Edmunds County Biographies

 

Barrow, C. H.

Coons, O. J.

Hill, Robert

Kapaun, Fred

Leandreaux, Alexander

Lennan, Charles E.

Parmley, Joseph W.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

O. J. COONS, one of the leading citizens of Bowdle, South Dakota, and cashier of the Bank of Bowdle, was born in Iowa county, Iowa. He was reared from the age of nine to twenty-two years in Missouri, where he attended the public schools. At the age of twenty-two years he began traveling as a salesman, continuing four years. He next clerked in a clothing store at Sac City, Iowa, for about eleven years, and then engaged in the real-estate and abstract business at that place for eleven years. He came to Bowdle in 1899, and bought out the Bowdle Bank, becoming cashier of the same, in which position he has since continued. He and his partner are also interested in a large cattle ranch in Edmunds county, where they have a ranch of nine sections of land.

Mr. Coons married Miss M. Jennie Traner, who was born in Grant county, Wisconsin. Mr. Coons is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Knights of Pythias.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
FRED KAPAUN.

Fred Kapaun is a worthy native son of South Dakota and a substantial agriculturist of this community, owning and operating a valuable farm on section 21, Clear Lake township, in Minnehaha county. His birth occurred in a sod house on the southwest quarter of that section, on the 2d of March, 1880, his parents being Ignatius and Rose (Pilfer) Kapaun, natives of Austria. The father emigrated to the United States and landed in New York about the time of the opening of the Civil war, while the mother crossed the ocean to this country about three years later. Their marriage was celebrated in Portage, Wisconsin. Ignatius Kapaun worked as a farmer and also in a sawmill until 1879, when he came to South Dakota, homesteading the southwest quarter of section 21, Clear Lake township, and also taking up a timber claim comprising the southeast quarter of section 20. Subsequently he purchased four quarter sections of land and turned these over to his sons. Joseph is now proprietor of the Palace Hotel at Montrose and Theodore, Henry, and Ludwig are all engaged in farming.

Fred Kapaun assisted his father in the work of the fields until he had attained his majority and then started out as an agriculturist on his own account, cultivating the home place. In 1907 he bought the property, which has since remained in his possession and in the operation of which he has been actively engaged to the present time. In 1914 he augmented his holdings, purchasing the northwest quarter of section 16, Clear Lake township, and also a tract of forty acres at Ipswich, South Dakota. He has met with gratifying success in his undertakings as an agriculturist and is widely recognized as a progressive, representative and esteemed citizen of his community.

On the 1st of February, 1905, Mr. Kapaun was united in marriage to Miss Louise Ebersviller, a daughter of Nick and Mary (Krusche) Ebersviller. The following children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kapaun: Mildreth, Martha, John Joseph, Mary Elaine and Nina Dorothy.

He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is now ably serving in the capacity of school treasurer, while formerly he held the office of constable. In religious faith he is a Catholic and is secretary of the St. Patrick's church at Montrose, which office he has held for the past three years. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Columbus. His entire life has been passed in the place of his nativity and he enjoys an enviable reputation as a substantial and enterprising young citizen.


“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915
 

JOSEPH W. PARMLEY.
Joseph W. Parmley is an exponent of the spirit of progress which is dominating the development of South Dakota and the northwest. He makes his home at Ipswich, Edmunds county, and has been closely associated with its development along educational, agricultural and commercial lines. His interests, however, have even wider significance and effect, for he is concerned in the good roads movement and in various other plans and projects which have to do with the development and upbuilding of the state, not only for the immediate present but also, for the future. Mr. Parmley is a native of Iowa county, Wisconsin, born January 12, 1861, and is a son of Joseph and Jane (Ashton) Parmley. After completing a common-school course he attende the State Normal School of Platteville and the Lawrence University at Appleton, Wisconsin.

