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Atkinson, John
Dr. John Atkinson, now located at Lewistown, Montana, was formerly one of the successful and highly respected members of the medical profession at Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he began practice in 1909. He was born in Ireland in 1872 and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Nixon) Atkinson. He acquired his early education in his native country and in 1887 came to America, locating in Canada. He took his high school course in Winnipeg, Manitoba, and later entered the University of North Dakota, where he remained two years. Following this he spent one year in Macalester College at St. Paul, Minnesota, and then entered the College of Physicians &. Surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, from which he received his degree of M. D. in 1903. He is a man of ambition, energy and resource, as is evidenced by the fact that he earned all of the money for his extensive education. Dr. Atkinson began the practice of his profession in Donaldson, Iowa, where he remained for one year and three months, later removing to Spencer, South Dakota, where he spent five years and nine months. On the 17th of July, 1909, he came to Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he remained for some time but is now practicing his profession in Lewistown, Montana, making a specialty of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. The consensus of public opinion regarding his professional skill is altogether favorable, for it is well known that he is a careful and conscientious physician. He is a member of the American Medical Association and the county and state medical societies and his ability is widely recognized in the profession. On the 23d of October, 1897, Dr. Atkinson was united in marriage to Miss Hazel E. Hamitt, of Spencer, South Dakota. He has made an excellent professional record, as is indicated by the practice now accorded him, and he is, moreover, known as a progressive and public-spirited citizen.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Baker, George
George L. Baker is filling the position of postmaster at Britton, where he is also conducting a drug store. He was born in La Salle, Illinois, November 22, 1850, a son of Richard and Sarah (Raycraft) Baker, who were natives of Ireland, born in 1818 and 1823 respectively. About 1848 Richard Baker went to Canada and it was in that country that they were married. In 1849 they removed to La Salle, Illinois, and for a number of years he engaged in farming. In Canada he had conducted business as a brewer. The year 1880 witnessed his arrival in Dakota territory, at which time he homesteaded in Clark county, and he proved up on his claim and there resided until his death. The town of Elrod now stands upon his old homestead. His parents never left Ireland, but the maternal grandparents of George L. Baker came to the new world and died in Wisconsin. In his political faith Richard Baker was a democrat and both he end his wife were consistent and active members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the faith of which they passed away, the former in 1901 and the latter in 1907. To them were born nine children, two of whom died in infancy, while five are yet living, as follows: George L., of this review; Esther, who is the widow of Frank Salter and makes her home in Chicago; John, who lives on the old homestead at Elrod, South Dakota; Mollie, who makes her home with her brother John; and William, who is engaged in the wholesale liquor business in Chicago. George L. Baker attended both public and parochial schools in La Salle, Illinois. He started in life as a farm hand and afterward was connected with a meat market at Ohio, Illinois, for five years. Removing westward to Dakota territory, he secured a homestead claim in Spink county upon which he lived for about a year and then went to Groton, remaining there one year. In 1884 he located in Britton, where for a short time he conducted a hotel but later traded his interest in that business for a drug store. Afterward he disposed of that but again purchased a drug store and has since continued in this line of business, his son, George G. Baker, being an equal partner in the undertaking.
In 1878 Mr. Baker was united in marriage to Miss Rate Fagan, a native of Illinois, by whom he has three children, namely: Edward W., who lives with the father; George G., who is engaged in the drug business at Britton; and Claude C, who conducts a moving picture show in Britton. Mrs. Baker belongs to the Presbyterian church and she presides with gracious hospitality over her home, making it a delightful resort for many friends. Mr. Baker is well known as an exemplary representative of the Masonic fraternity. He belongs to the lodge, the chapter, the commandery, the consistory and the Mystic Shrine and he is also a member of the United Workmen and the Maccabees. He has served as master of the lodge, was its secretary for twenty years and has been high priest of the chapter. His political views accord with the principles of the democracy and during President Cleveland's first term he was appointed to the position of postmaster and was again called to that office by President Wilson in September, 1914. He also served as probate judge for one term during territorial days and at all times he has most ably and efficiently discharged the duties of the positions to which he has been called. At the same time he has made a creditable record in business circles, for he came to Dakota a poor boy and is now numbered among the substantial residents of his district, owning town property to the value of twenty-five thousand dollars, together with a quarter section of land in Marshall county.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Bedford, H. W.
One of the progressive and active business men of Aberdeen is H. W. Bedford, president of the Dakota Wholesale Grocery Company, which he promoted and organized and which through his well directed efforts has already become one of the important mail order houses in this section of the state. Mr. Bedford was born at Port Huron, Michigan, in 1882, and acquired his early education in the public and high schools of that city, completing his studies at the University of Michigan. He afterward spent five years as steward in a hotel and then became connected with a coffee concern as a traveling salesman. He remained in that line of business for a number of years, finally becoming manager of the Sellers Coffee Company of Minnesota. Mr. Bedford severed his connection with that concern in 1913 and on the 24th of January of that year organized the Dakota Wholesale Grocery Company, of which he has since been president. This concern has a capital stock of five hundred thousand dollars and its officers are as follows: H. W. Bedford, president; H. E. Williams, secretary; and John C. Summerville, treasurer. The company does a mail order business exclusively and has no competitor in this line closer than Minnesota. The business is housed in a modern building in Aberdeen and its growth has been rapid since its foundation. It is in the hands of men of insight and capacity and its future expansion is, therefore, assured
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Bushnell, William
That which we hoard and cherish above all else are the priceless gems of memory. The remembrance of a noble life with its high purposes, its honorable activity, its noble deeds, its kindliness and its love is the most precious and sacred thing in the world. The record of William Francis Teeman Bushnell was so regarded by all who knew him. His home was in Aberdeen, South Dakota, but he was a man of the nation in that he reached out through his chosen life work and his sympathy to all mankind. In art circles through his music, in business through his activity in journalism, in public affairs through his indorsement of and cooperation with all movements for civic betterment he was a prominent figure and though his life record was brought to a close ere it had spanned forty-three years, it remains today as a source of encouragement and inspiration to all who knew him. Born inPeru, Illinois, December 3, 1857, he was the ninth in order of birth in a family of ten children. The father, William Francis Bushnell, was a government contractor, who became one of the pioneer residents of Illinois. Removing with his family to Evanston, that state, in the early '70s, he executed government contracts for the building of lighthouses and life-saving stations on the Great Lakes. The home training of William F. T. Bushnell constituted a wise preparation for the duties, responsibilities and obligations of later life. He was yet a boy when something of the real value of money came to him through his experience as an employe in a printing office in Mendota, Illinois. He also early came to realize the worth of education and eagerly availed himself of the opportunity of spending two years as a student in Northwestern Uni­versity during the residence of the family at Evanston. He was only about sixteen or seventeen years of age when he took charge of workmen in his father's employ, devoting three years to that service. Ambitious to engage in business on his own account, he turned to the art of music as an avenue toward that end. Nature endowed him with musical talent which he had cultivated by improving every opportunity. After leaving his father's employ he began teaching music, composing and publishing his compositions and giving concerts through Illinois and Iowa and later in Dakota. He was always a factor in promoting musical taste and love of the art in every section which he visited, yet he did not make this his life work, for on going to Huron, South Dakota, in 1883, he again became connected with the trade which he had learned in boyhood—that of printing. The Dakota Farmer, published at Huron, was a struggling journal and during his second year spent at Huron he associated himself with Augustin Davis in the purchase and conduct of the paper. In 1885 he purchased his partner's interest and remained thereafter sole proprietor until the organization of the W. F. T. Bushnell Publishing Company. While residing in Huron Mr. Bushnell was married on the 2d of June, 1886, to Miss Blanche Van Pelt, a daughter of George T. Van Pelt of Indiana, and they became the parents of two sons and a daughter; Paul N., Frederick W. and Helen, the sons being now active in the management of their own business interests.
Following his marriage Mr. Bushnell continued to reside in Huron until 1893, when he came to Aberdeen and thereafter continued the publication of the Dakota Farmer in the latter city. His efficient management was at once manifest. He made his paper the leading farm journal of the Dakotas and his plant one of the best publishing properties in the west. About 1899 Mr. Bushnell was joined in a partnership by N. E. Carnine of Brookings, South Dakota, and they purchased and removed into a new block with a new plant and were settled in their commodious quarters when Mr. Bushnell's life of untiring energy was brought to its close. Concerning his business career his intimate friend and associate in journalism, Hon. M. F. Greeley of Gary, South Dakota, wrote: "In all his dealings Mr. Bushnell was the soul of honor. For nearly seventeen years the writer knew him and his work intimately. We recall more than once seeing checks returned, sometimes for large amounts, and when money was sorely needed, simply because the advertisements accompanying them were not what Mr. Bushnell thought they ought to be. We remember one instance of this kind in particular, for the reason, perhaps, that at the time the very existence of the paper seemed hanging in the balance. The season had been one of the worst Dakota has known; money had stopped coming in almost wholly, and bills were accumulating and the last available dollar was needed in more places than one. Among the few letters that morning was one containing a check for nearly two hundred dollars from a commission house of doubtful standing. Without a moment's hesitation, this man of iron and honor thrust the check back into the letter, hastily wrote a line across it, and remailed it to the senders. When we remonstrated gently, saying that the firm was admitted to some of the best farm papers, the reply came as quickly as the check went: 'Though my paper goes down, and I have to work as a farm hand to feed my wife and children, not a thing shall go into its columns with my knowledge that can by any possibility mislead a single reader.'"
As stated, Mr. Bushnell made the Dakota Farmer one of the most successful farm journals of the country. He also organized the Dakota Cereal Company and remained at its head until his demise. The measure of his influence it is almost impossible to determine, for his activities were exerted along many lines, being at all times actuated by the spirit of progress and permeated by the spirit of broad humanitarianism and of Christianity. He never deviated from the highest principles of honor in his business affairs and he eagerly embraced the opportunities that would enable him to help his fellowmen. He was greatly interested in methods for developing the agricultural possibilities of the state; was secretary of the State Agricultural Association, of the Sheep Breeders' Association, of the first board of agriculture of Dakota territory and also of the state board of agriculture. When the question of Dakota's admission to the union as a state was foremost, he practically turned over his business interests to others and entered strenuously into the effort, not only to secure Dakota's admission, but to secure its admission under prohibition laws—a result that was accomplished. He was a believer in republican principles but never allowed partisanship to interfere with the right. Fraternally he was connected with the Masons and with the Odd Fellows. For many years he was a most active, earnest worker in behalf of the Methodist church, but his religion transcended denominational lines, reaching above into the higher realms of pure and undefiled Christianity. He organized and was superintendent of the First Union Sunday school at Huron and when the Methodist Sunday school was organized he became its superintendent and so continued throughout the period of his residence in Huron. He did not believe Christianity was a thing apart from daily life. He felt it had to do with every duty and with every relation and in religious work his interest and energy were conspicuously displayed. Death came to him at Colorado Springs, whither he had gone to attend the National Convention of Farmers, and there he passed away August 25, 1900. The summons was sudden but he was fully prepared, for his life record contained no neglected opportunities.
In speaking of his death his pastor said: "As a man, I have lost a true hearted friend. As a citizen, I have lost a fellow citizen of especial merit. As a Christian, I have lost one of the most congenial co-workers with whom it has been my privilege to associate. Looking at his life as a man of business, we certainly can see an example at once wholesome and helpful to his fellows in the field. It is not simply the fact that he was successful as a man of business, but it is the method by which he became successful, that challenges our scrutiny. Living as he did, in the early days of our state's development, amid the rush for riches by questionable processes, his heart, at least, was not overcome by the desire to build a fortune in hot haste. With but a meager outfit and with unpromising prospects, he entered on his work as journalist, and was content to struggle on with but slowly accumulating capital. When hampered by delays and halted by reverses, he did not weaken in his aims and efforts, but, untiring and undaunted, was quite willing to toil on to distant victory. The policy of such a course has received unqualified endorsement from the splendid business he succeeded in upbuilding, and which will stand, we trust, to teach the lesson that pains and patience are still rewarded in the business world.
"Another noticeable feature of Mr. Bushnell's life was the unusual interest that he took in the advancement of public morals. While at Huron and during the memorable struggle for prohibition in our constitution, he became secretary of the State Prohibition League, and, as such, he shouldered heroically the bulk of the burden of finding the means and the men for conducting the campaign. This interest in public morals was no fitful outburst of superficial enthusiasm, but was grounded deep in a heart that loved the right and loathed the wrong; hence, when movements were inaugurated from time to time, for the moral betterment of society, his heart and hands were ever ready to render aid. Surely, surely as he reviews these movements in the light of Heaven's morals, he will have no occasion whatever to regret his interest in the cause of civic righteousness.
"Along another and a higher plane, however, was the noblest effort of his life directed. Blest from birth with Christian parents, he early followed in their footsteps, uniting with the Methodist church to which they belonged, and in this church relationship he continued throughout life. It seemed settled from the start that he was to be an active Christian. For about twelve years he served as superintendent of the Sabbath school and at different times has done most acceptable work as leader of chorus choirs. In this latter capacity he was serving when first I knew him. My first sight of him, as I remember, was in connection with the union revival meetings of 1894. On coming to this city in that year I found the Grain Palace filled nightly with interested audiences; on the platform a large chorus choir had been gathered, and before them stood as leader, with consecrated talent, this beloved brother who will lead us in our songs no more. Later in that year, when the * Union Revival Band visited Bath, I remember seeing our brother riding thither upon his wheel to assist us in that work."
His pastor, continuing, said: "His interest in Christian work, however, was not limited to movements in his city or his country; but his heart went out as well to movements for the redemption of the world. In this connection I trust it will not be considered an intrusion into private matters if I state what is not generally known, namely, that for some time our brother has been supporting a school in China and that recently, in view of an increasing income, he expressed the purpose to undertake the support of two schools among China's dying millions."
Dr. J. Frank Stout, presiding elder of the Winona district of Minnesota, said of Mr. Bushnell: "I have known him since his boyhood and have loved him. He was every inch a man, and held his place among men in such a stalwart way that he was honored wherever he was known. There is no place where the real man is revealed as in his home and among his brothers and sisters. Around the hearthstone no masks are worn and pretenses are impossible. It is in such relations I have known him best, and because of this fact can testify to the inborn and ingrown loyalty of his manhood. That which was most conspicuous in him was the consistency of his affection for those he loved. It was a love which proclaimed itself in helpful deeds untarnished by selfish complainings. He was affectionate, without being demonstrative; generous without ostentation; helpful without any evidence of a patronizing spirit; stalwart in his convictions; and in all his relations, above all, Christian.
"His home was his delight; his wife was the joy of his heart; his children were the objects of his tenderest affection and painstaking care, and his friends were loyally enshrined in his heart which was large enough for all."
The president of the Aberdeen Choral Union, S. W. Narregang, writing of Mr. Bushnell, said: "He was a man that could adapt himself to all conditions and circumstances. He was capable and useful in every walk of life, and successful in all he undertook. There are but few men that can succeed at even one line of work—while with him he was not only successful from a business standpoint, but he was blessed with a nature so genial, so broad, so sympathetic, that his very presence gave courage, strength and happiness wherever he went. He was a man of broad views, keen perceptions and generous impulses. He loved his friends, and no sacrifice was too great when their welfare was jeopardized. It was my good fortune to be intimately acquainted with Mr. Bushnell for over ten years; he was ever a trusted friend, a genial companion and a brilliant entertainer." Still another wrote of him as, "So bright, so cheery, so tactful, so patient and so full of wise and successful expedient. Full of work, growing out of his editorial relations and his high conceptions of the duties of citizenship, which caused him to be a warm advocate of the cause of prohibition, he still found time for the faithful discharge of his duties to God and the church."
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Chrstenson, Alfred
Alfred Christenson, a well known and prosperous agriculturist residing on section 9, Mapleton township, Minnehaha county, was born in that township on the 24th of December, 1871. He was among the first white children born in this section of the state and as an infant was rocked in his cradle by the Indians hundreds of times. His parents were Christ and Martina (Estensen) Christenson, natives of Denmark and Norway respectively. They emigrated to the United States in 1869 and were married in Michigan, the father working in the mines at Calumet and Hecla of that state. Hearing of the free lands in South Dakota, they came west to this state in the spring of 1871, and Mr. Christenson immediately homesteaded eighty acres on section 16, Mapleton township, Minnehaha county. This land in the Big Sioux bottoms is today some of the best in the state. Subsequently Mr. Christenson preempted one hundred and sixty acres in Benton township and later bought one hundred and sixty acres in Mapleton township adjoining the Benton township farm. He resided on his preemption for a period of thirty-three years but after the death of his wife, in 1898, returned to Denmark, in which country he has since remained.
Alfred Christenson was reared under the parental roof and received his education in the public schools. He continued at home after attaining his majority, being associated with his father in his fanning enterprises until 1898, when he located on the place where he now resides and started out as an agriculturist on his own account. This farm was then owned by his father, and Alfred Christenson operated it as a renter for about eleven years. In 1909, however, he purchased the property, which embraces one hundred and ninety-two acres. He had purchased four hundred and eighty acres of land in Brown county in 1905 but disposed of the same before buying his home farm. He likewise owns the northwest quarter of section 21, Mapleton township, which he purchased in March, 1913, and in 1915 he purchased three hundred and twenty acres on section 28. the same township. As an agriculturist he has won a well merited and gratifying measure of success, carrying on the work of the fields in a practical, progressive and resultant manner. He is also a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative Lumber Company, the New Hope Grain Company of Crooks, South Dakota, and the Baltic Lumber Company.
