Kingsbury County Biographies

 

Alseth, Charles A.

Bailey, Nathan L., M.D.

Berdahl, James O.

Brennan, William F.

Carter, C. S.

Couse, Edward H.

Crothers, James L.

Drake, Mary Eveline

 

Finstad, Auris

Irvin, G. B.

Jensen, James P.

Kelley, Charles A.

 

Krueger, John W.

Maxwell, Albert D.

Ostroot, Gabriel J.

Royhl, Adam

 

Schultz, Peter H.

Stoner, Charles William

Sullivan, Thomas J.

Walsh, John P.

Warren, Charles Parker

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

"History of Dakota Territory" by George W. Kingsbury, Vol. V (1915), p. 295-296.

 scanned, OCRed and edited by Maurice Krueger, submitted by Christine Moehring mrychr(at)yahoo.com
 
 
C. W. STONER.

C. W. Stoner, a dealer in lumber, grain, machinery and coal, is a highly esteemed resident of Iroquois, and served for four years as a member of the state legislature. He was born September 2, 1854, at Decatur, Michigan, a son of C. W. and Roxy (Tyler) Stoner.

In 1882 the family removed to South Dakota and located upon a homestead two and a half miles south of Iroquois. The father cultivated that land for some years but after the death of his wife made his home with his son, C. W. (Jr.), until he too was called to his reward at the venerable age of eighty-nine years.

C. W. Stoner was educated in the public schools of Michigan and after putting aside his textbooks was connected with the manufacture of lumber and shingles until 1883, when he removed to South Dakota. He settled in Beadle County, where he homesteaded land, which he farmed for two years. At the end of that time he went to Iroquois and entered the mercantile field as a dealer in lumber, grain, machinery and coal. His business has increased steadily, keeping pace with the development of the country and he has become recognized as one of the leaders in commercial circles in Iroquois. He was the first and is now the oldest grain dealer in his part of the state.

On the 3d of July, 1879, Mr. Stoner was united in marriage to Miss Belle Field, a daughter of Warren Field, a resident of Michigan. They have the following children: Ray W.; Edna, now Mrs. John McDeid; lda, now Mrs. Truman Crowell; Gladys, who is now Mrs. L. Little; Minnie, who married H. Scott; Clayton, at home; and Imogene G., now Mrs. W. Jordan.
Mr. Stoner is a Republican and was county commissioner from 1903 to 1907. In the latter year he took office as a member of the state legislature and served until 1911, making a very creditable record in that capacity. His religious belief is indicated in his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. He is quite prominent fraternally, being a Mason, an Odd Fellow, an Elk, a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is also identified with the Rebekahs.

He is thoroughly interested in all that pertains to the welfare of his adopted state, is willing, if need be, to sacrifice personal advantage to the public good, and this spirit, combined with his agreeable personality, and integrity, has gained him not only the respect but also the good will of the community.


"A Woman of the Century: Fourteen Hundred-Seventy Biographical Sketches" by Frances Elizabeth Willard and Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, 1893
 

MARY EVELINE DRAKE

Drake, Mrs. Mary Eveline, minister of the gospel and church worker, born in Trenton, Oneida county, N.Y., 8th June, 1833. Her maiden name was Mary E. McArthur. Her father was of Scotch parentage, and her mother was English, a relative of Lady Gurney, better known as the celebrated Elizabeth Fry. From her parents she inherited that strong religious bent of character that has distinguished her life. When about six year of age she removed with her parents to southern Michigan, where she received most of her common school and academic education. From there the family removed to the town of Geneseo, Ill., where she spent her early married life, residing there most of the time for over twenty years. She joined her mother's church, the Congregational, and began that course of earnest personal effort for the conversion of others for which her nature peculiarly fitted her and in which she has been so successful. In addition to her work in prayer-meeting, Sunday-school and young peoples Bible-classes, she was frequently called to assist evangelists by visiting ana in revival meetings. During all that time she was active in all the various reforms and benevolences of the time. In war time she was especially active in the Women's Soldiers' Aid Society, going south as far as Memphis, and looking to the right distribution of the provisions sent to the hospitals there, and she was one of the leaders in the women's temperance crusade. She had the added care of her family, which she supported most of the time by the labor of her own hands. The natural result of such constant labors came in a severe attack of nervous prostration, which totally ended her work for a season. To secure full restoration, she went to reside for a time with her only living son, Gen. M. M. Marshall, then a railroad official in western Iowa. There she became the wife of Rev. A. J. Drake, of Dakota. A very few weeks of the bracing air of Dakota sufficed to restore her to perfect health and strength. She entered with her husband into the home missionary work, for which, by her zeal and his long experience, they were so well adapted. Mr. Drake was then laboring in Iroquois, a village at the junction of two railroads, where he had a small church of eight members worshiping in a schoolhouse. Though living tor the first two years at DeSmet, sixteen miles away, they they soon had other preaching stations and Sunday-schools in hand and preparations made for building a church in Iroquois. Mrs. Drake went east as far as Chicago and raised sufficient means to buy the lumber and push forward the work. Encouraged by her success, she was readily urged by her husband to take part in the public services, addressing Sunday-schools, till she came very naturally to choose a subject or text and practically to preach the gospel. The wide extent of their held and the constant need of dividing their labors tended strongly to this. A very much needed rest and the kindness of an eastern friend enabled them to attend the anniversary of the American Home Missionary Society in Saratoga. On the way, by special invitation, she addressed the Woman's Home Missionary Union of Illinois in Moline. Being heard in that meeting by Dr. Clark, of the American Home Missionary Society, on arrival at Saratoga she was called to address the great congregation assembled there. She has since spoken in many of the large cities and churches of New Kngland and other States. The result of these visits has been the raising of means sufficient, with what people on the ground could give, to build two other large churches in Esmond and Osceola, S. Dak. She and her husband are caring for a field forty-five miles in length and fifteen miles in breadth, with five churches and Sunday-schools. They also publish a monthly paper, entitled the "Dakota Prairie Pioneer." At the earnest request of the leading ministers in the State she consented to ordination and the largest Congregational council ever assembled in South Dakota ordained her to the work of the ministry in December, 1890. That was one of the first ordinations of a woman to the ministry west of the Mississippi.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915


