Hutchinson County, South Dakota

Biographies


 

 

History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

REV. HEINRICH P. UNRUH, one of the popular and successful farmers of Bon Homme county, was born in Volhynia, Ostrog, Russia, on the 25th of February, 1865, and is a son of Rev. Peter and Mary (Siebert) Unruh, both of whom were likewise born in Russia, being of German lineage and speaking the German language. Their ancestors removed from Germany into southern Russia a number of generations ago. The father of the subject was engaged in agriculture and in service as a minister of the gospel in his native land until 1874, when he emigrated thence to America, and with his family located in Hutchinson county, South Dakota, being one of the first settlers in that section, where he took up two hundred and twenty acres of government land, the same being entirely unreclaimed and located in the vicinity of Silver Lake. His equipment upon coming to the county consisted of a few household effects, a wagon, a yoke of oxen and two cows. He began his career here in true pioneer style, the original family home being a rude sod house, but in due time he brought his land under profitable cultivation and made the best of improvements on the property, becoming one of the honored and successful farmers of the county, where he and his wife still maintain their residence, residing on the old homestead which has been their place of abode for the past thirty years. He is a Republican in politics and both he and his wife are members of the Mennonite church. To them were born ten children, of whom all are living, the subject having been the second in order of birth, while five of the number were born after the removal of the family to America.

Rev. Heinrich P. Unruh was a lad of nine years at the time of his parents' immigration to the United States, and had received his early educational training in the excellent German schools of his native land, while he supplemented this by attending school as opportunity afforded after coming to South Dakota, though the advantages were of course meager in the early days, while his services were much in requisition in connection with the work of the home farm. He continued to assist his father in the management of the homestead until he had attained the age of twenty-one years, when he initiated his independent career, havingreceived from his father a gift of eighty acres of wild land in Turner county, this state, together with a yoke of oxen. He remained on this place two years, breaking the greater portion of the land, and then, in 1888, disposed of the property and purchased his present homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, in Bon Homme county. The place was partially lmproved, and had a sod house, in place he continued to reside until 1901, when he erected his present commodious frame residence. Mr. Unruh cultivates three hundred and twenty acres of land, of which one hundred and sixty are rented. Be receives a nice income from butter, eggs, produce and stock, and nets from seven hundred to eight hundred dollars yearly from hogs. The farm has a good orchard, is well fenced and is one of the attractive and valuable places of the county, while the subject is known as an energetic and indefatigable worker and as man worthy of unqualified confidence and esteem, which are freely accorded him. In politics he supports the Republican party, and both he and his wife are members of the Mennonite church.

On the 18th of February, 1886, Mr. Unruh was united in marriage to Miss Lena Schultz, who was born in Russia and who is a daughter of Henry Schultz, who was one of the pioneers and successful farmers of Bon Homme county, where his death occurred in 1880. His wife is still living and resides in the home of our subject. Mr. and Mrs. Unruh have eight children, whose names are here entered, with respective dates of birth: Benjamin, February 3, 1887; Peter, October 5, 1888; Susan, May 27, 1890; Jonathan, January 30, 1892, died September 9, same year; Anthony, November 12, 1893; Elizabeth, January 19, 1896; Anna, September 17, 1897; and William, September 1, 1899.

In reference to his services as a minister of the gospel it may be said that Mr. Unruh was elected a minister by the members of the Mennonite church at Loretta, Bon Homme county, January 4, 1889, and was confirmed and ordained on the 15th of February following by Bishop Benjamin P. Schmidt. He has since then served in the Christian ministry without salary. He works faithfully for the sake of Christianity and is greatly interested in the education of young children, having himself been a teacher of the German language for some time at Loretta.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904

DAVID D. WIPF, auditor of Hutchinson county and also editor and publisher of the Olivet Leader, was born in southern Russia, on the 4th of August, 1872, being a son of David and Katherina (Stahl) Wipf, of whose eleven children seven are living, namely: David D., subject of this sketch; Anna, wife of Paul Wollmann, of Wells county, North Dakota; Katherina, wife of Jacob E. Hofer, of that county; Paul, a resident of Hutchinson county, South Dakota; and Maria, Rebecca and Sarah, who remain at the parental home. The parents were both natives of southern Russia, whence they emigrated to the United States in 1879, being numbered among the pioneers of the territory of Dakota and being now resident of Hutchinson county, the father having devoted his life to agricultural pursuits. Upon coming to the territory he took up a homestead claim in Hutchinson county, eight miles northwest of the present village of Freeman, where he still resides now having a valuable landed estate of three hundred and twenty acres and having been signally prospered in his efforts as a farmer. He is a Republican but has never consented to become a candidate for political office, and he and his wife are devoted members of the German Mennonite church.