In 1905 Mr. Christenson was joined in wedlock to Mrs. Mary Brekke, a native of Norway and the widow of Andrew Brekke. By her first husband Mrs. Christenson had three children: Halver, Anna and Andrew. To her and Mr. Christenson have been born six children, five of whom survive, namely: Carl, Ingel, Cerena, Alice and Sophia. All the children are at home.
Mr. Christenson exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party and has acted in the capacity of supervisor for about four years, while for about two years he ably served as constable of the township. Fraternally he is identified with the Modern Brotherhood of America, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church, to which his wife also belongs. His entire life has been spent in Minnehaha county and he enjoys an enviable reputation as one of its representative agriculturists and respected citizens.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Danielson, L. W.
L. W. Danielson, prominently connected with business interests of Aberdeen as proprietor of a ladies' outfitting establishment, was born in Morris, Minnesota, February 7, 1880. His parents, J. E. and Ida (Norstrum) Danielson, are both natives of Stockholm, Sweden. The lather was thirteen years of age when he came to the United States and the mother fifteen. Later they were married in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and in 1878 removed to Morris, this state, where the father engaged in business as a general merchant. Both parents are still living and continue to make their home in Morris. From a very early age L. W. Danielson has been connected with the dry goods trade, for when fourteen years of age he entered a mercantile establishment of this character in Morris and retained his connection with it until 1904, becoming in the meantime thoroughly acquainted with the business in principle and detail. In June, 1904, he went to Duluth, Minnesota, and entered the employ of F. A. Patrick & Company. As a salesman for that firm he came to Aberdeen, South Dakota, in 1906 and continued in their employ until the 1st of November. 1911, when he resigned his position in order to embark in business on his own account. He opened a ladies' outfitting store and has since successfully conducted it, making it by his intelligent and capable management one of the leading concerns of the kind in the city. He occupies a building twenty-five by one hundred and thirty-eight feet in dimensions, both the first floor and basement being used. It is equipped with golden oak fixtures and nothing is neglected which would add in any way to its attractiveness and convenience. Mr. Danielson employs fourteen people in his establishment and carries a fine line of ladies' furnishings, his goods being distinguished by their correct style, fine workmanship and high quality. His patronage is large and rapidly increasing and it has been accorded him in recognition of his fair and honorable business methods.
On the 4th of August, 1909, Mr. Danielson married Miss Mary St. Clair, of Vinton, Iowa, a daughter of A. E. St. Clair, who is engaged in the automobile business in that city, being agent for the Ford and Paige cars. He is, however, practically living retired, being a man of considerable means, an extensive cattle dealer and landowner in former years. Mrs. Danielson came to Aberdeen in 1908 and opened a millinery establishment. She is now associated with her husband in business and has displayed remarkable business and executive ability. She has charge of the millinery department of the store and goes to New York twice each year to buy goods. She is considered a very shrewd buyer and stands high both in business and social circles. During his residence in Minnesota, Mr. Danielson assisted in organizing Company I, Fourteenth Minnesota Infantry, of which he became sergeant. At the time of the Spanish-American war he enlisted for service in defense of his country as a member of Company E, Fourteenth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. He went with his command to Chickamauga, Tennessee, and later to Knoxville, from which place he returned to Fort Snelling and after six months' service was mustered out. He is a member of the Aberdeen Commercial Club, the Elks and United Commercial Travelers. In politics he votes independently, supporting men and measures rather than party. His business record deserves commendation, for in the field of commerce he has displayed rare aptitude and ability in achieving results and has at all times employed methods which will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Darling, A. Clay
A. Clay Darling, engaged in the general practice of law in Aberdeen, South Dakota, was born in Lincoln county, this state, November 7, 1884. He is a son of Emory J. and Alzora E. (Parke) Darling, the former of whom came from Wisconsin to Lincoln county, South Dakota, in 1871, while the latter arrived in that county from Iowa in 1870. Their marriage was celebrated in Lincoln county in the year 1877. Emory J. Darling took up a quarter section of land upon which he resided until 1913, when he retired, moving to Aberdeen, where he and his wife now reside. In their family are three sons: Dr. Seeley A., a dentist of Aberdeen; A. Clay, of this review; and Dr. Harry R., also practicing dentistry at Aberdeen. A. Clay Darling acquired his early education in the public schools and later attended Sioux Falls College, graduating in 1902. He then enrolled in the law department of the South Dakota State University at Vermillion and received his degree from that institution in 1906. Following this he spent three years as brief clerk under Attorney General S. W. Clark and in 1909 entered into a partnership with W. F. Corrigan in the practice of law at Mellette, South Dakota. The firm came to Aberdeen in December, 1912, and here practiced successfully until the partnership was terminated in September, 1914, since which time Mr. Darling has been alone. He enjoys an extensive and representative patronage and is thus connected with a great deal of important litigation.
On October 11, 1910, Mr. Darling was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Notson, of Mitchell, South Dakota, a daughter of Rev. G. T. Notson, who was for several years superintendent of the Huron district of the Methodist church and is now actively connected with the Dakota conference of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Darling have four children: Cecil Parke, Dorothy Louise, Robert Clay and Emory Alden. Mr. Darling is connected with the Masonic order, gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is a member of the Methodist church. He is a young man of energy, resource and ability and has already become well known in the ranks of the legal profession in Aberdeen.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Granger, Frank
Frank E. Granger, of Aberdeen, the oldest court reporter in South Dakota, in point of continuous service in that capacity, was born in Chicago, Illinois, and there acquired his early education, afterward reading law and winning admission to the bar of Illinois. In 1883 he located in Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he proved up on some government land. Five years later he was made court reporter and for more than a quarter of a century has held that position, discharging his duties in a capable, prompt and able manner. Mr. Granger is also well known in Aberdeen as the founder of the Granger Business School, which he established in 1900 as a school of stenography. Later he installed a complete business course, buying out the Aberdeen Commercial College. In 1906 he established a branch at Big Stone City, South Dakota, later moving this to Ortonville, Minnesota, and selling it in 1913 to C. J. Stark. In 1908 Mr. Granger established another branch school, buying the Watertown Business School, which he sold two years later. In 1913 he sold the Aberdeen school to George L. Kemper, its present owner, who has placed M. B. Dewey in charge.
In November, 1883, Mr. Granger was united in marriage to Miss Fannie Roe, of Chicago, and they have become the parents of three children. Mr. Granger is connected fraternally with the Masonic lodge and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party. In 1893 he served as a member of the school board and did capable and intelligent work in that office. He has lived in Aberdeen for many years and is held in high regard there as a progressive and useful citizen.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Ground, Holland
Among the younger members of the medical profession who have gained prominence and success in their chosen Held is numbered Dr. Holland T. Ground, who since 1909 has been engaged in practice at Aberdeen. He was born in Indiana on the 7th of September, 1883, and is a son of Dr. William E. and Dolly (Birch) Ground, the former of whom has been in practice in Superior, Wisconsin, since 1891.
Dr. Holland T. Ground acquired his early education in the public schools and afterward attended the University of Wisconsin. He was graduated from the medical department of the University of Illinois in 1907 and afterward spent one year as interne in a Chicago hospital, following this by one year on the staff of the Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter, Minnesota. With this excellent preparation he located at Aberdeen for the practice of his profession in 1909. His ability in his chosen calling is pronounced and he has a large and representative patronage, which has grown steadily with each year of his residence in Aberdeen. In 1910 Dr. Ground married Miss Grace McDonnell, a native of Evanston, Illinois. Dr. Ground is a member of the Roman Catholic church, is connected fraternally with the Knights of Columbus and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He belongs to the American Medical Association and the county and state medical societies and through his membership in these bodies keeps in touch with the most advanced medical thought. He stands high in professional and social circles and has the confidence and esteem of all who know him.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Harkin, Earl
Earl B. Harkin, one of the progressive and able lawyers of Aberdeen, was born in Wisconsin in 1881, a son of P. W. and M. V. Harkin. After acquiring a public-school education he entered the legal department of the University of Wisconsin, graduating in law in 1902. He afterward practiced for five years at Hillsboro, Wisconsin, and in 1907 came to Aberdeen, where he has since resided. He is well known as a forceful and capable lawyer, well versed in legal principles and precedents and possessed of the insight, ability and mental powers necessary for success in his profession. Mr. Harkin was elected states attorney in 1910 and was reelected in 1912, proving an efficient and capable incumbent of that office, his duties being discharged in a systematic, prompt and able manner. In 1909 Mr. Harkin was united in marriage to Miss Bessie A. Moore, of Conde, South Dakota, a native of Hillsboro, Wisconsin. Mr. Harkin is a member of the Catholic church and is a republican in his political beliefs. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Columbus, the Elks and the Red Men. He is a man of insight and ability and has made rapid progress in a profession where advancement comes only as a result of merit and ability.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Jarvis, James
Business enterprise finds a worthy, alert and energetic representative in James L. Jarvis, a hardware dealer of Brookings, who is also chairman of the board of county commissioners of Brookings county. He recognizes the duties and obligations as well as the privileges of citizenship and thus can find time from a growing business to devote to public service. He was born in South Bend, Indiana, on the 7th of January, 1860, a son of Eli and Lovina (Wyland) Jarvis, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of the Hoosier state. The father has been a lifelong farmer. After leaving the south he removed to Indiana and in 1860 went to Kansas but in 1862 took up his abode in Shelby county, Iowa, where he and his wife still make their home. James L. Jarvis was educated in the public schools of Harlan, Iowa, and in the high school there and remained upon the home farm until he reached his twenty-first year. He then went to Wauseca, Minnesota, and a year later removed to Winona, Minnesota, where he worked at the carpenter's trade through the summer months, while in the winter he taught school. In 1881 he took up railroading and was employed by the Northwestern Railroad Company until 1883. In the fall of 1886 he came to South Dakota, settling at Langford, where he entered the service of the Dakota Lumber Company as manager of the yards, remaining in that position of trust and responsibility for five years. In 1891 he resigned his position and entered into partnership with J. C. Bassett of Aberdeen, South Dakota, opening a hardware store at Langford. Mr. Bassett, recognizing the ability of Mr. Jarvis, furnished him the requisite capital and for ten years the firm of Jarvis &, Company did a prosperous business at that point. In 1901 Mr. Jarvis disposed of his interests there and removed to Brookings, where he established his present business, which has since been developed into one of the leading hardware houses of Brookings. He carries a large line of both shelf and heavy hardware and his patronage has grown from the beginning until his business has now reached large and gratifying proportions.
In the spring of 1883 Mr. Jarvis was united in marriage to Miss Vesta V. Sanford, of Winona, Minnesota, by whom he has one child, Ruth, now a high-school pupil of Brookings.
Politically Mr. Jarvis is a republican, stanch in his advocacy of the principles of the party, and in 1908 he was elected to the board of county commissioners, where he made a creditable record, so that he was reelected to the board in 1912 and was made its chairman in 1913. Mr. Jarvis is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership in Brookings Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M., while he and his wife are members of Brookings Chapter, No. 15, O. E. S., of which he is the present patron. He likewise belongs to Brookings Lodge, No. 40, I. O. O. F., and has membership with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen. He is likewise a member of the Brookings Commercial Club and is in full sympathy with its purposes to further the business interests of the city, extend its trade relations and uphold its municipal honor. He and his wife have been members of the First Presbyterian church for many years and Mr. Jarvis is serving as one of its elders. His life has been characterized by high and honorable principles and the record which he has made in every relation marks him as a man who never lowers his standards and one who pursues a course not because it is policy to do so, but because he believes in the value and efficacy of the path that he has marked out.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Johnson, Henry
Professor Henry Charles Johnson, since 1909 city superintendent of schools at Aberdeen, has devoted his life largely to educational work and, ever laboring for the attainment of high ideals, he has made his service a potent and helpful influence in promoting intellectual advancement in the various localities in which he has made his home. In his present position his record has been one of well directed service and important accomplishment and stands as a credit to his belief in education, his sincerity of purpose and his public spirit. Professor Johnson was born at Mount Sterling, Wisconsin, October 11, 1876, and is a son of Erick and Mattie Johnson, who removed to South Dakota in 1909. The father is now engaged in farming near Greene, Iowa. Professor Johnson acquired his high-school education in Mount Sterling, Wisconsin, and afterward attended a normal school in Charles City, Iowa. He received the degree of B. A. from the Iowa State University in 1902 and the degree of M. A from the same institution in 1907. Following the completion of his studies he turned his attention to teaching and engaged in that occupation in the country schools of Iowa and Wisconsin, later becoming connected with the Keswick (Iowa) high school. He rose rapidly in his chosen profession, being appointed principal of the high school at Decorah, Iowa, and serving in that capacity for two years and for a similar period of time as superintendent of schools of that city.
Professor Johnson came to Aberdeen in 1909 and in the same year was appointed city superintendent of schools here, an office which he has filled with honor and credit since that time. He has become a recognized leader in the field of education and personally superintends every detail of the work intrusted to him. He planned the high school building which was erected in 1911 and ordered the equipment, which is modern, up-to- date and sanitary in every particular, making this one of the best and most modern school buildings in the state. The high school has four hundred and fifty pupils and the entire enrollment of the city schools is eighteen hundred, under charge of seventy-four teachers. Professor Johnson is one of the most progressive educators in the state and has inaugurated important departments in the school system of Aberdeen, providing for the medical examination of every pupil and for the promotion of physical efficiency and health by courses in physical culture. This department is in the hands of a physical director employed by the year and there is a trained nurse in constant attendance. In the new high school there is a fine gymnasium and the playground is equipped with two thousand dollars' worth of apparatus, a visible evidence of the superintendent's belief in outdoor exercise as an aid to health. Professor Johnson has introduced into the schools of Aberdeen courses in manual training, printing and domestic science and these have already become popular departments. His entire life since attaining his majority has been given over to educational work and he is a recognized leader in this field. He is zealous and discriminating and studies each child from the standpoint of the individual, providing for his or her development along the most practical lines. In 1905 Professor Johnson married Miss Marie Whitwell, of Decorah, Iowa, and they have become the parents of four children, one of whom has passed away. The Professor is a member of the Congregational church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is connected fraternally with the Knights of Pythias and the Masonic lodge. Educational interests of Aberdeen owe to him a great and lasting debt, and his influence hat been a tangible force for good in other fields.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Kelly, Morris
Morris H. Kelly, who at the time of his death, which occurred on the 21st of December, 1904, was receiver of the land office at Aberdeen, was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, in the year 1849, of Quaker parentage. His father, John Kelly, was a farmer by occupation, making that pursuit his life work. He married Elizabeth Hunt and they became the parents of eight children. Good educational advantages were afforded the family and Morris H. Kelly, after attending the public schools, continued his studies in the Quaker Academy at Bloomingdale, Indiana. When a young man he left home and went to Farmer City, Illinois, where he engaged in the hardware business. Thinking that he would find still broader opportunities in the new but growing northwest, he came to South Dakota, moving a stock of goods to Ashton, where he arrived on the 3d of March, 1882. He opened the first hardware store in the town and conducted the business successfully until July, 1887, when he went to Aberdeen. There he joined the Western Farm Mortgage Company, of which he became treasurer. He was connected therewith for a number of years. Later he was made receiver of the land office and continued to acceptably fill that position to the time of his death.
Mr. Kelly was not only active in a business way, but also in connection with public affairs. He was interested in everything that pertained to civic progress and improvement and for several years did excellent service for the city as a member of the city council. He was also a member of the building committee at the time the Mitchell library was erected. He believed in the employment of each opportunity and in many ways he demonstrated his devotion to the public good, even though he would derive no individual benefit therefrom. In 1872 in Tuscola, Illinois, Mr. Kelly was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Glasgow, who was born in Charleston, Illinois, a daughter of Kimball Glasgow, a native of Hardin county, Kentucky, who removed to Charleston, Illinois, at an early period in the development of that place. He was extensively engaged in farming and stock-raising in that locality, being one of the leading representatives of agricultural interests there. He married Margaret Reat, of Ohio, and they were the parents of eight children. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly had a family of four children, namely: Mrs. A. W. Vodish; Margaret R.; John R., who is now a lieutenant in the United States army; and Herbert G., deceased. Mr. Kelly voted with the republican party and was always ready to support his political position by intelligent argument. He stood very high in Masonic circles, was most active in the order and attained an honorary thirty-third degree, given only in recognition of valuable service to the craft. At one time he was grand commander of the grand commandery of the state. In his passing death removed one of the valued citizens of Aberdeen, for he was reliable and enterprising in business, loyal in citizenship, faithful in friendship and devoted to the welfare of his family.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


King, Hiram
Dr. Hiram I. King, a prominent and successful physician and surgeon of Aberdeen, has built up an extensive and remunerative practice during the years of his residence here. He was born in Spring Green, Wisconsin, in 1882 and is a son of Owen and Helen (Weston) King. He acquired his early education in the public schools of his native city and later entered Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, from which he was graduated in medicine in 1905, serving afterward for two years as interne in the Alexian Brothers Hospital, that city. In 1907 he began the general practice of medicine and surgery, locating at Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he has remained continuously to the present time, enjoying a lucrative and constantly growing practice. As a member of the American Medical Association, the American College of Surgeons, and the county and state medical societies he keeps in touch with the trend of modern advancement in his profession, of which he has remained always a close and earnest student. In 1914 he took a post-graduate course at Vienna, Austria, and is a member of the surgical staff of St. Luke's Hospital, Aberdeen.