CHARLES PARKER WARREN.

Charles Parker Warren, attorney at law of Huron, was born at Oronoco, Minnesota, April 28, 1873. His father, Josiah H. Warren, was both a farmer and builder and after living for a considerable period in Minnesota removed to Dakota territory in 1882, settling in Kingsbury county, where he engaged in farming until his death in 1902. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary A. Gibson, is now living in Highmore, South Dakota.

In their family were four children, of whom Charles Parker Warren is the third in order of birth. He was a lad of nine years when brought to this state and in the district schools he acquired his early education, later attending the high school at Iroquois, South Dakota, and the Western Normal School at Lincoln, Nebraska. He then entered the University of South Dakota, in which he pursued his classical course, and afterward became a student in the Law University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated with the class of 1901. Mr. Warren located for practice at De Smet, South Dakota, and while there residing served for two terms as states attorney, making a creditable record in that position. After a residence there of about nine years he removed to Huron in 1910, joining ex-Governor Coe I. Crawford in a partnership under the firm style of Crawford & Warren. This relation is still maintained and the firm occupies an enviable position at the bar of the state.

In his political views Mr. Warren has always been a republican since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He is identified with several leading fraternal organizations, including the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is a member of the Huron Commercial Club and is filling the office of president. His interest in behalf of the general welfare is manifest in many tangible and effective ways and his cooperation proves a potent force in advancing the general interests of the community. He belongs to the South Dakota State and the American Bar Associations and in his profession has steadily advanced. He worked his way through college, teaching at intervals between college terms, and the strength of character which enabled him to pursue that course has been one of the potent elements on which he has builded his later success. Since beginning the active work of the profession he has constantly advanced, and the court records bear testimony to his ability in the practice of law.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JOHN P. WALSH.

John P. Walsh has been engaged in business as an undertaker of Huron since July, 1908, and has served for two terms as coroner of Beadle county, his second term expiring January 1, 1915. His birth occurred in Falmouth, Kentucky, on the 11th of March, 1876, his parents being John J. and Mary Ann (Durkin) Walsh. In December, 1882, the father removed to Volga, South Dakota, and on the 17th of March of the following year brought his family to this state, taking up government land near the postoffice known as Estelline. There be resided until 1899 and then removed to Castlewood, where he is now living retired. The period of his residence in this state covers three decades, and he is widely recognized as a substantial and esteemed citizen.

John P. Walsh acquired his early education in the public schools, learned telegraphy and also pursued a short course of study in the Globe Business College of St. Paul, Minnesota. Subsequently he became assistant agent at Watertown and Hetland, South Dakota, and later served as night clerk and ticket agent at Willmar, Minnesota, next taking a position as station agent at Appleton. Minnesota. In 1900 he located in Beadle county, this state, and during the following four years was engaged in general agricultural pursuits. Disposing of his interests in that connection, he removed to Castlewood and embarked in the hardware, furniture and undertaking business. He is a 1908 graduate of the Cincinnati College of Embalming. On the 27th of July, 1908, Mr. Walsh removed to Huron and purchased the undertaking establishment of William Tolmie, which he has conducted continuously since in a manner that has gained him an enviable reputation and deserved patronage. He also handles art goods and in this branch of his business has likewise won success.

On the 17th of June, 1901, Mr. Walsh was united in marriage to Miss Margaret T. Tobin, of Huron, by whom he has two children, John R. and Ellen Lucille. He is a republican in politics and served for two  terms as coroner of Beadle county, in which connection he made a highly creditable record. In 1913 he was one of the organizers of the Commercial Club of Huron and served as its president until March 1, 1914. He is identified fraternally with the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Loyal Americans and the Knights of Columbus, being grand knight of the last named organization in 1911 and 1912. Both he and his wife are devout communicants of the Catholic church. Of strong integrity and honesty of putpose, despising all unworthy or unfair means to secure success in any undertaking or for any purpose or to promote his own advancement in any way, whether politically or otherwise, he has always enjoyed in large measure the goodwill and trust of the general public, while those who know him personally prize his  friendship because of his genial companionship and his personal worth.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
Transcribed by Karen Seeman

THOMAS J. SULLIVAN.

