submitted,                                              /s/ W. B. Mullins. M. D.


GROSS AUTOPSY FINDINGS:

The body was that of a well-developed, slightly obese colored fe­male appearing well preserved for some 60 years of age. Three excoriated areas averaging some 2.5 cm in diameter were present over the middle part of the anterior chest just to the left of the midline. The nature of these defects were consistent with the two upper (most cephalad) being areas made by the bullet striking the edge of the skin and the lower most (most cauded) being the site of entry through the lower part of the rib cage into the peritoneal cavity. A recent midline surgical abdominal incision was noted and surgical drains were present on each side of the abdomen. A recent surgical incision was over the left elbow. Vein cut down sites were present over the ankles.

Pleura: Surfaces smooth and glistening. No blood or excess fluid. Peri­toneum: Irregular fibrinous adhesions. Focal slight exudate on loops of small bowel. Small intestine distended.

Heart: Heart weighed some 450 grams. Coronary arteries widely patent. Valves showed no significant change. No old or recent infarct.

Lungs: Weighed some 475 grams each. Showed moderate congestion and edema.

Spleen: Spleen weighed 120 grams. No significant change on external or cut surfaces.

Liver: Liver weighed some 2100 grams and showed a yellow color and a greasy consistency.

Gallbladder and bile ducts were negative.

Pancreas: Irregular fat necrosis in peri-pancreatic tissue. Focal hemorrhage and laceration in head of pancreas.

G. I. Tract: Esophagus and stomach negative. Perforated area 1.5 cm in diameter located near junction and third parts of duodenum; Moderate adjacent hemorrhage. Focal serosal exudate on widths of small bowel.

Adrenals: Of average size and slightly decreased yellow tan color.

G. U. Tract: The kidneys weighed 190 grams each. Capsule stripped easily. Moderate congestion was noted.

Head: not examined.

MICROSCOPIC AUTOPSY FINDINGS:

Heart: Sections showed slight hypertrophy.

Lungs: There was moderate congest1on and edema of the lungs.

Spleen: No diagnostic abnormality except slight congestion.

Liver: moderate fatty degeneration. Acute pas­sive central congestion.

Pancreas: Laceration with hemorrhage in head of pancreas. Fairly wide spread fat necrosis of peripancreatic fat tis­sue and omentum.

G. I. Tract: Focal peritonitis of loops of small bowel. Recent hemorrhage in perforated area of duodenum.

Adrenals: Slight lipid depletion.

G. U. Tract: Moderate congestion of kidneys.
 

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