In 1910 Dr. King was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Pardon, of Wisconsin, and they have become the parents of two children. The Doctor is a member of the Roman Catholic church, gives his political allegiance to the democratic party and is connected fraternally with the Knights of Columbus, the Order of Foresters, the Knights of the Maccabees, and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Both he and his wife are popular in social circles and possess many sterling characteristics which win them the regard and confidence of all who come in contact with them.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Malone, S. P.
S. P. Malone, the efficient and capable postmaster of Huron, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, August 6, 1858. He is a son of James and Mary (Brown) Malone, natives of Ireland, who emigrated to America in early life. They settled in Nebraska in 1869 and there the father engaged in farming. S. P. Malone learned the boiler-maker's trade in Pennsylvania and followed it in that state until 1881, when he came to South Dakota, settling in Huron. He secured a position with the Northwestern Railway Company and continued in the employ of that concern until March 28, 1908. He was in the passenger service for some time and in September, 1885, was given charge of an engine, which he ran until the close of his railroad career. On the 1st of April, 1908, Mr. Malone was appointed postmaster of Huron and has served since that time, having been appointed January 24, 1912. He discharges the duties of the office in a prompt, capable and reliable manner, and his work has received widespread commendation. On the 14th of June, 1888, Mr. Malone was united in marriage to Miss Ellen E. Sullivan, a native of Columbia, Brown county, South Dakota, and they have become the parents of two children: Robert E., now attending Brookings College; and Lucy R., employed in the money order department of the postoffice. Mr. Malone is a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and is affiliated also with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and takes an intelligent interest in public affairs, although he is not an office seeker. He is numbered among the early settlers in Huron and during the period of his residence here has gained the respect and confidence of all with whom business, official or social relations have brought him into contact.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Mathiesen, Hans
Hans Mathiesen is the senior partner in the firm of H. Mathiesen A Sons, proprietors of the Hillside Stock Farm, which is pleasantly and conveniently located two miles east of Watertown. There they are engaged in the breeding of Percheron horses, shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs, and they rank with the leading stockmen of northeastern South Dakota. Hans Mathiesen makes his home in the city of Watertown but is widely known throughout the county. He was born in Norway on the 20th of August, 1851, a son of Ole Mathiesen, who was a native of that part of Norway which is known as the land of the midnight sun. Further mention of him is made in connection with the sketch of Magnus Mathiesen on another page of this volume.
Hans Mathiesen was reared under the parental roof and in the public schools of his native country pursued his education. His opportunities, however, were somewhat limited, for when but thirteen years of age he started out as a wage earner and has since been dependent upon his own labors. His father had the contract to furnish wood for the copper mines and Hans was employed in chopping wood and hauling it to the mines.. In 1868, however, he bade adieu to friends and native country and sailed for the United States with his father, being then seventeen years of age. They journeyed westward into the interior of the country and Hans Mathiesen began working in the mines, being employed in the first level of the Hecla mines after they were opened. Eight or nine years were devoted to that occupation but in June, 1883, he came to South Dakota, settling in Watertown, where he embarked in merchandising, being thus prominently identified with the commercial interests of the city for fourteen years. In fact throughout all the intervening period to the present he has been a leading figure here, actively connected with business and public interests. In 1887 he was elected to the office of county treasurer of Codington county and then disposed of his store. For four years or for two terms he continued in that position, giving his undivided attention to the duties of the office, from which he retired with the confidence and high regard of all by reason of the capability and fidelity which he had displayed in the discharge of his official duties. In 1891 Mr. Mathiesen purchased three hundred and twenty acres of his present farm and has added thereto until he is now the owner of an entire section, and in connection with four of his sons he rents other land, so that they are now operating ten hundred and eighty acres. They are among the most extensive farmers of Codington county and the Hillside Stock Farm is known far and wide because of the progressive and scientific manner in which it is conducted. Splendid crops of corn, wheat and other cereals are annually harvested and, moreover, they conduct an extensive business as breeders of Percheron horses, shorthorn cattle, Duroc Jersey hogs, M. B. turkeys and Scotch Collie dogs. In 1879 Mr. Mathiesen was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Reque, a daughter of the old pioneer, Lars V. Reque of Deerfield, Wisconsin, who was one of the oldest Norwegian settlers in America. He emigrated to the United States in 1837 and died in Deerfield, in 1912, when in the ninety-fourth year of his age. He was known far and wide as one of the builders of Wisconsin. To Mr. and Mrs. Mathiesen have been born ten children, eight of whom still survive, as follows: Otto Ferdinand, who serves as assistant cashier of the State Bank at Bonners Ferry, Idaho; Edwin Lewis; Luella Emelia; John Walter; Frank Robert; William Hubert; Homer Arnold; and Agnes Ingeborg Frederika. All the children are at home except the eldest son. The parents have given their children excellent educational opportunities, thus specially qualifying them for life's practical and responsible duties. Mr. Mathiesen and his family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church of Watertown, of which he was one of the organizers and charter members. He has been a generous contributor to its support and an earnest worker for its upbuilding and the extension of its influence. In his political views Mr. Mathiesen is an earnest republican and has served as a member of the school board and of the city council of Watertown, ever exercising his official prerogatives in support of those measures and movements which are factors in upholding the highest civic standards. He has also been township assessor for the past four years and in November, 1914, he was elected to represent the thirty-first district in the state legislature. By reason of the extent and importance of his business interests, his public-spirited citizenship, his loyalty to all those interests which work for honorable manhood, he has become recognized as one of the foremost citizens of Codington county, belonging to that class of men who uphold the political and legal status and advance the material and moral progress of the community.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Olander, Adolph
Adolph Olander, owner of the Olander block, in a portion of which he conducts one of the leading clothing stores in Aberdeen, was born in Sweden, April 28, 1861. He came to the United States in 1881 and located first in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he remained until 1898 engaged in the clothing business. In September of that year he removed to Aberdeen, South Dakota, and entered the employ of I. Apple & Company, in whose service he continued for six years thereafter. In 1904 he joined D. F. McPherson and they opened a clothing store which they conducted successfully for eight years. This partnership was dissolved in January, 1912, and Mr. Olander built the Olander block, a fine business building twenty-five by one hundred and twenty feet in dimensions. Upon the second floor are offices and a studio, but the first floor and basement are occupied by Mr. Olander, who conducts a large clothing establishment there. He has a well selected stock of goods and does a large business, for his prices are reasonable, his methods straightforward and honorable, and his integrity above reproach. On the 7th of October, 1890, Mr. Olander was united in marriage to Miss Tena Holmberg, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and they have become the parents of five children: Emil, who is studying law in the University of South Dakota; and Amy, Adolph, Jr., Carl and Ruth, at home.Mr. Olander is a member of the Wesleyan Methodist church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He has made good use of his time and opportunities and as the years have gone by has gained prosperity, standing today among the representative and successful business men of the city.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Robinson, Oliver
Oliver A. Robinson is a well known and greatly respected resident of Spink county, where he owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres located on section 31, Harmony township. In addition to the cultivation of his farm he follows his trade of carpentering to some extent and is known as a capable and reliable workman. He was born in St. George, Quebec, Canada, on the 22d of February, 1867, a son of Francis Xavier and Emily (Russeau) Robinson. The family are of Scotch descent, but have been in the new world for many generations. The father came to South Dakota with his family from Iowa, where he had lived for thirteen years, and after coming here took up a homestead in Brown county, which he improved and where he lived for ten years, after which he removed to Spink county, but subsequently went to Parker and resided there for a time. Still later he took up his residence in Jefferson and is now a resident of that place. He is eighty-six years of age, but is in better health than many a man ten years his junior. His wife passed away in 1892 and is buried in Aberdeen, this state.
Oliver A. Robinson received his education in Iowa, but left school when a youth of seventeen. He then assisted his father upon the farm until he had reached the age of twenty-four years, when for two years he rented a farm, after which he purchased a relinquishment. He still owns that farm and raises both grain and stock, keeping eleven head of cattle, nineteen horses and a number of hogs. In connection with farming he works at the carpenter's trade and has built a number of residences, barns, etc., in his locality. Whatever he does is done well and his labors return him a good annual income.
Mr. Robinson was united in marriage, on the 6th of June, 1893, at Frankfort, South Dakota, to Miss Barbara Valder, a daughter of Peter and Matilda (Duren) Valder, the former a hotel proprietor at Frankfort. Her father passed away in 1901 and was buried in Frankfort, but her mother still resides in that city. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have ten children, namely: Loretta, the wife of Merritt Sheldon, a farmer of Spink county; Ermena, at home; Loraine and Louis helping their father; Stephen, who passed away in 1914, at the age of thirteen years and is buried at Frankfort; Callist and Alma, who are attending school; and Audrey, Eulalia and Maurice. The father is independent in the exercise of his right of franchise, voting for the man rather than the party. He is a member of the Catholic church and is ever ready to aid in the furtherance of its work. For three, decades Mr. Robinson has farmed in South Dakota and has always been among the first to adopt new machinery or new methods that promise to be of value. His progressive spirit and his industry have brought him prosperity and he is one of the substantial farmers of Spink county. Those who know
him best esteem him most, as his character is based upon those admirable qualities which stand the severest tests of life.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Tolvstad, Martin
Martin L. Tolvstad owns a farm of six hundred and forty acres situated on sections 1, 6, 12 and 19, La Prairie township, Spink county, and is recognized throughout his locality as an able and up-to-date agriculturist. He came to South Dakota in the fall of 1880, a number of years before the admission of the state into the Union, and in the intervening thirty-five years has witnessed an almost magical transformation in the country. It was then a wilderness and the Indians were still feared by the comparatively few white settlers who had begun the work of transforming the wild prairies into a highly developed agricultural section. Mr. Tolvstad was born in Ringsaker, Hedemarken; Norway, on the 11th of July, 1859, a son of Lars and Elie Tolvstad. When he was two years of age his father came with his family to this country and settled in Wisconsin, where he rented a farm. In 1882 he came to South Dakota and filed on the land which his son Martin L. now owns. He passed away in 1891, at the age of seventy-five years, and three years later his wife was called to rest at the age of sixty-six years. Both are buried in Bethany cemetery in La Prairie township.
Martin L. Tolvstad received his education in the district schools of Trempealeau county. Wisconsin, but put aside his textbooks when but fourteen years of age. He then assisted his father in the work of the farm until 1880 when he came to South Dakota and filed on a pre-emption claim near the present town of Stratford, Brown county. This he sold in 1883 and then filed on the homestead where he now makes his home. He later bought additional land and now owns in all six hundred and forty acres, which he has mainly devoted to the raising of grain, although he is gradually giving more attention to the raising of stock as well. The land is in a high state of cultivation and the buildings and fences are kept in excellent repair. The house, which is a commodious structure, is rendered especially attractive by a beautiful grove which surrounds it. Mr. Tolvstad has proved himself a man of sound business judgment and of untiring industry and the material success which he has achieved and the esteem of many friends are but the merited reward of his life of usefulness. In La Prairie township, December 4, 1893, Mr. Tolvstad married Miss Gertrude Kittlesland, a daughter of Ole and Lüv Kittlesland. The former died in Norway, but his wife, who emigrated to America with her children after the death of her husband, survived him until 1912 and is buried in the Bethany cemetery in La Prairie township, Spink county. Mr. and Mrs. Tolvstad have three children: Ella, who attended the high school of Brentford and the Normal School; Harry and Frank, who are assisting their father in the work of the farm. Mr. Tolvstad votes for men and measures rather than for party and takes an active part in local public affairs. He has held several township offices and in 1892 was elected clerk of the town, serving with ability in that position. He was appointed eighteen months after that term expired and was reelected on the expiration of his appointment and still holds the office. He also served for years either as clerk or treasurer of the school board and is now holding the latter position. Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He has done much to aid in the agricultural development of Spink county and the esteem in which he is held is justly merited. He has built one of the finest country residences in that county and it is the meeting place for his many friends.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Voedisch, A. W.
A. W. Voedisch, the only manufacturing jeweler in South Dakota, is prominently connected with business interests of Aberdeen as proprietor of the business controlled by the Voedisch Jewelry Company, which he organized in 1894. He is also well known among the music lovers in the city and highly esteemed as the originator of the Aberdeen May Musical Festival which under his direction has become one of the important annual events in musical circles of the state. Mr. Voedisch was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, in 1872 and is s son of Frederick and Catherine Voedisch, who removed to Minnesota in 1882, taking up government land near the South Dakota line. One year and a half later they removed to North Dakota, where the father died.  A. W. Voedisch acquired a grammar and high school education and following the completion of his studies became connected with the jewelry business, in which he has since continued. In 1894, when he was twenty-two years of age, he came to Aberdeen and established the Voedisch Jewelry Company, locating his enterprise in the building now occupied by the Firey drug store. He later established himself in the Bowles building and in 1904 removed to his present location, where he has a fine store twenty-five by seventy feet in dimensions. Mr. Voedisch is the only manufacturing jeweler in South Dakota and he manufactures all kinds of solid gold goods and fills a number of special orders, doing the manufacturing for over one hundred and twenty jewelers in various parts of the northwest. He employs ten men in his manufacturing department and he has besides, a modern retail store which his able management has made a profitable business institution. In 1899 Mr. Voedisch was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Kelly of Aberdeen and they have become the parents of two sons. Mr. Voedisch is a thirty-second degree Mason, holding membership in the lodge, chapter, commandery and Shrine, and he belongs also to the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. His political allegiance is given to the republican party. Mr. Voedisch is well known as the founder of the Aberdeen May Musical Festival, of which he has been director since its organization in 1901. This festival is held for three days every May and is supported by the-best musical talent in the country, attracting music lovers from all parts of the northwest. Mr. Voedisch as a leading spirit in the promotion of this enterprise has been warmly commended by those of Aberdeen for the service which he has rendered the city in bringing into it each year about live thousand people of the finest type of citizenship. He is prominent in both business and musical circles and his sterling worth is manifest in the appreciation of a large circle of friends.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Ward, A. L.
Prominently identified with various business and corporate interests of Aberdeen, A. L. Ward has risen by force of his ability, executive power and initiative spirit to a high place in commercial affairs of that city, where since 1885 he has made his home. He is the founder and promoter of the Ward Hotel and is connected also with the Ward-Owsley Company, wholesale and manufacturing confectioners, and his extensive interests have made him for many years a force in promoting the prosperity of the city. Mr. Ward was born in 1861 and was taken to Linn county, Iowa, by his parents in 1866, acquiring his education in the public schools of that locality. In 1882 he came to South Dakota, where he took up government land in Beadle county, proving up his claim and continuing to reside upon his farm until 1885. In that year he came to Aberdeen and opened the first modern restaurant in the city, conducting this enterprise successfully for some years thereafter. In 1897 he erected the Ward Hotel, of which he has since been the proprietor and which under his capable and intelligent management has become one of the leading hostelries in the city. It has ninety rooms and twenty-five baths and is well furnished and completely equipped, provided with all the conveniences and accessories necessary to the comfort of the guests. Mr. Ward is interested also in the Sherman Hotel and is a director in the Aberdeen Railway, which he aided in promoting. In addition to these connections he is also well known as one of the organizers of the Ward-Owsley Company, wholesale and manufacturing confectioners, and since the foundation of this enterprise he has given a great deal of time to its affairs. The company owns a two-story building with one hundred foot frontage and controls a large business in all departments, giving employment to forty people in the home plant and to four traveling salesmen.