Thomas J. Sullivan has been successfully engaged in business as a real-estate dealer of Iroquois since 1901 and also serves as postmaster of the town, having been appointed to that position on the 19th of October, 1913. His birth occurred in Clermont, Iowa, on the 2d of December, 1875, his parents being Patrick and Mary Sullivan, the former an agriculturist by occupation. In the acquirement of an education he attended the public schools and a business college of his native state and subsequently removed to southwestern Minnesota, where he followed farming for a short time. He then embarked in the machine business and later turned his attention to real-estate operations. In May, 1901, he came to South Dakota, locating at Iroquois, in Kingsbury county, where he has been continuously engaged in the real estate business to the present time, handling considerable property and having gained a knowledge of values that has made his advice sought and appreciated by clients. He also conducts an insurance business and in this department has likewise met with success. On the 19th of October, 1913, he was appointed postmaster of Iroquois by President Wilson, the duties of which office he has discharged in most capable and creditable manner to the present time.

On the 25th of November, 1903, Mr. Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss Edna Grace Swafford, a daughter of Calvin G. Swafford. She passed away on the 5th of March, 1909, leaving one child, Marjorie May. Mr. Sullivan gives his political allegiance to the democracy and is widely recognized as a loyal and public-spirited citizen whose aid and influence are ever given on the side of right, progress, reform and improvement. In religious faith he is a Catholic, while fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Columbus, the Woodmen and the Royal Neighbors. He is a generous supporter of all worthy movements and is highly esteemed as a most useful and valued citizen.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

PETER H. SCHULTZ.

Peter H. Schultz, a leading, influential and prosperous citizen of Kingsbury county, has made his home in South Dakota for more than a quarter of a century and during the past sixteen years has successfully conducted business as a member of the firm of Richards & Schultz, general merchants of Iroquois. His birth occurred in Germany on the 26th of August, 1869, his parents being John H. and Anna M. Schultz, the former a cooper and farmer by occupation. He began his education in the schools of the fatherland and subsequently pursued a high-school course in Denmark. After putting aside his textbooks he worked on a farm until the time of his emigration to the United States, in 1888. He made his way direct to South Dakota and on the 5th of June of that year arrived in Iroquois. During the following three years he was engaged in farm work and then embarked in the butchering business at Iroquois, there conducting an enterprise of that character for seven and a half years. On the expiration of that period, in 1898, in association with Frank A. Richards, he opened a general merchandising establishment, beginning business on a modest scale. The firm has since been conducted under the style of Richards & Schultz and has been accorded a constantly growing and gratifying patronage until the business is now a very profitable one. The proprietors study the wishes of their patrons and especially cater to the needs and demands of the farmer. Mr. Schultz is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company and also in the Bank of Bancroft and enjoys an enviable reputation as one of the substantial enterprising and public-spirited citizens of his community.

On the 21st of January, 1899, Mr. Schultz was united in marriage to Miss Ella M. Brown, a daughter of James P. Brown, who took up a homestead claim in South Dakota in 1882. To them have been born two children, Philo H. and Leo M. Mr. Schultz is a republican in politics and in 1912 was chosen as the representative of the twenty-third district in the state legislature, making such a creditable record that he was again nominated by his party for reelection. He has also served as a member of the township board and has ever been a most public-spirited and loyal citizen who has done everything in his power to promote the general welfare and advance the best interests of the community. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the consistory at Yankton and also to the Mystic Shrine at Sioux Falls. He is likewise affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Danish Brotherhood. He delights .in fishing, hunting and motoring and in social circles has made many friends who appreciate his character worth and enjoy his companionship.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

ADAM ROYHL.

Adam Royhl is one of the prominent pioneer citizens of Arlington. He was born in Darmstadt, Germany, on the 18th of September, 1857, a son of Caper and Susan Royhl, who in 1872 emigrated with their family to the United States, locating in Columbia county, Wisconsin, where the father farmed until his death.

Adam Royhl began his education in the public schools of Germany and continued it in the schools of Wisconsin. After his school days were over he assisted his father in the work of the farm and also worked in the pineries of Wisconsin. In 1879, however, he removed to South Dakota and homesteaded the northwest quarter of section 14, township 111, range 54, a tract of land located northwest of Arlington. After farming for eleven years, or in the fall of 1890, he removed to Arlington and engaged in the meat business there. Two years later he turned his attention to the buying and selling of grain, being the owner of several elevators. He was successful in this business, but after some time sold out. In 1911 he was appointed postmaster by President Taft and retired upon the expiration of his term in the spring of 1915. He handled the details of the office well and gained the commendation of his fellow citizens by his efficiency and dispatch.

