Codington County Biographies

 

Alexander, J. B.

Alexander, M. D.

Bale, George

Bartlett, G. E.

Beals, W. L.

Bennett, George B.

Bennett, J.

Bradford, C. H.

Brann, E. N.

Briggs, M. T.

Campbell, Robert F.

Campbell, Robert F.

Carpenter, C. C.

Carpenter, C. O.

Church, C. G.

Comfort, Horace

Conklin, S. J.

Crane, Frank

Crane, Frank

Deming, L. S.

Dewey, O. E.

Edes, George A.

Foley, Andrew D.

Fraser, W. O.

Gesley, O.

Given, Walton S.

Granger, Frank E.

Hagen, H. O.

Hanten, John B.

Heintz, Louis F.

Higgins, P. E.

Holmes, Charles F.

Hoyt, F. W.

Johnson, H.

Johnson, O. C.

Kemp, Oscar P.

Kemp, John

Lovejoy, D. B.

Lyon, Leander D.

Marshall, William

Mathiesen, Hans

Mauseth, Peter

Maxwell, C. C.

McIntyre, William

Michaels, John

Michaels, John R.

Miller, Joseph C.

Monks, J. I.

Mulholland, J. C.

Olson, Edgar C.

Owsley, J. J.

Owsley, J. J.

Owsley, S. M.

Page, Warren

Ransom, Albert Walworth

Reed, William M.

Rice, E. C.

Rice, G. F.

Riley, James

Riley, James

Scudder, S. D.

Seim, Olaf

Seward, Charles X.

Sheafe, Mark Wentworth

Sheldon, S. B.

Spicer, R. B.

 

Stoddart, G. H.

Stoddart, George H.

Tarbell, O. H.

Teed, T. S.

Thomas, D. C.

Thomas, D. C. - 2

Thomas, George W.

Thomas, W. R.

Turner, James P.

Ulrick, E. H.

Wagner, Henry Adam

Walker, Delbert T.

Walrath, H. D.

Walsh, John P.

Warner, R. T.

Weaver, Archie

Weaver, Archie

Whistler, C. C.

Wiley, C. C.

 


 

 




History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

D. C. THOMAS is a native of Waukesha, Wisconsin, where he received such educational advantages as were afforded in the common schools, and he was reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm. His quickened ambition and natural predilection prompted him to spare no effort in 'securing a broader education, and by teaching and doing such other work as came to hand he succeeded in defraying the expenses of his collegiate course. He was matriculated in the law department of the celebrated University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where he was graduated. He initiated the practice of his profession in Buena Vista county, Iowa, in which state he continued in practice until 1879, when he came to what was then the territory of Dakota and located in Watertown, as one of the first representatives of his profession in the town and county. Here he became associated in practice with his brother, W. R. Thomas, and they succeeded in building up a large and lucrative practice and in gaining marked precedence at the bar of the territory and the state.

The subject has been most intimately identified with the growth and development of Watertown. He has been a member of the directorate of the City National Bank from the time of its organization, served for several years as president of the board of education, was incumbent of the office of mayor of the city, and has been shown other gratifying and unmistakable evidences of popular confidence and regard. He is at the present time president of the state board of charities and corrections, and the executive duties of this important office demand a very considerable portion of his time and attention. He has been an ardent and uncompromising advocate of the principles of the Republican party from the time of attaining his majority, and has been one of its most prominent leaders in this state. He effected the organization of the party in Codington county, and was chairman of its first central committee, while upon him devolved the duty of conveying to the governor the petition for the organization of the county. In 1880 he made a trip to Washington, where he prevailed upon the authorities to change the location of the United States land office from Springfield to Watertown. Mr. Thomas is an appreciative member of the time-honored order of Freemasons. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Watertown, of which he has been a trustee from the time of its organization.

Mr. Thomas was married to Miss Mary Logan, who was born in Pennsylvania, and they have one child.


Who’s Who in South Dakota, Vol. 2
By O. W. Coursey
Educator School Supply Co., Publisher, 1916
Transcribed and Contributed by Jim Dezotell

C. C. CARPENTER

Two boys were attending public school in adjoining rooms in the city of Watertown, this state, in the early 90's. Their home environments were different and their impulses were the direct antitheses of each other. One's sixth special sense (spiritual) had been cast by Providence in a major key; the other's, in a minor.

Twenty years elapsed; the two boys have now become grown men. A few months since, they faced each other at the bar of justice — the boy, whose impulses were upward, was sitting on the bench as a circuit judge, while his schoolmate, whose impulses were downward, now stood before him as a criminal, awaiting sentence to the penitentiary.

This scene was enacted in the court room at Webster. The criminal had been convicted of carrying dynamite. The maximum statutory penalty for this offense is eight years. When asked if he had anything to say why the maximum penalty should not be given him, the criminal stepped forward, laid his head on his hands on the jurist's bench and with the tears streaming down his face, said: "Judge, don't send me to the penitentiary; it would break my old parents' hearts. You knew me as a boy at Watertown; have pity on me. Give me a chance; I'll do better." 

The judge was deeply moved. After a moment's reflection, he said : "Yes; we were schoolmates, and I am sorry for you. I will, therefore, give you only six months in jail and not send you to the penitentiary. During your confinement in jail, I will look for a good job for you; and I want you to promise me that when you get out you will be a man."

"I will; God witness it!" said the penitent wretch.

But, the judge! Ah! yes; the judge. How our suspense grows! We are almost tempted to jump over a few lines so that our eyes may more quickly catch his name — Cyrus Clay Carpenter, of the twelfth circuit who, upon request, was temporarily occupying Judge McNulty's bench in the fifth. And the criminal? We have said enough. The Day county records bear his name. 

PREPARATION FOR LIFE

Judge Carpenter was born January 13, 1878, at Ft. Dodge, Iowa — that grand old town with which we all instinctively link the name of Senator Jonathan P. Dolliver. He has never been terrorized by reason
of the date of his birth — the 13th. Just what his parents may have thought about it, is another proposition. His marriage — well, let's wait and see.

He attended public school at Ft. Dodge, 1884-87. Then his parents removed with him to Watertown, South Dakota, at which place he also attended public school, having for one of his teachers the Hon. Doane Robinson's sister. She is a grand woman. Recently, at Pierre, when she heard that her old school boy, now a stern judge on the bench, was in the city, she sent for him to come to see her. Their meeting was very cordial and reminiscent.

Cyrus finally completed the grammar grades at Watertown. About that time his parents moved back to Ft. Dodge, and young Carpenter was sent to Cornell college at Mt. Vernon, Iowa, to complete his education. He stuck to it most faithfully for six years. 

FIRST CASE IN COURT

In 1898, before he had completed his college course, Cyrus got lonesome to return to his boyhood haunts at Watertown, or he may have gotten a presentiment that he should return; at least his parents could no longer restrain him, so they advanced the money and our typical young westerner set out for his destination. 

It so happened that during his boyhood days at Watertown, the friendship of a girl schoolmate had entered into his life. When the young Cornell student arrived at Watertown, he found that this charming lady was soon to become the bride of another man; in fact, her wedding gown was already prepared.

Cyrus Clay Carpenter's fate was hanging in the balance. He sought an interview with her; pleaded his first case in "court;" won it! and the young couple — he under age and she but a few days over — made a "flying" trip through Iowa, to Janesville, Wisconsin, where a license was secured and the "Carpenter boy" from Cornell and Miss Katherine Flint, of Watertown, became husband and wife. Fate said right then and there: "This lad has made good in 'court,’I will make of him a jurist." And Fate made good its own pledge.

BECOMING A JUDGE

The happy young couple, after their romance, came back to Watertown where Mr. Carpenter accepted a position as a clerk in a drug store. So well did he apply himself that he was soon able to pass the examination and become a registered pharmacist. Later, he bought a drug business of his own. However, in 1905, he sold out and went to the University of Minnesota where he took his law course. In October, 1907, he passed his bar examination, and immediately thereafter, he and Frank McNulty formed a partnership at Sisseton for the practice of law. It sounds like fiction to say that inside of four years each of these two young attorneys found their way to the circuit bench.

At the end of the first year of their partnership, Attorney Carpenter was appointed register of the land office at Lemmon. He accepted the position. Its location threw him into a new field. So when the twelfth judicial circuit, comprising a number of newly organized counties in the northwest part of the state, was formed, Governor Vessey appointed Mr. Carpenter to the bench. The appointment came unsolicited; he accepted; Fate had won ! 