The subject of this sketch was a lad of seven years at the time of his parents' emigration to America, and he was reared on the homestead farm in Hutchinson county, while his educational advantages were those afforded in the public schools. That he made good use of the same is evident when we revert to the fact that at the age of nineteen he began teaching in the district schools, continuing to devote his attention successfully to this work for about five years, during the winter months, while during the summer seasons he was engaged in farm work. Within this period the Sioux Indian reservation was thrown open to settlement and he filed entry on a quarter section in Lyman county, but as the land did not come up to his expectations he finally abandoned it. In June, 1897, Mr. Wipf resigned his position as teacher in District No. 31, Hutchinson county, where he had taught for three terms, and accepted a position in the office of the county treasurer, where he worked one month in a clerical capacity and was then, on the 1st of March, appointed deputy treasurer, under Christian Buechler, and of this position he continued incumbent until January 1, 1901. In the fall of the preceding year he was nominated for the office of county auditor, to which he was duly elected, and on the 1st of March, 1901, he entered upon the discharge of his duties. He gave a most acceptable administration and was chosen as his own successor in the fall of 1902, for a second term of two years. He is a staunch advocate of the principles of the Republican party and has been an active worker in its cause. In May, 1903, Mr. Wipf purchased an interest in the Olivet Printing Company, publishers of the Olivet Leader, a weekly paper and one of the best and most popular in the county, and he has since been editor of the same. G. W. Murner is president of the company and J. B. Ashley secretary and treasurer. Mr. Wipf is a member of Eureka Lodge, No. 71, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at Bridgewater; Scotland Chapter, No. 52 Royal Arch Masons, at Scotland; and Oriental Consistory, No. 1, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, in Yankton, while he is also identified with Menno Camp, No. 3071, Modern Woodmen of America. He and his wife are members of the Mennonite church.

On the 1st of June, 1891, Mr. Wipf wedded Miss Katharina Wipf, of this county, she likewise being a native of southern Russia, whence her parents came to the territory of Dakota in 1877. Of this union have been born two children, one of whom died in infancy, while the surviving child is John D., who was born on the 19th of July, 1895.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

JOSEPH WILHELM WIPF. The subject of this sketch comes of staunch old Swiss lineage, though his ancestors for several generations have been established in the southern portion of Russia. The original representatives proceeded from Canton Unterwalden, Switzerland, into the Tyrol, Austria, and thence into Russia. Mr. Wipf is one of the enterprising and prominent young business men of Freeman, Hutchinson county, and has been a resident of South Dakota since 1879, in which year his parents emigrated from Russia and became pioneers of this commonwealth, the father having become one of the successful farmers of Hutchinson county.

Joseph W. Wipf was born in the colony of Huterthal, southern Russia, on the 12th of August, 1869, a son of Joseph and Susanna (Wurz) Wipf, who were reared and educated in Russia, the former there learning the blacksmith trade, to which he devoted his attention for a number of years, also engaging in farming. He continued to follow the later vocation after coming to South Dakota, and he died in Hutchinson county,on the 11th of November, 1888, respected by all who knew him. His wife survived him by nearly a decade, being summoned into eternal rest on the 6th of November, 1898. Both were devoted members of the Mennonite church, and the father was a staunch Republican in politics, his life having been one of honest and earnest endeavor.

The subject of this sketch was eight years of age at the time his parents took up their abode on the pioneer farm in this county, and here he was reared to manhood, securing his early educational training in the public schools and supplementing this by a six-months course in the South Dakota State University, at Vermillion in 1888-9. In 1896-1897 he was matriculated in the pharmaceutical department of the University of Iowa, at Iowa City, and was there graduated as a member of the class of 1897. In 1886 Mr. Wipf began teaching in the district schools of Hutchinson county, and continued in pedagogic work until 1892, in which latter year he held a clerkship as bookkeeper in the Bridgewater State Bank, while during the years 1893-4 he was bookkeeper in the hardware establishment of Meyer Brothers, in Bridgewater. Since 1897 he has been engaged in the drug business in Freeman, owning a half interest in the drug store conducted under the firm name of J. W. Wipf & Company. He also holds a half interest in the Freeman Telephone Company. In politics he gives his allegiance to the Republican party, and his religious faith is that of the Mennonite church, of which he has been a member since 1889. Fraternally he is identified with Eureka Lodge, No. 71, Free and Accepted Masons, and Menno Camp, No. 3071, Modern Woodmen of America.

On the 13th of October, 1897, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Wipf to Miss Mary Graber, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Graber, of Storkweather, North Dakota, and they became the parents of three children: Evelina, born November 11, 1898; Elva, born September 8, 1901, died two days later, and Edmund Filmore, born January 20, 1902.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

ANDREAS A. WIPF, M. D., was born in southern Russia, on the 12th of September, 1868, being a son of Andreas and Susan (Glanzer) Wipf, to whom were born five children, namely: Sarah, who is the wife of Joseph G. Gross, of Hutchinson county; Joseph A., who is engaged in farming in this county; Susan, who is the wife of Andrew R. Hofer, a farmer of this county; Anna, who remains at the parental home; and Andreas Albert, the immediate subject of this sketch. The Wipf family traces back to Swiss origin, but has been established in Russia for fully a century, representatives of the name having removed from Switzerland into Tyrol, Austria, and thence into southern Russia, where both parents of our subject were born and reared. In 1875 they emigrated to America and came to Hutchinson county, South Dakota, where the father entered a homestead claim on Wolf Creek, five miles southwest of the present town of Bridgewater, and there he improved a valuable farm, upon which he died, and where his estimable wife still continues to make her home, being numbered among the honored pioneers of the county.