In 1894 Mr. Ward was united in marriage to Miss Carrie H. Paulhamus, who came to Aberdeen with her mother in 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Ward have become the parents of two children, a son and a daughter. Mr. Ward is a thirty-second degree Mason, holding membership in the lodge, chapter, commandery and Shrine; is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He has been a resident of Aberdeen for thirty years and has during that period been closely and influentially associated with business interests of the city. He has won a gratifying degree of success and his influence has been a tangible force for good in community development.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Young, William
William Young, owning a farm of four hundred acres in La Prairie township, Spink county, was born in Waunakee, Wisconsin, December 28, 1876, a son of Goddard and Elizabeth Young. The former, who came from Germany, was a farmer and for some time followed agricultural pursuits in Wisconsin before his arrival in South Dakota about 1890. After coming to this state he first settled on a farm in Tetonke township, which he rented for several years. Subsequently he bought four hundred and eighty acres of land in La Prairie township and later added a quarter section. He has since sold one hundred and sixty acres to his son, but is still owner of four hundred and eighty acres. He resides in Warner, Brown county, and is respected by all who know him as a man of sterling integrity. His wife died near Waunakee in 1881 and is there buried. They were the parents of three sons and a daughter, namely: John, who is farming in partnership with his brother; Mary, who died in 1904 and is buried in the Aberdeen cemetery; William; and Henry, a farmer of La Prairie township. William Young received his early education in his native county, but completed his schooling in the La Prairie district school, putting aside his textbooks at the age of twenty. Needless to say, during this time he assisted his father in the work of the fields during the summers. After leaving school he remained home for some time and then purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, later buying one hundred and sixty acres from his father and eighty acres from another farmer. His place comprises in all four hundred acres and he does mixed farming; his stock and crops together bringing him in a substantial income. He manages the varied work of the farm so as to secure the best results with the least expenditure of time and energy and, as he keeps everything in splendid condition and uses the most up-to-date machinery, he finds farming not only profitable but congenial. He is also interested in Minnesota land, owning two hundred and forty acres near Breckenridge. Mr. Young was married in La Prairie township, Spink county, on the 20th of March, 1901, to Miss Rosie Jahnke, a native of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and a daughter of Charles and Caroline (Glandzmann) Jahnke. The former resides at Groton, South Dakota, but the latter has been laid to rest in the cemetery at Verdon, South Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Young have two sons, Luverne J., who is attending school, and Floyd William. The father is one of that rapidly increasing number of men who refuse to be dictated to by party leaders, voting for men and measures rather than for party. His land is in the river bottom and constitutes as fine a farming property as there is in Spink county, but much of its value is due to the efforts of Mr. Young, for when it came into his possession it was wild land and considered of small value. It was necessary to clear it of trees and undergrowth before it could be cultivated and this arduous work he performed before putting in his crops. He has used excellent judgment in the care of his land and has conserved its fertility so that it products excellent crops annually.
Source: History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Hansen, Mathilda
Mathilda Hansen
born 07/26/1869
died 03/10/1954
Mathilda Hansen was born on July 26, 1869, in Columbia County, Wisconsin. It was there that her early childhood was spent. On June 20th, 1882, she came by train in an immigrant car to Groton, South Dakota, along with her father, Hans J. Hansen, her mother, Dorthea Hansen, three sisters and two brothers. They went by team and wagon to her father’s claim south-west of Groton about fifteen miles to a district that was later to be organized as Gem township.  Mathilda’s first house here was a sod house made by her father. Due to their many tasks of home making and late arrival their only crop the first year was a few vegetables. Their only meat was fish caught from the Jim River one and one-half miles from the homestead. They brought with them a dog, one cow, a few chickens and two horses. Since they had no fences the horses and cow were picketed out. Water for the livestock and household was drawn with a rope and bucket from a well which was dug about twenty-five feet deep. A school house called the “Nelson School” was built one and one-half miles from Mathilda’s home. Mathilda, along with her two sisters and one brother, were the first pupils. The school was also used as a place of worship for the Lutheran Church. Rev. Gjevre and Rev. Storle were the first pastors.  The following year 1883 an epidemic of diphtheria claimed the lives of one brother and one sister. Her father hauled the wheat needed for flour to Columbia, South Dakota, to be ground at the mill. Her mother made yarn and knitted it into mittens and stockings for the family. Cow chips, twisted hay and some wood hauled from Rondell was their fuel. At times when a severe wind blew, Mathilda and her brother and sisters had to sit on the roof of their sod house to keep it from blowing away. In those days some deer and many antelope were still to be seen on the prairie. In 1921 Mr. and Mrs. Hansen sold part of the home farm to Hans C. Hansen, Jr. and Herman L. Hansen and bought a farm on the outskirts of Aberdeen. They joined the Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Aberdeen at that time. Mrs. Hansen was an active member, she helped prepare and cook the ludefisk for their annual Ludefisk dinners for twenty-five years. They lived at this place from 1921 to 1925, they then returned to the home place and due to poor health Mr. Hansen soon retired from the road contracting business. Mrs. Hans C. Hansen passed away on September 2, 1933. Mrs. Mathilda Hansen now lives on the home place three and one-half miles north of Stratford, with her son Herman L. Hansen. During Mrs. Hansen’s long and eventful life she has raised eleven children, Mrs. Bernt Kringen, Carl M. Hansen, Hans C. Hansen and Mrs. Arnold M. Krueger of Aberdeen, Herman L. Hansen and Mrs. Edward Bunsness of Groton, Mrs. George Burke of Watertown, and George M. Hansen of Stratford. Three daughters have passed away, Mrs. Dorthea Ruckman, Mrs. Clara Olson and Mrs. Anna McLaughlin.
Source: Unknown
Contributor:Jacque McDonnell


Mason, George
Mason, George Grant, Division Superintendent Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. Office Aberdeen, S. D. Born Sept. 16, 1868. Graduated from Sheffield Scientific School, Yale University, 1888, and took a special course at Stevens' Institute Technology at Hoboken, N. J., in 1889. Entered railway service Sept. 1889, since which he has been consecutively to June 1S93, special apprentice in shop and test work at West Milwaukee shops Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry; June 1893 to July 1895, foreman locomotive and air brake department same shops; July to Dec. 1895, assistant roundhouse foreman at West Milwaukee; Dec. 1895 to July 1898; roundhouse foreman at Green Bay, Wis.; July 1898 to Nov. 1899, chief draftsman at West Milwaukee shops; Nov. 1899 to Oct. 1904, trainmaster Iowa & Dakota division; Oct. 1904 to date, superintendent James River division; entire service with the Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry.
Source: The Biographical Directory of the Railway Officials of America; T. Addison Busbey, 1906
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Scott, Charles
Scott, Charles H., Superintendent Missouri Kansas & Texas Ry of Texas. Office Greenville, Tex. Born May 31, 1861, in Wisconsin. Entered railway service 1879 as messenger Southern Minnesota Rd at Lacrosse, Wis., since which he has been consecutively 1880 to 1894, with Chicago Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry as telegraph operator, train dispatcher and trainmaster at Lacrosse, Wis.; 1894 to 1895, trainmaster at St. Paul, Minn. 1895 to Dec. 1, 1902, division superintendent same road at Aberdeen, S. D.; Dec. 1, 1902, to Dec. 1, 1903, out of service; Dec. 1, 1903, to Dec. 24, 1905, trainmaster Missouri Kansas & Texas Ry of Texas at Smithville, Tex.; Dec. 24, 1905, to date, division superintendent same road at Greenville, Tex.
Source: The Biographical Directory of the Railway Officials of America; T. Addison Busbey, 1906
Contributor: Karen Seeman


Chamberlin, John
JOHN CHAMBERLIN, one of the sterling pioneers of Cambria township. Brown county, is a native of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he was born on the 2d of March, 1831, being a son of John and Anna Chamberlin, both of whom were born and reared in the state of New Jersey, the father being a miller by vocation. The subject was reared to manhood in the state of New Jersey, having been assigned to the care of his uncle when he was eleven years of age. In that state he gained his education and at the age of sixteen entered upon a four-years apprenticeship at the trade of wagonmaking, receiving
the sum of one hundred dollars in cash for the services rendered during this period, while he was permitted to work in the harvest fields two weeks each season, thereby gaining a little extra money. In 1852 he came west to Kingston, Green Lake county, Wisconsin, where he established a shop and engaged in the work of his trade, also dealing in general merchandise on a small scale. He followed his trade for a period of thirty years, having been foreman of a large shop in Vermont prior to his removal to Wisconsin. He remained in Kingston seven years and then removed to Portage City, Wisconsin, where he was for one year employed in the car shops of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. Later he removed to Randolph, in the same state, where he made his home until 1880, having served as postmaster of the town for the greater portion of the intervening period. In the year mentioned Mr. Chamberlin came to what is now the state of South Dakota, taking up a homestead claim in Brown county, on July 15th, this being the place on which he has ever since continued to reside, having brought his family to the pioneer farm in October of the same year. During the winter of 1880-81 he and his family occupied a sod house on an adjoining farm, and during a period of eight months no other woman than his wife entered the primitive dwelling, with one exception, the nearest neighbors being one and a half miles or more distant. It is needless to say that the family encountered its quota of hardships and deprivations, and during the winter mentioned some of the flour used in the household was obtained by grinding the wheat in a common coffee-mill. In the fall of 1880 Mr. Chamberlin hauled lumber from Watertown and constructed a small house on his claim, while his present comfortable and attractive farm residence was erected about fifteen years ago, the other farm buildings being likewise of substantial order. At the time he came here there were but four or five other families in Cambria township. Shortly after taking up his residence here Mr. Chamberlin also took up a tree claim, and his landed estate now comprises four hundred and eighty acres, of which three hundred and twenty comprise the home place, while the remaining one hundred and sixty acres constitute a separate farm, about a half mile distant. The subject has from the beginning devoted his attention mainly to the raising of grain and at the present time he devotes three hundred acres to this branch of his enterprise. He has raised as high as thirty bushels to the acre, and his largest crop in one year aggregated thirty thousand bushels. He was prominently concerned in the organization of the township and has been closely identified with its development and material upbuilding. He has served for many years as chairman of the board of township trustees, and in 1891 he was elected to the office of county commissioner, in which capacity he served three years. In politics he is arrayed as a stalwart supporter of the principles of the People's party, and both he and his wife are zealous and valued members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Booth. They were concerned in the organization of the original class which resulted in the founding of this church, about 1884, and of the few who thus gathered together for worship there is probably but one other left in the township, Mrs. Wenz. Mr. Chamberlin has been an official in the church from the time of its organization to two years ago and was Sunday school superintendent fifteen years.
On the 24th of April, 1837, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Chamberlin to Miss Martha I. Clark, who was born and reared in Vermont, having received her education in the academy at Brandon, that state, and having been a successful teacher for about two years prior to her marriage. They have no children.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Koepsel, William
WILLIAM KOEPSEL, a member of the state senate and one of the honored citizens of Brown county, is a native of the Badger state, having been born on a farm in Dodge county, Wisconsin, on the 27th of June, 1858, and being a son of Herman and Caroline (Detlaff) Koepsel, who were numbered among the sterling pioneers of that state. The subject grew up under the invigorating discipline of the farm and received his educational training in the public and parochial schools. He continued to be identified with the great industry of agriculture in Wisconsin until 1882, when he came to what is now South Dakota and cast in his lot with its people. He secured his present farm, in Groton township, shortly after his arrival in the state, having now a well improved and attractive farm of four hundred and eighty acres and being known as a progressive and enterprising agriculturist and stock-grower. In politics Mr. Koepsel has ever been a stanch advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party, and while he has been an unostentatious worker in the party cause he has not been animated by ambition for office, so that his selection to his present distinguished position as a member of the state senate, in the fall of 1902, indicates in how high esteem and confidence he is held by the people of the district from which he was chosen for this honorable preferment. In the senate he was assigned to the committees on education, federal relations, public health, charitable and penal institutions, and legislative expenses, and in each of these important connections he proved himself signally faithful to the duties devolving upon him, while he introduced and stanchly advocated four bills of no slight importance, though never seeking to make himself obtrusive in the great deliberative body of which he is an able member. He is recognized as a man of most scrupulous honesty of purpose in all the relations of life, and thus the people of his district consistently place their trust and confidence in him as a representative of their interests and those of the state at large. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and has been president of the Groton congregation since its organization.
Mr. Koepsel was married, in March, 1883, to Bertha Waugerin, a native of Wisconsin, who died in April, 1885, leaving one son, Edward. He was married again in February, 1888, to Adeline Wegner, of Groton. Mrs. Koepsel died in August, 1900, leaving three daughters, the oldest, Emma, being eleven years; the second, Frieda, nine years, and the youngest, Lydia, four years old. Mr. Koepsel was married the third time in April, 1902, to Miss Meta Zahl, of Minnesota, a native of Germany
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Robinson, A. P.
A. P. ROBINSON, who is justly considered one of the leading agriculturists of Brown county, was born in St. Lawrence county. New York, March 23, 1851. When a boy he was taken to Wisconsin by his parents and spent his youth, until nineteen years of age, in Dodge county, that state, living on a farm until his fourteenth year. Meanwhile he acquired a common-school education and on leaving the farm entered his father's store. In 1869 he went to native town and secured his early educational training in its public schools, after which he completed a course of study in St. Lawrence University, in Canton, that state, where he was graduated as a member of the class of 1880. He then took up the study of law. in the office of Hon. Leslie W. Russell, of that place, one of the most eminent members of the bar of the state. He served as attorney general of the state, was a member of congress for several terms, while in 1884 he was defeated for the United States senate by a few votes, his opponent being the Hon. William M. Evarts. He later became an associate justice of the supreme court of the state, resigning this office a short time before his death. Under this able and honored preceptor Judge Stearns prosecuted his legal studies, continuing in the office of Judge Russell until 1884, when he accompanied his preceptor to Albany, being one of his clerks while he was serving as attorney general. During the winter of 1884 the subject took a course of lectures in the Albany Law School, having been admitted to the bar of the state in November of the preceding year. Judge Stearns was graduated in the law department of Union University, in Albany, on the 22d of May, 1884, having completed the prescribed two-years course in one year, and from this institution he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. After his graduation he entered upon the active practice of his profession in Canton, New York, where he remained one year. In April, 1885, he came west on business, and became so impressed with the attractions of this division of our national domain that he located in Wadena, Minnesota, where he was associated in practice with Frank Wilson until 1887, meeting with excellent success. In 1889 his father died and he returned to his old home in New York to assist in the settlement of the estate. He had previously, in 1887, visited South Dakota on business, remaining several months, and upon returning to the west he located in Fort Pierre, this state, in 1890. Here he has since been engaged in active practice, retaining at the present time a large and representative clientage and holding high prestige at the bar of the state. He served three terms as state's attorney for Stanley county, and one term as judge of the county court, making an excellent record in each of these offices. He was one of those prominently concerned in bringing about the abolishment of the grand-jury system in South Dakota, and he drew the first information for murder after the law of 1896 went into effect, said information having been drawn on the 3d of July of that year, while the law went into
effect only two days previously. During his first term as county attorney he was prosecutor in three murder trials, and while serving on the county bench he settled the estate of Frederick Dupree, amounting to one hundred and eighty thousand dollars. The Judge has been an ardent and effective worker in the cause of the Republican party, and in 1892-3 was secretary of the Republican League of the state. Early in the year 1893 Gov. Charles H. Sheldon selected Mr. Stearns for one of his staff and commissioned him a colonel. He held this appointment for four years, and did his full share of the honors and entertaining at the South Dakota building at the World's Fair in Chicago during the season of 1893. He was also appointed and commissioned by Governor Sheldon to represent this state as a delegate to the World's Real Estate Congress, held in Chicago during the week commencing October 12. 1893. He was a charter member of Hiram Lodge, No. 123. Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Fort Pierre, and the charter for the same was secured largely through his efforts, as there was no little opposition on the part of other lodges. Owing to the danger entailed in crossing the Missouri river at certain seasons of the year he finally secured the required dispensation from the grand lodge. He has been a strong advocate of the project of building a railroad from Pierre to the Black Hills, and his opinions and written articles on the subject have been freely quoted and republished.
From the time of locating in the state Judge Stearns has been more or less interested in real estate and stock raising enterprises, and in 1900 he effected the organization of the St. Paul & Fort Pierre Cattle Company, of which he has been vice-president and general manager from the time of its inception. J. B. Little, of St. Paul, Minnesota, is president, and H. A. Knight, of Minneapolis, is secretary and treasurer. The company is capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars, and is engaged in the grazing and maturing of beef cattle, having one of the finest stock ranches west of the Missouri river, the same being located on the Bad river, two and one-half miles south of Fort Pierre, where they have a large ranch and fine ranch buildings. They make a specialty of buying Texas cattle, shipping them to their ranch and here maturing them for the Chicago market, while the company are rapidly increasing the number of stock fed on the ranch, conducting operations on a constantly increasing scale.
On the 24th of November, 1893, Judge Stearns was united in marriage to Mrs. Mary A. Miar, who was born and reared in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, being a daughter of John Heyler, a prominent farmer of
Tioga county. No children have been born of this union
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Murdy, Robert
ROBERT L. MURDY. M. D., who is successfully engaged in the practice of his profession in the attractive city of Aberdeen, Brown county, was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, on the 31st of May, 1869, and is a son of Andrew and Eliza Murdy, the lineage being of Scotch-Irish derivation. He received his early educational discipline in the public schools of Iowa, having completed a course of study in the
high school at Moulton, while later he attended a business college in the city of Keokuk. In 1889 he was matriculated in the Keokuk Medical College, where he completed the prescribed course and was
graduated as a member of the class of 1892, receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine. In 1896 he was graduated in the Missouri Medical College, at St. Louis, Missouri, from which institution likewise he
secured a degree. In 1901 he took a post-graduate course in a clinical school in the city of Chicago; in 1902-3 he took post-graduate work in surgery and gynecology in Vienna, Austria, and upon his return
to America, in the spring of 1903, he took a post-graduate course in the New York Polyclinic, so that he is most admirably equipped for the work of his exacting and noble profession. In 1892 the Doctor
located in Bowdle, Edmunds county. South Dakota, where he was engaged in practice until September of the following year, when he went to the city of St. Louis for further study. In January, 1898, he returned to South Dakota and located in Aberdeen, where he has since been most successfully engaged in practice save for the intervals given to post-graduate study in various prominent institutions, as previously noted. He is a member of the American Medical Association, the State Medical Society of South Dakota and the Aberdeen District Medical Society, and is held in high esteem in professional circles as well as in the business and social circles of his home city. He has read several interesting and practical papers before the local and state medical societies. He is surgeon for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company and visiting surgeon to St. Luke's Hospital at Aberdeen. In politics he is a conservative Democrat, believing firmly in the generic principles of the party, and fraternally is identified with the Knights of Pythias, Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Modern Woodmen of America. He is not formally a member of any religious body but is an attendant of the Protestant Episcopal church, with whose faith and impressive ritual he is in sympathy, Mrs. Murdy being a communicant of the same.  On the 19th of April, 1896, Dr. Murdy was united in marriage to Miss Pearl Colliver, who was born in Davis county, Iowa, being a daughter of John and Martha Colliver. Of this union have been born two children, Robert C. and Bernice, who lend cheer and brightness to the family home.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Kribs, P. D.