His work on the bench as a jurist soon attracted wide and favorable attention. The attorneys in his circuit are unstinted in their laudations of his fairness and capabilities, while the newspapers continually sound paeans of praise in his honor.

As a student of criminology, the judge belongs exclusively as well as inclusively to the new school of thought — that is, to the reformation of the criminal instead of merely to his punishment. "Some men are born (criminals), some achieve (crime) and others have (criminality) thrust upon them." We beg leave to digress long enough to suggest that if the legislature were to enact a law authorizing the paroling of all convicts in our state penitentiary, except life termers, on the basis of attaining their freedom, if they remained harmless during their entire pardon, and if they did not, that they would not only have to undergo imprisonment for the unexpired portions of their terms, but would, in addition thereto, have to serve their original sentences all over again, that not to exceed one per cent of them would ever go wrong. The theorist says, "A lot of them are born criminals and they are serving their second or third terms now." Very well; the trouble is here; we need a board of employment whose business it shall be to see that good, remunerative, suitable employment is found for each dismissed convict before he leaves the prison doors, and not thrust him out into a cruel, competitive world to make a living sewing buttons onto shirts when there is no other shirt factory within a thousand miles, and when it is a woman's job at best. Yes; we have something yet to learn, and Judge Carpenter is on the right track. 

MILITARY AND PERGONAL

While Judge Carpenter was in the drug business at Watertown, he was appointed adjutant of the old first regiment, S. D. S. G., which position he occupied for two years. Then he was promoted to major of a squadron of cavalry. He served in this position for three years, but gave it up when he entered law school. Clay makes an ideal military officer. He is happy but firm, and he possesses that uncommon kind of common sense which makes it possible for him to handle all kinds of men without friction. 

The home life of Judge and Mrs. Carpenter has been blessed by the presence of Cyrus, Jr., by Lee, and by two of the sweetest twin girls that ever entered life. Their names are Doris and Dorothy.  The judge has an exceptionally pleasing personality. He makes friends readily; and he is so democratic in his habits and yet so cultured in manner that all who know him love him. He is an A-l "mixer" and we shall look for his rapid rise to a position of even greater prominence and power within the next few years.

(Later. — Owing to the meager salary paid by this state to its circuit judges, Judge Carpenter has resigned his position on the bench and returned to private law practice.)


“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915
 

GENERAL MARK WENTWORTH SHEAFE.

A distinguished and honored citizen of South Dakota is General Mark Wentworth Sheafe, of Watertown, who was identified with the pioneer development of the territory and has as well been a factor in the upbuilding of the state. He was born May I8, 1844, in Brooklyn, New York, and in the paternal line is descended from one of the oldest English families, the name of Wentworth being not unknown in English history and at the same time appearing frequently on the pages of America's annals. The lineage can be traced back to the year 1066, before the time of the Norman conquest. The records have been carefully preserved and proven and many men of distinction in England have borne the name of Went worth, which is still known there. The name of Sheafe originated in Cranebroke, Kent
England, in 1520, and the family history has been preserved from that time to the present. John Wentworth. an ancestor of General Sheafe, was the last royal governor of New Hampshire in 1775. His father, Governor Benning Wentworth, was mentioned by Longfellow in his poem entitled "Tales of a Wayside Inn." The son of Governor Wentworth was one of the signers of the original Articles of Confederation in 1778, representing the colony of New Hampshire.

In the maternal line General Sheafe is also descended from good old colonial stock, having emigrated from England to Massachusetts in 1646. The family during the Revolutionary war owned Bunker Hill at Charlestown, where, but for a mistake, the battle of that name would have been fought. In that battle were two great-grandfathers of General Sheafe and the records show that the family have participated in every war waged by this country from the first Indian war—King Philip's—down to the Spanish-American war.

General Sheafe passed his boyhood and youth in Boston, acquiring a liberal education for those days, and at the age of seventeen was examined for and prepared to enter Harvard College. However, the Civil war had just begun and, fired with enthusiasm, he, with a number of his fellow students and friends, enlisted in the Forty-fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers, becoming members of Company H, with which he went to the front. On the expiration of his term of service he accompanied his father to Janesville, Wisconsin, where he entered the First National Bank. While there residing he was married in 1866 to Miss Cassa A. Hall, by whom he had three children.

In 1871 General Sheafe was desirous of going to the frontier and Dakota territory seemed to him a promising field for endeavor and energy. Accordingly in the fall of that year he removed lo Elk Point, Union county, where he became extensively engaged in a lumber business and also in milling. It is a strange coincidence that he should have been the first to ship freight by rail into the territory, and in connection with his large flouring mills he was the first in the territory to adopt the roller process, discarding the old-time millstones. While conducting private business interests he was always more or less prominently connected with public interests and activities and thus aided in shaping the history of county and state along various lines. In 1877 he was selected by Governor Pennington to accompany Colonel, later General, F. D. Grant on a trip into the Indian country with s view of establishing a trail between the Missouri river at Fort Pierre and the Black Hills.

The Indians were restive and somewhat hostile but the trip was made in company with four other parties and its object successfully accomplished, the old Black Hills trail being adopted. In 1881 General Sheafe witnessed the great flood of the Missouri river bottom when the city of Vermillion was completely wiped out and the fertile river valley was ten feet under water. At that time he lent his endeavors to saving the lives of settlers and was himself reported drowned. In fact he had the doubtful pleasure of reading his own obituary as printed in the Sioux City Journal, but apologies were duly made to the public.

In 1882 General Sheafe married Miss Agnes Spark, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, and to them two children were born, Mark Wentworth and Mary Agnes. The former is a prominent lawyer of Codington county and has been twice elected as state's attorney.

In 1885 General Sheafe was appointed register of the United States land office at Watertown under President Cleveland and removed to the city which is now his home. In that year he also received at the hands of Governor G. A. Pierce the commission as colonel of the Second Regiment, Dakota National Guard, with instructions to perfect the organization of the regiment, which he did. serving as colonel commanding for fifteen years with great success. In 1893 he was again appointed register of the United States land office at Watertown, which position he filled until April, 1897.

In the meantime he continued the successful management of his business affairs and broadened the scope of his activities. In 1890 he was elected president of the Dakota Loan & Trust Company, a financial institution for making loans on real estate, the stock of which was owned in New England. Crop failures and a low ebb in financial matters
throughout the west compelled the liquidation of this corporation, with but slight loss, however, to its stockholders and clients.

In 1898, at the time the war was declared against Spain by the United States, Colonel Sheafe prepared his regiment for active service and it was one of the first ready for the front. The First South Dakota Regiment made a record second to none. At this time Colonel Sheafe was appointed brigadier general of the United States volunteers by President McKinley and was ordered to report for duty with his brigade, which consisted of the Third New York. Twenty-second Kansas and One Hundred and Fifty-ninth Indiana Regiments. In command of his brigade he gained great credit and the love of his officers and men. The war ending, he asked to be relieved of his command and returned to civil life, assuming again the management of his business affairs. He was for many years largely engaged in handling range cattle on the then uninhabited plains west of the Missouri river and looks back upon the free life with the cowboys, among the wild Texas steer and the bronchos with great pleasure, especially so from the fact that they have both been legislated out of existence in the northwest.

General Sheafe was six times elected mayor of Elk Point and was also elected to the territorial senate in 1874, being today almost the only survivor of that body. In 1890 he was elected to the second state legislative assembly as senator from Codington county and served with credit to himself and honor to his constituents. In 1876 he was selected as territorial delegate to the democratic national convention at St. Louis. In 1897 General Sheafe represented the state of South Dakota at the inauguration of William McKinley to the presidency and was assigned for duty with a mounted troop, acting as bodyguard to the president. In 1913 he was selected to represent the state at the inauguration of President Wiison and on that occasion acted as aid to the grand marshal. In politics General Sheafe is an old-time Jeffersonian-Jacksonian democrat, with all the honor that the name implies. His religious creed is that of the Protestant Episcopal church, of which his forefathers had been adherents for over four hundred years. He is connected with the Masonic fraternity, having had the higher degrees conferred upon him. He is also a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and regards that organization as one doing much good in the world. He likewise holds membership with the Sons of the American Revolution and the Military Order of Foreign Wars of the United States. General Sheafe has had a varied experience. Descended from an old distinguished family of Massachusetts and New Hampshire, distinguished both in civil and military connections, he yearned for the freedom and simple life of the far west- As a soldier in the Civil and Spanish-American wars he received praise and as a government official he has done his full duty; as a lawmaker his record is good and as a business man he has ever been known for his probity. He has seen the territory which he loved and which contained a total of twenty
thousand white inhabitants in 1871, blossom and bring forth two noble states. He has witnessed the passing of the buffalo, the antelope and the cowboy. He has seen his own beloved state, South Dakota, spring up from a few organized counties on the Missouri river and become a grand sovereign commonwealth, rich in soil and resources and equally rich in its acquired advantages. He has lent the best endeavors of his best days to helping bring about this result, and when the last call is made and "taps" are sounded over his body, his wish is that it may rest in the bosom of this state—his home.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JOHN P. WALSH.