Dr. Wipf was seven years of age at the time when the family came from Russia, and he was reared to maturity in South Dakota, his youthful days being devoted to working on the home farm and attending the common schools. Later he entered the Dakota University, at Mitchell, and finally was matriculated in the University of South Dakota, in Vermillion, where he continued his scholastic discipline. He then devoted three winters to teaching in the district schools, engaging in farm work during the summer seasons. In 1891 he took up the study of medicine, and in the fall of that year entered that celebrated institution, Rush Medical College, in the city of Chicago, where he completed the prescribed course under the most favorable auspices, being graduated in the spring of 1894, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Shortly afterward the Doctor opened an office in Freeman, where he has since been established in the practice of his profession and where he has attained distinctive prestige as an able and discriminating physician and surgeon. He is a stalwart supporter of the Republican party, but has never held office, save that of county coroner, in which capacity he served four years. He is a member of the South Dakota State Medical Society and is held in high esteem by his professional confreres. Fraternally he is identified with EurekaLodge, No. 71, Free and Accepted Masons; Scotland Chapter, No. 31, Royal Arch Masons; Oriental Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite; El Riad Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, the latter two being organized in the city of Sioux Falls, and he is also affiliated with the lodge of the Ancient Order of United Workmen at Bridgewater and the camp of the Modern Woodmen of America at Menno. The Doctor is the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and eighty-five acres, located three miles northeast of Freeman, in Turner county.

On the 26th of June, 1894, Dr. Wipf was united in marriage to Miss Dorothea Hoellwarth, of Hutchinson county, and they are the parents of six children, namely: Claudia, Adeline, Alice, Alfred, Lilly and Kurt.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

FREDERICK HAAR, one of the leading dealers in agricultural implements and machinery in Hutchinson county, was born in the southern part of Russia on the 27th of February, 1856, being a son of Jacob and Frederica (Rop) Haar, who emigrated thence to the United States in 1875, coming forthwith to South Dakota and locating in Hutchinson county, where the father filed entry on homestead, preemption and timber claims of one hundred and sixty acres each, seven miles southwest of the present village of Freeman, which had not then sprung into existence. He resided on this farm about fifteen years, thence removing to Edmunds county, where he remained three years, and finally taking up his residence in the village of Freeman, where he and his wife have since maintained their home. Both are devoted members of the Lutheran church, and he is a Republican in his political proclivities.

Frederick Haar, the subject of this sketch, was reared to maturity in his native land, where he received the advantages of the common schools, and he was nineteen years of age at the time when he accompanied his parents to the United States, in 1875. He shortly afterward entered claim to a quarter section of government land near that of his father, in Hutchinson county, and after his marriage, in 1876, he settled on his farm and set himself vigorously to the task of improving the same and bringing it under effective cultivation. He continued to be thus identified with agricultural pursuits about six years, at the expiration of which, in 1882, he took up his residence in the newly established village of Freeman, where he entered into partnership with Hon. Christoph Guenthner and engaged in the hardware and implement business, in which they continued to be associated for nearly a score of years. In 1901 they disposed of the hardware tock and the partnership was dissolved by mutual consent. Mr. Haar retained the implement business, which he has since continued as an individual enterprise, and his reputation as a careful and upright business man is so thoroughly established that he has continued to control a large and important trade, having the implicit confidence of all who know him. He is a stanch adherent of the Republican party but has never sought office, and both he and his wife are worthy members of the Lutheran church, in which he is serving as elder.

On the 4th of June, 1876, Mr. Haar was married to Miss Dorothy Schmidtcall, of Yankton county, and of their fourteen children twelve are living, namely: Gottlieb, who is cashier of the Merchants' State Bank, of Freeman; Jacob, who assists his father in the management of his implement business; Barbara, who is the wife of Reinhold Baer, who is engaged in the hardware business in Freeman; Mina, who is the wife of David Ellwine. of this place; Robert, who is at the parental home; Theodore, who is attending college in Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Lydia, Caroline, Hella, Albert, Bertha and Hugo, who remain beneath the parental roof.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

JOHN SCHAMBER.- The career of the honored subject of this sketch offers both lesson and incentive, since it indicates what is possible of accomplishment on the part of the young man of foreign birth who comes to our great republic and bends his energies to legitimate industry, availing himself of the resources at his command and gaining a success worthy the name. Mr. Schamber has been a prominent figure in the public and business affairs of South Dakota, of which he is a pioneer, and has been called upon to serve in offices of high trust and responsibility, as this context will later indicate. He is one of the leading business men of Hutchinson county, being engaged in the banking business in Menno, and is eminently entitled to consideration in this history.

Mr. Schamber was born in the historic Crimean district of southern Russia, within sixty miles of the famed old city of Sebastopol, on the 6th of March, 1856 being a son of Peter and Wilhelmina (Luese) Schamber, of whose six children four are now living, namely: Peter, a resident of Yankton county, this state; John, the immediate subject of this sketch; Rosina, wife of Joseph Bohrer, of Mercer county, North Dakota; and George, a prominent merchant of Freeman, Hutchinson county. The parents were born in southern Russia, where they were reared and where their marriage was solemnized. Peter Schamber was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1875, when he came with his wife to the United States, whither our subject had preceded him by one year. The former took up a homestead claim in Yankton county, where he resided until 1884, when he removed to the village of Freeman, where he passed the residue of his life, his death occurring in May, 1901, while his devoted wife passed away in 1883.