On the 24th of November, 1881, Mr. Royhl married Miss Minnie Detman and their children are: Albert, who is cashier of the First National Bank of Arlington; Max, a lawyer residing at Huron; Leon C, of Yankton, South Dakota; and Ella, at home. Mr. Royhl is a stanch republican in politics. From 1903 until 1907 he represented his district in the state legislature and manifested notable efficiency in committee rooms and also proved an able speaker on the floor of the house. His religious belief is that of the Lutheran church and his wife is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. Mr. Royhl is a Mason and has crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, holding membership in the Shrine at Sioux Falls. He is vice president of the First National Bank and for fifteen years served as president of the school board, these connections indicating something of his interest in various lines of endeavor. The circle of his friends is limited only by the circle of his acquaintances and those who have known him longest entertain for him the deepest regard, which can only be said of those whose lives have been at all times honorable and upright.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

GABRIEL J. OSTROOT.

Gabriel J. Ostroot, one of the enterprising and promising young business men of Kingsbury county and South Dakota, is the secretary and treasurer of the Lake Preston Milling Company. His birth occurred in Cherokee county, Iowa, on the 8th of October, 1880, his parents being Jonas and Carrie Ostroot. The father came to this state in 1882, settling on a tree claim and carrying on agricultural pursuits for some time. Subsequently he turned his attention to general merchandising and still conducts a store, being accorded a liberal patronage and being widely recognized as a prosperous and esteemed citizen of his community.

Gabriel J. Ostroot, who was but two years of age when brought to South Dakota by his parents, acquired his early education in the public schools of Brookings and later entered Brookings College, completing the commercial course in that institution in 1900. After putting aside his textbooks he was identified with his father in business until 1907, when he came to Lake Preston and became connected with the Ostroot Elevator Company, which owned a number of elevators. Later he purchased an interest in the Lake Preston Milling Company and assumed the position of secretary and treasurer, in which dual capacity he baa served to the present time. The company supplies light and power to Lake Preston, De Smet, Hetland and Erwin and is an incorporated concern the stock of which is held by Lake Preston people. Mr. Ostroot has contributed in no uncertain degree to the success of the company and enjoys an enviable reputation as a progressive and substantial young business man.

On the 10th of June. 1913, Mr. Ostroot was united in marriage to Miss Ida T. Larson, a daughter of Sievert H. Larson. They now have one child, Geraldine. Mr. Ostroot gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is a Lutheran in religious faith, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has resided in this state throughout almost his entire life, or for about a third of a century, and has made a host of friends who esteem him highly for his many good traits of character and genuine personal worth.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

ALBERT D. MAXWELL.

Albert D. Maxwell is a pioneer merchant of Arlington and today occupies a prominent place in that community. The A. D. Maxwell Hardware Company owns the largest hardware store in that section of the state, an important business concern. Mr. Maxwell was born in Clinton, Illinois, November 10, 1855, a son of Martin and Mary E. Maxwell. The father was one of the pioneer lumbermen of Wisconsin, going to that state in 1855. He has passed away but his widow survives.

Albert D. Maxwell was educated in the public schools and upon putting aside his textbooks worked in a hardware store at Durant for a time. He then chartered a boat running on the Chippewa and Mississippi rivers and operated that vessel for two years. In 1880 he arrived in Dakota territory and immediately opened a hardware store in Norden, now Arlington. There was then no railroad in that part of the state and everything was hauled from Volga, the nearest railroad point. Although the pioneer conditions prevailing added unusual obstacles to those that always confront the merchant, Mr. Maxwell persevered and as he used good business judgment in all of his transactions success came to him and the volume of his trade increased from year to year. His business is now housed in two splendid two-story brick buildings, fifty by one hundred and sixty-five feet in dimensions, and he carries the largest hardware stock in his section of the state. He also handles farm implements, autos and a number of other lines and Dick Maxwell, as he is familiarly called, is known to everyone in his part of South Dakota. His store was not only the first established in Arlington, but was the first hardware store in Kingsbury county, and he has added new lines and adapted his policy to the changing conditions of the section from which he derives his patronage. The prestige that he gained as a merchant in the early history of this section he has maintained. In 1880 he homesteaded land in Brookings county and is the owner of considerable farm property.

Mr. Maxwell was married March 2, 1880, to Miss Charlotte C. Gilmore, a daughter of John Gilmore, of Wisconsin, and their children are: Lou, now Mrs. Albert Royhl, of Arlington; John, Martin E. and Neil, all of whom are associated with their father in business; and Hugh, a resident of Mitchell, this state.

Mr. Maxwell is a republican and boa held all of the local offices, proving as capable in an official capacity as in business circles. His religious faith la that of the Methodist church and he takes a helpful interest in the work of that organization. He is loyal to the spirit and purposes of the Masonic order, of which be is a member, belonging to the blue lodge, chapter, commandery and Shrine, and the success that he has gained in a material way is equalled by the esteem and respect in which he is generally held. He is the best known man in Kingsbury county and one of the capitalists of his section of the state. His wealth has been gained, however, by the exercise of foresight, determination and business acumen and not by questionable practices. He takes satisfaction in the knowledge that he has been able to assist greatly in the commercial development of his section of the state and he has great faith in the future of South Dakota.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JOHN W. KRUEGER.

John W. Krueger, residing in Erwin, Kingsbury county, is proving a popular and able official as cashier of the Bank of Erwin. His birth occurred in Wisconsin on the 15th of December, 1876, his parents being Carl and Genevieve Krueger, who came to South Dakota in 1884, the father purchasing land in Day county. Both Mr. and Mrs. Carl Krueger have passed away.