His residence in Dakota territory dates from 1883. After looking over the northwest he concluded that it would eventually be a great agricultural empire. The railroads had reached Aberdeen and already extensions were being considered. Mr. Parmley studied the map and said that some day the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company would build west to the Pacific and felt that there was no more feasible route than from Aberdeen straight to the coast. He started out on foot and when forty miles west stopped on the present town site of Roscoe and looked around him for miles, the meeting of sky and prairie constituting his horizon. He secured a part of the present town site of Roscoe as his preemption, then returned to Aberdeen, purchased lumber for a shanty and drove back to his claim. In connection with Charles P. Morgan of Chicago he named the "town" Roscoe, in honor of Roscoe Conklin, who was then at the zenith of his career. Other settlers soon came and in connection with Henry Huck, Mr. Parmley in September of that year began the publication of the Roscoe Herald, of which he afterward became sole owner. He continued to publish that paper until 1910, when he purchased the South Dakota Tribune and merged the two journals under the name of the Ipswich Tribune. All this time he was working earnestly for the development of the district in which he had located and his efforts extended beneficially along many lines.

When Edmunds county was organized in August, 1883, Mr. Parmley was appointed superintendent of schools and was elected to that office in the fall of 1884. He was instrumental in organizing the educational system of the county, and when he retired from the position of county superintendent the educational work had been placed upon an excellent basis, leading to its continued growth and development. When he left the position of county superintendent he was elected register of deeds and county clerk. In 1887 he studied law and was admitted to the bar but has never engaged in active practice. His knowledge of the law, however, has been of the utmost value to him in conducting his private business interests and in promoting public projects. Moreover, he served as county judge for a number of terms both by election and by appointment of the governor, and he has also been numbered among the lawmakers of the state, having for two terms been a member of the state legislature. He has been urged by a large constituency on several occasions to become a candidate for congress, for governor and for the United States senate but has always declined. He has ever regarded the pursuits of private life as in themselves abundantly worthy of his best efforts and has preferred that his public service should be done as a private citizen. Those who know aught of his career recognize, too, that his efforts have been farreaching and effective and that many public movements owe much to his indorsement and active support.

Mr. Parmley is intensely interested in better farming methods and was a pioneer in introducing Durum wheat, better varieties of corn, alfalfa and drought resistant forage crops. He has also introduced and bred herds of registered cattle and at the present time has the largest herd of Shetland ponies in the northwest. Moreover, he is the owner of the business conducted under the name of the Edmunds County Abstract Company and is half owner of the Mcpherson County Abstract Company at Leola. His resourceful business ability has not been exhausted even through these connections and into other fields he has extended his efforts, being at the head of the Aberdeen Pressed Brick Company and active in developing an industry that promises much for the northwest.

Moreover, Mr. Parmley is known as the father of the good roads movement in the state and is president of the South Dakota Good Roads Association. He was the originator of a plan to build an improved public highway from Aberdeen to Mobridge, which against his protest was named the Parmley Highway. Later he led the movement for the extension of the road to the falls of St. Anthony east and to the falls of the Yellowstone west, thus making a great road from the Twin Cities to the Yellowstone National Park. This has developed into a great cross-country road and is now extending east as far as Chicago and west to Seattle, while the plan is to continue east to Plymouth Rock, making a great transcontinental highway. Mr. Parmley has been at the head of this undertaking and for the past two years has been president of the organization known as the Yellowstone Trail Association, The value of such a project cannot be overestimated and the promoters of such an undertaking deserve the gratitude of their fellowmen.
Mr. Parmley is also intensely interested in the world peace movement and is in demand as a lecturer on the subject of the settlement of disputes between nations by arbitration or a world court. He is now president of the South Dakota Peace Society. He has traveled extensively in the United States, Canada and Mexico and his writings descriptive of his journeys, as well as of subjects of general discussion, are in demand by many magazines. Beside the honorary positions above mentioned that he fills, he is a trustee of the Dakota Wesleyan University and is a member of the National Scientific and other societies. It would be tautological in this connection to enter into any series of statements showing him to be a man of broad culture, of liberal knowledge and wide public spirit, for these have been shadowed forth between the lines of this review. He looks at life from a wide standpoint, recognizes the opportunities for national and world progress and attacks everything with a contagious enthusiasm. Mr. Parmley is a member of a number of secret societies, including the Modern Woodmen of America and the United Workmen. He is also a thirty-second degree Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine.