John P. Walsh has been engaged in business as an undertaker of Huron since July, 1908, and has served for two terms as coroner of Beadle county, his second term expiring January 1, 1915. His birth occurred in Falmouth, Kentucky, on the 11th of March, 1876, his parents being John J. and Mary Ann (Durkin) Walsh. In December, 1882, the father removed to Volga, South Dakota, and on the 17th of March of the following year brought his family to this state, taking up government land near the postoffice known as Estelline. There be resided until 1899 and then removed to Castlewood, where he is now living retired. The period of his residence in this state covers three decades, and he is widely recognized as a substantial and esteemed citizen.

John P. Walsh acquired his early education in the public schools, learned telegraphy and also pursued a short course of study in the Globe Business College of St. Paul, Minnesota. Subsequently he became assistant agent at Watertown and Hetland, South Dakota, and later served as night clerk and ticket agent at Willmar, Minnesota, next taking a position as station agent at Appleton. Minnesota. In 1900 he located in Beadle county, this state, and during the following four years was engaged in general agricultural pursuits. Disposing of his interests in that connection, he removed to Castlewood and embarked in the hardware, furniture and undertaking business. He is a 1908 graduate of the Cincinnati College of Embalming. On the 27th of July, 1908, Mr. Walsh removed to Huron and purchased the undertaking establishment of William Tolmie, which he has conducted continuously since in a manner that has gained him an enviable reputation and deserved patronage. He also handles art goods and in this branch of his business has likewise won success.

On the 17th of June, 1901, Mr. Walsh was united in marriage to Miss Margaret T. Tobin, of Huron, by whom he has two children, John R. and Ellen Lucille. He is a republican in politics and served for two terms as coroner of Beadle county, in which connection he made a highly creditable record. In 1913 he was one of the organizers of the Commercial Club of Huron and served as its president until March 1, 1914. He is identified fraternally with the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Loyal Americans and the Knights of Columbus, being grand knight of the last named organization in 1911 and 1912. Both he and his wife are devout communicants of the Catholic church. Of strong integrity and honesty of purpose, despising all unworthy or unfair means to secure success in any undertaking or for any purpose or to promote his own advancement in any way, whether politically or otherwise, he has always enjoyed in large measure the goodwill and trust of the general public, while those who know him personally prize bis friendship because of his genial companionship and his personal worth.


“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915
 

HENRY ADAM WAGNER.

Henry Adam Wagner, the popular mayor of Watertown and proprietor of the Watertown Carbonating Company, was born in Luxemburg, Germany, on the 11th of June, 1871, his parents being John P. and Margaret (Suttor) Wagner. He spent the first thirteen years of his life in the land of his birth and then accompanied his parents on their emigration to the new world, the family taking up their abode near Watertown, Codington county. South Dakota. Here the father engaged in farming until four years prior to his death, when he removed to Watertown and lived retired. He became the owner of seven hundred and twenty acres of very valuable and productive land. His death occurred in the fall of 1912 and that of his wife about a year and a half previously.

Henry A. Wagner began his education in the schools of his native land and later attended college at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, completing his education, however, at Conception, Missouri. After leaving school he engaged in the lumber and grain business in Goodwin, South Dakota, for two years and was subsequently interested in the grain and coal business at Palmer and Kranzburg. He also conducted a general store at the latter place until his removal to Watertown in 1905. Forming a partnership with Sylvester Dory, he embarked in his present business as proprietor of the Watertown Carbonating Company. They began operations in a small frame building, but their trade steadily increased and today they have one of the most up-to-date establishments of the kind in the state, shipping their products all over South Dakota and into Minnesota. They employ on an average twelve men. Mr. Wagner is also a stockholder in several local concerns and is regarded as one of the leading and enterprising business men of the town.

On the 16th of June, 1896, Mr. Wagner was united in marriage to Miss Anna M. Kranz, a daughter of John Kranz, of Kranzburg, who is still living at the age of eighty-three years. Her mother, however, is deceased. Mr. Kranz came to this state in 1878 and as a farmer was prominently identified with its early development and prosperity. Mr. and Mrs. Wagner have three children, Blanche, Roxanna and Vernon. The family hold membership in the Catholic church and in politics Mr. Wagner is a democrat. He has taken quite an active and influential part in state affairs and has been called upon to fill several offices of honor and trust, being elected mayor of Watertown, first under the old
form of government, but within a month was reelected when the commission form of government came into existence. He has now filled that office for three years, with credit to himself and to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. During this time great municipal improvements have been started, including a great deal of paving work, the extension of sewers, etc. He is a member of Council No. 859, Knights of Columbus, is a life member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is also connected with the Eagles, the Owls, the Commercial Club, the United Travelers and the Fraternal Reserve Association. He finds recreation in outdoor sports, being especially interested in hunting and fishing as well as motoring. During his residence in Watertown his influence has been widely felt and he is justly regarded as one of the leading citizens.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JAMES P. TURNER.

James P. Turner is conducting a general blacksmithing and woodworking establishment and general repair shop at Faulkton and is thus closely associated with industrial activity there. He was born in Elgin county, Ontario, Canada, December 1, 1858, a son of James and Mary (Jardine) Turner, natives of Scotland, the mother being but a young girl when the family removed to Canada. The father was about twenty-five years of age when he became a resident of that country. In the land of hills and heather he had previously learned the carpenter's trade and in the new world he carried on contracting and building until his death, which occurred in March, 1864, when his son James was about five years of age. In the fall of 1893 the mother came to the United States and now resides with her son in Faulkton.

The family numbered five children, of whom James P. Turner is the third in order of birth. He attended the public schools of Canada and at the age of nineteen years began learning the blacksmith's trade, at which he served a four years' apprenticeship. In 1883 he came to Dakota territory and worked in Watertown for a year, removing thence in the spring of 1884 to Faulk county. He opened a shop at La Foon, then the county seat, and he was one of the first to establish a blacksmithing business in Faulkton when the county seat was removed to that place. He has continuously engaged in blacksmithing there save while he served as postmaster, and he is now operating a general repair shop and doing both blacksmithing and woodworking, having a well equipped plant. He is likewise proprietor of the leading drug store in Faulkton, which is being managed by his son, Hugh A., while the father devotes his entire attention to industrial pursuits.

On the 3d of February, 1887, Mr. Turner was united in marriage to Miss Belle K. Puntine, a native of Ontario, Canada, and a daughter of John and Margaret (McDonald) Puntine, who have passed away. To Mr. and Mrs. Turner were born five children, as follows: Jessie A., who is the wife of E. E. Aaron, a ranchman residing at Billings, Montana; Hugh A., who is engaged in the drug business at Faulkton; Frank A., who resides at borne and has pursued a course in civil engineering at the South Dakota State School of Mines at Rapid City; and Muriel B. and Charles J., both of whom are attending school and are still at home. The wife and mother passed away December 15, 1900, and her death was deeply regretted by her many friends.

Mr. Turner is well known in Masonic circles, holding membership in the lodge and chapter of Faulkton, being a past master of the former, while in the latter he has served as high priest. He has attained the Knight Templar degree in Redfield Commandery and he is ever most loyal to the teachings of the craft. At the present writing he is serving as secretary of both the lodge and chapter. He also belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Modern Brotherhood of America and the Modern Woodmen of America. In his religious belief he is a Baptist, while his political faith is that of the republican party.

He is recognized as one of its prominent representatives in Faulk county and he served as postmaster of Faulkton under the administration of President Taft. He was also called to the office of mayor and then after being out of the position for a time was reelected and is serving for the second year as chief executive of the city, to which he gives a business- like and progressive administration. He has been a member of the board of education for a number of years, is a director of the Providence Hospital and lends hearty aid and cooperation to all movements that are of value and worth to the city.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

GEORGE H. STODDART.