P. D. KRIBS was born in the city of Elgin, Illinois, on the 5th of July, 1846, being a son of Paul and Sarah A. Kribs, who removed thence to Trempealeau county, Wisconsin, in 1865, his father there engaging in farming, to which he continued to devote his attention until his death. The subject, was thus reared to manhood in the county noted and there received his early educational discipline in the public schools, after which he prosecuted a course of study in the Galesville University, at Galesville, that county, while it is interesting to recall in the connection that among his fellow students was Hon. Charles N. Herreid, the present governor of South Dakota. After leaving school Mr. Kribs was engaged in teaching until March, 1886, when he came to South Dakota and located in the village of Leola, McPherson county, where he engaged in the drug business. He also became the publisher of the Northwest Blade, which he continued in Leola for three years, then removing the plant and business to Eureka, in the same county, where he continued the publication until April, 1894, when he sold out to his partner. In July, 1893, Mr. Kribs came to Columbia, and here established himself in the drug business, which he has since continued.
Mr. Kribs is a stalwart advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party and has taken an active part in political affairs. In the autumn of 1902 he was elected to represent Brown county in the lower house of the state legislature. He was assigned to the committees on education, public health, libraries and printing. Mr. Kribs has ever been a stanch friend of the cause of popular education and has rendered most effective service along this line since coming to South Dakota. Before a meeting of the board of directors of Brown county he read a timely and able article touching the matter of centralizing the work of rural schools in the interest of effective service, advocating the establishing of central high schools in the various townships and thus bringing the higher school advantages accessible to a greater number and materially improving the system as a whole. This article was published by the state department of education and largely circulated throughout the state.
In Leola, McPherson county, this state, on the 8th of November, 1887, Mr. Kribs was united in marriage to Miss Hattie M. Cavanagh, who was born in the province of Ontario, Canada, being a daughter of P. and Mary A. Cavanagh, who came to South Dakota in 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Kribs have three daughters, Edith, Olive and Ruth, who remain at the parental home and who are to be afforded the best of educational advantages.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Bayne, William
WILLIAM H. BAYNE was born near Medina, Orleans county, New York, on December 30, 1840. His father was a farmer and William H. devoted his early life to the rugged outdoor labor so conducive to health, physical development and the formation of industrious habits. His education embraced the common-school course and he grew to young manhood well prepared for the duties that awaited him as an industrious and intelligent American citizen. He was a young man in his twenty-first year when the country became alarmed by the threat of civil war and when the rebellion broke out he tendered his services to the government, enlisting in November, 1861, in Company D, Twenty-eighth New York Infantry. He accompanied his command to the front and saw considerable active duty in Maryland and along the Potomac river, but after a few months a severe attack of typhoid fever caused him to be sent to the hospital at Winchester, where he remained under treatment until his discharge, just six months and ten days after entering the army.
In the spring of 1864 Mr. Bayne went to Toledo, Ohio, for the purpose of helping his uncle run a boat on the Miami canal, but soon reaching that city he changed his mind and again entered the military service, joining Company C, of the One Hundred and Thirtieth Ohio National Guards, with which he continued for a period of four months and twenty days. During a part of that time his command was stationed at Johnson's Island, and from there was sent to Virginia, where it did guard duty principally until the expiration of the subject's period of enlistment. On leaving the army Mr. Bayne went to Michigan and, purchasing a small tract of land near the city of Coldwater, engaged in the pursuit of agriculture. After spending fifteen years in that state, he disposed of his land and other interests and in 1880 came to South Dakota and located a claim near Rondel, Brown county. Immediately following this he went to Chicago and began working at carpentry, which trade he had previously learned, and for a considerable length of time he was employed in the town of Pullman, at various kinds of mechanical labor.
Returning to Dakota in 1880, Mr. Bayne secured a tree claim and homestead, which he has since improved and on which he now lives, devoting his original homestead to the raising of live stock. He carries on farming and the livestock business quite extensively and has made a success of both, owning at this time one of the best improved places in the township of his residence, in addition to which he rents considerable land for the prosecution of his agricultural interests. He pays considerable attention to live stock, making a specialty of cattle and hogs, and from this source derives a liberal share of his income.
Mr. Bayne is an enterprising man and a creditable representative of that large and respectable class of yeomen that in a quiet, unostentatious way have done so much to improve the great west and develop its resources. A gentleman of pleasant manner and mien, courteous in his relations with others, he makes friends of all he meets and exercises a wholesome influence among his neighbors and fellow citizens. His sound judgment, practical common sense and correct ideas of right led to his election to the office of justice of the peace, which position he held for a period of ten years, proving an able and discreet dispenser of justice, as is attested by the fairness of his rulings and the impartial manner in which he rendered his decisions. Mr. Bayne is a Republican in politics and remained true to the principles of his party when it was threatened with disruption by the Populist movement of a few years ago. He has never been a seeker after public position, but labors earnestly for the success of the party's candidate, preferring to work for others rather than claim official honors for himself.
Mr. Bayne was married while living in Michigan, but his wife died in California a few years ago. Her maiden name was C. A. Kingsley and she bore him children as follows: Alice S., who lives in Sioux City, Iowa; Georgia M., wife of John Humphrey, also of that place; Pearl, now Mrs. John Meesh, of California, and Mrs. Ella E. Gay, whose home is in California. In 1884 Mr. Bayne was married to Jennie F. Cool, of Grand Detour, Illinois. Fraternally Mr. Bayne belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and at different times has filled official position in the local post with which he holds membership.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Bockler, John
JOHN H. BOCKLER is a native of Washington county, Wisconsin, where his birth occurred on the 27th day of November, 1861. Born in the country and reared on a farm, he grew up with well-defined ideas of life and its responsibilities, and while still young he laid plans for the future and has lived to carry out the same. He attended school in Winona county, Minnesota, and on attaining his majority came to
South Dakota, arriving in Brown county in the year 1882. Shortly after reaching his destination Mr. Bockler pre-empted a claim in Rondel township, seven miles southeast of Warner, and, addressing himself to its improvement, in due time had a good farm under cultivation, from the proceeds of which he has since been enabled to add to his realty until he now owns land to the amount of four hundred and eighty acres, all well situated and valuable. He has devoted his attention to general farming and stock raising and is today classed with the enterprising and successful men of the community in which he lives, being well situated financially and an influential factor in the affairs of his township and county.
Mr. Bockler has achieved an enviable reputation by reason of his success as a raiser of fine stock, his horses, cattle and sheep being of superior breeds and among the best to be found in this part of the state. He pays especial attention to the Percheron horse, in the breeding and raising of which he has gained more than local repute; his cattle are of the finest blood and he has also been fortunate in the raising of the famed Cotswold breed of sheep, having been among the first to introduce those valuable animals among the farmers of Brown county. Mr. Bockler's various business enterprises have succeeded according to his expectations and his career since coming west presents a succession of advancements such as few would have achieved under similar circumstances. He has taken an active interest in public affairs, served two terms as county commissioner and was a member of the board that planned and contracted for the new court house. In politics Mr. Bockler is what may be termed an independent, reserving the right to exercise his own judgment as to candidates and principles instead of obeying the dictates of party leaders.
Mr. Bockler. on December 10, 1891, entered the marriage relation with Miss Ida Pansegrau, of Aberdeen, and his family at this time consists of four children, namely : Nora, Herbert, Edna and Ethel. Mr. and Mrs. Bockler are among the highly esteemed people of their community, respected by a large number of friends for their many sterling qualities.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Lincoln, Isaac
Among those prominent in the banking and financial circles of South Dakota is Isaac Lincoln, president of the State Bank of Aberdeen, vice-president of the Aberdeen National Bank and president of the First National Bank of Webster, Day county. Mr. Lincoln is a native of the state of Maine, and is descended on both sides from colonial stock, his ancestors having come to New England
in 1636, settling on Cape Cod. Mr. Lincoln was born in Brunswick, Maine, and is a son of Dr. John D. and Ellen (Fessenden) Lincoln, who were likewise born and reared in Maine, where the respective families were early established. He secured his education in the public schools of his native town and in Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. Shortly thereafter he came to the territory of Dakota, where he engaged in farming and stock raising until 1886, when he located in Aberdeen. Besides his banking interests he is engaged in the real-estate business and in farming, having one of the largest stock and
grain farms in the county, which he personally supervises. In politics he is a Republican, and fraternally is identified with the Masonic order.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Andrus, Henry
HENRY CLAY ANDRUS is a native of the state of Michigan and a scion of one of its honored pioneer families. He was born in Highland township, Oakland county, on the 26th of September, 1844, being a son of Justus L. and Sarah W. (Smith) Andrus, and as his father was a great admirer of Henry Clay the honored name was given to our subject. Mr. Andrus was reared on the old homestead farm, and his educational advantages were such as the common schools of the time and place afforded. In the spring of 1864, at the age of nineteen years, he tendered his services in defense of the Union, enlisting as a member of Battery H, First Michigan Light Artillery, and joining the command at Chattanooga, Tennessee. He thereafter remained in active service until the close of the war. He was an active participant in the ever memorable Atlanta, campaigns, and later his command came back to Nashville, Tennessee, in pursuit of Hood's forces, and it remained in that state until the news of the surrender of Lee was received. Mr. Andrus proved a loyal and valiant young soldier and made a record which will ever redound to the honor of his name. He was mustered out at Jackson, Michigan. July 22, 1865, and then returned to the old home farm in Michigan. He thereafter continued to be actively engaged in agricultural pursuits in his native county until the spring of 1883, when he determined to cast in his fortunes with what is now the state of South Dakota. He came with his family to Aberdeen and shortly afterward took up a homestead claim in what was then New Hope township, his farm being in that portion which was afterward segregated and named Highland township, this title having been suggested by him, in honor of the township in which he was born, in the old Wolverine state. He located on his claim and forthwith began its improvement and cultivation, and today he is the owner of one of the finest farm properties in this favored and attractive section of the state. He not only improved the original claim, but also took up tree claims, and the landed estate now comprises two hundred and forty acres, the major portion being under cultivation while the place is equipped with substantial buildings, good fences, an orchard of apple and plum trees, which are bearing each year, and all represent the tangible results of the well directed efforts of the subject of this sketch. He was, however, not satisfied to thus look only to his personal interests, but from the start evinced a lively public spirit and gave his aid and influence and service in the promotion of all measures and enterprises for the general good. He served for thirteen years as township and school treasurer, and continued to be treasurer of the school board of his district until his removal to Aberdeen. He took up his residence in this city in November, 1897, having a pleasant home and amidst a host of stanch friends he is enjoying the rewards of his former toils and endeavors. He is now a member of the board of education in Aberdeen and is a member of its building committee. Mr. Andrus has ever been a stanch advocate of the principles and policies of the Republican party, and has been an active worker in behalf of its cause. In 1896 he was made the nominee of his party for representative in the state
legislature, but met the defeat which attended the party ticket in general throughout the state in that campaign, there being a veritable landslide in favor of the Populist party. He is a member of Robert Anderson Post, No. 19, Grand Army of the Republic. In Highland township, Oakland county, Michigan, on the 15th of January, 1867, Mr. Andrus was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Ann Curdy, who was born and reared in the above township, and was a schoolmate of her future husband. Her parents, Thomas and Sarah J. (Lockwood) Curdy, were natives of New York state, from whence they removed to Michigan, and were early settlers of Oakland county, that state, where they continued to reside until their deaths, the father dying March 17, 1898, and the mother on March 1, 1904, at Milford. To Mr. and Mrs. Andrus two sons have been born: Ernest Curdy, who died January 3, 1879, aged nine years, and Homer S., born April 3, 1879.
Mr. Andrus and wife are members of the First Baptist church of Aberdeen, of which he is a deacon, a trustee and superintendent of the Sabbath school. Mrs. Andrus has ever been active in the different lines of church work, has served for four years as organist, is teacher of the young ladies' class in the Sabbath school, and is president of the Woman's Relief Corps. Mr. Andrus has led a busy and active life, and his work has not been without success. The world is better for his having lived in it, as his endeavors have been set to a high standard of citizenship, and the communities in which he has resided have felt his influence and been benefited. Perhaps his greatest and most beneficial influence was felt in the pioneer community with which he cast his lot when he came to Brown county, this state. At that time what is now Highland township was without church or Sunday school organization of any kind, and but little, if any, attention was given by the people to the proper observance of the Sabbath day. Sunday was the same as any week day. Aided by a few kindred spirits, Mr. Andrus, in 1884, organized a Sunday school. This was followed in 1892 by the organization of a church, services being held in school houses. The result of this missionary work in Highland township is appreciable today, and Mr. Andrus has his reward in the knowledge that that community stands with any other in the state in regard to law-abiding, religious and God-fearing people. Truly, Mr. Andrus has proven himself a pioneer of South Dakota in the broadest and best sense of the term.
Mrs. Andrus is one of the pioneer school teachers of Brown county. She received a normal school training in Michigan, and upon coming to South Dakota and finding a dearth of school teachers over the country she became a teacher in the district schools of Highland township and taught for nine terms, and then in New Hope township.

Homer A., son of the subject, was educated in the public schools of Aberdeen and at the Agricultural College at Brookings, South Dakota, where he spent two years. He served as a sergeant in Company F, First Regiment South Dakota National Guard, and then became sergeant in Company L, Second Regiment, and is now on detail as sergeant major of the regiment. He is a fireman in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company at Aberdeen.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Sheridan, John
JOHN S. SHERIDAN is one of the representative citizens and successful farmers and stock growers of Brown county, his finely improved estate being located three and one-half miles northeast of Columbia. John Stinson Sheridan traces his genealogy in the agnatic line back to stanch Irish stock, his great-grandfather having emigrated with his family from the Emerald Isle to America about the year 1812, and having settled in Rochester, New York, where was born his grandson John, father of the subject of this sketch. This honored founder of the family in America died prior to the family's coming west in 1834. The grandfather, Thomas Sheridan, was married in Rochester, New York. He and a brother, and their families, came west in 1834, locating near Commerce, later called Nauvoo, in Hancock county, Illinois, and while there they mingled with the Mormons, who lived there at that time, and found them to be very good neighbors.
John S. Sheridan was born near Nauvoo, Hancock county, Illinois, on the 19th of December, 1852, being a son of John and Jane (Middleton) Sheridan. John Sheridan was born in 1820, married in 1850, and died in February, 1853. Jane, his wife, was born in Pennsylvania in 1826 and died in November, 1894. From their childhood both were residents of Illinois. The subject of this sketch received his early educational training in the public schools of Illinois, Fort Madison Academy and at Notre Dame, read law in Keokuk, Iowa, and was admitted to the bar of that state in 1881. He continued to there maintain
his residence until August, 1882, when he came to Columbia, Brown county, South Dakota, where he established himself in the lumber business about the time of the completion of the line of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad through the place. He continued to be identified with this line of enterprise until 1886, and then located on his present fine farm, three and one-half miles north of Columbia. He is now the owner of a well-improved landed estate of eight hundred and eighty acres, nearly all being in the home farm, and of this four hundred and fifty acres are devoted to the raising of grain.
Characteristics of the Sheridan family are moderate thrift, industry and temperate habits, and today the subject's motto, in reference to his farming operations, is not quantity nor extent, but method and thoroughness and all stock the equal of the best. The subject is known as a man of marked public spirit and has taken a deep interest in local affairs, while he has long been prominent in the councils of the Populist party in the state, though being independent in his views and ever manifesting the courage of his convictions. On the Populist ticket he was elected to membership on the board of county commissioners in 1898, and served in this capacity for four years, proving a most loyal and able public official. During the period of his service the county court house and jail were erected. He has been a delegate to the various conventions of his party and ever shown a deep interest in its cause. In religion the subject is a Roman Catholic, while fraternally he is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen.