John W. Krueger attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education and also pursued a business course at Charles City, Iowa. Subsequently he was employed in a store at Andover, South Dakota, for eleven months and afterward was connected with a produce concern at Fargo, North Dakota, for a short time. He next became bookkeeper in the State Bank at Andover and was later promoted to the position of cashier, in which capacity he served for nine years. On the expiration of that period he entered the service of the Day County Land Company, a real-estate concern, and subsequently embarked in the real-estate business on his own account at Blunt, Hughes county, being thus engaged for a year and a half. In 1912 he embarked in the hardware business but later sold out and entered the Bank of Erwin as cashier, in which capacity he has ably served to the present time, contributing to the continued growth and success of the institution in an appreciable degree.

On the 7th of January, 1908, Mr. Krueger was united in marriage to Miss Eva Hitchcock, a daughter of Gideon Hitchcock. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican party and in religious faith is a Congregationalist. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to the lodge, chapter, commandery and the Mystic Shrine. He is fond of motoring and all outdoor sports and has won the high esteem and friendship of those with whom he has come in contact in both business and social relations.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JUDGE CHARLES A. KELLEY.

Judge Charles A. Kelley, who is now serving for the second term as county judge of Beadle county, is a prominent and leading representative of the legal profession in Huron, and held the office of states attorney from 1902 until 1906. His birth occurred in Illinois on the 21st of November, 1874, his parents being Michael and Mary Kelley, natives of Ireland, who emigrated to the United States as young people. They came to South Dakota in 1882, taking up a tract of government land north of Iroquois, where Michael Kelley followed general agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of his life. The demise of his wife occurred in 1900.

After completing the public-school course Charles A. Kelley prepared for the practice of his chosen profession as a student in the law department of the University of Wisconsin at Madison. In April, 1900, be was admitted to the South Dakota bar and began practice at Huron, where he has remained throughout the intervening years, enjoying an extensive and lucrative clientage. He has become a prominent factor in public life serving as states attorney from 1902 until 1906, in which connection he made a highly creditable and unassailable record. In 1909 he was chosen mayor of Huron, serving for one term and giving the city a businesslike, progressive and most effective administration. In 1910 he was honored by election to the office of county judge and two years later won reelection, so that he is still on the bench. The legal profession demands not only a high order of ability, but a rare combination of talent, learning, tact, patience and industry. The successful lawyer and especially the competent judge must be a man of well balanced intellect, thoroughly familiar with the law and practice, of comprehensive general information, possessed of an analytical mind and a self-control that will enable him to lose his individuality, his personal feelings, his prejudices and his peculiarities of disposition in the dignity, impartiality and equity of the office to which life, property, right and liberty must look for protection. Possessing these qualities. Judge Kelley has been an able exponent of the dignity and equity of the law. He is also the president of the Kelley Land Agency, and in 1905, in association with his brother-in-law, erected a modern office structure in Huron which is known as the World building.

On the 12th of November, 1899, Judge Kelley was united in marriage to Miss Alice C. Issenhuth, of Huron. In the state of his adoption, where he has now resided for many years, he enjoys an enviable place and reputation' in social, professional and fraternal circles.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JAMES P. JENSEN.

James P. Jensen is actively and successfully engaged in business as a general merchant at Erwin, having built up an extensive and well merited patronage. His birth occurred in Fillmore county, Minnesota, on the 1st of November, 1872, his parents being P. K. and Anna Jensen. He attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education and after putting aside his textbooks assisted his father for a time. Subsequently he spent a year as an employe in a shoe store at Austin and then resided during one summer at Minneapolis, while later he entered the service of the Milwaukee Railroad. In 1897 he removed to Bryant, South Dakota, and there first secured a position in a hotel, afterward turning his attention to farm work. In 1899 he located in Erwin and entered the general store and postoffice of J. R. Wills, remaining with him for one year. At the end of that time he secured a position with A. J. Hilton, whose establishment he purchased in association with a Mr. Peterson in 1904. Subsequently he bought the interest of his partner and has conducted business independently during the past few years. An extensive and profitable patronage is accorded him, for he carries a large and well selected stock of goods at reasonable prices and has won an unassailable reputation for reliability and integrity. His record as a business man is one well worthy of emulation and commendation, as he started out empty-handed and has worked his way steadily upward unaided to a position among the prosperous and representative merchants of his adopted state.

On the 9th of July, 1902, Mr. Jensen was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Johnson, by whom he has three children, namely: Verna B., Orville H. and Curtis L. He gives his
political allegiance to the democracy and has served as a member of the school board for six years, the cause of education ever finding in him a stanch champion. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church and fraternally he is identified with the Masons, being a worthy exemplar of the craft. He finds recreation in fishing and motoring and also enjoys the companionship of friends, of whom he has made many during the period of his residence in this state.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

G. B. IRVIN.

G. B. Irvin, a progressive, enterprising and respected young citizen of Iroquois, is actively engaged in business as a member of the firm of Irvin Brothers, dealers in farm implements. His birth occurred in Kentucky on the 9th of February, 1879, his parents being Gideon and Eliza Irvin, both of whom are deceased. Throughout his active business career the father devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits.