George H. Stoddart, city auditor of Brookings, was born in Shullsburg, Wisconsin, on the 29th of July, 1854, his parents being William and Sophia (Hatt) Stoddart, the former a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and the latter probably of New York city. William Stoddart was but a young lad at the time his parents died and he and his four brothers were reared by their grandparents. In his young manhood he and two of his brothers came to the United States and William Stoddart settled at West Point, New York, where he pursued a seven years' medical course under one of the government surgeons at that place, eventually winning his M. D. degree. At that time Lee, McClellan and Burnside were all at the West Point Military Academy and Mr. Stoddart knew them well. Following his graduation he went to Shullsburg, Wisconsin, where he practiced for several years, and subsequently removed to Minersville, afterward to Jamestown and still later to Boscobel, Wisconsin. In the meantime he had entered upon the work of the ministry of the Congregational church and gave his later life to Christian service. He passed away at Black Earth, Wisconsin, where he was occupying a pulpit at the time.

George H. Stoddart spent his youth in Wisconsin and was educated in the public schools. He left the parental roof at the age of nineteen years and in 1873 made his way to Yankton, South Dakota, where he became identified with the government survey work, with which he was connected for five years. In the spring of 1878 he removed to Codington county and took up a homestead on the shores of Lake Kampeska. In 1880 he proved up on the land, for which be paid a dollar and a quarter per acre, and that year he went to work in the engineering department of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, working with the surveying force of that road for eight years, during which period he gradually advanced and in 1888 became roadmaster of that division, in which important capacity he served for ten years. During that time, or in 1891, he transferred his headquarters to Brookings, where he has since resided, and in 1898 he resigned his position, but the following year ran the transit for the surveying gang on the location of the road from Tyler to Astoria and subsequently did special work for the road at different times. In 1903 he was elected city clerk of Brookings, which was then acting under a special charter. After the city came under the general laws he continued his work, but the name of the office was changed to that of city auditor, in which position he has continued to serve. From the fact that the city owns its electric light, heat and power plant, heating the business section of the city, and also owns its telephone line, the position is one of importance and Mr. Stoddart has been most faithful and efficient in the discharge of his duties.

In 1891 Mr. Stoddart was united in marriage to Miss Marie Marrow, of Redfield, South Dakota, and they became the parents of three children, of whom two are yet living: Mattie, who is attending the South Dakota State College at Brookings; and Harriett. Mr. Stoddart is a member of Brookings Lodge, No. 24, A. F. A A. M.; Brookings Chapter, No. 18, R. A. M.; Brookings Commandery, No. 14, K. T.; and he and his wife are members of Brookings Chapter, No. 15, O. E. S. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen and he has membership in the Brookings Commercial Club, while his wife and daughters are members of the First Presbyterian church. He is one of the representative citizens of Brookings and in an analyzation of his life work it will be found that loyalty .to duty has been one of his strong characteristics. If study and work can make for efficiency—and it always does—there is no doubt that he has displayed efficiency in every position to which he has been called. Another proof of this is found in the fact that he has been continuously promoted and that his life work has been of constantly increasing responsibility and value.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

OLAF SEIM.

Olaf Seim was well known as a general contractor for a period of a quarter of a century or more in Deadwood, being closely identified during that time with building operations. He is now practically living retired but is vice president of the Black Hills Trust A. Savings Bank and is proprietor of the Seim flat building. He was born in southern Bergen, Norway, September 20, 1866, a son of Nels L. and Christie Seim, also natives of Norway, the former born November 13, 1813, and the latter in 1824. The father learned the trade of shipbuilding in early life and followed that pursuit for a long period. Afterward he purchased a farm, on which he lived partially retired to the time of his death, which occurred in 1905. He served in the regular army of Norway for three years. His wife passed away in 1908. Olaf Seim, the youngest of their seven children, attended the schools of southern Bergen and when seventeen years of age began learning the builder's trade, which he followed in Norway until the spring of 1885, when he came to America. He first settled in Iowa, near Lansing, Allamakee county, where he worked at his trade for about two years. He then removed to Watertown, South Dakota, where he began contracting along the line of the Great Northern Railroad, which was then being built into Huron. He erected houses along the line of that road in the new towns which were being established and after two years spent in that work arrived in Deadwood in the spring of 1889. There he worked at his trade and did general contracting of all kinds, continuing in the business until a recent date, when he practically put aside business cares save for the supervision which he gives to his invested interests as proprietor of the Seim flat buildings and as a stockholder and the vice president of the Black Hills Trust & Savings Bank. He is also owner of the Seim mine near Deadwood and has a mine formerly known as the Porth mine. He likewise owns stock in other mining properties and is the owner of the Black Hills Steam Laundry and the Black Hills & Kilker Garage. He has various residence properties and his investments represent the results of a life of well directed activity, energy and thrift. He is now numbered among the substantial citizens of his community and his prosperity is well deserved.

In September, 1896, Mr. Seim was married to Miss Eda Martin, who was born in Norway, near Christiania. Her parents never came to America but still occupy the old homestead farm in Norway, where the father is an extensive owner of timber lands. Mr. and Mrs. Seim have one child, Ida Selma, eleven years of age, now attending school. Mr. Seim is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and of the Lutheran church, and these associations indicate much of the nature of his interests and the principles which guide his actions. In politics he is a democrat and served as a member of the city council for eight years, being chairman of the council or acting mayor of the city for two years. He has ever exercised his official prerogatives in support of measures for the general good and his cooperation in citizenship has been an element of value in the upbuilding and progress of Deadwood.


“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915
 

ROBERT F. CAMPBELL

Dr. Robert F. Campbell is a prominent physician of Watertown, South Dakota, and is also one of the leaders in all aggressive movements having as their purpose the upbuilding of the city. He was born in Aylmer, Ontario, Canada, on the 23d of March, 1857, a son of William and Jane (Van Wagganer) Campbell, both natives of Canada and of Scotch extraction. The father was a business man and for many years was postmaster of Aylmer, Ontario, but after his retirement from business cares and responsibilities he and his wife came to Watertown, South Dakota, where their son Robert F. had preceded them. Both passed away in that city about 1905.

Dr. Campbell was reared at home and acquired his early education in the public schools of his native town. He was later a student at McGill University of Montreal and at the Bellevue Medical Hospital of New York, being graduated from the latter institution with the class of 1882. In the spring following his graduation he located in Watertown, South Dakota, where he has been in active practice for thirty-two years. For more than thirty years he has occupied his present suite of offices in the Millett block. Dr. Campbell realizes thoroughly the fact that new discoveries are being constantly made by investigators and that the physician and surgeon must remain constantly a student if he would not be left in the rear of his profession. Through -his membership in medical societies and through reading professional journals he has done much to keep abreast of the times, but he has also felt that further study in the medical centers of the world would be of great benefit. In 1900 he took special courses in surgery in Berlin and London, and again in the fall of 1913 he took a special course in Berlin and Vienna, spending eight months on the last trip. His study of the methods used in the great foreign hospitals and his observation of the work of the most famous surgeons of Europe have fitted him for the exacting duties of the surgeon and he is known as one of the best in South Dakota. In 1901, in connection with Drs. H. M. Finnerud and H. A. Tarbell, he established a private hospital known as the Watertown Hospital. Later he bought out the interests of his partners and is now the sole owner of the institution, which accommodates fifteen patients and is one of the best equipped small hospitals in the middle west. Everything possible is done to secure absolute cleanliness and the care given the patients compares favorably with that of the great metropolitan institutions. Dr. Campbell has a wide and growing reputation as a surgeon and his percentage of successful operations is unusually high.

The Doctor was married in 1884 to Miss Kate A. Williams, a daughter of Hon. C. G. Williams, of Janesville, Wisconsin, who represented his district in congress for a number of years and subsequently was appointed registrar of the land office at Watertown.

Dr. Campbell is a republican in his political belief and has served repeatedly as coroner and city physician, holding the latter position at the present time. He is surgeon for the Chicago & Northwestern, the Rock Island, the Great Northern and the Minneapolis &. St. Louis Railroads. He is connected with the business interests of Watertown as a stockholder and member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Watertown. He is a man of high principles, his record as a private citizen and as a physician being above reproach, and he is accorded that respect which true worth alone can command. Although he has prospered beyond the average in his profession and has a reputation which extends over the state of South Dakota, he has yet found time to make his life of great value to
the public welfare and has taken the initiative in many movements that have proven of lasting benefit to his city and county.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

WARREN PAGE.

Warren Page, now living retired in Henry, belongs to that class of public-spirited citizens who manifest their interest in the welfare of county and state by hearty cooperation in all movements which seek to promote the public good. He is now living retired but for many years was actively engaged in farming. He has always been a resident of the middle west, his birth having occurred in Wisconsin on the 9th of April, 1844, his parents being William and Permelia Page, who have long since passed away. The father always made farming his life occupation.