John Schamber was reared on the home farm and secured his education in the common schools and the teachers' seminary in his native land, and there he taught school during one winter term prior to his emigration to America. His English education has been acquired by self-application and absorption since he came to the United States. Mr. Schamber arrived in New York city in August, 1874, and thence came westward to Iowa, where he gave his attention to farm work for one year, then coming to South Dakota and taking up a preemption claim in Yankton county, six miles southeast of the present town of Menno. Later he filed a homestead entry on this claim, while in the same locality his father also took up a homestead. In 1880 the subject left his farm, upon which he had made excellent improvements, and came to Menno, where he secured a position as clerk in a general store. In 1882 he removed to Freeman, where he engaged in the general merchandise business, in partnership with his brother George. They continued to be the leading merchants of the town until 1900, when our subject retired from the firm, selling his interest in the business to his brother, with whom he had been so long and pleasantly associated. In 1886 the farmers' elevator was erected in Freeman, the same being controlled by a stock company of leading farmers in the locality, and our subject and his brother became numbered among the heaviest stockholders in the new concern. In 1894 they acquired control of the enterprise, and finally became sole owners of the property. In 1902 our subject sold his interests in this line to his brother, who still remains in control of the same. In 1900 Mr. Schamber became one of those principally concerned in the organization of the Merchants' State Bank at Freeman, being made president of the same and retaining this office until February, 1902, when the bank was sold to the present owners. In November, 1901, he organized the Exchange State Bank of Menno, of which he is now the sole owner, the institution being recognized as one of the solid and reliable monetary establishments of the state and controlling an excellent business. He has maintained his home in Freeman.

Mr. Schamber is one of the leaders of the Republican party in the state, and his hold upon public confidence and esteem has been manifested in no uncertain way. He has held numerous local offices of minor order, and in 1886 was elected treasurer of Hutchinson county, serving three successive terms. In 1893 he was elected to represent his district in the state senate, being chosen as his own successor in the election of 1895 and proving a valuable member of the deliberative body of the general assembly. In 1898 still further distinction became his in that he was elected to the important office of state treasurer, in which he served two terms, having been reelected in 1900 and continuing incumbent of the office until January 1, 1903. He retired from this position with the record of having given a most able and discriminating administration of the fiscal affairs of the state. He is ever alive to the best interests of his home town, as well as the state in general, and his public spirit is manifested in a most helpful way. He is at the present time chairman of the board of trustees of Freeman. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran church, and both are prominent in the best social life of the community.

On the 11th of November, 1881 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Schamber to Miss Maria Kayser, daughter of Adam Kayser, of Parkston, and they are the parents of ten children, namely: T. Adolph, who is a student in Concordia College, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, preparing himself for the ministry of the Lutheran church; Robert E., who is cashier of the Exchange Bank of Menno; Otto G. is manager of the J. H. Leval & Company lumber yard at Lesterville and is said to be the youngest manager in the employ of that company; Hildegard, Herta, Edgar, Udo, Hedwig, Berthold and Alfred, all of whom are still at the parental home.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

SOLOMON D. MEYERS was born August 10, 1858, and received his education in the public schools of Iowa, to which state he removed with his parents during his early childhood. He also accompanied his parents to South Dakota, and after assisting his father for some time on the home place, took up one hundred and sixty acres of land in Hutchinson county, which he cultivated for several years. Disposing of the above, he bought the quarter section which he now owns. Some few years later he became manager of the Schwartz & Company general store at Milltown, in which capacity he still continues. Politically Mr. Meyers supports the Republican party. Fraternally he is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge of Parker and the Woodmen of the World. Religiously he is a supporter and faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Meyers entered the marriage relation with Miss Mary Whaling, of Iowa, who has borne him three children.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

GOTTHILF DOERING, of Tripp, Hutchinson county, was born in the southern part of Russia, and was reared and educated in his native land, being seventeen years of age at the time of the family emigration to the United States. He remained on the homestead farm until the death of his father, after which he went to Edmunds county,
where he continued to reside one year, thereafter securing a clerkship in a mercantile establishment at Ipswich. Soon after the founding of the village of Tripp, Mr. Doering came here and engaged in the general merchandise business until 1901, when he removed to Harvey, North Dakota, where he engaged in business until 1902, when he returned to Tripp and purchased a general merchandise business, in which he has since continued.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

J. U. STEICHEN.

J. U. Steichen, an enterprising and promising young citizen of Hutchinson county and South Dakota, has served as cashier of the Dimock State Bank since its organization and is likewise a director and stockholder of the institution. His birth occurred in Alexandria, Hanson county, South Dakota, on the 8th of March, 1891, his parents being James and Lena Steichen. The father came to this state about thirty-four years ago and located on a homestead near Alexandria. Subsequently he embarked in business as a general merchant of Salem, McCook county, and later conducted a similar enterprise at Emery, in Hanson county. Elected to the position of county auditor, he held that office for two terms and then engaged in the grain business at Emery. In 1896 he embarked in the grain business at Parkston, Hutchinson county, and afterward conducted business as a dealer in implements until he entered the Hutchinson County Bank as cashier, in which capacity he has since remained. His wife is also yet living and they enjoy a very extensive and favorable acquaintance throughout their home community.

J. U. Steichen attended the parochial, graded and high schools in the acquirement of an education and after putting aside his textbooks entered the Security State Bank at Ethan, Davison county, remaining with the institution for two years. On the expiration of that period he came to Dimock to take the position of cashier of the newly organized Dimock State Bank, of which W. H. Shaw is the president. Mr. Steichen is also one of the directors and stockholders of the institution, the business of which is constantly increasing, and his efforts are a factor in its growth, for he is a capable, courteous and popular official.