G. B. Irvin acquired a public-school education in his youth, and after putting aside his textbooks secured employment as a farm hand. Later he started out as an agriculturist on his own account and for a number of years gave his time and energies to the work of the fields with excellent results. In the spring of 1908 he came to South Dakota, settling at Osceola, where he embarked in the implement business and there conducted an enterprise of that character for two years. In 1911 he removed his stock to Iroquois, where he has remained to the present time and has been accorded an extensive and profitable patronage, being widely recognized as one of the promising and prosperous young business men of his adopted state.

On the 30th of January, 1901, Mr. Irvin was united in marriage to Miss Chloe Downs, a daughter of G. W. Downs, of Illinois. To them have been born two children, Gladys and Eunice. Mr. Irvin is a republican in politics. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons, being a member of York Lodge, No. 53, A. F. & A. M., the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He also belongs to the Commercial Club and is a public-spirited and loyal citizen whose deep interest in the development of South Dakota is manifest in his able support of many measures instituted to promote the advancement and upbuilding of the commonwealth.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

AURIS FINSTAD.

The neat and systematic arrangement of the drug store of Auris Finstad, of Sioux Falls, the excellent line of drugs and druggists' sundries which is carried and the enterprising methods of the proprietor, have made him one of the wide-awake, alert and energetic merchants of a city which is rapidly developing along substantial and broadening lines. His surname indicates his Norwegian ancestry. A native of the land of the midnight sun, he was born at Stavanger, Norway, February 25, 1870, a son of Claus and Goneld Finstad. For six years he was a student in the public schools of Norway and in 1883, when a youth of thirteen years, came with his parents to the new world, the family home being established at Mitchell, in what was then Dakota territory. He continued his education in the schools of that city, passing through consecutive grades until he completed the high school course. At the age of seventeen years he entered the drug store of L. O. Gale and there learned the business with which he became familiar in principle and detail. In 1891 he removed from Mitchell to Emery, South Dakota, where he opened a drug store, conducting the business successfully for five years. In 1897 he went to Hetland, this state, where he was in a drug store for two years. He afterward spent a year in a drug store in Yankton and in 1900 came to Sioux Falls, where he entered the employ of R. F. Brown, a druggist, with whom he continued for three months. He next purchased a drug store in Arlington, South Dakota, which he conducted until March, 1912, and then returned to Sioux Falls, where he is now proprietor of one of the best drug stores of the city.

It was on the 23d of May, 1910, at St. Paul, Minnesota, that Mr. Finstad was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Lundin. His parents were of the Quaker church and he was reared in that faith. Fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias and with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he has been a close student of the questions and issues of the day but has no desire for office as a reward for party fealty. The industry, perseverance and reliability characteristic of the people of his nationality find exemplification in him and constitute the salient features in his growing business success.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JAMES L. CROTHERS.

James L. Crothers, who has lived retired at Hetland since 1907, successfully carried on agricultural pursuits in Kingsbury county for more than a quarter of a century and is now serving as president of the Farmers Elevator Company. His birth occurred in Canada on the 22d of May, 1854, his parents being Robert and Mary (Corrigan) Crothers, the former an agriculturist by occupation. The family came to South Dakota in the fall of 1880, taking up a homestead claim on section 19, Badger township, Kingsbury county, where Robert Crothers carried on farming until his demise.

James L. Crothers acquired his education in the public schools of Wisconsin, his parents having taken up their abode in that state when he was but two years old. After putting aside his textbooks he was engaged in farm labor until the removal of the family to this state in 1880, when he homesteaded on section 18, Badger township, Kingsbury county, and also took up a preemption and tree claim. As time went on his efforts were rewarded with success and he retired in 1907, having accumulated a comfortable competence in the careful conduct of his farming interests. He now owns a half section of valuable land and still retains the original homestead. Mr. Crothers is the president of the Farmers Elevator Company at Hetland and also owns stock in the elevator at Badger.

In November, 1878, Mr. Crothers was united in marriage to Miss Cordelia J. Thomas, a daughter of Eli and Alma Thomas, of Wisconsin. Their children are as follows: Guy V., who attended the University of South Dakota at Vermillion, for two years, and was graduated from the La Crosse Business College; Laura, who is the wife of D. H. Carlson; and Winnie, who gave her hand in marriage to Ray Johnson. Our subject and his wife also have five grandchildren.

Mr. Crothers is a republican in politics and has served as county commissioner for one term and also as clerk of the school board, making an excellent and commendable record in public office. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church, while fraternally he is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He has watched with interest the growth and upbuilding of South Dakota during the past third of a century and has done his share in the work of development that has transformed a frontier region into a well settled and prosperous commonwealth.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

EDWARD H. COUSE.