In pursuit of his education Warren Page attended the public schools of his native state and afterward entered the Wayland University at Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. When he had completed his course in that institution he turned his attention to fanning in the Badger state and for ten years was thus employed. He then came west to South Dakota, settling in Kampeska township, Codington county, in 1882. There he homesteaded on section 30 and with characteristic energy began the development and improvement of his place. Year by year saw the farm further under cultivation and in course of time the crops gathered brought to him a substantial annual income. To his original claim he added until he became the owner of four hundred acres, which he continued to cultivate until 1907, when he put aside active business cares and rented his land, having in the meantime acquired a substantial competence that now supplies him with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life.

In June, 1869, Mr. Page was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Scott, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Winchester Scott, of Waupun, Wisconsin, the latter still living. Mr. and Mrs. Page have become parents of three daughters: Jennie, now the wife of John Peck, a resident of Hazel; Edith, the wife of Alexander Peck, also of Hazel; and Vera, the wife of Pierre Cosgrove, of Henry. Mr. and Mrs. Page attend the Congregational church, are interested in its work and generous in its' support. Their influence is always on the side of progress, reform, justice and truth.

Mr. Page belongs also to the Elks lodge, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He votes with the republican party and for fourteen years he filled the office of county commissioner, to which position he was elected in the fall of 1895, his record in that connection being most commendable and exemplary. He has also served as town clerk and at the present writing—in 1915—is president of the school board of Henry. The cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion and he is doing much to uphold the interests of the schools in his town. He is entitled to wear the little bronze button of the Grand Army of the Republic, for he served for three years at the front with the boys in blue, enlisting as a member of Company K, Twenty-ninth Wisconsin Infantry, with which he went to the front, returning only when the regiment was discharged in 1865. He participated in a number of hotly contested engagements and his record as a soldier, indicating his loyalty and fidelity to his country, has been equaled by the record which he has made as a public-spirited citizen in times of peace.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

EDGAR C. OLSON.

In all of his business career, progressive and successful as it has been, his has never been the command of the tyrant to go, but always the call of the leader to come, and thus Edgar C. Olson today occupies a conspicuous and enviable position in the commercial circles, not only of Sioux Falls, but of the northwest, being at the head of a company which owns a chain of clothing stores throughout this part of the country.

He is a native of Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, born April 6, 1874, his parents being Gabriel and Martha (Nelson) Olson. He was the seventh in order of birth in a family of three sons and five daughters, all of whom are yet living with the exception of the eldest son, John G., who died in 1004. The removal of the family in 1875 to Kasson, Minnesota, enabled Edgar C. Olson to there pursue his education in the public schools. He also attended high school at St. Paul, Minnesota, and spent three years as a student in a night school in that city in order to overcome what he regarded as a lack of early educational opportunities. He has ever been a student of life and in the school of experience he has learned many valuable lessons which he has put to good use.

Mr. Olson became a clerk in a clothing store in St. Paul in 1890, and there remained until 1900, when he went to Marshall, Minnesota, and in partnership with a brother, established a clothing store under the firm name of Olson Brothers. This was successfully
conducted for two years. In 1902 the firm of Olson Brothers opened a branch store at Brookings, South Dakota, which is still in operation and Edgar C. Olson continued in charge there until 1912, when he came to Sioux Falls, where the previous year he had been instrumental in organizing the firm of Olson, Delaney & Berdahl. This firm continued until July 15, 1913, at which time the business was taken over by the present E. C. Olson Company. Theirs is one of the leading clothing establishments, not only of the city, but also of this section of the country, and their store presents a most attractive appearance. The fixtures are of late design done in fumed oak. The big suit rack will accommodate twelve hundred men's and boys' suits and overcoats, and the stock includes clothing, hats, haberdashery and men's furnishings.

As the years have passed Edgar C. Olson has established business in various sections until he now has a chain of nine stores. The one at Watertown, South Dakota, established in 1907, which was conducted under the name of Olson-McCosham Company, is now under the name of The Olson-Lee Company. The business at Rapid City was started in 1909 and has always been conducted under the firm style of Olson & Company. M. G. Olson, brother of E. C. Olson, established stores at Montevideo, Minnesota; Wheaton, Minnesota; Sisseton, South Dakota, and Grand Forks, North Dakota. These are all owned by the E. C. Olson Company, together with the stores at Rapid City, at Brookings and at Sioux Falls. The business today is extensive, being one of the important commercial enterprises of the northwest and the capability, progressiveness and laudable ambition of E. C. Olson and his brother have constituted a substantial foundation upon which their success has been built.

On the 8th of January, 1905, at Brookings, South Dakota, Mr. Olson was united in marriage to Miss Callie T. Williams, a daughter of Edward Williams, and they have one son, Lyle Williams, born July 31, 1907. The parents are members of the Baptist church, while Mr. Olson belongs also to the Masonic fraternity, having taken the degrees of the York Rite and the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and with the Commercial Club and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. While he is never neglectful of the duties of citizenship and in fact stands many times as a leader in support of public projects, he has never sought political preferment, giving to his business affairs that close attention which is largely the secret of success. He keeps in touch with the most modern commercial methods and conforms his interests to the highest requirements of commercial ethics.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JOHN R. MICHAELS.

John R. Michaels holds title to three hundred and twenty acres of land located on section 21, Germantown township, Codington county, and is one of the leading agriculturists of his locality. He is also county commissioner and influential in the affairs of local government. He was born In Dodge county, Wisconsin, on the 27th of November, 1873, a son of John H. and Lena (Dahl) Michaels, both natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, where they were reared and married. In the early '60s they left the fatherland and came to the United States and made their way inland, settling in Dodge county, Wisconsin, where the father was employed as a farm hand for some time. In 1880 he came to what is now South Dakota with a threshing outfit, which he owned and which he operated that season. The following year he brought his family to Dakota territory and subsequently purchased a farm in Germantown township, Codington county. He added to his first quarter section from time to time and eventually owned eight hundred and eighty acres of land. He had one of the first threshers in his part of the state and for several seasons operated an outfit, replacing his horse power machine with one whose motive power was steam, as soon as able to do so. He was on the board of county commissioners for nine years and was a member of the state legislature for three terms. He passed away on the 12th of March, 1909, when sixty- six years of age. His widow survives and resides in Watertown, this state.

John R. Michaels was reared under the parental roof and was given that excellent home training which means so much in the building of character and the development of efficiency and his education was acquired in the public schools of the neighborhood. After his marriage, which occurred in 1895, he began farming for himself and for some years rented his father's home farm, although he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of the land where he now resides in the fall of 1895 and two years later bought a quarter section adjoining. Since 1899 he has made his home upon his place, which comprises three hundred and twenty acres in a body and is one of the most valuable farms in the county. During the intervening sixteen years he has brought his land to a high state of cultivation and has made many improvements upon the place. He carries on general farming, although his greatest attention is given to the raising of grain, to the production of which this section is especially well adapted. His labors return him a good income and he is one of the well-to-do men of his locality.

Mr. Michaels was married on the 2d of July, 1895, to Miss Louise Redemske, of this county, a native of Dodge county, Wisconsin. To Mr. and Mrs. Michaels have been born two children, Hilda Ida and Etta Anna. Mr. Michaels is a republican and has served as a member of the township board and of the school board almost continuously since removing to his present farm. In the fall of 1912 he was appointed to the board of county commissioners to fill out the unexpired term of Peter Phillip, deceased, and was elected to the same position at the election of the same year. He is at present serving in that capacity and is proving a judicious and able official. He is held in the highest esteem wherever known and is a man of influence in his county.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

FRANK E. GRANGER.

Frank E. Granger, of Aberdeen, the oldest court reporter in South Dakota, in point of continuous service in that capacity, was born in Chicago, Illinois, and there acquired his early education, afterward reading law and winning admission to the bar of Illinois. In 1883 he located in Aberdeen, South Dakota, where he proved up on some government land. Five years later he was made court reporter and for more than a quarter of a century has held that position, discharging his duties in a capable, prompt and able manner. Mr. Granger is also well known in Aberdeen as the founder of the Granger Business School, which he established in 1900 as a school of stenography. Later he installed a complete business course, buying out the Aberdeen Commercial College. In 1906 he established a branch at Big Stone City, South Dakota, later moving this to Ortonville, Minnesota, and selling it in 1913 to C. J. Stark. In 1908 Mr. Granger established another branch school, buying the Watertown Business School, which he sold two years later. In 1913 he sold the Aberdeen school to George L. Kemper, its present owner, who has placed M. B. Dewey in charge.