On the 16th of September, 1913, Mr. Steichen was united in marriage to Miss Flora Turgeon, a daughter of Phil Turgeon. He gives his political allegiance to the democracy and is a devout communicant of the Catholic church, while fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Columbus, belonging to Maher Council, No. 1076. He is fond of outdoor sports and enjoys enviable recognition as a progressive and esteemed young citizen of his community and a worthy native son of South Dakota, in the development of which he is deeply and also helpfully interested.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

FRED SINKBEIL, Jr.
Fied Sinkbeil, Jr., a prominent young citizen and worthy native son of Hutchinson county, is the secretary and manager of the Parkston Telephone Company. His birth occurred on the 26th of December, 1883, his parents befng Fred and Elizabeth Sinkbeil. In 1879 the father emigrated from Russia to the United States and made his way direct to South Dakota, locating about five and a half miles southeast of Parkston and using his three rights as a homesteader. He has remained on the old homestead throughout the intervening thirty-five years and now owns six hundred and eighty acres of rich and productive land. He worked on the railroad when it was built through this section and is honored as one of the pioneers whose labors were a factor in the development and growth of the state. To him and his wife, who is also living, were born five sons, three of whom still survive.

Fred Sinkbeil, Jr., attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education and after putting aside his textbooks assisted his father in the operation of the home farm until twenty-five years of age. Subsequently he was engaged in the implement business at Parkston for two and a half years with Joseph Kebisenann, but on the expiration of that period sold out and bought a fourth interest in "the Parkston Telephone Company. Later he secured control of the town lines and then admitted Herman Blaseg as a partner, having since remained secretary and manager of the company, which now has one hundred and seventy-five subscribers and is continually receiving new business. The line has long distance connections to all principal points. Mr. Sinkbeil is also engaged in business as a dealer in all kinds of seeds and enjoys a gratifying patronage in this connection.

On the 28th of March, 1909, Mr. Sinkbeil was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Schmidt, a daughter of Jacob Schmidt and a representative of an honored pioneer family of this state. They now have one child, Reuben Fred.

Mr. Sinkbeil gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while his religious belief is indicated by his membership in the Lutheran church, of which he has served as secretary for two years. He is known as a loyal and public-spirited citizen of the state in which his entire life has been spent and in his home community has identified himself with the volunteer fire department, acting as assistant foreman of cart No. 2. His social qualities have gained him wide acquaintance and certain sterling traits of character which he possesses have won for him the friendship of the many with whom he has been brought in contact.


“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915

MATHIAS BEHREND.

Mathias Behrend is a member of the firm of Behrend & Oberembt, dealers in automobiles and supplies. Before embarking upon this line of business he was connected with other interests in Parkston, all of which have contributed to the business enterprise and activity of the town and its consequent upbuilding. He was born in Madison, Wisconsin, December 3, 1868, a son of Mathias and Mary Behrend. The family came to South Dakota in 1882, settling at Starr, Hutchinson county. The father secured a homestead and for twentv years devoted his time and energies to general farming, his business affairs being industriously prosecuted. He died on the 18th of March, 1910, but is survived by his widow, who makes her home in Parkston.

Mathias Behrend was educated in the parochial schools of Madison, Wisconsin, assisted his father through the period of his boyhood and youth and afterward began earning his own living by working for others. He engaged in business on his own account in 1894 and for twenty years was connected with the liquor trade. In 1911 he engaged in the automobile business, to which he now devotes his energies. In 1902 he built the city exchange and country telephone lines. Of the company which was organized for the conduct of the business he was elected president and continued in that position until four years ago, when he disposed of his interests to Fred Sinkbeil, Jr. For eighteen years Mr. Oberembt has been a partner of Mr. Behrend in these different business ventures. In 1911 they erected their present building, which is fifty by eighty feet with an addition twenty-five by one hundred feet. They handle the Buick, Reo and Haines automobiles and they are conducting the principal business in their line in Parkston and that part of the state. They have sold many machines and they have a large trade in automobile supplies.

On the 3d of April, 1894, Mr. Behrend was united in marriage to Miss Julia Puetz, a daughter of Peter Puetz, and their children are Marie, Louisa, Francis, Esther, Helen and Joseph. In his political belief Mr. Behrend is a democrat. His religious faith is that of the Catholic church and he was treasurer thereof for ten years. He served as chief of the
fire department for a decade and for two years was a member of the city council, exercising his official prerogatives in support of various progressive measures which have benefited the city and advanced its growth. When leisure permits he enjoys a fishing and hunting trip and he also finds recreation and pleasure in motoring. He has long been well known in connection with business activity in Parkston and is now at the head of a profitable and growing commercial enterprise.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

GEORGE H. KATTELMANN.

 George H. Kattelmann, proprietor of the Boston Restaurant at Sioux Falls, has a wide acquaintance in that city, where he has conducted his present business for about eight years. He was born in St. Louis, Missouri, April 11, 1856, his parents being William and Mary (Richardson) Kattelmann. The father, a native of Bremen, Germany, was born May 27, 1827, and came to America with his parents in 1837.