Edward H. Couse, one of the venerable and highly esteemed residents of De Smet, was a pioneer merchant of the town but has lived retired since 1902. He has made his home in this state for more than a third of a century and is moreover entitled to distinction as one of the honored veterans of the Civil war. His birth occurred in New York on the 1st of April, 1830, his parents being Henry H. and Caroline (Smith) Couse, both of whom are deceased. He attended the public schools in his youth but his knowledge was largely acquired in the difficult school of experience. When the Civil war broke out be was engaged in opening up a farm which be had purchased from the government at a dollar and a quarter per acre, but the call of his country was paramount and in 1862, before he had finished breaking his land, he enlisted for service in the Ninth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry as an adjutant, having been appointed to this rank by Governor Ramsey. During his three years' service he participated in some of the principal engagements of the conflict, though the first year following his enlistment was spent in Minnesota on account of the Indian outbreak. He was wounded at the battle of Nashville and honorably discharged on the 1st of September, 1865, having made a most creditable record as a brave and loyal defender of the Union cause.

Following the cessation of hostilities Mr. Couse was engaged in milling for a period of four years and subsequently followed farming until he came to South Dakota, locating at De Smet in 1880. The previous year be had filed on a homestead and tree claim. Eventually he embarked in the hardware business and conducted an enterprise of that character continuously and successfully until 1902, when he disposed of his interests and retired to private life. He still owns considerable real estate, however, and is widely recognized as one of the wealthy, respected and representative citizens of his community.

In 1855 Mr. Couse was united in marriage to Miss Lydia Eaton. The latter adheres to the faith of the Episcopal church. Mr. Couse has never indulged in intoxicants nor tobacco and his temperateness in all things has brought hirn to a hale and ripe old age. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is a valued member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic. He is well known throughout the community and has boats of friends, who accord him the esteem which he well deserves.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

C. S. CARTER.

C. S. Carter, manager of the C. W. Derr Lumber & Grain Company, has been the resident agent of this concern at Badger for the past eight years. His birth occurred in Iowa on the 15th of January, 1883, his parents being J. T. and Laura T. Carter, who established their home at Parker, South Dakota, in 1901. The father devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits until his retirement in the year 1909, when he took up his abode in California.

C. S. Carter acquired his early education in the public schools and later continued his studies in the Dakota Wesleyan University at Mitchell. His initial training in the business world was received as agent for J. F. Anderson and a short time afterward he accepted a position with the C. W. Derr Lumber & Grain Company, which he has represented as resident agent at Badger for the past eight years. In this capacity he has proven his services of value to the company and he is widely recognized as an enterprising and able young business man.

On the 21st of October, 1908, Mr. Carter was united in marriage to Miss Mattie M. Hatch, a daughter of George Hatch. They have two children, Clare and Floyd. Mr. Carter gives his political allegiance to the prohibition party, being a firm advocate of the cause of temperance, and his religious faith is that of the Congregational church. He is fond of fishing, baseball and other outdoor sports and is a popular young man who easily wins and holds friends by reason of his many good traits of character and a pleasing personality.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

WILLIAM F. BRENNAN.

William F. Brennan, a prominent agriculturist and leading citizen of Kingsbury county, has been a resident of South Dakota for about a third of a century and now owns and cultivates five hundred and sixty acres of valuable land in Whitewood township. His birth occurred in Dane county, Wisconsin, on the 23d of February, 1859, his parents being Martin and Ellen (O’Sullivan) Brennan. The father came to South Dakota in 1884, taking up a homestead claim on section 1, township 109, range 55, where he carried on agricultural pursuits continuously and successfully until called to his final rest in November, 1909. The period of his residence in the community covered a quarter of a century and his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. The demise of his wife occurred in the year 1895. Their home was established in this state in pioneer times and their son, M. J. Brennan, was the first section boss and moved the first section house
here.

William F, Brennan acquired his education in the public schools of his native state and was a young man of twenty-three years when in 1882 he came to South Dakota, preceding his parents by two years. He took up a homestead claim on section 1, township 109, range 55, and as the years have passed has added to his original holdings until he now owns five hundred and sixty acres in Whitewood township, Kingsbury county, cultivating the entire tract. In connection with the production of cereals he is also engaged in the raising of shorthorn cattle, keeping many head. Modern farming implements facilitate the work of the fields, and in his undertakings as an agriculturist Mr. Brennan has won a well merited and gratifying measure of success.

On the 25th of June, 1902, Mr. Brennan was united in marriage to Miss Caroline Munkler, a daughter of Thomas Munkler and a representative of a well known pioneer family of South Dakota. Mr. Brennan is a supporter of the democracy and a prominent figure in state politics, having been elected to the senate for a two-year term in 1910. In 1904 he was sent as a delegate to the democratic national convention at St. Louis and he has attended nearly all the state conventions, as well as two territorial conventions. In his home community he has also been called to serve in public office, acting as chairman of the town board and the school board.

He is a Catholic in religious faith and has membership in the Knights of Columbus, belonging to Huron Lodge, No. 777. In motoring he finds needed recreation as well as pleasure. As a pioneer of South Dakota, Mr. Brennan has been an interested witness of its development and growth and has aided in the work of progress along many lines.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

JAMES O. BERDAHL.