In November, 1883, Mr. Granger was united in marriage to Miss Fannie Roe, of Chicago, and they have become the parents of three children. Mr. Granger is connected fraternally with the Masonic lodge and he gives his political allegiance to the republican party. In 1893 he served as a member of the school board and did capable and intelligent work in that office. He has lived in Aberdeen for many years and is held in high regard there as a progressive and useful citizen.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915


HANS MATHIESEN.

Hans Mathiesen ie the senior partner in the firm of H. Mathiesen A Sons, proprietors of the Hillside Stock Farm, which is pleasantly and conveniently located two miles east of Watertown. There they are engaged in the breeding of Percheron horses, shorthorn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs, and they rank with the leading stockmen of northeastern South Dakota. Hans Mathiesen makes his home in the city of Watertown but is widely known throughout the county. He was born in Norway on the 20th of August, 1851, a son of Ole Mathiesen, who was a native of that part of Norway which is known as the land of the midnight sun. Further mention of him is made in connection with the sketch of Magnus Mathiesen on another page of this volume.

Hans Mathiesen was reared under the parental roof and in the public schools of his native country pursued his education. His opportunities, however, were somewhat limited, for when but thirteen years of age he started out as a wage earner and has since been dependent upon his own labors. His father had the contract to furnish wood for the copper mines and Hans was employed in chopping wood and hauling it to the mines.. In 1868, however, he bade adieu to friends and native country and sailed for the United States with his father, being then seventeen years of age. They journeyed westward into the interior of the country and Hans Mathiesen began working in the mines, being employed in the first level of the Hecla mines after they were opened. Eight or nine years were devoted to that occupation but in June, 1883, he came to South Dakota, settling in Watertown, where he embarked in merchandising, being thus prominently identified with the commercial interests of the city for fourteen years. In fact throughout all the intervening period to the present he has been a leading figure here, actively connected with business and public interests. In 1887 he was elected to the office of county treasurer of Codington county and then disposed of his store. For four years or for two terms he continued in that position, giving his undivided attention to the duties of the office, from which he retired with the confidence and high regard of all by reason of the capability and fidelity which he had displayed in the discharge of his official duties.

In 1891 Mr. Mathiesen purchased three hundred and twenty acres of his present farm and has added thereto until he is now the owner of an entire section, and in connection with four of his sons he rents other land, so that they are now operating ten hundred and eighty acres. They are among the most extensive farmers of Codington county and the Hillside Stock Farm is known far and wide because of the progressive and scientific manner in which it is conducted. Splendid crops of corn, wheat and other cereals are annually harvested and, moreover, they conduct an extensive business as breeders of Percheron horses, shorthorn cattle, Duroc Jersey hogs, M. B. turkeys and Scotch Collie dogs.

In 1879 Mr. Mathiesen was united in marriage to Miss Johanna Reque, a daughter of the old pioneer, Lars V. Reque of Deerfield, Wisconsin, who was one of the oldest Norwegian settlers in America. He emigrated to the United States in 1837 and died in Deerfield, in 1912, when in the ninety-fourth year of his age. He was known far and wide as one of the builders of Wisconsin. To Mr. and Mrs. Mathiesen have been born ten children, eight of whom still survive, as follows: Otto Ferdinand, who serves as assistant cashier of the State Bank at Bonners Ferry, Idaho; Edwin Lewis; Luella Emelia; John Walter; Frank Robert; William Hubert; Homer Arnold; and Agnes Ingeborg Frederika. All the children are at home except the eldest son. The parents have given their children excellent educational opportunities, thus specially qualifying them for life's practical and responsible duties.

Mr. Mathiesen and his family are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church of Watertown, of which he was one of the organizers and charter members. He has been a generous contributor to its support and an earnest worker for its upbuilding and the extension of its influence. In his political views Mr. Mathiesen is an earnest republican and has served as a member of the school board and of the city council of Watertown, ever exercising his official prerogatives in support of those measures and movements which are factors in upholding the highest civic standards. He has also been township assessor for the past four years and in November, 1914, he was elected to represent the thirty-first district in the state legislature. By reason of the extent and importance of his business interests, his public-spirited citizenship, his loyalty to all those interests which work for honorable manhood, he has become recognized as one of the foremost citizens of Codington county, belonging to that class of men who uphold the political and legal status and advance the material and moral progress of the community.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

 

 

WALTON S. GIVEN.

Walton S. Given, cashier of the First National Bank of Britton, was born in Woodstock, Illinois, February 4, 1879, and is descended from early American ancestry represented in the Revolutionary war among the Virginian troops with Pitkin and Sumter. His parents, C. A. and Elizabeth (Ryder) Given, were both natives of Woodstock, Illinois, although their parents were Virginians. C. A. Given made farming his life work and thus provided a comfortable living for his family. He was a well read and broad-minded man and the salient traits of his character were such as commended him to the confidence and high regard of all. His early political support was given to the democratic party but later he joined the ranks of the republican party. Fraternally he was connected with the Masons and religiously with the Presbyterian church, while his wife was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Walton S. Given completed a high-school course in Elgin, Illinois, by graduation with the class of 1897, being then a youth of eighteen years. Soon afterward he made his way to Watertown, South Dakota, and for two years engaged in teaching in the country schools near that place. He afterward attended the State Normal School at Madison, from which he was graduated in 1900, and then accepted the position of principal of the schools of South Shore, South Dakota. A year later he removed to Britton, where he was city superintendent of schools from 1901 until 1910, and from 1905 until 1910 he spent his summers in teachers' institute work all over Dakota. He was particularly able in that field, as well as in the regular work of the schoolroom, where his ability to impart clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he bad acquired made him a most valued educator. His efforts have been an important force in the development of the school system of his part of the state, for he was largely instrumental in advancing the standards of the schools. He promoted his own knowledge through attendance for several seasons at the University of Chicago, and broad reading, study and investigation have continually augmented his intellectual force. In 1910 he was elected assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Britton, of which he was made cashier in January, 1911, and has since been identified with this institution, to which he gives his undivided attention.

In 1906 Mr. Given was united in marriage to Miss Annie Sheridan, a native of Madison,
South Dakota, and a daughter of Elmer Sheridan, who is engaged in the abstract and insurance business. They have one child, Elmer S. Mrs. Given belongs to the Presbyterian church, while Mr. Given is a member of the Masonic fraternity. In politics he is a republican but has never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business duties. He is now making good in the position of cashier of the First National Bank of Britton and is accorded the high regard and confidence of his colleagues and contemporaries.


J. B. Alexander, firm of Alexander Bros.,—born in Cass county, Mich., in 1845; moved to Red Wing, Minn., in 1866; came to Watertown in the spring of 1879; elevator erected in the summer of 1879; married to Melissa Odell, of Vandalia, Mich., and has three sons and one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881. 


M. D. Alexander, firm of Alexander Bros., grain elevator—born in Cass county, Mich., in 1853; thence to Red Wing, Minn.; thence to Watertown; married to Mary Odell, of Vandalia, Mich., and has two sons and one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


G. E. Bartlett, blacksmith—born in N. Y. in 1838; moved to Wis. in 1849; came to Watertown in April, 1879, and engaged in business as above; married to Frank E. Tripp, of Hingham, Wis., and has four sons.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


W. L. Beals, firm of Ulrick & Beals, Proprs. Central House—born in Mass. in 1845; came to Watertown in March, 1879; married to S. A. Farrington, of Me. The Central House was erected in the spring of 1879.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


J. Bennett—physician and surgeon; firm of Bennett & Briggs; born in York county, Pa., in 1814; moved with parents to Oxford, 0.; thence to Illinois in 1845; thence to Sparta, Wis., in 1856; came to Watertown in May, 1879; married to Julia Shelley, deceased, of Connecticut,and has one son and two daughters; his present wife was Mrs. Emma Malmus, of Vicksburg, Miss.; he has recently platted the north addition to Aberdeen, D. T., from land owned by him adjoining that town. The Doctor was an old-time abolitionist: was eight years clerk of the circuit court and ex-officio recorder in Illinois, and a member of the Wisconsin legislature in 1859 and 1869, besides having held other responsible public positions.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Geo. B. Bennett—Watertown and Jim River Stage Line; born in New York in 1836; moved to Bureau county, Ills., in 1855; went to Colorado in 1859; returned to Illinois in 1860; thence entered the army during the Rebellion; returning from the army, entered the service of the Western Stage Co., with headquarters at Des Moines, Iowa. In 1863 went west to Ft. Randall and Fort Benton; came to Dakota in April, 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