 George H. Kattelmann had but limited educational opportunities, and whatever success he has achieved in life is attributable entirely to his own labors. In the spring of 1879 he came to Dakota territory, spending one summer at Valley Springs, where he worked as a farm hand. He later went to Hutchinson county, where he entered one hundred and sixty acres of land. He also entered three hundred and twenty acres in Hanson county and there he engaged in farming for about five years, or until 1889, but on account of drouth and other discouraging circumstances he did not win much success. In 1889 be removed to Sioux Falls and secured a position in a restaurant, being thus employed until 1894, when he embarked in business on his own account. He has now a large and popular place, the business prospering from the beginning. The restaurant was originally called The Gem, later the Klondyke, afterward The Mint, and under that name he Bold out in 1905. The following year he established the Boston Restaurant, of which he is now proprietor, making it one of the popular eating places of the city, accorded a liberal and well deserved patronage.

 Mr. Kattelmann was married in Chicago to Miss Lillian D. Bliss and they have a son, George W. They attend the Christian Science church and fraternally Mr. Kattelmann is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance is given to the republican party. He is truly a self-made man in all that the best sense of the term implies, for he has worked his way upward undeterred by obstacles and difficulties, his energy, persistency and unfaltering will having been the keynote in the success which he has achieved.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

GOTTLOB HAAR.

Gottlob Haar is the secretary and treasurer of the Murner Abstract Company of Olivet and in this connection has gained a large clientage which makes his business a paying one. He is a native son of Hutchinson county, born on the 1st of October, 1877, a son of Fred and Dorothea Haar. The father came to the United States when a young man from South Russia, where he was born and reared. He arrived in 1877 and, making his way to the northwest, homesteaded in Dakota territory, where he carried on farming for a number of years, aiding in transforming the wild land into productive fields. He is now engaged in the hardware and implement business in Freeman and is a well known and representative citizen of the town in which he makes his home.

Gottlob Haar pursued his early education in the public schools of his native county and afterward attended a private school in Milwaukee. His early business training was received at Freeman, where he remained for two years. On the expiration of that period he turned his attention to the abstract business in Olivet, where he was located when he became an active factor in political circles by accepting the office of clerk of the courts in 1907. He still continues in that position, in which he has proved a capable, efficient, prompt and reliable official. At the same time he maintains his interest in the abstract business and the two make continuous demands upon his time and energies, so that he is leading a busy life.

On the 22d of December, 1901, Mr. Haar was united in marriage to Miss Mamie Eaton and to them have been born three children, Harold, Howard and Ruth Aillyn. In religious faith Mr. Haar is a Lutheran and he and his family attend the church of that denomination.

His political indorsement is given to the republican party, which finds in him a stalwart champion. He is not identified with any fraternities but is fond of outdoor life and in such finds his chief recreation. He represents one of the old families of his part of the state and has been a witness of much of the growth and development of the county from pioneer times. He is popular and well liked and his circle of friends ia constantly growing as the circle of his acquaintances is extended.

 


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

WILLIAM H. GLYNN.

William H. Glynn, a .prominent young lawyer of Parkston, where he has practiced his profession continuously since 1909, is now serving a two-year term as states attorney, having been elected to that office on the republican ticket in 1914. His birth occurred in Clayton, Iowa, on the 3d of April, 1880, his parents being Alfred and Lena (Lape) Glynn, who still reside in the Hawkeye state. By profession the father is a mechanical engineer. William H. Glynn acquired his general education in the graded and high schools and subsequently entered the law department of the University of South Dakota at Vermillion, from which he was graduated in 1909. He at once located for practice in Parkston and has there remained to the present time, having built up an extensive and profitable clientage. In 1914 he was honored by election to the office of states attorney, in which he is now serving and has already made a very creditable record.

On the 1st of September, 1909, Mr. Glynn was united in marriage to Miss Amelia Becker, a daughter of John Becker. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has ably served as city attorney of Parkston. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons. He delights in outdoor recreation of all kinds and in his home community is popular and esteemed as an able attorney and progressive young citizen.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

FRANK A. MORRIS was born on a farm near Nora, Illinois, on December 15, 1855, the son of Crowell E. and Nancy P. (Voris) Morris, and the seventh child of ten children. He received his education in the common schools of Jo Daviess county, the high school of Warren, and the Northwestern Normal, of Galena, Illinois. After leaving school he became a tenant on his father's farm for a period of five years. From that time on until 1882 he taught school and farmed. In 1882 he entered a homestead in Hutchinson county, Dakota territory, where he remained until March, 1892, when he rented his farm and entered the real-estate and banking business at Tripp, South Dakota; continued in the banking business, of which he was president, until 1896, when he sold his bank to his cashier. He remained in the real-estate business until appointed surveyor general for the district of South Dakota by President McKinley in 1898, being reappointed by Roosevelt in 1902. In politics he is a Republican and served in the seventeenth and eighteenth sessions of the territorial legislature. He is a member of the Parkston lodge of Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Lodge No. 444, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, at Huron,  South Dakota.

Mr. Morris was married October 15, 1879, to Elizabeth A. Carpenter, and they have three children, Lulu B., Ada M. and Helen N., all living with the exception of the eldest daughter, who died September 26, 1902.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

REV. CHARLES AUER.