James O. Berdahl is a successful and well known young legal practitioner of Lake Preston, where he has followed his profession since 1909 and is also recognized as a leading worker in the interests of moral and educational uplift. His birth occurred in Minnehaha county, South Dakota, on the 23d of April, 1881, his parents being Andrew J. and Karen (Otterness) Berdahl, who came to South Dakota in 1872, locating in Minnehaha county. The mother died May 12, 1915. The father was a member of the constitutional convention from 1885 until 1889 and is widely recognized as one of the influential and respected citizens of the community which has now been his home for more than four decades.

James O. Berdahl acquired his early education in the district schools and later attended the schools at Baltic and Garretson, while subsequently he pursued a course of study in Augustana College of Canton. He then followed the profession of teaching fox three years, and on the expiration of that period, in 1906, entered the School of Law of the University of South Dakota at Vermillion, being graduated therefrom in 1909. The same year he opened an office at Lake Preston, where he has since remained and has built up an extensive and lucrative clientage and won an enviable reputation. He is felicitous and clear in argument, but is never abusive of his adversaries and is a foe worthy the steel of .the most able opponent.

In politics Mr. Berdahl is a democrat and in 1914 was honored by his party with the nomination for state's attorney. He is a Lutheran in religious faith, is now serving as a member of the board of trustees of the local church and is also a member of the board of Augustana College. His influence is ever given on the side of right, progress, reform and improvement, as is further indicated in the fact that he is a member of the South Dakota Anti-Saloon League and is now serving for the fifth year as president of the South Dakota Luther League. In hunting and fishing he finds needed recreation as well as pleasure. His entire life has been spent in South Dakota and his record is that of one of its worthy and valued native sons.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915
 

NATHAN L. BAILEY, M. D.

Dr. Nathan L. Bailey is a well known physician and surgeon of Lake Preston, where he as been successfully engaged in the practice of his profession during the past decade. His birth occurred in Boscobel, Wisconsin, on the 13th of September, 1860, his parents being Mark and Rebecca (Darland) Bailey, both of whom are deceased. Throughout his active business career the father was engaged in general agricultural pursuits.

Nathan L. Bailey obtained his education in the graded and high schools of his native state and was subsequently engaged in farming in association with his brother in Wisconsin. In 1881, when a young man of twenty-one years, he came to South Dakota but a short time later returned to the state of his nativity. In 1887 he again came to South Dakota, locating at Lake Preston, where he entered the drug store of which his brother was proprietor, the latter being also a physician by profession. He remained in the store until 1890 and in that year became a student in the Keokuk Medical College of Iowa, being graduated from that institution with the degree of M. D. in 1892. During the next twelve years he was engaged in the practice of medicine in Wisconsin and then returned to Lake Preston, this state, which has since remained the scene of his professional labors. An extensive and well merited practice has been accorded him as he has demonstrated his skill and ability in the successful treatment of many difficult cases. With the steady progress of the profession he keeps in close touch through his membership in the Third District Medical Society, the South Dakota State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He has served as superintendent of the county board of health and is now acting in the capacity of county poor physician.

In January, 1890, Dr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss Cora Chase, her father being Dudley L. Chase, who was a pioneer settler of South Dakota and broke the first five acres of ground in Kingsbury county. The Doctor and his wife have three children, namely: Ethelyn, who follows the profession of teaching in Kingsbury county; and Vena and Vera, twins, who are high-school students.

In politics Dr. Bailey is a stanch republican and he served as the second mayor of Lake Preston, giving the town a progressive and beneficial administration. He has also done valuable service as a member of the council for a number of years. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church and fraternally he is identified with the Masons, being a worthy exemplar of the craft. Hunting, fishing and motoring afford him pleasure and recreation and he is well known and popular in both professional and social circles of his adopted state, being widely recognized as an able physician, a public-spirited citizen and a trustworthy friend.


History of Dakota Territory, George W. Kingsbury, Vol. 4, 1915

 

CHARLES A. ALSETH.

Charles A. Alseth has since 1911 been a factor in financial circles of Lake Preston. His birth occurred near Whitewood, South Dakota, on the 26th of November, 1883, his parents being John O. and Martha Alseth, pioneers who settled in Yankton county, South Dakota, in 1869 and removed to Kingsbury county in 1878. He homesteaded on section 21, township 110, range 54, and also took up a tree claim, devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits with excellent results for a number of years. At the present time he is living retired in Lake Preston, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves.

Charles A. Alseth pursued his early education in the public schools and subsequently entered Yankton College, which institution conferred upon him the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1910. The following year he entered the Merchants Exchange Bank of Lake Preston as cashier, having purchased an interest in the institution, of which he remained a director and stockholder until January 1, 1915. In 1915 Mr. Alseth organized and became one of the incorporators of the Farmers National Bank of Lake Preston, which has a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars, and he is serving as cashier of that institution. In his capacity of cashier he has contributed to the growth and success of the bank in no uncertain degree and enjoys an enviable reputation as a popular, courteous and able official. He was likewise one of the organizers of the Lake Preston Lumber Company.

In politics Mr. Alseth is a stanch republican, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons and the Yeomen. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church, the teachings of which he exemplifies in his daily life. He has gained a creditable measure of success in business and financial circles for one of his years, and South Dakota is proud to number him among her native sons.

 

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