In 1886 Mr. Parmley was united in marriage to Miss Lissie E. Baker, of Dodgeville, Wisconsin, a daughter of Francis and Mary (Dony) Baker. Two children have been born of this union: Loren, now twenty years of age, who is attending the State University of South Dakota; and Irene, who is attending high school in Ipswich.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

CHARLES E. LENNAN. one of the successful and highly esteemed real-estate dealers of Bowdle, Edmunds county, is a scion of stanch old colonial stock, of Scotch-Irish origin, and is himself a native of the old Pine Tree state, having been born in Belfast, Waldo county, Maine, on the 14th of December, 1848, and being a son of Ansel and Mary (Maxey) Lennan, both of whom were likewise born and reared in that noble old New England commonwealth. David Lennan, grandfather of the subject, was one of the largest owners of timber lands in Maine, where he met with heavy financial losses at the time of the Moosehead lake speculation, his loss having footed up to fully fifty thousand dollars in the connection through his endorsing security papers. The father of the subject was for many years deputy collector of customs at Belfast, Maine, was for several years a pension agent, and also devoted no little attention to the buying of raw furs, passing the last twenty years of his life in the city of Bangor, where his wife also died. The father, an old-line Democrat, wielded no little influence in political affairs in his native state and was a man of the highest integrity and honor in all the relations of life. Of his two children the subject of this review is the younger.

Charles E. Lennan secured his early educational discipline in the public schools of Maine, which he attended until he had attained the age of nineteen years. He then engaged in the ship brokerage and commission business, and later as shipper and dealer in baled hay and farm produce, at Bangor, Maine, also operating quite heavily in the same lines in New Brunswick, building up a most successful business, in which he continued for some time. From 1880 he was engaged in the wholesale and produce business in the city of Boston, Massachusetts. In the spring of 1883 he came to what is now the state of South Dakota and took up government land twelve miles northwest of the present town of Blunt, in Hughes county, returning to Boston in the autumn of 1884. There he established himself as selling agent in the wholesale hay business, with the firm of Scott & Bridge, extensive operators in the line. In the autumn of 1885 he located at Crown Point, Indiana, with the intention of shipping hay from that point to eastern markets, but one month later decided to again come to South Dakota. He invested in land at Scranton, Walworth county, and found the investment entailed a total loss. He then came to the present site of Bowdle, where he in a sense brought in the first building in the embryonic village, having originally erected said building at a point one and one-half miles southwest, and having hauled the same to the new site. In this building he established himself in the real- estate business. The years 1886 and 1887 proved hard ones in the state, and all of the real-estate dealers located on the railroad at points west of Ipswich were practically starved out by reason of lack of patronage and general business stagnation, but Mr. Lennan weathered the storm and finally found his anchorage secure. He has succeeded in building up a very prosperous business and is known as one of the leading real-estate men of this section of the state. He also makes a specialty of the extension of financial loans upon real-estate security. In politics he gives his allegiance to the Republican party and fraternally is identified with the Masonic order, in which he has received the degrees of the lodge and chapter.

On the 26th of December, 1896, Mr. Lennan was united in marriage to Miss Hortense B. Kennedy, who was born in Illinois, and reared in Kansas, of which state her foster-brother is governor at the time of this writing.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

C. H. BARROW was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, and received his education in the public schools and the high school after which he attended an academy,. graduating therefrom. He went to Redwing, Minnesota, and read law, being in due time admitted to the bar. He began practice at Minneapolis, but soon afterwards located at Ipswich, South Dakota, where he has since been engaged, meeting with distinct and gratifying success. He has been honored by election to the state legislature and has served as state’s attorney several terms. Fraternally he belongs to the Masons, Odd Fellows, Maccabees and United Workmen.

Mr. Barrow was married to Effie L. Hawkins, and they have two children.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

ROBERT HILL, M. D., a leading physician of Ipswich, South Dakota, was born in the north of Ireland (County Antrim), April 10, 1865, and is the son of Joseph and Harriett (Collins) Hill. The father was also a native of North Ireland, is a farmer by occupation, and still resides in Ireland, being now in his seventy-sixth year. The mother died in 1892.