Father Charles Auer is well known as the beloved pastor of the Catholic church of SS. Peter and Paul at Dimock, which in 1885 was known as Rome, then Starr and since 1912 as Dimock. His birth occurred in Germany on the 11th of January, 1867, his parents being George and Josepha Auer. In the acquirement of an education he attended the parochial schools of Hamilton, Ohio, and his theological training was received in St. Meinard Seminary of St. Meinard, Indiana. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1892 and was assigned to his first mission in the counties traversed by and adjacent to the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers in southwestern Kentucky with headquarters at Paducah, Kentucky. In 1906 he came to South Dakota and was assigned to the mission at Farmer, where he remained in charge for about eight years. In 1913 he was appointed pastor of the church of SS. Peter and Paul at Dimock, his immediate predecessor, Rev. J. L. Wulf, passing away on the 6th of September of that year. The latter had charge of the parish from 1894 to 1896 as a young man, was subsequently transferred to Milbank but eventually returned to Dimock and spent the last five years of his life as pastor of the church of SS. Peter and Paul. He erected the beautiful brick church at a cost of thirty-five thousand dollars and had begun the building of the new brick school house at an estimated cost of sixteen thousand dollars, but the latter structure was completed by Rev. Auer and represents an expenditure of thirty thousand dollars. The school course covers eight grades and the students are taught by six Sisters of St. Francis of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Rev. Auer is identified with the Knights of Columbus, belonging to Paducah (Ky.) Council, No. 1055. He enjoys the cooperation of his parishioners in unusual degree and his consecrated labors have been an appreciable factor in the growth and spread of Catholicity here.


“History of Dakota Territory”, George W. Kingsbury, 1915
 

CYRUS C. PUCKETT

Cyrus C. Puckett is one of the representative men of Tyndall, South Dakota, where he is engaged in the practice of law and is also editor of an up-to-date and reliable weekly newspaper. His great-grandfather, Daniel Puckett, was a Quaker, who, hating slavery, removed from South Carolina to southeastern Indiana about 1800. His son. the grand-
father of our subject, was Cyrus Puckett, who married Bettie Thomas, and they became the parents of Cyrus J. Puckett, who was born in Fountain county, Indiana, December 26, 1840. In 1848 the last named was taken by his parents from Indiana to Jo Daviess county, Illinois, the trip being made by team, as there were then no railroads in that part of the country. Although he was but eight years old at the time, he remembers a deer which was running about the yard of the hotel in Chicago at which they stopped, and he also remembers that a guest of the hotel placed him upon the deer's back and that the deer allowed him to ride there. An uncle of C. J. Puckett, Levi Coffin by name, kept one of the stations of the underground railway in Indiana, thus helping many escaping slaves to reach Canada and freedom. It was he who gave shelter to the original of the character of Eliza in Mrs. Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin." The young woman in question actually made her escape across the Ohio river much as described in the famous novel and Mr. Coffin assisted her on her way north.

Cyrus J. Puckett married Elizabeth Deetz, a daughter of William and Mary (Kleese) Deetz and a native of Sullivan county, Pennsylvania. The Deetz family was early established in this country and all of its men proved their patriotism by active participation in the war of the Revolution. C. J. Puckett removed from Jo Daviess county, Illinois, to Hutchinson county, South Dakota, in 1884, buying three hundred and twenty acres of land situated two miles north of Scotland. He at once became recognized as a leader in progressive farming in the state and was the first to demonstrate that corn could be profitably grown here. He also set out the first orchard in the region and sowed the first meadow of timothy and clover. He was likewise interested in educational advancement and was one of the founders of Scotland Academy, serving also as trustee of the institution. In 1901 he took up his abode in Vermillion and there still makes his home. C .J. Puckett was twice married and by his first wife had three sons, namely: Frank, a banker of Hosmer, South Dakota; Walter, an agriculturist of Roundup, Montana; and Willard, who follows farming at Stillwater, North Dakota. To Mr. Puckett and his second wife were born two sons: Cyrus C. of this review; and Owen, a civil engineer of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

Cyrus C. Puckett was born in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, January 25, 1882, and was but two years of age when brought by his parents to Hutchinson county, this state. He received his elementary education in the common schools of the neighborhood and was later for two years a student in Scotland Academy and for one year in Warren Academy, Jo Daviess county, Illinois. His collegiate and professional work was done at the State University of South Dakota, located at Vermillion, where he studied for four years, being graduated with the Bachelor of Arts degree in 1905. While still a student in the university he spent the summers from 1903 to 1905 on a claim in Edmunds county, South Dakota, thus securing valuable experience and making enough money to partially pay his college expenses. After 1905 he entered the postal service at Vermillion and was identified therewith until 1909. He took up the study of law after 1907 and received the LL. B. degree upon the completion of his course in 1910. Upon his admission to the bar in that year he opened an olfice in Tyndall, where he has since been building up a growing law practice. In 1911 he formed a partnership with Dr. Klima and W. W. French in purchasing the Tyndall Tribune, which paper they have since published together. Mr. Puckett has charge of the editorial work, Dr. Klima the operating department and Mr. French the business management of the paper. It is a well edited and well conducted country weekly, giving to its subscribers not only a full account of local happenings but also keeping them informed as to the great events occurring in the world at large. Its editorials are potent forces in promoting many worthy enterprises and always seek the advancement of Bon Homme county and the state of South Dakota. As it has a wide circulation and is recognized as one of the best advertising mediums of the county, it is accorded a liberal patronage by local merchants.

Mr. Puckett is a republican in politics and his religious allegiance is given to the Congregational church. Fraternally he belongs to the Masonic order, being a member and master of Tyndall Lodge, A. F. & A. M, and likewise a member of the chapter at Vermillion. He also belongs to the well known college fraternity. Beta Theta Pi. He recalls the fearful blizzard which occurred January 12, 1888. He and his mother and two brothers were at home and were not exposed to danger, but a girl living with the family, who was at school, was obliged to remain there throughout the night, as it would have been tempting death to endeavor to return home. The stock was left unfed that night, as it
was altogether unsafe to go out into the storm even to the barn. Mr. Puckett has proved himself worthy of his pioneer ancestors, and as a lawyer and editor is doing much to further the welfare of his county and state.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

FRED WILLIAM BARTH.