In his native town of Nauvoo, Illinois, on the 26th of September, 1883. Mr. Sheridan was united in marriage to Miss Eunice Golden, who was there born and reared, and they are the parents of four children, all of whom are still at home, namely: Genevieve R., Kathleen E., John Leo and Golden Thomas. The Golden family were pioneers of Hancock county, Illinois.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Chase, George
GEORGE J. CHASE, who is one of the representative farmers and stock growers of Brown county, was born in Steuben county. New York, on the 5th of August, 1853, and is a son of Ezra and Adelaide C. Chase, the former of whom is deceased, while the latter is still living and makes his home in Michigan. As a child the subject accompanied his parents on their removal to Wisconsin, his father engaging in the lumbering business near Palmyra and later at Oshkosh, where he took up his residence in 1862, so that the son George early became familiar with the strenuous life in the lumber woods, while his educational privileges were confined to a somewhat irregular attendance in the common schools. Mr. Chase remained in Wisconsin until 1882, when he came to Columbia, South Dakota, to join his uncle. General Charles B. Peck, who was one of the first to take actively and energetically in hand the work of building up the town, where he erected both the Grand Hotel and the State Bank building, besides having other important interests, including a large tract of land in the county and the best residence in the new town. He remained here about five years and did much for the upbuilding and prosperity of the village and county, being a man of much enterprise and executive ability. He now resides in Houston. Texas, being general manager of the Texas Car Association. He served four years during the war of the Rebellion and after the war took an active interest in political affairs. While a resident of Columbia he served as quartermaster general on the staff of Governor Pierce. He became identified with railroad building when a young man. He was general manager of the Grand Trunk Railroad at Port Huron. Michigan, before coming to South Dakota and was general manager of the Atlantic & Danville Railroad at Portsmouth, Virginia. Upon coming to South Dakota he constructed the line from Ordway to Columbia, at an outlay of eleven thousand dollars. The failure of the new town, which has since regained its prestige and greatly augmented it, changed all his plans and he finally withdrew from the field. He donated the lots for the erection of the county buildings in Columbia, which was then looked upon as the eventual county seat, and his name is one which well merits a place of honor in this history. For three years the subject took charge of his uncle's farming interests here and after the removal of the latter was placed in charge of all his local interests until the same were closed out. Mr. Chase came to his present farm, two and one-half miles north of Columbia, in March, 1885, and here he now owns an entire section of valuable land, which is devoted to the raising of grain and live stock, both departments of the enterprise being made successful through his able management. Three hundred acres are given over to the raising of grain, and upon the farm may be always found a fine herd of shorthorn cattle, together with sheep, swine and good horses.
Mr. Chase gives a stanch allegiance to the Republican party, and has frequently served as delegate to state and county conventions, though he has never been personally ambitious for public office of any description. Fraternally he is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen.
In Clintonville. Wisconsin, in 1878, Mr. Chase was united in marriage to Miss Edith Phen, who was summoned into eternal rest on December 26, 1894. She is survived by her two sons. Percy, who is in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, and Charles B., who remains with his father on the home farm. On the 9th of December, 1895, Mr. Chase married his present wife, whose maiden name was Carrie L. Russell. She was born and reared in Wisconsin and was a successful and popular teacher in the public schools prior to her marriage. Of this union has been born one son, Ezra Clifford.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Jones, Morgan
MORGAN E. JONES, one of the honored pioneers of Cambria township, Brown county, is a native of Wales, though he has passed practically his entire life in the United States. He was born on the 5th of August, 1841, being a son of Evan and Mary (Jones) Jones, who immigrated to America when he was two years of age, locating in La Crosse county, Wisconsin, where his father engaged in agricultural pursuits, being one of the pioneers of the Badger state, where both he and his noble wife passed the remainder of their lives. They became the parents of five children, of whom four are living at the present time.
The subject of this sketch was reared to maturity on the homestead farm, having the experience common to the farmer boys of that pioneer epoch in Wisconsin and early beginning to aid in the work of clearing the land and assist in its cultivation, while his educational advantages were such as were afforded in the common schools of the locality and period. He continued to reside on the old homestead for more than thirty years, having become the owner of the property, and in 1881 he disposed of his interests there and came to Brown county, South Dakota, arriving here in the spring of that year and taking up a homestead claim in section 33, Cambria township, which is his present farm. He has made the best of improvements on his place and the same is one of the model farms of the county. He also bought a relinquishment on a tree claim, which he has within the past few years given to his son Frank, while he later bought another quarter section, in the same township, which he presented to his son John, so that he is favored in having the members of his family in close proximity to the old homestead, since his two married daughters also are located not far distant.
Mr. Jones was reared in the faith of the Republican party and gave his support to the same until the presidential campaign of 1896, when he showed the courage of his convictions and voted for Bryan for president. He has served for many years as a member of the school board of his district, and has been a member of the board of township trustees from practically the time of its organization until the present, a fact which indicates the high estimation in which he is held in the community. He was reared in the Congregational church, but he and his wife are now members of the Welsh Calvanistic Methodist church at Plana.
In La Crosse county, Wisconsin, on the 25th of December, 1866, Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Protheroe, who likewise was born in Wales, whence she accompanied her parents to America in early childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Jones have six children namely: Abbie, who is the wife of Earl B. Holmes, a successful farmer in this township; Frank, who married Miss Maggie Jones, is engaged in farming in the same township, as is also John, who married Anna Owens; Morgan remains on the homestead farm ; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of Edward L. William, of this township; and Charles remains beneath the parental roof.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Roberts, Robert
ROBERT D. ROBERTS, a native of Wales, was born on April 24, 1840, but when a child of about six or seven years of age was brought to the United States and grew to maturity in Columbia county, Wisconsin. He attended the public schools at intervals during his minority, was reared on a farm and early profited by the wholesome discipline and rugged usages of outdoor labor, such a mode of living being conducive to strong physical growth, and the symmetrical development of mental and moral attributes. Inheriting a natural liking for agriculture, he decided to devote his life to the tilling of the soil, accordingly he began the same on starting out to make his own way, and followed it in Wisconsin until the year 1879. Disposing of his interests in the above state at that time, Mr. Roberts changed his abode to Castleton, North Dakota, but after spending the ensuing three years there, came to Brown county, South Dakota, and in 1882 took up a pre-emption claim of three hundred and twenty acres, near the site of Plana, which he still owns. Three years later he moved to his present home, four miles north of the town, where he owns a fine tract of eight hundred acres, the greater part under a high state of cultivation, and on which are to be seen some of the best improvements in the county. As a farmer Mr. Roberts is easily the peer of any of his fellow citizens thus engaged, being practical in his work and management, progressive in the matter of cultivation and making a close and careful study of agricultural science. His specialty is grain, in the raising of which he has achieved an enviable reputation. He devotes from seven hundred to eight hundred acres of his land to wheat alone, and harvests as high as nine thousand five hundred bushels per year, besides raising large quantities of oats, corn and vegetables, for all of which he receives good prices. He is also largely interested in live stock, which industry he prosecutes with encouraging financial results, devoting especial attention to fine graded cattle, in addition to which he breeds and raises a large number of horses and hogs, realizing from his animals a handsome and steadily increasing income. Mr. Roberts possesses sound judgment and fine business ability and understands how to take advantage of circumstances and to mold conditions to suit his purposes. Energetic and far-seeing, he does things on a large scale and is not satisfied with any but the best results. His labors have been wisely directed, his affairs economically administered, and the success with which his efforts have been crowned bear evidence to his resourcefulness and masterly management, and show him to be a man of much more than ordinary acumen and forethought. A staunch, uncompromising Republican and an influential party worker, Mr. Roberts has never entered the domain of politics as an aspirant for office, having no time to spare from his business affairs to seek public honors at the hands of his fellow citizens. He has been a delegate to a number of conventions, however, and labors earnestly for the success of his party's candidates, but is by no means narrow in his views, being liberal in discussing the issues of the day, although firm and unyielding in the support of what he considers right and for the best interests of the people. As a citizen he is broad-minded and intelligent, and with commendable public-spirit, encourages all enterprises for the advancement of his adopted state, discharging his every duty in an unselfish and praiseworthy manner, and making his life conform as nearly as possible to the progressive, American spirit of the times. Mr. Roberts married, in Wisconsin, Miss Catherine Rowlands, whose family, like his own, came from Wales, and settled in Columbia county, that state, a number of years ago. After a happy wedded experience of eight years' duration, Mrs. Roberts departed this life in 1889, leaving two sons, John and Rees, both at home. The former, after completing the public-school course, was graduated in 1903 from the Archibald Business College, and at this time assists his father in the latter's business affairs, being a young man of intelligence, an accomplished accountant and well calculated to manage the important interests confided to him. The younger son is also well educated and, possessing native ability of a high order and an aptitude for business, will no doubt develop into a useful man and a praiseworthy citizen, an honor to his family and a credit to the community in which he was born and reared.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Jones, Daniel
HON. DANIEL D. JONES. a native of Fox Lake, Wisconsin, was born March 15, 1862, and at the age of twenty years came to Brown county, South Dakota, with the growth and development of which he has since been very actively identified. Immediately following his arrival he bought a relinquishment near the site of Plana, later took up the quarter section on which the town stands and in 1886, when the Great Northern Railroad was being constructed through this part of the country, platted the village and offered the lots for sale. With an abiding faith in the growth and ultimate importance of the village as a trading point and favorable place of residence, he erected a store building which he stocked with a miscellaneous assortment of merchandise and at once embarked in the goods business. The venture proved highly satisfactory, for the rapid growth of the town and adjacent country assured him a large and continuously increasing patronage and within a comparatively brief period his trade had so grown in magnitude and importance that he found himself on the high road to prosperity.
Meanwhile Mr. Jones used his influence to attract a thrifty class of people to the community and he also became a power in public as well as business affairs. A Republican in all the term implies, he manifested such zeal in political matters that in 1894 he was elected to represent Brown county in the state legislature; he served during the fourth session of that body and during his incumbency was placed on some of the most important of the house committees, including among others, the judiciary and the warehouse committees. Mr. Jones retired from the legislature with an honorable record and the good will of his constituents of all parties and from the expiration of his term until 1899 devoted his attention closely to mercantile business, in addition to which he also became largely interested in real estate. In the latter year he received the nomination for clerk of the Brown county courts and in the election which followed defeated the former incumbent, C. C. Fletcher, a popular man and formidable competitor, by a very decisive majority.
The better to discharge his official functions, Mr. Jones, shortly after the election, disposed of his mercantile establishment and, moving to the county seat, entered upon the duties of the clerkship. He proved an able and popular clerk, was courteous and obliging to all who had business to transact in the office, and his relations with the public were as pleasant and agreeable as his conduct was upright and exemplary. His term expiring in January, 1903, he at once turned his attention to his private affairs, not the least of which has been the improvement of Plana, where he has erected a number of buildings of different kinds, and in addition thereto he has aided very materially the growth and development of Aberdeen.
As indicated in a preceding paragraph, Mr. Jones has dealt considerably in real estate and at the present time he owns nine hundred and sixty acres of fine land in Brown county, the greater part being in the vicinity of Plana. He has improved much of his real estate, thus largely adding to its value and has extensive agricultural and live-stock interests from which he receives a liberal share of his income. He is also associated in the grain business with E. G. Perry under the name of Perry & Jones, the firm thus constituted operating seven elevators in many places, the largest being in Aberdeen, from which city the business is conducted.
Mr. Jones has long been interested in the general growth and development of his adopted state, and has unbounded faith in its future. He has encouraged everything calculated to promote the welfare of Plana and its populace, stands for public improvements and has done as much perhaps as any one individual to advertise the advantages of Brown county to the world as a favorable locality for agriculture and stock raising and as a safe place for the investment of capital. Personally Mr. Jones is a gentleman of unblemished character, as well as his career in public places and as the custodian of important trusts, has always been above reproach.
Mr. Jones was married in Wisconsin, in 1884, to Miss Maggie Jones, who departed this life on the 8th day of February, 1901, leaving one daughter, Mabel, now pursuing her studies in the high school.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Everson, Ole
OLE W. EVERSON is a native of the far Norseland, having been born in Norway, on the 10th of June, 1854, but he is essentially American in spirit and breeding, since he was an infant at the time when his parents, Henry and Stana Everson, left their native land and emigrated to America. For the first five years the family resided in the state of Illinois, whence they removed to Faribault county. Minnesota, where the father engaged in farming and where the subject was reared to maturity, receiving his educational training in the common schools. When about eighteen years of age he left the parental roof to engage in the active duties of life on his own responsibility. He served an apprenticeship at the carpenter trade, which he continued to follow as an employe of one man for eight years, in western Minnesota. He then, in April, 1878, came to what is now the state of South Dakota, as one of the pioneers of Brown county, being accompanied by his brothers, Benjamin and John, and a brother-in-law. William R. Howes, and all took up government land in the beautiful valley of the James river. They took up squatter's claims, and when the government survey was completed, in 1880, they filed formal entry on their land, while as soon as possible each of the party also took up a tree claim. In the summer seasons the subject returned for the first two years and worked at his trade, returning to his claims in the winter, in order to be able to perfect his title to the same. His mother came here in the fall of 1879, her husband having died in Minnesota, and the two other brothers here took up their permanent abode in the spring of the same year, the family being thus numbered among the first settlers in this section of Brown county. The subject instituted the improvement of his farm and for two years he added materially to his income by working at his trade in Orway and Columbia. Since that time he has practically given his entire attention to his farming enterprise, having now a well improved estate of five hundred and sixty acres, of which one hundred acres are on the west side of the James river, while the value of the place is increased by the fact that on the same is a fine growth of natural timber, covering about thirty-three acres and including ash, box elder and willow trees. Four hundred acres are under cultivation and devoted principally to the raising of wheat, while the one hundred acres on the opposite side of the river are given over to grazing purposes, the livestock raised by Mr. Everson being of a high grade. He was reared in the Republican faith and continued to support the principles of this party until the reform movement was inaugurated by the organization of the Populist party, when he transferred his allegiance to the same, later voting the Democratic ticket when a fusion was effected. He now holds himself independent of partisan lines and votes in accordance with the dictates of his judgment. Mr. Everson has not wavered in his allegiance to the state of South Dakota and has found his faith justified in the magnificent development of her resources, his satisfaction with conditions here having not been lessened by a tour of inspection and investigation which he made in Washington and Oregon in 1902. He is sparing no pains in the further improvement of his farm, and in the rich bottom lands is successfully growing fruit trees, having a fine orchard well matured at the present time. Early in the spring of 1879 Mr. Everson built the first frame house in Brown county, and the same constitutes a portion of his present substantial and attractive residence.
In this county, on the 12th of May, 1883. Mr. Everson was united in marriage to Miss Delia Bigsby, a stepdaughter of Daniel Farley, one of the sterling pioneers of the county. Of this marriage have been
born five children, namely: Henry James, Frank Marion. Stana Maria, George Marshall and Henrietta Jane.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


West, John
JOHN E. WEST is a native of the Empire state of the Union, having been born in the city of Syracuse, New York, on the 22d of May, 1848, and being a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Bloomer) West. He was reared in his native commonwealth and there secured a common-school education. When but fifteen years of age he manifested in a significant way his loyalty to the Union, the country being then in the period of the great Civil war. In 1863 he enlisted in the Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, proceeding with his command to the front and taking part in a number of the most hotly contested battles incident to the farther progress of the war, among the number being Spottsylvania, the Wilderness, Petersburg and Fort Steadman, He received his honorable discharge in Washington City, 1865, having proved himself a valiant young soldier and gaining the right to be designated as a youthful veteran. He retains an interest in his old comrades in arms and perpetuates the associations of his army days by retaining membership in the Grand Army of the Republic.
After the close of the war Mr. West was variously employed in the state of New York until 1874, when he secured the position of fireman on the New York Central Railroad. Four years later he was given an engine and continued in the employ of that great system for eight years. In 1883 he entered the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, and in this connection established his residence and headquarters in Aberdeen, which has thus been his home for the past score of years, during which time he has had runs out from this point, now hauling the passenger train west of Aberdeen. He has ever been self-controlled and clear-minded in his thirty years of service as an engineer and his record has not been marred by serious accidents. He is a popular member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and also of the time-honored Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. In politics he gives his allegiance to the Republican party, taking an intelligent and lively interest in the questions and issues of the day.
At Bowdle, Edmunds county, South Dakota, on the 13th of February, 1889, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. West to Miss Mamie C. Barndt, who was born at St. Mary's, Ohio, and reared at McComb, Hancock county, Ohio. They have two daughters, Florence and Helen. The parents of Mrs. West were L. T. and Louise (Crawford) Barndt. The father was born at New Lexington, Perry county, Ohio, and died at Everett, Washington, on December 7, 1903, at the age of seventy-one years. The mother, who is still living, was also born in Ohio.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Pond, James
JAMES H. POND is a native of Calhoun county, Michigan, where his birth occurred on January 7, 1853. His father, James E. Pond, a native of Franklin county, New York, and a farmer by occupation, was one of the pioneers of Michigan, settling in the county of Calhoun as early as 1842, and taking an active and prominent part in its development. He married in Michigan Eliza Stillson, daughter of Baker Stillson, who was also an early settler of Calhoun county, moving there about the year 1844. The boyhood and youth of James H. were spent on the family homestead in Michigan, and after a preliminary training in the common schools he entered the high school of Marshall, from which institution he was in due time graduated. Later he took a course in the Northern Indiana Normal at Valparaiso, after which he taught of winter seasons in his native county, until 1880, when he came to South Dakota, and took up a homestead in Brown county, about six miles north of Aberdeen. From that time until 1897 he devoted his attention to farming and to the improvement of his land, also taught several terms the meanwhile and earned an enviable reputation as a successful instructor and able manager of schools. Since coming to South Dakota Mr. Pond has improved two farms and now owns three hundred and twenty acres of fine land in Brown county, nearly all of which is in a high state of cultivation.