Doctor Hill was reared in County Antrim, and during the period of his youth, between the age of eleven and fourteen years, he attended the Lesburn Academy. From this institution he matriculated into the Queen's University, Belfast, where he partially completed the medical course, spending about three years at the university. In 1885 he came to the United States and joined his brother in McPherson county. South Dakota, with whom he remained a few years, and then went to Keokuk, Iowa, and entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons in that city, where he was graduated in 1894. He began the practice of medicine at Leola, McPherson county. South Dakota, during the summer of 1894, following which he visited his old home in Ireland, where he spent most of that winter. In the spring of 1895 he returned to the United States and, stopping in New York and Chicago, spent some time in hospital work. He then located at Ipswich. The Doctor is a member of the Aberdeen District Medical Society, the South Dakota Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He is a thirty-second-degree Mason, and also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of the Maccabees and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, being medical examiner for the three orders. He has served as coroner of McPherson county for the past eight years. He is a Republican in politics and in religion is a member of the Congregational church.

Dr. Hill was married, September 18, 1895, to Bird R. Roe. who was born in Michigan, and to them have been born three children. Helen Harriett, Ruth Elizabeth and Robert Roe.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

ALEXANDER LEANDREAUX, one of the successful stock growers of Edmundscounty, comes of French lineage and is a native of the province of Quebec, Canada, his birthplace having been sixty miles east of the city of Montreal, where the family was early established. He was born in November, 1835. and will have thus passed the psalmist's span of three score years and ten by the time this history is issued from the press, but he is an excellent type of the sturdy pioneer and in appearance and actions gives slight indications of the years which rest so gently on his head. His parents passed the closing years of their lives in the state of Massachusetts. In 1852, when about seventeen years of age, Mr. Leandreaux left his native province and made his way to the Lake Superior region, where he was engaged in teaming for the ensuing three years. In the autumn of 1855 he went to the city of New York and there embarked for California, making the trip by way of the isthmus of Panama and arriving in due course of time in San Francisco. He went to the gold fields and devoted his attention to placer mining there for three years, being successful during the major portion of the time, as it evident when we revert to the fact that he cleared sixteen thousand dollars in thirty days. In 1858 he joined the stampede to the newly discovered gold fields of the Frazer river, where, within one year, he lost nearly all he had previously accumulated. He then proceeded to Colville, Washington, at the head of the Columbia river, where he remained two years, being fairly successful in his operations. He then went to Florence City, Idaho, three hundred miles distant, remaining six months and finding his success notable for its absence. He then returned to Colville and started in the business of transporting supplies by means of pack trains of mules, continuing this enterprise four years and making the same profitable. Thereafter he was for three years in Virginia City , Montana, where gold was first discovered in that state, and he then joined in the unsuccessful stampede to the Blackfoot district, and thence, the same fall, went to the Deer Lodge valley and made his way down the Missouri river on a steamer called the '"Zephyr," to Fort Rice. In the following spring he, with others, was ordered to leave, by reason of the treaty stipulations made with the Indians, the major in command of the post having about this time taken measures to also expel Father Smith, one of the missionary priests of the Catholic church. He fired his gun at the good father, and one of the Indians stepped forth and reproved the major, telling him he was a fool and trying to kill God Almighty. Mr. Leandreaux went next to Fort Sully, where he worked about five months for the post traders, Duff & Peck, assisting in the erection of their store. He then secured permission and established a wood yard on the river, and continued to operate the same until the railroad reached Pierre, having made the business a profitable one. He then engaged in the livestock business, going to Minnesota for stock and pasturing the same on the range about Fort Pierre. He next located on the Cheyenne river, where he continued in the same line of enterprise for three years, utilizing the Bad river range for the ensuing two years, and then moving his stock to the Moreau river valley, where he has since remained, running about five hundred head of cattle, principally of the Hereford breed, while he also has an average of one hundred horses, both draft and light driving. He is the owner of a fine modern residence in Evarts, and the family occupy the same during a portion of each year. Mr. Leandreaux has been twice married, his first wife having been a Sioux woman, and after her death he married a half-breed French and Sioux woman. He has one son and eight daughters.


 

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