C. H. Bradford—general merchandise; born at Minneapolis, Minn., in 1857; came to Watertown in May, 1880, and engaged in business as above; married to Anna Larson, of Kasson, Minn.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


E. N. Brann—real estate; born at Gardner, Me., in 1850, moved to LaCrosse, Wis., in 1873; came to vicinity of Lake Kampeska in May, 1878, and moved to Watertown at the beginning of its settlement; was principal of the Watertown schools and the first county superintendent of schools in Codington county.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


M. T. Briggs, M. D.—firm of Bennett & Briggs, physicians and surgeons; born in Kalamazoo county, Mich., in 1873; moved to Illinois in 1878, thence to Wisconsin; came to Watertown March 24, 1879; married to Olive Parson, of Texas, Mich., and has two sons and two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


C. O. Carpenter—born in New York in 1837; moved to Illinois in 1860; thence to Minnesota; came to Codington county April 22d, 1878; Mr. Carpenter erected a portion of his present residence in Watertown in 1878, and kept hotel therein for about two years, his being the first place of public entertainment in Watertown; married to Charlotte Knapp, of New York, and has two daughters; was the first assessor of Codington Co.; Mrs. Carpenter and daughters were the first permanent female settlers in Watertown.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


C. G. Church, firm of Poore & Church, attorneys, real estate and loan—born at Jericho, Vt., in 1854; came to Watertown in April, 1880; married to Carrie J. Bishop, of Burlington, Vt., and has one daughter.

M. G. Cobb, insurance and farming, Gary, Dakota—born in Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1838; moved to Wisconsin in 1848; thence to Minn.; thence to Gary in 1878; married to Ellen A. Shellman, of N. Y., and has one son and two danghters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Horace Comfort, firm of Campbell & Comfort, attorneys, real estate and loan—born at St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, in 1858; located at Chicago, Ills., in 1879; came to Watertown in Aug., 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


S. J. Conklin, attorney and editor Dakota News—born in Penn Yan. N. Y., in 1829; moved to Waterloo, Wis., in 1857; came to Watertown in May, 1879. Mr. Conklin was for three terms member of the Wisconsin legislature; served as Quartermaster in a Wis. regiment during the rebellion; was for some time Judge Advocate of a general court martial; was for three years Supervisor of Internal Revenue in the South, and has held other positions of trust; practices in the United States courts; married to Maria Wait, of Jasper, N. Y., and has two sons and one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Frank Crane, principal Watertown schools and county superintendent—born Dec. 14. 1855, at Sparta, Wis.; came to Watertown in April, 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


L. S. Deming, clerk of district court, firm of Thomas & Deming, real estate—born at Ft. Madison, Iowa, in 1854; moved to Vermillion, Dakota, in 1870; thence to Yankton in 1875; came to Watertown in May, 1878; married to Laura L. Leach, of Lake View, Codington county.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


O. E. Dewey, firm of 0. E. Dewey & Co., drugs and groceries —born in Jefferson county, N. Y., in 1843; moved to Bureau county, Ills., in 1871; thence to Watertown, where he has been in business ever since the town was started; moved his family to Watertown in the spring of 1881; married to Emma Kemp, daughter of J. E. Kemp, of Watertown, N. Y., and has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Geo. A. Edes, editor and propr. Codington Co. Conner—born in Foxcraft, Me., in 1844; moved in 1857 to Western N. Y.; returned to Portland, Me., where he worked at the printer's trade; went to California in 1862, where he remained two years, returning to Me.; thence to Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., where he resided about nine years. In 1872 he went to Montana; thence to Salt Lake City, Council Bluffs, and Omaha, after which he once more returned to Me.; going back to Minneapolis, he subsequently published the Buffalo Co. Journal at Alma, Wis., the Trempealeau Co. Messenger, at Whitehall, Wis., and the Lyon Co. News at Marshall, Minn.; came to Watertown in May, 1880, and purchased the Independent, which he merged into the Courier; married to Nettie Englesby, of Wis., and has one son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


W. O. Fraser—firm of Conklin & Fraser, proprietors Dakota News; born in Shelby, O., in 1852; went to California in 1871; returned to Ohio in 1876; thence to Wisconsin in 1877; came to Watertown in 1879; married to Ella Langlotz, of Waterloo, Wisconsin.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


O. Gesley—county treasurer, born in Beloit, Wis., in 1854; came to Watertown in February, 1879, and engaged in hardware business; elected treasurer in the fall of 1880; married to Anna Johnson, of Canby, Minn.

Moses Greer, Jr.—firm of Cleveland & Greer, general merchandise; born in Canada in 1853; moved with parents in 1854, to Winneshiek county, Iowa; thence in the spring of 1870 to Lanesboro, Minn.; thence to Decorah, Iowa; came to Watertown in the fall of 1880.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


H. O. Hagen—general merchandise; born in Norway in 1848; came to the United States in 1873, and located in Marquette county, Mich.; moved to Calumet, Mich., in the spring of 1874; came to Watertown April 15, 1881; married to Oline Mary Olson, of Norway, and has three sons and one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Louis F. Heintz—firm of Heintz & Hassinger, clothing, boots, shoes, etc.; born in Winona, Minn., in 1859; came to Watertown in August, 1880, and entered business as above; married to Lizzie Rice, of Winona.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


P. E. Higgins—Sheriff of Codington county—livery; born in Shenango county,N. Y., in 1845; moved with his parents to Mineral Point, Wis; thence to Palmira, Wis.; thence to StevensPoint, Wis.; came to Watertown in June, 1880; appointed sheriff in the spring of 1881.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


F. W. Hoyt—-clothing, hats and caps, gent's furnishings; born in 1850 at Utica, N. Y.; came to Watertown from New York City in July, 1879, and opened the first stock of clothing in Watertown; he married Arabella Kemp, of Watertown, N. Y., and has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


H. Johnson—firm of Johnson & Cartford, proprietors Johnson House; born in Norway in 1832; came to the United States in 1853, and settled at Black River Falls, Wis.; came to Watertown in the spring of 1879, and engaged in business as above; married "to Martha Birch, and has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


O. C. Johnson—proprietor Bank of Watertown; born in Norway in 1838; came to the United States in 1844 and located in Walworth county, Wis.; established the Bank of Watertown in March, 1880; married to Mrs. Caroline B. Bodtker, and has one son: Mr. Johnson's home is at Beloit, Wis.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Oscar P. Kemp—firm of Kemp Bros., hardware and farming machinery; born in 1852, in Watertown, N. Y.; moved in 1875 to Sparta, Wis.; came to Codington county in March, 1878, and located on a farm of 560 acres, one mile,west of the present town of Watertown, owned by Kemp Bros, and John E. Kemp, of Watertown, N. Y.; married Elva M. French, of Neilsville, Wis., and has one son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


John Kemp—born in Watertown, N. Y., in 1853; moved to Ohio in 1871; thence to Sparta, Wis., and came to Watertown in 1879; married to Clara Deringer, of Sparta, Wis.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.



D. B. Lovejoy—born in N. Y. in 1835; moved to Wis., in 1856, and located at Evansville, Rock county; served four years and three months in the army during the war of the rebellion; from Evansville he moved to Richland county, Wis.; thence to New York city, where he was employed in the service of the county court; came to Codington county in the spring of 1876, being one of the earliest and most sagacious pioneers; married to Nancy Briggs, a native of N. Y., and has one son and one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


William Marshall, manager J. S. Keator's farm, Hamlin county, Dakota—born in Canada in 1834; moved to Wis. in 1861, and came to Hamlin county in 1879; married to Mary Shanks, of Canada, and has two daughters. Mr. Marshall was appointed postmaster of Keator post-office, in July, 1879.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Peter Mauseth, furniture—born in Norway in 1844; came to the United States in 1873, and located in Mien.; came to Watertown in July, 1879; married to Caroline Olson, of Norway, and has one son and three daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


C. C. Maxwell, proprietor temperance billiard hall—born at Mt. Pleasant, 0., in 1840; moved to Indianapolis, Ind., in 1860; thence to Chicago, Ills.; thence to Plainview, Minn.; came to Watertown in the spring of 1879; married to Loenza A. Porter, of Plainview, Minn., and has two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Wm. McIntyre—propr. East Watertown House; born in N. Y. in 1842. moved with parents to Columbia county, Wis.; thence to Monroe county, Wis.; came to Codington county in October, 1877, and located two miles west of the present town of Watertown; the following spring Mr. McIntyre located where he now resides, opening his hotel March 13, 1880; married to Addie E. Blodgett, of Ohio, and has one son and two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