In 1882 Mr. Pond effected a copartnership with G. L. Famham in the real-estate business, opening an office in Ordway, which place at that time entertained hopes of becoming the state capital. After one year the firm was dissolved, from the expiration of which time until 1897 the subject devoted his attention to agriculture and educational work, meeting with encouraging success in both lines of endeavor, especially the former. In the latter year he discontinued farming and since then has been engaged in the real estate business, his operations the meanwhile taking a wide range and returning him liberal profits. Mr. Pond handles all kinds of real estate and commands a large and lucrative patronage, buying and selling lands and city property in nearly every county of South Dakota, besides acting as special agent for C. E. Gibson, of Boston, who owns about one hundred and fifty farms in this state, the renting and management of which are left entirely to the subject's judgment and discretion. He is empowered to sell or trade these farms when he can do so to advantage, also inspects other lands which his employer contemplates purchasing, the latter being guided very largely in the matter by such representations and suggestions as the subject makes. In addition to the Gibson agency, Mr. Pond has charge of about fifty farms in Brown county owned by other parties, which he rents, manages, sells or trades, as the case may be, and in an early day he rendered valuable service to settlers by locating claims and otherwise assisting them to get a start in the new country. While thus engaged he met with many thrilling experiences and not a few dangers, traveling as he did over all parts of the country in all seasons. Upon several occasions he encountered terrific blizzards, from some of which he narrowly escaped with his life, and in all experienced hardships and suffering in which were tested to the utmost his strength and endurance.
Through the medium of his business Mr. Pond has been instrumental not only in advertising the advantages and remarkable natural resources of South Dakota to the world, but in attracting to the state an intelligent, enterprising class of people, who have accomplished great results in the matter of its material development. He is first of all a business man, and as such ranks with the most enterprising and progressive of his contemporaries, and everything making for the prosperity of his city and county or for the welfare of his fellow men receives his encouragement. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party, but is not a partisan in the sense of seeking official position.
Mr. Pond was married on April 7, 1886, at Ordway, to Miss Lizzie Smith, daughter of Captain William Smith, one of the pioneers of 1880.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Rice, Benjamin
BENJAMIN H. RICE holds the responsible position of superintendent of the Brown County Hospital, in the city of Aberdeen. The hospital was established in the year 1891, as a private institution, but with no farm in connection. Two years later, in recognition of the exigent needs, the county effected the purchase of the property, which occupied an entire block in the northern part of the city, and at once enlarged the buildings, to which various additions have since been made from time to time, to meet the demands placed upon the noble institution. The hospital is equipped with modern appliances and conveniences and has at the present time accommodations for about forty patients or indigent persons. The hospital department is maintained as entirely separate from the infirmary proper, and those from any class in life can secure treatment and care, as well as the unfortunate wards of the county. The hospital had three superintendents prior to the incumbency of Mr. Rice, who was, appointed to the office in April, 1901, by the board of county commissioners, and his retention, in the office offers the best voucher for the fidelity and discrimination which he has brought to bear in the discharge of his duties. Mr. Rice was born on a farm in Green Lake county, Wisconsin, on the ist of December, 1851, being a son of Benjamin H., Sr., and Judith (Colvin) Rice. When he was thirteen years of age his parents took up their residence in Olmstead county, that state, and later to Pope county, Minnesota, where our subject was reared to manhood, having grown up under the sturdy discipline of the farm, while his educational training was secured in the common schools. He continued to reside in or near Sauk Center, Minnesota, until 1882. when he came to Brown county, South Dakota, arriving here in May and taking up a pre-emption claim of government land, which he improved and proved upon, while he also secured a homestead claim in the same township of Allison, and upon the same continued to reside until he was appointed to his present position. This homestead farm of one hundred and sixty acres is well improved and under excellent cultivation, and he retained possession of the property until 1901, when he sold the same. He was one of the very first settlers in the township mentioned and is highly esteemed in the county which has so long been his home. In politics Mr. Rice has been a most ardent worker in the cause of the Republican party, but has never sought official preferment as a candidate for elective position. Fraternally he is identified with the lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Frederick, this county, this village being in the vicinity of his old homestead, and he has passed the official chairs in the same and been a delegate to the grand lodge of the state.
In Pope county, Minnesota, on the 24th of May, 1878, Mr. Rice was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Higginson, who was born in Watertown, Sanilac county, Michigan, whence she accompanied her parents on their removal to Minnesota when a young lady of nineteen years. She is a daughter of George and Jennie Higginson, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Rice have no children.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Hart, John S.
Among the leading commercial enterprises represented in the thriving city of Aberdeen is that conducted under the title of the J. S. Hart Lumber Company, and of this important concern, which operates a chain of several retail lumber yards throughout the state, the subject of this sketch is the executive head, while he is known as one of the representative business men of Aberdeen, in which city he has made his home and headquarters since 1898. In 1898 Mr. Hart engaged in the retail lumber business in Aberdeen, and the enterprise so rapidly increased in scope and importance that in 1900 it was found expedient to increase its facilities, and Mr. Hart then associated himself with George H. Hollandsworth, of Sioux City, Iowa, and effected the incorporation of the business under the present title, while the company is capitalized for one hundred thousand dollars. Since the incorporation retail yards have also been established in Ipswich, Faulkton, Mellette, Warner, James, Columbia, Houghton and Plana, while the main offices of the company are in Aberdeen. It is scarcely needless to state that full and complete lines of lumber and builders' material are kept in stock at all times and in each of the several yards, while the concern has grown to be one of the largest and most important of the sort in the state. The company gives employment to a corps of about twenty-five men and the business is conducted with that progressive and alert spirit so characteristic of the west.
John S. Hart, who has been mainly instrumental in the building up of this enterprise, is a native of the state of Iowa, having been born in Clinton county, on the 10th of December, 1863, and having passed his boyhood days on the farm, while, his educational training was secured in the public schools of his native state. He is a son of H. A. and Mary Jane Hart, the former of whom was born in the state of Ohio and the latter in Indiana. In early days the father was a trader on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. He removed to Iowa in 1847, purchasing a large tract of land near Camanche, in Clinton county. He then returned to Indiana, but in 1859 he came back to Iowa and built on his land, at the same time building a flouring mill, which he operated for several years, carrying on farming operations at the same time on a large scale. He raised a family of four sons and four daughters, of whom seven are still living. He died in 1885, aged seventy-seven years. His widow survived until 1902, when she died, aged seventy-three years.
In his political proclivities, though never ambitious for any official preferment, Mr. Hart is a Democrat, and fraternally he has attained the thirty-second degree in the Masonic order, having completed the round of the York and Scottish rites so far as conferring of degrees in America is possible. He is an enthusiastic sportsman and finds recreation afield and afloat during his vacations, while he is one of the prominent and popular members of the Aberdeen Gun Club.
At Charter Oak, Iowa, on the 12th of August, 1889, Mr. Hart was united in marriage to Miss Celia M. Marshall, who was born and reared in that state, being a daughter of Clark T. and Dora Marshall. Of this union have been born three children. Harry, Maud and Cloe M.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Giddings, Calvin
CALVIN MARCELLUS GIDDINGS sprang from pioneer stock, his father, Jabez Giddings, a native of New York, having been one of the first settlers of Stevenson county, Illinois, moving to that state before the land was surveyed, and living for some time as a squatter. Calvin M. Giddings was born in Lena, Illinois, January 10, 1859, and until his sixteenth year remained on the home farm, assisting with the varied duties of the same. At that age his father gave him his time, after which he worked as a farm laborer in the neighborhood until the following fall, when he went to Mason City, Iowa, making the trip on horseback. He remained about three years at that place, devoting two years of the time to farm work, and in the fall of 1875, with a young man of his acquaintance, went to Texas, with the object in view of engaging in the live-stock business. On arriving at his destination, however, he changed his mind, and instead of investing in cattle, decided to become a cotton planter. He raised two crops of cotton, but the conditions not being favorable, neither proved profitable, but on the contrary resulted in the loss of nearly all his capital. Somewhat discouraged by his ill success, he shook the dust of Texas from his shoes and in the fall of 1879 returned to Iowa, bringing with him six horses, which represented all that he had saved from his experience in cotton culture. After spending the fall and winter of the above year in Iowa, he started the following spring for Dakota, shipping his horses to Milbank, which place he reached in due time and from which he drove the animals through to Brown county. On June 21, 1880, he entered a tract of land at the land office in Watertown, his claim being one of the first taken in Aberdeen township. Moving on his claim in the spring of 1881, he at once began developing his land, one of his first improvements being a small board dwelling, the only house of the kind within a radius of several miles. He hauled his lumber from Watertown, one hundred miles distant. Mr. Giddings was the second permanent settler in Aberdeen township, the first having been a man by the name of Britzius.
In the spring of 1881 Mr. Giddings moved to his place and on July 31st, of the same year, took to himself a wife and helpmeet in the person of Miss Harriet Bland, who with her brother, Charles Bland, came to South Dakota, in May, 1879, both entering land in Brown county. Mrs. Giddings is a native of England and came direct from that country to South Dakota, and in due time proved up on her claim, receiving a deed for the same from the government. Her brother improved a fine farm, and after making it his home for a period of twenty years, emigrated to Oregon, where he now resides. The marriage of Mr. Giddings and Miss Bland was the first event of the kind solemnized in the county of Brown. Shortly after it took place the happy couple moved to the bride's place. Since coming west Mr. Giddings has purchased land in various parts of the country, owning at this time in Brown county alone over two thousand acres, the greater part of which has been brought to a high state of cultivation. He gives special attention to farming, which he has made quite successful, his wheat crop for a number of years past averaging fifteen thousand bushels a year, in addition to which he also realizes returns from the sale of livestock, much of his land being well adapted to cattle raising.
Mr. Giddings has bought and sold a great deal of real estate since coming to Dakota, has broken thousands of acres of virgin prairie, and made many fortunate investments, being now not only one of the largest land owners in Brown county, but also one of its most enterprising farmers and well-to-do men. He has traveled extensively over the western states and territories, from Texas to California, visiting many points of interest, made a trip to the Hawaiian islands; besides traversing all parts of South Dakota, comparing the relative merits of the different localities. Among them he prefers the county in which he now lives and, having been remarkably fortunate in all of his business affairs, here purposes to make it his permanent place of abode.
As a farmer Mr. Giddings is energetic and exercises sound judgment in the matter of tillage. He is systematic in his plans, uses the best modern machinery and implements and never fails to realize large returns from the time and labor expended on his fields, his wheat for a number of years, averaging forty bushels to the acre, and oats often running as high as one hundred and ten. He raises the finest grades of cattle and hogs, and, though paying less attention to live stock than to agriculture, no little share of his income is derived from the latter source. In politics Mr. Giddings is not a partisan, but supports the party which best represents his principles, though of recent years he has given support to the Prohibition party, being strictly a temperate man with a strong antipathy for the liquor traffic. Fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and religiously attends the Methodist church, of which body his wife is a faithful member.
Mr. and Mrs. Giddings are the parents of five children, namely: William J., Leander J., Luther E., Horace B. and Paul C. Mr. Giddings is a friend of higher education, and has done much to promote the interests of the same in the county of his residence. He has given his children the best advantages in this direction obtainable, the three oldest being graduates of first-class educational institutions, while the other two are now pursuing their studies under favorable auspices.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Morgan, William
WILLIAM HENRY MORGAN, attorney-at-law and one of the leading members of the South Dakota bar, was born in South Elgin, Illinois, on June 23, 1851. His father is Manly S. Morgan, one of the leading pioneers of Illinois, who in early life was a mechanic, but for many years has been an extensive horticulturist and grower of products for early market, owning large forcing plants. William Henry spent the years of his childhood and youth in his native town, and after receiving his elementary education entered Wheaton College, from which institution he was graduated in 1878. Later be began the study of law and subsequently became a student of the Union Law College, Chicago, where he was graduated and in 1887 was admitted to the bar. Meantime, 1882, Mr. Morgan came to South Dakota, and took up a homestead near Westport, Brown county, after which he returned to Illinois and completed his legal education as noted above. Returning to Dakota in 1889, he opened an office in Aberdeen, where he has since devoted his attention almost exclusively to a general practice, and meeting with success. Mr. Morgan served one term as probate judge, aside from which he has held no official position. He has taken an active interest in public affairs since coming west, and was an influential leader in the reform movement, which sent Hon. J. H. Kyle to the legislature, and later to the United States senate. He still manifests a lively regard for whatever concerns the welfare of his city, county and state, and as a public-spirited citizen, gives an earnest support to any and all measures making for these and other laudable ends.
Mr. Morgan was married at Wheaton, Illinois, June 23, 1880, to Miss Minnie Weamer, stepdaughter of Rev. Dr. James B. Walker, a distinguished divine of that state and the author of several popular and scholarly works, one of which, "The Philosophy of the Plan of Salvation," has been translated into several of the leading languages of the world, as well as many dialects. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan have no children of their own, but some years ago they opened their home to a lad by the name of Charles Walker, whom they reared from boyhood to manhood.
Religiously Mr. Morgan is a Congregationalist, as is also his wife, both being members of the church in Aberdeen. Fraternally he is identified with the Modern Brotherhood of America and politically, he is a Democrat.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Thompson, Frank
FRANK F. THOMPSON was born in Brown county, Wisconsin, on the 5th of November, 1856, being a son of Franklin and Lydia (Putnam) Thompson. He passed his youthful days in Illinois and Michigan, and completed the curriculum of the public schools in the latter state, being graduated in the high school of the city of Grand Rapids as a member of the class of 1874. His father was for a half century engaged in the hotel business, and our subject early became actively associated with him in the conduct of the same. He thus gained a most excellent training for this line of enterprise and finally engaged in the same on his own responsibility, having conducted a hotel at Morley, Michigan, for several years, and coming to Claremont, Brown county. South Dakota, in 1883, and took up a homestead claim of one hundred and sixty acres of government land and followed farming for about six years. He then engaged in the hotel business in Claremont, at which he continued until 1898, when he was elected sheriff of Brown county, when he of course took up his residence in Aberdeen, the county seat. He gave a most effective administration during his first term and was chosen as his own successor in the election of 1900. He has ever been a stanch adherent of the Republican party and was elected to the office of sheriff on the ticket of his party. He retired from this office, with a most enviable record to his credit, on the 5th of January, 1903, and seven days later was appointed to his present office, that of chief of police of Aberdeen. He still owns the hotel in Claremont, the same having been rebuilt in 1902 and having modern equipments throughout. The popular chief is identified with the Knights of the Maccabees and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a man of genial personality and has a host of friends in Brown county. He was formerly a practical devotee of the "national game," having played base ball in the Inter-State league, comprising the states of Michigan, Indiana and Illinois, and his interest in the sport is still of insistent order, as is shown in the fact that he never fails to attend local games save when duty calls him elsewhere.
At Morley, Michigan, in 1876, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Lyman, who died in Claremont, in 1890, leaving two children, Samuel R. and May. In 1892 Mr. Thompson wedded Miss Josie Holt, of Brown county, and they have three children, Grace, Roy and Glenn.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Fossum, Albert
ALBERT W. FOSSUM, D. D. S., of the firm of Fossum Brothers, the well-known dentists in the city of Aberdeen, is a native of Lansing, Iowa, where he was born on the 22d of June, 1874, being a son of Andrew C. and Walbord (Olson) Fossum, both of whom were born in Christiania, Norway. The father of the subject is a well-known and successful contractor of Aberdeen, to which place he came with his family in 1881. Dr. Fossum received his elementary educational discipline in his native town, and was a lad of seven years at the time of the family removal to Aberdeen, so that he has passed practically his entire life here. He completed the curriculum of the public schools of this city, and in 1895 was matriculated in the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, in the city of Chicago, where he completed the prescribed course in that excellent institution, being graduated as a member of the class of 1898, and receiving his degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. After his graduation he returned to Aberdeen and established himself in the practice of his profession. He has given close attention to business, is thoroughly skilled in both the operative and laboratory phases of his profession and his efforts have been attended with most gratifying success, since he has built up a large and representative practice, his well-equipped offices being located in the Wells building, on Main and Third streets. His brother, Carl, has been his assistant and coadjutor since 1901 and is likewise a thoroughly competent workman. Dr. Fossum is a member of the South Dakota Dental Association and also of its executive committee, and it was largely due to his efforts that the annual meeting of the association for 1904 is to be held in Aberdeen. In politics the Doctor is a stanch Republican, but is not active in this field and has never been an aspirant for office.