Fred William Barth is a retired farmer living on section 2, township 98, range 52, near Olivet, in Hutchinson county. The success which is his and which now enables him to rest from further labor has come to him as the reward of earnest, persistent and intelligently directed effort. He was born in Prussian Saxony, Germany, on the 5th of January, 1842, a son of Ernest and Mary Barth. His education was acquired in the fatherland and in the United States. He left the former country in 1859 and sailed for America, making his way first to New York and afterward to Illinois. He was in the latter state at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war and with patriotic spirit he responded to the call of his adopted country for aid and served for two years in the Eighteenth Illinois Infantry. On one occasion he was wounded and he participated in a number of the hotly contested engagements of the war, remaining at the front until honorably discharged in 1865.

Mr. Barth then returned to his home in Illinois and the following year went to Iowa, where he carried on general farming until 1875. That year witnessed his arrival in South Dakota and he located on section 2, township 98, range 58, securing a tree claim. With characteristic energy he began to break the sod and till the fields and continued to engage in general farming there until be turned the place over to the management and operation of his sons. In the meantime he had added to his property on different occasions so that his landed possessions now aggregate two thousand acres and he is accounted one of the prosperous and successful agriculturists of Hutchinson county. He was one of the pioneers of his section of the state, casting in his lot among the earliest settlers. For miles around him stretched the unbroken prairie, and his neighbors were largely the Indians. The work of progress and civilization seemed scarcely begun, but with resolute spirit he undertook the task of aiding in the reclamation of the district, and as the years have passed, success has been his in considerable measure.

In 1869 Mr. Barth was married to Miss Lyda Baumgart, a daughter of Carl Baumgart. To them were born the following children: Henry, who passed away in 1912; John; Martha; Lena; Albert; Elmer; Frank; Charles, who pursued a law course in the University of South Dakota at Vermillion and is now a practicing attorney of Friend, Nebraska; Edward; and Katie.

In politics Mr. Barth has been a stalwart republican since casting his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. He always supports the men and measures of the party, believing firmly in its principles, and he has filled the offices of justice of the peace and deputy assessor. His religious faith is that of the Evangelical church. In the early days he was "boss farmer" among the Indians. He has lived to see remarkable changes as the work of development and improvement has been carried forward and the tents of the red men have been replaced by the homes of civilization. He can relate many interesting incidents of the early days and there is no phase of pioneer life with which he is not familiar. However, he had the prescience to discern what the future had in store for this great and growing western country and in the fullness of time he has gathered the fruits of his labor and is today one of the prosperous residents of Hutchinson county.


History of South Dakota, Vol. 2
by Doane Robinson
B. F. Bowen & Co., Publisher
1904
Contributed by Jim Dezotell

CARL BRAATZ was born in Prussia March 23, 1851, and is the third of a family of seven children born to Carl and Minnie (Cols) Braatz. These parents were also natives of Prussia and never left the fatherland, both having died near the place where they were born and reared. The following are the names of their children, in order of birth: William, a farmer of Winona county, Minnesota; Amelia, deceased; Carl, the subject of this sketch; August, a resident of Minnesota; Robert, Fred and Bertha, who remain in Germany. 

Carl Braatz was reared in his native land and grew to maturity on his father's farm, receiving a good education in the public schools. He early became inured to honest toil and while still a mere youth could perform a man's duty at almost any kind of manual labor, in consequence of which he was able to care for himself when thrown upon his own resources. Thinking to better his condition in America, whither so many of his countrymen had preceded him, Mr. Braatz, in 1867, came to the United States and spent the ensuing three years in Winona county, Minnesota, where he turned his hands to various employments, devoting especial attention to agricultural pursuits. At the expiration of that time he engaged in steamboating, in which capacity he plied various rivers in the west and south, and to this line of work and to railroading he devoted the greater part of six years. Severing his connection with his employers in 1878, he went to Hutchinson, South Dakota, where he took up a quarter section of land which he at once proceeded to improve and on which he lived for a period of sixteen years. Disposing of his original homestead in 1894, he purchased his present place and at this time he owns a fine farm, the greater part of which has been improved by his own labor and from which he realizes every year a liberal income. Like all progressive tillers of the soil in this state, he gives considerable attention to live stock, raising fine cattle, horses and hogs, and from this source no little of his prosperity has been derived. Mr. Braatz is in independent circumstances and has succeeded in accumulating a sufficiency of this world's goods to render useless every anxiety for the future. He has held various local offices, though by no means an aspirant for public honors, and in politics votes the Democratic ticket. 

The domestic life of Mr. Braatz dates from September 13, 1879, at which time he contracted a matrimonial alliance with Miss Sarah M. Stonebrake, who was born January 19, 1860. The result of this union has been the birth of the following children: Millie, born May 24, 1880; George, July 30, 1881; Ferd, October 11, 1882; Hattie, February 9, 1884; Seymour, July 15, 1885: Eliza, December 22, 1887; Isaac, July 25, 1890; Bertha, January 9, 1897; John, June 14, 1900. 


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