J. I. Monks—postmaster; firm of Monks & Wiser, hardware and farming machinery; born in 1851 at Winchester, Ind.; moved to Mankato, Minn., in 1867; came to Watertown in February, 1879, and began business in March of that year; married to May Howard, of Mankato, and has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


J. C. Mulholland—propr. Merchant's Hotel; born in Hardin county, Ohio, in 1836; moved to Iowa in 1856; thence to Wisconson; thence to Olnistead county, Minn.; came to Watertown in 1879, where he engaged in the hotel business in May, 1880; married to Jemima C. Carl, and has six daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


J. J. Owsley, Jr., firm .of Owsley Bros. & Co.—born at Oshkosh, Wis., in 1855; thence to Sparta, Wis.; came to Watertown in March, 1879; married to Effie Streeter,of Sparta, Wis., and has one son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


S. M. Owsley, firm of Owsley Bros. & Co.—born at Indianapolis, Ind., in 1847; moved with his parents to Oshkosh, Wis.; thence to Sparta, Wis., and has charge of the business of the firm at the latter place; married to Anna Walker, of N. Y., and has three sons.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


J. J. Owsley, Sr., firm of Owsley Bros. & Co., general merchandise—born in Indiana in 1816; moved to Oshkosh, Wis., in 1855; thence to Sparta, Wis., in 1860; came to Watertown in March, 1879; married to Amanda Peppard, deceased, of Ohio, by whom he has one daughter; his present wife was Hattie Major, of Ind.; they have two sons and one daughter. The firm of Owsley Bros. & Co. also carry on an extensive business at Sparta, Wis.; have 160 acres of land near Wilmer, Minn.; about 1,200 near Watertown, 400 of which are under cultivation, and several quarter sections in Brown county, D. T.

Warren W. Pay, Oakwood and Watertown stage line—born in New Hartford, N. Y., in 1838; moved to Woodstock, Ills., in 1853; thence to Wis.; thence to Blue Earth county, Minn.; thence to Iowa in 1860; was one of the first volunteers at the outbreak of the rebellion; returned to Iowa after the war; came to Brookings county, Dakota, in 1873.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


William M. Reed, bus. manager Empire Lumber Co.—born in N. Y., in 1852; moved to Mich, in 1866; thence to Winona, Minn.; thence to Washington Ty., in 1876, whence he returned to Winona; came to Watertown in April, 1880; married to Agnes Hamilton, of Winona.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


G. F. Rice—firm of Rice Bros., general merchandise; born in Wisconsin in 1852; came to Watertown in the spring of 1878 and entered into business as above; owns a fine farm of 600 acres one mile east of Watertown; the firm have in addition an extensive merchandising establishment at Aberdeen. Mr. Rice was married to Emma Neber, of Oakdale, Wis., and has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


E. C. Rice—firm of Rice Bros., general merchandise; born in Wisconsin, in 1855; came to Watertown in the Spring of 1878, and has charge of the firm's business at Aberdeen, D. T.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


James Riley—harness and saddlery; born in Monmouth county, N. J., in 1848; moved with his parents to Southern Missouri; thence in 1861 to Omaha, Neb.; thence to Beloit, Wis.; located in 1870 at Missouri Valley Junction, Iowa; thence in 1874 to Yankton, Dakota; came to Codington county in the spring of 1877, locating near Lake Kampeska. Engaged in above business in Watertown in Jan., 1880; was the first sheriff of Codington county, having been appointed to that office at the organization of the county.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


S. D. Scudder—real estate and loan agent; born in India under the American flag in January, 1860; when about twelve years of age he went to Germany where he was educated; from Germany he went to his home in Brooklyn, N. Y., engaging in business in the Bank of Montreal, New York City; came to Sleepy Eye, Minn., in 1880, and engaged in the banking bussiness; came to Watertown in 1881.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Chas. X. Seward—city clerk and attorney, firm of Seward, Glass & Eddy, law, real estate and loan; born at Marengo, Illinois, in 1857; came to Watertown in January, 1879.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


S. B. Sheldon—Codington County Bank; born in St. Lawrence county, N. Y., in 1842; thence in 1866 to St. Paul, Minn.; thence to Anoka, Minn.; came to Watertown in July, 1880; married to Catherine Kosterman, of Racine, Wis. Carl G. Sherwood—attorney and real estate agent at Clark, Clark county, D. T.; born in Broome county, N. Y., in 1855; moved to Illinois in 1878; c ame to Clark county in the summer of 1881.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


R. B. Spicer, County Register of Deeds and Business Manaager for Youmans Bros. & Hodgins—born in Erie county, Ohio, in 1849; thence to Michigan in 1868; to Missouri in 1871, and to Minnesota in 1874; came to Codington county in 1878; elected Register in the fall of 1880; Mr. Spicer owns a farm of 200 acres adjoining Watertown.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


G. H. Stoddart, Civil Engineer—born in Wisconsin in 1854; moved to Yankton, Dak., in February, 1873; came to Codington county in 1878; is engaged as above in the service of the C. & N. W. R. R. Co.; wa3 the first county surveyor of Codington county. H. A. Tarbell, firm of Tarbell Bros.—born in Cavendish, Vt., in 1855; moved to Owatonna, Minn; thence to Faribaulb; thence to Waseca, Minn; came to Watertown in the spring of 1879; engaged in 1881 in prosecuting the study of medjcine in the medical department of Dartmouth College, N. H.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


O. H. Tarbell, firm of Tarbell Bros., drugs, books and stationery—born in Cavendish, Vt., in 1852; moved to Owatonna, Minn., in 1872; thence to Faribault; thence to Waseca, Minn.; came to vicinity of Lake Kampeska in May, 1878; moved to Watertown in March, 1879; married to Etta Williamson, of Owatonna, Minn., and has one son.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Geo. W. Thomas, firm of C. C. Wiley & Co., real estate—born in New York, in 1844; came to Watertown from New York City in 1878; located permanently at Watertown in June, 1879.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


W. R. Thomas, firm of D. C. & W. R. Thomas, attorneys — born in Berlin, Wis., in 1853; moved to Sioux Rapids, Iowa, in 1873; graduated from the Iowa law school at Des Moines, in 1877; came to Codington county, first in the summer of 1876, and located here permanently in the spring of 1878; married to Mary Peterson, of Rochester, Minn.; has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


D. C. Thomas, attorney—born in Wis. in 1846; graduated at the Michigan University, Ann Arbor, Mich., in 1869, and located at Sioux Rapids, Iowa, of which town he was one of the originators; came to Watertown in 1878; married to Mrs. Mary Clark, of Sioux Rapids, and has one daughter.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


H. D. Walrath—Codington County Bank; born in 1842, at Morristown, St. Lawrence County, N. Y-; moved in 1870 to Omaha, Neb.; thence to Indiana; thence to Cherokee, Iowa; came to Watertown in July 1880; married to Emma F. Sheldon, of New York.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


R. T. Warner—attorney; born in Connecticut in 1842; moved to Wisconsin; thence to Dakota in 1878; came to Watertown March 20, 1879.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


Archie Weaver—general merchandise; born in Ohio in 1845; moved to Grand Rapid?, Wis., in 1866, where he engaged in business; came to Watertown April 1, 1879, where he engaged in business as above.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


C. C. Whistler—firm of Stevens & Whistler, meat market, born in Morrow county, 0., in 1852; moved to Sparta, Wis., in 1859; thence to Watertown in 1879; married to Jennie Andrews, of Sparta, and has one son; the firm of Stevens and Whistler also have a business establishment at Sparta, of which Mr. Stevens has personal charge.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


C. C. Wiley—firm of Wiley & Co,, real estate and loan; born in Massachusetts in 1842; moved in May, 1876, to Yankton, Dakota; came to Codington county, May 8, 1877, having taken a claim at Lake Kampeska the fall before; has resided in Codington county ever since the spring of 1877; married Harriet P. Sprague, of Vermont, and has one son and two daughters.

HISTORY OF Southeastern Dakota, Its Settlement and Growth, Sioux City Iowa: Western Publishing Company, 1881.


E. H. Ulrick—firm of Ulrick & Beals, proprietors Central House; born in Canada and is about 30 years of age; Mr. Ulrich came to Codington county in the fall of 1871.

 

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