On the 11th of August, 1899, Dr. Fosum was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Louise Wilson, a daughter of Frederick D. Wilson, who was formerly engaged in the grocery business in Aberdeen. Of this union have been born two daughters, Helen and Muriel.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Perry, George
GEORGE S. PERRY was born in Berkshire, England, on the 12th of January, 1853, and is a son of William and Charlotte (Hobbs) Perry, the father dying in Cleveland, Ohio, in April, 1880, aged about sixty years, and the mother at Mitchell, South Dakota, on December 24, 1889, aged seventy-three years, six months and thirteen days. The subject received his early educational training in his native land, and was twelve years of age at the time of his parents' emigration to America. The family located in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, and here Mr. Perry soon gave distinctive evidence of his predilection for mechanical pursuits, since when he was but fourteen years of age he was not only acting as engineer in a manufacturing establishment, but also had the general charge of the factory during the illness of the owner. At the age of seventeen he secured a position as fireman on the Cleveland & Wheeling Railroad, and two and one-half years later had been promoted to the position of engineer. He thus continued in the service of the road noted for another year and then entered the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, with headquarters in the city of Pittsburg. He remained with this company until the great strike of 1877, at which time he entered the employ of the Canada Southern. When the Vanderbilts secured control of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, in 1879, Mr. Perry was assigned an engine and operated the same in connection with the building of the road westward from Glencoe, Minnesota, to Ortonville, South Dakota, his conductors at the time being Andrew W. Glenn and Charles Dean, with whom he has ever since been associated in the same relative capacity, their official alliance, if so it may be termed, having thus continued for nearly, a quarter of a century. They continued with the extension of the road to Bristol, and reached Aberdeen, South Dakota, in 1881. Mr. Perry also worked on construction to Ashton and Ellendale and was then given the passenger run to Milbank. In June, 1883, he was the driver of the engine on the construction of the track southward to Woonsocket, where the extension from the south was met. He was given the first passenger run on this branch, between Aberdeen and Mitchell, and for twenty-one years he has continued to thus traverse this branch. In thirty years of service Mr. Perry has never had a serious wreck and has never personally been injured in any accident. He has confined his attention exclusively to the demands placed upon him as an engineer, taking pride in his work, knowing its responsibilities and realizing that it is worthy of his best efforts. He is a veteran and trusted employe of the company and has the high regard of all who know him. He is identified with the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and also with the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained to the Knights Templar degrees, being a member of the various bodies of the order in Aberdeen, where he has a pleasant home and is well and favorably known. He is a stanch Republican in politics.
At Saint Thomas, Ontario, Canada, on the 6th of July, 1878, Mr. Perry was united in marriage to Miss Leila Whitcomb. daughter of S. W. Whitcomb, who was for many years an engineer on the New York Central Railroad. Mr. and Mrs. Perry have five children, namely: George W.. Cora, Dean, Floyd N. and Leila M. The first named was educated in the Goldie College, Wilmington, Delaware.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Tiffany Brothers
TIFFANY BROTHERS.— Among the leading commercial enterprises in Aberdeen may be mentioned the Aberdeen Steam Laundry, which is conducted and owned by the subjects of this brief sketch, the firm controlling a business which extends into the most diverse sections of South and North Dakota and also into Minnesota, local agencies being maintained in the various towns. The equipment and accessories of the establishment are the best modern type and work is turned out with expedition and in such style as to retain the patronage of those who have once availed themselves of its conveniences. The laundry was established in January, 1900, and in the same employment is given to a corps of from twenty-five to thirty persons, while the work is all under the direct supervision of a thoroughly skilled and experienced foreman, the equipment of the laundry representing a financial investment of about twenty-five thousand dollars. The interested principals are William J. and Oliver M. Tiffany, both of whom are actively identified with the conducting of the rapid growing business. Prior to coming to Aberdeen they had been engaged in the same line of enterprise in Northfield, Minnesota, for a period of five years, so that they fully understood how to secure the best results and give the most satisfactory service to their patrons.
W. J. and O. M. Tiffany were born near Northfield, Minnesota, the former on July 4, 1872, and the latter on June 18, 1877, the sons of Mathew Tiffany, who was born in Oneida county, New York, and married Elizabeth Steadman, of New York state. The parents removed to Minnesota during the early 'seventies.
W. J. attended the district schools and put in four years at the Northfield high school. He received his business training as a clerk in a dry-goods store at Northfield, where he spent two and a half years. He then engaged in the laundry business in Northfield.
O. M. attended the district schools, graduated from the Northfield high school, and also graduated from Carlton College (Northfield) in 1898. He then taught school one year, after which he joined his
brother in the laundry business. They came to Aberdeen together.
W. J. married Minnie Miller, a native of New York state, who is the daughter of Jay Miller, of Glenn, New York. Six children have been born-of this union : Ernest W., Jay M., Stanley M., Dewey E., Lillian V. and Irene V.
O. M. married Maude McGandy, of Marshall, Minnesota, daughter of James McGandy, and they have one child. Earl.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Darling, Floyd
FLOYD C. DARLING, deceased, was a native of the great Buckeye state, having been born in Warren, Trumbull county, Ohio, on the 18th of February, 1853, and being a son of Russell and Mary (Laraway) Darling. He received his educational training in the public schools of Ohio, and as a youth became identified with the great railroading industry. At the age of twenty-two years he engaged as locomotive fireman on the line of the Erie Railroad, between Cleveland and Youngstown, Ohio. He was faithful and capable and in due time advancement came, and in 1879 he was placed in charge of an engine. In 1883 he came to Aberdeen, and was given an engine on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, which he continued to run until his death. He was punctilious and careful in the discharge of his responsible duties and to this fact was due the excellent record he made, no serious accidents having marred his experience as an engineer.
In politics Mr. Darling was a member of the Republican party, and he held the Knights Templar degree in the York Rite of the Masonic fraternity, and also the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, being a popular member of the various bodies of the order in Aberdeen, including the temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was also a knight commander of the Court of Honor and was also a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
In Titusville, Pennsylvania, on the 20th of June, 1873, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Darling to Miss Margaret McCauley, who was born in Pennsylvania. Of this union were born six children, concerning whom we enter the following brief record: Viola is the wife of Arthur W. Oliver, of Victor, Colorado; Etta is the wife of Orville Card, of Aberdeen; Nellie is the wife of John Clawson, of Aurora, Illinois; Margaret is employed in one of the leading mercantile establishments in Aberdeen, and Ruby is a member of the class of 1906 in the high school. Flora, the fourth child of Mr. and Mrs. Darling, died in Cleveland, Ohio. The eldest daughter was formerly the wife of the late Eugene A. Lamb, who was proprietor of the Aberdeen marble works and brick yard, and three children were born of this union, Gertrude, Francis and Marie. Mrs. Darling is a member of the Catholic church. Mr. Darling died April 3, 1904.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Noble, Henry
HENRY NOBLE was born January 26, 1852, at Garnadilla, Iowa, and there grew to maturity on a farm. During his boyhood and youth he attended the public schools of his neighborhood, and until his twenty-fifth year remained under the parental roof, assisting his father in running the home place and contributing his full share to the support of the family. In 1877 Mr. Noble severed home ties and engaged with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad as fireman, the duties of which position he discharged until 1879, when he was promoted engineer, with headquarters in the town of McGregor. In 1883 he was transferred to Mitchell, South Dakota, and after remaining ten years at that place, removed to Aberdeen, where he has since resided, being on the run between these two points. Mr. Noble's run is one of the most important on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul system in the west and his responsibilities are therefore very great. During his long period of service he has rarely been absent from duty, and his efficiency and faithful service have been such as to gain the unbounded confidence of his superiors. Fraternally Mr. Noble is a Knight Templar and a thirty-second-degree Scottish-rite Mason, being one of the leading members of the order in the city of his residence and honored at different times with important official station. He is also an influential factor in the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, and as a citizen enjoys in a marked degree the confidence and esteem of the community. Blessed with a strong physique and endowed with an ardent nature, he is exceedingly fond of field sports and out-of-door amusements, and during his vacations finds his greatest enjoyment with the rod and gun.
In 1872, while residing in his native state of Iowa, Mr. Noble was united in marriage with Miss Phila Pickett, a union which has been blessed with two children, Lila, a teacher in the public schools, and a son by the name of Field.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Cochrane, Wampler
WAMPLER LEMUEL COCHRANE, Ph. D., superintendent of the public schools of Aberdeen, is a native of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, born in the town of Clarksville, October 22, 1870, and nine years later accompanied his parents to Sullivan county, Missouri, where he lived on a farm until a youth of seventeen. Meanwhile he acquired his preliminary education in the public schools, and at the age noted entered Humphrey's College, Missouri, from which in due time he was graduated. While prosecuting his collegiate course he devoted his vacations to teaching, and, better to fit himself for the latter profession, subsequently became a student of the normal school at Kirksville, Missouri, where he pursued his studies until 1900, when he graduated with the class of that year. Prior to finishing his professional course at Kirksville, Professor Cochrane served as principal of schools at Glenwood and Browning, Missouri, also held a similar position for some time in the town of Craig, and in 1899 was elected superintendent of the public schools of Moulton, Iowa. Entering upon his duties at the last named place immediately after his graduation, he held the position during the ensuing three years, and at the expiration of that time resigned to take charge of the schools of Aberdeen, South Dakota, to which place he was chosen by the unanimous vote of the board of trustees. Professor Cochrane's work in this city has fully justified the board in the wisdom of their choice, his labors as an organizer as well as an educator giving new life and impetus to the schools of the city, and making the local educational system not only the leading one in South Dakota, but among the best in the United States, as prominent, educators who have investigated his efforts and critically observed his methods cheerfully admit. Since taking charge of his present position he has inaugurated and carried to successful issue a number of radical reforms in the matter of instruction and management, including, among others, a new and greatly improved course of study, which is conceded to be one of the most thorough in the state, and making professional training as well as scholarship a prerequisite on the part of the teacher. The present corps of teachers, carefully selected with reference to intellectual culture and professional training, are either normal graduates or hold diplomas from other first-class educational institutions, and their tenure depends entirely upon fitness, the incompetents in due time being weeded out, and only those of high order of ability as instructors being retained. There are now in Aberdeen six school buildings of the latest and most improved style of architecture, all neatly finished and supplied with the necessary furniture and educational appliances. A building but recently erected is said to be one of the finest specimens of school architecture in the state, if not the best. It is seventy by one hundred and forty feet in area, two stories high, contains twenty-two commodious, well-lighted rooms, with a seating capacity of three hundred, and with furniture and other necessary appliances, represents an outlay considerably in excess of fifty thousand dollars. The high school has long enjoyed the reputation of being one of the best institutions of the kind in the country, its
graduates being received by the leading colleges and universities of South Dakota and other western states without examination, and it also articulates with the Chicago University, Columbia University at Washington, D. C, and with all the first-class educational institutions in the land.
In addition to his duties as superintendent Professor Cochrane is in great demand at certain seasons as an institute lecturer, his services in this capacity being highly prized wherever he has labored. Since locating at Aberdeen he has not only been active in promoting the city's educational interests, but has also contributed in no small degree to its general prosperity, being interested in all movements and enterprises making for the material advancement of the community and the social and moral good of his fellow men. Fond of athletics and healthful outdoor sports and amusements, he has used his influence to encourage the same among young people of the city, especially among students, and it was largely through his efforts that a finely equipped gymnasium was added to the splendid school building recently erected.
Professor Cochrane, in 1895, contracted a matrimonial alliance with Miss Alice Knight, of Linneus, Missouri, one of his classmates in college, and later a successful and popular teacher, the union resulting in the birth of one child, a son by the name of Harrold. Religiously Professor Cochrane and wife subscribe to the Methodist faith and belong to the church of that denomination in Aberdeen.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Williamson, George
GEORGE N. WILLIAMSON has been successfully engaged in the practice of law in the city of Aberdeen, Brown county, for the past twelve years, and is one of the representative members of the bar of the state.
He is a native of the state of Minnesota, having been born in Rochester, Olmsted county, on the 20th of December, 1865, and being a son of Nathan N. and Mary Williamson, the former of whom was born in the state of New York and the latter in New England, while they were numbered among the pioneers of Minnesota, the father having been for many years engaged in the contracting business at Rochester. The subject received his early educational discipline in the public schools of Oronoco and Rochester, Minnesota, and then entered the law department of the University of Minnesota. He was admitted to the bar of his native state in 1889 and the same year to that of the new commonwealth of South Dakota, since he located in Aberdeen in 1892 and here initiated the active work of his profession, in which he has been most successful, being an able trial lawyer and a duly conservative counselor, he is a close student of his profession and gives careful preparation to every cause which he presents before court or jury. In politics he is an independent Republican and while he takes an active interest in public affairs and in the success of the party cause, he has never been ambitious for political office. He has attained the thirty-second degree in the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Masonry, and is also identified with the Knights of Pythias.
On the 15th of April, 1896, Mr. Williamson was married to Miss May M. Mackenzie, who was born in the city of St. Paul, Minnesota, on the 3d of August, 1875, being a daughter of Alexander C. and Annie Mackenzie. Of this union have been born three children, Alan N., Marjorie and Helen.
Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904
Contributor: Jim Dezotell


Barrett, C. Boyd
C. BOYD BARRETT, of Aberdeen, South Dakota, is descended on the paternal side from one of the old families of Maryland, while on the maternal side from the old Carr family, of Virginia. His family experienced in full the vicissitudes and misfortunes which fell so heavily upon so many of the sterling old families of the south during the period of the Civil war, but they were willing to make all these sacrifices, though theirs was to become eventually the "lost cause."
Major Barrett was born on the ancestral plantation, in Loudoun county, Virginia, on the 23d of May, 1838, being a son of John F. and Caroline (Wade) Barrett, both representatives of prominent old families of that commonwealth. The father of the subject followed the vocation of a planter until he was summoned from the scene of life's labors and was a man of prominence and influence in the community, having been a captain in the state militia and having held various local offices of public trust. Both he and his wife were devoted members of the Presbyterian church, in which he served as elder for many years. Major Barrett was reared under the gracious influences of the old homestead and received a good academic education. As a youth he became a member of a cavalry company in the state militia, and was in active service with his command in guarding the Potomac at the time when John Brown made his famous raid. At the outbreak of the Civil war this company became a part of the Sixth Regiment of Confederate Cavalry, and later was assigned to the Thirty-fifth Virginia Battalion, under General K. V. White. It was the portion of our subject to take part in thirty-eight of the pitched battles incidental to the progress of the great internecine conflict, and he was in active service during practically the entire period of the war. His command was in service in northern Virginia, being for much of the time in the Shenandoah valley and the Piedmont region, under "Stonewall" Jackson. He also took part in the Pennsylvania campaign, participating in the battles of the Wilderness, Antietam, Sharpsburg and in the Gettysburg campaign, under command of the gallant General Wade Hampton, and he was with his regiment at Appomattox at the time of General Lee's surrender. For some time he was assigned to detail duty on the staff of General Lawton, of Georgia. Major Barrett was three-times wounded in action, and thrice had his horse killed from under him. He was captured in a skirmish in Clark county, Virginia, in 1862, and was confined for four months in the federal prison in the city of Washington, being one of the one hundred and thirty-five prisoners who were the last to be exchanged before the close of the war. His widowed mother, in the midst of alarms and menacing turbulence, had bravely remained on the old homestead, in company with one devoted old slave. The fortunes of the family fell to the lowest ebb and the beautiful old plantation was a scene of havoc at the time when our subject returned. He had been reported killed in the battle of the Wilderness, and his mother had been bowed under this additional sorrow, knowing not that he was still living until he put in his appearance at the old home. He devoted four years to endeavoring to restore the prestige and prosperity of the plantation, but was eventually compelled to abandon this devoted service. He removed to Alexandria, Virginia, where he was engaged in the hotel business for five years and then took up his residence in Washington, D. C. where he engaged in mercantile business, continuing this enterprise until 1883, when impaired health, resulting from the injury received in a wound through the right lung while in service, compelled him to seek a change of climate. He accordingly came to South Dakota and located in the village of Aberdeen, Brown county, where he continued in the hotel business until 1884, and he then purchased the Aberdeen Republican, now known as the Aberdeen Democrat. He retained the original name, but changed the political policy of the paper, making it an excellent advocate of the principle of the Democratic party, and he successfully conducted the paper until 1893, when President Cleveland conferred upon him the office of receiver of the United States land office in Aberdeen. He continued incumbent of this position four years, after which he again became editor of the Republican, having retained possession of the property. He sold the plant and the business in 1902, after having been closely identified with its fortunes for more than a decade and a half. He is a vigorous and able writer, and made the paper a force and power in the political affairs of the state. He has ever been a stalwart advocate of the principles of the Democracy and has been prominent in its councils and formed the acquaintanceship of its leading men. In 1894-5 he was a member of the Democratic congressional committee. Mr. Barrett is an elder in the Presbyterian church and is a Mason. He married Mollie D. Fadeley, of the same county in Virginia, and they have two children: C. Boyd, Jr., and Caroline B. Mr. Barrett is also engaged in the real-estate and insurance business, the firm being Barrett & Son. [Source: History of South Dakota, Vol. 2; Doane Robinson; B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher, 1904; Contributor: Jim Dezotell]
 


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